Cobblestone5 min lettiAmerican Government
Election Controversy
Throughout U.S. history, the presidential candidate who won the popular vote almost always won the Electoral College vote, too. But there have been a handful of times when a candidate who won the popular vote did not win the electoral vote, and thus
Cobblestone1 min lettiAmerican Government
Did You Know ?
Horace Greeley holds an unenviable place in history. He is the only presidential candidate to die during the process. He ran against President Ulysses S. Grant in the 1872 general election. He passed away after the popular vote was tabulated but befo
Cobblestone2 min lettiPolitics
Let’s Debate
Have you ever had an argument with a friend, a classmate, or a family member? It’s okay not to agree. But how do you get to some common ground if you both feel strongly? You might want to learn how to debate. Presidential candidates—even members of
Cobblestone2 min lettiCrime & Violence
Many Hats
Do you think you might want to run for president some day? Be prepared to wear many hats. The office of the president of the United States has changed over the centuries. For example, when George Washington was elected in 1789, the nation consisted o
Cobblestone1 min lettiAmerican Government
Cabinet Positions
Vice PresidentSecretary of StateSecretary of the TreasurySecretary of DefenseAttorney General (Department of Justice)Secretary of the InteriorSecretary of AgricultureSecretary of CommerceSecretary of LaborSecretary of Health and Human ServicesSecreta
Cobblestone5 min lettiPolitics
Rock the Vote
Jasmine Jones (ABOVE) is the organizing director for Rock the Vote. She works with teenagers and adults to spread election information. She sat down with COBBLESTONE to talk about her work and about how kids can get involved with elections. Rock the
Cobblestone1 min lettiPolitical Ideologies
All About Elections Crossword Puzzle
Can you solve this crossword puzzle about presidential elections? All the answers can be found in this issue. Answers on page 49. 2. Political parties traditionally gather at a national _____ to officially nominate their candidates for president an
Cobblestone2 min lettiAmerican Government
Sparks For Change
The United States has never had a woman president. But that doesn’t mean women haven’t tried to change that. In 1884, as voters across the United States lined up on Election Day, they saw a woman’s name on their ballots: Belva Ann Lockwood. Lockwoo
Cobblestone2 min lettiPolitical Ideologies
Picking A President
Here are three countries that also have presidents. You’ll see that not all elections are the same . . . The tiny west African nation of The Gambia has a high illiteracy rate, so voting in that country involves marbles and steel drums. Each drum is
Cobblestone1 min letti
Cobblestone
Meg Chorlian, Editor John Hansen, Art Director Pat Murray, Designer Emily Cambias, Assistant Editor Stacey Lane Smith, Assistant Editor Naomi Pasachoff, Editorial Consultant, Research Associate, Williams College James M. O’Connor, Directo
Cobblestone2 min lettiPolitical Ideologies
Say What?
A platform is a formal declaration of the principles upon which a group, such as a political party, “stands.” A party or a candidate’s platform usually is announced as a way to get support. It includes ideas that a party or a candidate has about how
Cobblestone2 min lettiCrime & Violence
Getting Started
Every four years, in even years divisible by four, Americans make an important decision. They elect a president. Voting in any election is an important civic responsibility. A vote is a voice. It gives citizens a say in who their leaders are. Unlike
Cobblestone1 min lettiAmerican Government
Freeze Frame
George Washington is the only U.S. president to be chosen unanimously. He earned 69 out of 69 Electoral College votes in 1789. When he ran for reelection in 1792, he won 132 out of 132 Electoral College votes. His size 13 shoes were pretty difficult
Cobblestone4 min lettiPolitical Ideologies
Road To The White House
Running for president is a long and exhausting process. Take a look! Long before Election Day in November, many people announce their decision to run for president of the United States. But there can be only one president. Candidates know that to win
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Your Letters
In 1814, John James Audubon described his discovery of the Bird of Washington, or Washington’s Eagle. It was the largest sea eagle known to ever exist. Only a few people ever claimed to have seen one. Some people believe that the species is currently
Cobblestone1 min lettiPolitical Ideologies
Adding It Up
Are you wondering how the Electoral College’s numbers add up in presidential elections? Each state plus the District of Columbia is given a certain number of electors. The number of electors for each state is equal to its number of members in Congres
Cobblestone1 min lettiPolitical Ideologies
It’s Official
Want a handy guide to the presidential election process? Check out usa.gov/voting. It’s an official website of the U.S. government about voting and elections. Click on the category of “Presidential Election Process” and you’ll find a helpful video an
Cobblestone4 min lettiPolitical Ideologies
Why the Electoral College?
