NPR

To Forward Progressive Agenda, Harry Reid Says The Filibuster Must Go

Even in retirement, the former Senate majority leader is calling to change the rules. Reid tells NPR the filibuster is obstructing the Senate from tackling big issues like climate change and gun laws.
"The filibuster has been used as a weapon to just have the Senate do nothing," former Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., told NPR. Source: Bill Clark

At 79, Harry Reid may be retired, living in a gated community in Henderson in his home state of Nevada, but his national political shadow looms large.

He spent 34 years in Congress before retiring his position of Senate minority leader in 2017. He built a machine for the Democrats in Nevada that ultimately delivered the battleground state to Hillary Clinton in 2016 and the Democrats in the 2018 midterms. He had a reputation for being a tough politician who did what was necessary to get what he thought needed to be done, done. Even if sometimes that meant calling his opponents names, changing rules or, pushing the narrative that Mitt Romney didn't pay taxes without furnishing any evidence to back up the claim.

Today, Reid is still battling cancer. He's in chemotherapy but he says the prognosis is good.

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