NPR

Sesame Allergies Are Likely More Widespread Than Previously Thought

New research suggests allergies to sesame are comparably prevalent as those to some tree nuts. The findings come as the FDA weighs whether to require sesame to be listed as an allergen on food labels.
Source: Patrick Donovan

As an ingredient, sesame is pretty popular— it's in tahini and sushi; it's often mixed in granola, sprinkled on bagels or used as a flavoring in an array of dishes. But according to new research, this may be a problem for a substantial number of Americans.

While previous studies suggested sesame allergies affected about .2% of U.S. children and adults, new research published this week in JAMA Open estimates the number of sesame-allergic Americans could be as high as .49% — around 1.6 million people.

The study's findings come on the "prevalence and severity" of sesame allergies in the U.S. to aid in its decision.

Stai leggendo un'anteprima, registrati per continuare a leggere.

Altro da NPR

NPR2 min lettiMedical
What We're Learning From The U.S. Vaccine Rollout
Ten million doses stuck on the shelf. What we’re learning from the vaccine rollout. Answering your questions on COVID vaccines.
NPR1 min letti
Coast Guard Ends Search For Missing Crewmembers Of Capsized Boat Off Louisiana
The Seacor Power capsized 8 miles south of Port Fourchon, La. in the Gulf of Mexico last Tuesday amid rough waters.
NPR2 min lettiCrime & Violence
Coverage Of Chauvin Verdict Seems As Divided As Nation's Politics
Broadcast and cable news networks showed different approaches to coverage of Chauvin verdict.