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Every Last One

Every Last One

Scritto da Anna Quindlen

Narrato da Hope Davis


Every Last One

Scritto da Anna Quindlen

Narrato da Hope Davis

valutazioni:
4.5/5 (164 valutazioni)
Lunghezza:
10 ore
Pubblicato:
Apr 13, 2010
ISBN:
9781442334014
Formato:
Audiolibro

Descrizione

Beloved blockbuster storyteller Anna Quindlen's powerhouse new novel, her first since the #1 bestseller Rise and Shine , confirms her status as an incomparably accurate and compassionate observer of families and the tragedies they face.

This moving, suspenseful, and surprising new novel by beloved author Anna Quindlen is about a suburban family and the unintended, explosive consequences of what seem like small, casual actions. Quindlen returns to the subject of family, and family in turmoil, a subject she's explored with great success in all of her previous novels thanks to her insightful, compassionate understanding of the intricacies of human relationships.
Pubblicato:
Apr 13, 2010
ISBN:
9781442334014
Formato:
Audiolibro

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Cosa pensano gli utenti di Every Last One

4.3
164 valutazioni / 104 Recensioni
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Recensioni dei lettori

  • (3/5)
    Not one of her best
  • (3/5)
    Really depressing.
  • (3/5)
    I liked the idea of story, but I have to say, the writing wasn't what I am used to reading from Quindlen. There was too many boring details for such intense subject matter. I was not impressed.
  • (5/5)
    A beautifully written story of a suburban family, told through the eyes of the mother, Mary Beth Latham. Slightly bores, feeling restless and increasingly uneasy, Mary Beth senses a looming, but indistinct threat.Too quickly, a tragedy strikes that challenges Mary Beth's will to survive the unimaginable and highlights to her and the reader how precious the "normal" day is.
  • (5/5)
    Heartbreaking and beautiful. Redeeming and loving. Anna Quindlen is a superb writer and tells stories that make you want to take the journey with her characters. I wanted more--my highest praise.
  • (5/5)
    I have loved Anna Quindlen since I first discovered her "Living Out Loud" nearly 30 years ago. Once again she brings you into the depths of her characters lives - she is amazing.
  • (5/5)
    When I went to add this book to my Kindle, it was apparent I'd read it before, but I didn't remember it at all well. I think it must have been because it was after my accident and surgery, and much of that period is hazy. Also, I think it's because it's a difficult book for a mother to read. It's difficult; not just because of the horrific events that interrupt a fairly normal life, but because of the things that happened before that. We find out that the daughter had survived a period of anorexia/bulimia. We never know exactly what triggered that, but they've all survived. Still, someone who thought of herself as a sensitive and hyper-vigilant mother didn't see the issue right in front of her until she saw her daughter undressed one day and saw that she could clearly see every bone in her torso. She had to have other members of her family and school teachers and counselors tell her that her son was severely depressed. She didn't see that her daughter's former boyfriend had turned into a dangerous stalker whose obsession was ready to leap out of control. Those things are truly frightening. She includes a thought that really struck me as so fundamentally true. She says that everyone who loses someone who dies re-experiences the death every morning as they emerge from sleep. At first, the death hasn't happened, and then as the web of sleep releases them, they have to ask themselves "the question" again, and the death happens all over again. All the violence in this book happens in another room, and can only be imagined in retrospect, but it is very, very difficult to experience through reading just the same. The only thing that needs to be noted about an exceptionally well-written book. Highly recommended.
  • (3/5)
    Murder most foul. And I don't like murder stories.
  • (5/5)
    I used to love Anna Quindlen's columns in Newsweek, and I was excited to pick this book up at a library book sale. The first half of the book is the story of a typical family (if there is such a thing). Mary Beth Latham is a wife and mother of three teenagers. Each has their own triumphs and their own issues. Quindlen captures the daily moments of being a mother beautifully, while at the same time building subtle tension. A string of crimes in their safe suburban neighborhood, an ex-boyfriend who continue to obsess over Latham's daughter, a son who shows signs of depression - these are the things that keep Latham up at night. But I never imagined what tragedy the Lathams would face. Because I had developed a relationship with Mary Beth, I felt her emotions deeply and had to read the rest of the book in small chunks. A book that can evoke that kind of emotion is a good read in my book.
  • (5/5)
    I found I could not put this book down. Iwas not prepared for the tragedy that happens in this bookeven tough I had read the cover. The story tells of a mother who faces atragedy with courage and all the emotions that go along with losing loved ones.
  • (5/5)
    Beautiful, lyrical writing made this story of a family disaster a couldn't-put-it-down read. The characters are all believable, and while the tragic events are (thankfully) ones that most of us will never experience, I felt compelled to keep reading, not just to find out what would happen, but to admire the prose of this gifted author. EVERY LAST ONE will stay with me for a long time. It's as much about love and healing as it is about dysfunction. Loved it!
  • (5/5)
    Exquisite, spellbinding, deeply poignant.
  • (5/5)
    This book reminds me of We Need to Talk about Kevin and Picoult's Seventeen Minutes. A troubled teen-aged boy turns a family upside down. This story is told from the mother, Mary Beth's, point of view and we see her deal with the consequences. Classic chick lit, this is a quick read.
  • (4/5)
