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Gov. Cuomo Apologizes For 'Misinterpreted' Comments Amid Sexual Harassment Claims

The governor said he will ask New York's attorney general and the state's chief judge to pick an independent investigator to review allegations against him brought by two former aides.
New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo speaks during the daily media briefing on July 23, 2020 in New York City. A second former aide from his administration has come forward with allegations of sexual harassment from Cuomo. Source: Jeenah Moon

Updated at 8:00 p.m. ET

After a second former aide came forward with sexual harassment allegations against New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo, the governor acknowledged in a statement Sunday evening that some of his behavior toward his staff may have been "insensitive" but said his comments had "been misinterpreted as an unwanted flirtation."

Earlier on Sunday, Cuomo asked New York's attorney general and the state's chief judge to pick an independent investigator to review the accusations against him.

"I never intended to offend anyone or cause any harm," , adding that he has teased people "about their personal lives, their relationships, about getting married or not getting married," as

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