The Christian Science Monitor

How one woman is taking an after-school program to the big leagues

Schoolteacher Julie Kennedy was working at an elementary school in Washington in the early 1990s when she noticed time and again that a number of her fifth-grade girls were hanging out on street corners after school.

A soccer player, Ms. Kennedy invited them to join her for a match or two in the hours following class. Her informal after-school program was a hit, and the students kept coming back – even well into the winter. So Kennedy turned to her love of poetry, inviting the girls to join her for some creative writing.

This is how DC Scores, an after-school program in Washington, got its start. Officially launched in 1994, the nonprofit has grown from its small group of girls to now involve 3,000 students – boys included – each day. It still focuses on soccer and poetry, and as part of its diverse offerings that have become a signature blend, it also emphasizes service. The range of programming helps children build confidence and have the tools needed

Neighborhood teamsD.C. UnitedThree other groups that engage children

Stai leggendo un'anteprima, registrati per continuare a leggere.

Altro da The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor4 min letti
‘Not Really A White Boys’ Sport’: Canadian Youth Hockey Gets Inclusive
Hockey is perhaps the most iconic pastime in Canada but has been historically expensive and predominantly white. Now the sport is changing to survive.
The Christian Science Monitor2 min letti
Where Women Led In 2019
In mass protests in five Muslim countries, many of the demonstrators were not only women but also the leaders. This social breakthrough in equality helps lay a path for full democracy.
The Christian Science Monitor2 min lettiPolitics
Harris's Lack Of 'Authenticity' Hurt. But What Makes A Politician Genuine?
Successful candidates are often skilled at coming across as ‘real’ to voters. It’s about conveying an unscripted quality – and a lack of fear.