    Just before one of my favorite indie bookstores closed its doors for good, I went on a book-buying spree. This was one of the books I got, picked without even reading the back cover, simply because I've liked much of Quindlen's works. Once I started reading, I almost put it down; I could see horrific disaster looming. I just wasn't sure how I'd handle that type of personal tragedy, even though it's been almost 2 years since my family's fatal night. But I, too, have a survivor in my life, and she faces life with such courage and humor, that I owe it to her not to be stuck in the past. And I owe it to myself, and to my departed brother, not to make him a martyr or give that awful day more power. So, I pushed on. Quindlen takes subjects that wrench a sane person's mind, and presents them in a way that they become thoughtful vehicles for growth, and for those who have been a victim of devastating personal events, a vehicle for healing. The character study is delicate and beautiful, completely realistic. There were a number of lines, particularly in the last third of the book, that resonated in my own soul, discoveries I have made and descriptions of emotions/patterns of healing. The story was compelling; even knowing something bad was coming, I wanted to read more, not in the sense of seeing a horror movie, or staring at an accident at the side of the road, but because Quindlen drew me in. And when I say "bad things happen", it's with reservations, because I don't want to give too much of the story away. Also, don't let that deter you thinking it will be gruesome. There's a delicacy in the telling of this story that not only helps characters get through, but carries the reader along, too. People ask me how I am, and while I'll never be the same, none of us ever are. We move ahead; we learn to face each day, and if we're lucky, we clutch onto hope or faith or whatever gets us through. And we keep our memories and our loved ones alive in our hearts, and live the future with caring, courage, laughter and love.
  • (4/5)
    Quindlen writes about undercurrents---what you don't see. I, too, listened to the audio and was, as erinclark described in another review, pulled right into a place where no one would ever want to be---you just don't quite see it coming especially in the way that it hits. But of course every life has ups and downs----some lifetime roller coasters are the childrens' variety and others are the kind that terrify. You can't see what someone else is living through but Quindlen gives us one person's vivid description.
  • (5/5)
    This was very difficult subject matter to read. Because I am not a father(but have many nieces and nephews) emotionally it could not touch me like it would a parent. It was a great book. Quindlen has a great way of portraying daily life. I got emotionally involved and connected to the characters before the "key event" occurred. I think this was well done by Quindlen and something that some of negative reviewers did not seem to get. It also made their lives juxtapose against the event in a way to truly shock you. The 2nd half of the book was not as compelling to me but it still was believable in terms of how the protagonist dealt with everything. I definitely recommend this to all , but only if you are ready to deal with some very difficult and emotional issues.
  • (5/5)
    Loved it, a real tear jerker... a story about loss that was so real. You don't get over losing people in a day or a week and this book really nails that.
  • (4/5)
    I enjoy the drama that Anna Quindlen packs into her novels. It is always an emotional read-sometimes over the top, but at the same time, so very real. I cried more than once getting through the story. I can't imagine surviving this type of violence.
  • (4/5)
    I listened to this book on audio and was really taken with the author style. I was listening along about Mary Beth's trials as a parent, business owner and wife when all of the sudden, BAM! the story takes a complete turn and I was even more hooked than I had been. Very well written and compelling. Recommended.
  • (5/5)
    Anna Quindlen is a very talented writer. I knew that from reading her newspaper and magazine columns, and from reading one of her earlier novels, [Black and Blue], which looks domestic violence square in the eye and lives to tell about it. So I maybe should have expected that the lull I fell into when I started reading Every Last One wouldn't last. Through the first 100-plus pages, I found myself getting a little impatient with what seemed like a typical Mom's Midlife Crisis book, with the mom in question, MaryBeth, juggling her landscape business with her less-than-passionate marriage and her oh-so-modern kids: the teenage girl who yearns to be a Writer and the fraternal twin boys who couldn't be less alike. But even though the plot seemed a bit predictable, Quindlen's fine turns of phrase kept me reading, like this one as she contemplates how her growing children and husband no longer need her the way they once did:Sometimes I feel as though the entire point of a woman's life is to fall in love with people who will leave her. The only variation I can see is the ones who fight the love, and the ones who fight the leaving. It's too late for me to be the first, and I'm trying not to be the second."Just when I was figuratively rolling my hand in a "c'mon, get on with it" gesture, Quindlen turns the whole setup on its head in a way that left me gasping out loud, in a good way. I won't say more about that; I've already said too much, though apparently not as much as the dust jacket blurb, which many reviewers have cited as an unwelcome spoiler. In fact, don't run out and read Every Last One right now. Wait a few months until all you remember is that I told you that you must read it, but you don't remember why. You can thank me later.
  • (5/5)
    Wow.......I wasn't sure what to expect when I read the book jacket. The author draws us in with her wonderful protrayal of a suburban family and hits us with a tragedy that you think you see coming...but will take you by surprise. Excellent writing. This is not a simple vacation read but an extraordinary story of love, friendship, family and finding a way to carry on when the unspeakable happens. Highly recommended.
  • (5/5)
