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Author Wants To Take Readers On 'Healing Journey' In New Novel 'Professor Chandra Finds His Bliss'

"Professor Chandra Finds His Bliss" is the story about a conservative economist finding his meaning in life.
"Professor Chandra Follows His Bliss," by Rajeev Balasubramanyam. (Robin Lubbock/WBUR)

For some, enlightenment and happiness comes easily. For others, it never does. And then there all those in between — like the featured character in the new novel, “Professor Chandra Finds His Bliss.”

Author Rajeev Balasubramanyam’s (@Rajeevbalasu) story is of a conservative, internationally renowned economist, Professor Chandra, who in a single day doesn’t win the Nobel Prize, gets hit by a car, has a heart attack, and doesn’t receive a condolence call from his estranged daughter.

But after a seemingly endless list of downfalls and unexpected life events, Professor Chandra finds himself at a meditation retreat. And thus, his spiritual journey begins.

“I think it is a novel which encourages the reader to go on a healing journey with the character,” Balasubramanvam tells Here & Now’s Robin Young.

The novel is loosely based on Balasubramanvam’s personal experiences growing up in London, where he says everything in his life was “achievement based and not emotion based.”

“I neglected the inside and I focused on achievement,” he reflects.

And in the novel, Professor Chandra experiences an emotional disconnect from who he truly is — and decides to do some internal searching through meditation.

“The tragedy is that Professor Chandra is such a high achiever

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