The Atlantic

Cottage Cheese Is the New Greek Yogurt

Americans’ dairy consumption is about to get a lot more cultured. An Object Lesson.
Source: James and James / Getty

Cottage cheese faced a problem: After World War II, batches of the soft, lumpy dairy concoction developed a propensity to take on a rancid odor and a bitter taste. That changed in 1951, when dairy researchers identified the culprits, three bacterial miscreants that produced this “slimy curd defect.” To prevent the condition, researchers advised cheesemakers to keep these bacteria from entering their manufacturing facilities in the first place. Thus ended the scourge.

Despite this and other advances in cottage-cheese production, like texture analyzers, high-powered microscopes, and trained human tasters, cottage cheese has never enjoyed the same popularity as yogurt. That’s because cottage cheese, once revered for its flavor and versatility, has taken a series of gut-punches in the dairy sector: enduring associations with weight loss, inconvenient packaging, and near-total displacement by its cousin, Greek yogurt, to name a few. But stalwart food scientists and artisanal dairy farmers have high hopes for the future of cottage cheese. With yogurt sales on the decline, a golden age

Stai leggendo un'anteprima, registrati per continuare a leggere.

Altro da The Atlantic

The Atlantic5 min lettiMedical
Pandemic Data Are About to Go Sideways
States are likely to report fewer coronavirus cases, but not because things are getting better.
The Atlantic6 min letti
The Beauty of Keeping Mum
All things, great and small, start out as nothing. I began to go hoarse in late summer. I would apologize when rasping unintelligibly on a call, take another slug of water, and chalk it up to a passing cold. Could it be COVID-19? I worried it might b
The Atlantic5 min lettiMedical
A Tragic Beginning to the Holiday Season
COVID-19 hospitalizations have been at a record high for more than two weeks, and daily deaths have exceeded 2,000 for the first time since May.