    Very few books make me cry, this one did. Just one section, but it was very moving. Horrible family tragedy and how everyone copes in the aftermath.
  • (3/5)
    Another book about the seething undercurrents of suburbia - I seem to be reading a lot of this these days. It's ironic because I've spent my whole life as an urban person without much exception. Every time I've spent any time in suburbia I've moved back into an urban neighborhood as fast as possible. I think Blue Velvet - David Lynch's fabulous and fiendish take on suburbia - is the template for these kinds of stories. His vision is so compelling that I find myself thinking of the very first sequence of shots every time I read a book like this.The first Anna Quindlen book I ever read was Black and Blue, a book that managed to be utterly compelling and brutally, uncomfortably honest. More than anything I've ever read about domestic violence, Black and Blue captures what it's like inside the house where those things happen.I'd say the same of Every Last One, a book that neatly delineates before and after without spending much time on the line between the two. There is before, when it's all suburban and family sunshine, but with those seething currents I mentioned earlier. On the surface, it's all perfect, but right underneath, just a fingernail scrape away things are a lot darker. Then there is after, when it's all about healing from grief and redemption.I appreciated how subtle this book was - no self-indulgent dwelling on ugly things, but rather a quiet acknowledgment of events and more concern about how events change lives. Although I found the main character somewhat frustrating - always so safe, always turning her eyes away from what might not be safe - I also deeply related to her story. Not an easy read, but a good one.
  • (3/5)
    I will be thinking about this book for a while. Particularly at times when the little things in life seem overwhelming. A reminder of how much we have to be thankful for in the day to day routines of our lives. Something we realize only what those routines are disturbed or in this case shattered.
  • (4/5)
    I have enjoy the writing style of Quindlen. I have read many of her other books.This was a quick read. I really couldn't put it down.Mary Beth Latham is a mother of 3 teenagers and a wife. You get sucked into their busy but not problem free lives. Then an act of violence happens and you see Mary Beth and the life she never imagined she would have.
  • (5/5)
    I give this book five stars. It has stayed with me clearly in the months since I finished it---the characters emerged fully, their situation beautifully drawn. I can't say that about many books. I think this book stands head and shoulders over all Quindlen's others---she has really surpassed herself.
  • (4/5)
    I just finished this book, Every Last One, about a minute and a half ago. It had been on my list to read for a while and I was interested because it's mostly about a mom and her life raising her daughter Ruby, her twin boys Max and Alex, and her husband Glen. I am going to start by saying I think it was a very "close to home" book. Some of the things that are discussed are things I think we all think about, but don't talk about. How marriage changes over time and how hard it can be to find your place as a mother, wife, and your own person. The book does a great job talking about how different and similar twins and siblings in general can be. I really was a thought provoking and personal read for me. However, I won't tell you exactly what happens, but this is one of the most heart wrenching books I have ever read. You can almost see yourself in the main characters shoes and glimpse how she feels. I balled. Flat out cried, with that big lump you can't swallow in your throat type of sobbing. I think any book that makes you feel that much emotion deserves to be recognised and be labeled as "well written". On the other hand, before you pick it up, I would be sure you want to have your heart ripped out of your chest and then given a small band aid to put over the wound. It will make you want to sneak into your kids room and listen to the sleeping for a night. Then the next night tell your husband how wonderful he is and make him his favorite dinner. It might also make you curl up into a ball and have a really good cry over lots of things in your life. You have been warned, do as you will. It was a great book, but now I have to check on my sleeping children and kiss my husband.
  • (3/5)
    Anna Quindlen's Every Last One covers some of the same territory examined by We Need to Talk about Kevin, but with much less bravery, boldness and honesty. The narrator, Mary Beth Latham, presents herself as the archtetypal all-sacrificing American Mom and only glancingly touches upon her own possible complicity in the tragedy that befalls her family. The depiction of grief is nothing I've not seen before, in books and in TV movies. Everything is just too neat, right down to an ending that hauls in a shrink to Explain Things as awkwardly as the psychiatrist in the last scene of the movie Psycho.SPOILER ALERT: Quindlen introduces provocative elements into the plot but seems to lose her nerve, and lets them lie unexamined. Namely, Mary Beth had an affair with the father of the murderer, Kiernan (also the husband of her best friend). How much of Kiernan's attachment to Ruby was a morbid interest in the woman who he might have been seen as breaking up his own family? Kiernan's mother Deborah is dismissed by everyone as crazy. Perhaps it is my leftover admiration for the Shriver book that makes me think Deborah might have told the more interesting story.
  • (4/5)
    I was really unsure how to rate this book. It was a good book. I thought it was very well written. But there is no way I can call it enjoyable. It was just so incredibly depressing.
  • (5/5)
    I LOVED THIS BOOK! Immediately you are swept into the life of a working wife and mother of three teenagers who seem to all be holding it together on the surface. It's not until half way through the book that a cold reality strikes that leaves you reeling and breathless. This tragic tale is told in a matter-of-fact way that hits right at your heart. I laughed and I cried...more than once.