Why did the Founding Fathers create the Electoral College? To answer that question, it is important to look at the problems they were trying to solve more than two centuries ago. The United States was a different country in the 1780s than it is today
Cobblestone2 min letti
Madame President?
Maybe everyone reading this month’s column will witness the first woman elected president of the United States. When that happens, perhaps everyone’s thoughts will turn to the first woman who ran for that office. She is this month’s mystery hero. B
Cobblestone3 min lettiPolitical Ideologies
It’s a Date!
When it came to casting votes for the president of the United States, the Founding Fathers did not set a specific day. They left that decision to the states. The only requirement was that the states hold their elections sometime in the 34 days before
Cobblestone1 min letti
Just For Fun
We’re looking for a funny caption for this photo. Send your idea, name, and address to: Just for Fun, COBBLESTONE, Cricket Media, 70 East Lake Street, Suite 800, Chicago, IL 60601, or email it to cobblestone@cricketmedia.com. Include a note from a pa
Cobblestone4 min lettiAmerican Government
Constitutional Amendments
The Founding Fathers hoped the U.S. Constitution would create a framework for “a more perfect union” for the United States. But they knew they couldn’t think of everything their young country might face, so they also included ways to change or modify
Cobblestone1 min lettiNature
A National Symbol
What’s the first creature that comes to mind when you think of the United States and its president? The bald eagle, of course! A majestic and powerful bird, the bald eagle is an important American symbol. As a top bird of prey, not much intimidates i
Cobblestone1 min letti
Cobblestone
Meg Chorlian, Editor John Hansen, Art Director Pat Murray, Designer Emily Cambias, Assistant Editor Stacey Lane Smith, Assistant Editor Ellen Bingham, Copy Editor and Proofreader Naomi Pasachoff, Editorial Consultant, Research Associate,
Cobblestone2 min letti
Scientific Explorers
William Beebe started his career studying birds in the late 1800s, but his fascination with the ocean led him to shift to marine exploration. He was determined to observe the creatures of the deep sea in their natural habitat. In the 1930s, he teamed
Cobblestone2 min lettiNature
Getting Started
By the time the first Audubon Society was organized in the late 1800s, the person it was named for had been dead for several decades. But John James Audubon left a strong impression on Americans. His most famous work, The Birds of America, consisted
Cobblestone2 min lettiNature
Birds On The Brain
A knee injury kept young Alfred Newton from running around with other children. As a result, he spent much of his childhood in England observing nature. Between 1855 and 1864, he traveled around the world, studying different birds. He and a friend ma
Cobblestone4 min letti
Meet the Audubons
The life of John James Audubon had an unlikely beginning. He was the illegitimate son of Jean Audubon, a French naval officer and landowner, and his mistress, Jeanne Rabine. He was born on the French colony of Saint-Domingue, present-day Haiti, on Ap
Cobblestone2 min lettiNature
Say What?
Ornithology is a branch of science that focuses on the study of birds. An ornithologist is a scientist who studies birds. Both words are derived from Greek words: ornis, meaning “bird,” and logia, meaning “a branch or a school of study.” Oology is
Cobblestone1 min letti
A Stately State Park
Henderson, Kentucky, keeps the memory of John James Audubon alive through the John James Audubon State Park. The park extends across more than 700 acres. It includes the Audubon Woods, a bird sanctuary, and a lake reserved for bird and animal life. V
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