Apple Magazine

FOODTECH: CHANGING THE WAY WE EAT

With consumers becoming increasingly conscious of their health and the environment, new startups are innovating in food and introducing new technology to reduce carbon emissions and make us healthier and greener. This week, we delve deeper into the growing FoodTech industry, and explore some of the biggest innovations set to shake up our mealtimes…

CHANGING INDUSTRY

Put food and technology in the same sentence, and it’s likely that brands such as Uber Eats and Blue Apron come to mind. Both have innovated in their fields, allowing consumers to order food from their smartphone or have a box of ingredients shipped to their address, but they’re just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to the food industry. Food delivery accounts for around one percent of the total food industry (€83 billion per year, according to McKinsey) whilst the meal kit industry is now thought to be , both huge figures for relatively simple concepts that combine food and the tech on our iPhones.

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