NPR

U.N. Report Says Massacres In Congo Might Constitute Crimes Against Humanity

A United Nations' investigation finds at least 535 men, women and children were killed in December amid a conflict between the Banunu and Batende communities in the Democratic Republic of the Congo.
Survivors of an attack in the western village of Bongende, in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, stand next to what is said to be a mass grave containing the bodies of 100 people killed during days of violence in the region in December 2018. Source: Alexis Huguet

Murder, rape and torture — those are just some of the abuses United Nations investigators say were committed during massacres that occurred in December in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, and may amount to crimes against humanity.

"The report details the horrors documented, such as a 2-year-old reportedly thrown on Tuesday in Geneva.

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