Literary Hub3 min letti
How to Write? Don’t… At Least Not Yet
“I enter into a dead end. There, all possibilities are exhausted; the ‘possible’ slips away and the impossible prevails. To face the impossible—exorbitant, indubitable—when nothing is possible any longer is in my eyes to have an experience of the div
Literary Hub7 min letti
On Co-Living and the New Generation of Digital Nomads
Coming home from school as a child, Gillian Morris was never sure whom she might find. Her family’s home in the 1990s suburbs of New York had an open‐door policy toward guests. There was always a visiting musician, a family friend whose house was bei
Literary Hub3 min letti
The American Dream Has Always Been Open to Interpretation
The coronavirus pandemic is dramatically disrupting not only our daily lives but society itself. This show features conversations with some of the world’s leading thinkers and writers about the deeper economic, political, and technological consequenc
Literary Hub3 min letti
George Saunders: Everyone Wants to Be Loved. What Do We Do with That?
How To Proceed is a bi-monthly conversation about writing, creativity and the world we live in. Author Linn Ullmann talks to some of the world’s most exciting literary voices about their books, their writing process, and how they view the world and c
Literary Hub13 min lettiPsychology
The Soul-Excavating Work of Louise Glück
The studio is larger than a studio; though you sleep on a fold-out futon that you do not fold out, there is a separate room with a kitchen and a small table, one you’ve bought for yourself by yourself not with or for him from whom you’ll soon be divo
Literary Hub8 min letti
The Delight of Daniel Mendelsohn
A stranger. A voyage. A return. Fathers and sons. Shipwreck and temptation. Hiddenness and unveiling. Detour upon detour. The stuff of a million stories, whether quest or exile, that wend and spiral and fold upon themselves, weaving a narrative path
Literary Hub5 min letti
Lit Hub Recommends: Hocus Pocus, The Bachelorette, and Mr. Darcy.
Tis the only season I care about—Halloween. In my house, we’ve already carved one jack-o-lantern (it’s Optimus Prime), roasted pumpkin seeds, and watched Hocus Pocus. My son’s birthday is at the end of the month, and while I went store-bought last ye
Literary Hub5 min letti
What I Learned From Interviewing Indie Booksellers In Every State
I miss reading a book, alone, at a bar. I miss sitting in crowded movie theaters, watching horrible film adaptations of wonderful novels. I miss listening to authors read their books, packed in shoulder to shoulder with a small crowd around me, inhal
Literary Hub5 min letti
Unexpected Lessons From The Back Roads Of The American Midwest
In April of 1991, as the senior class at Lawrence University in Wisconsin was planning various spring break trips to go hiking in the Ozarks; playing on the beaches in Florida; or canoeing the glassy lakes in northern Minnesota, a guy named David God
Literary Hub12 min letti
The Spontaneous Quarantine Writing that Became a Hit in Japan
“Then a woman with lips blue with cold… whispered in my ear—(we all spoke in whispers there): ‘Could you describe this?’ I said, ‘I can!’” –Anna Akhmatova *  I’m a writer specializing in very short fiction with a surrealist tinge. Starting in April,
Literary Hub16 min lettiSociety
How Do We Rebuild a Shared American Reality on a Foundation of Lies?
On May 28, 1975, then-Senator Joe Biden wrote a letter to Hannah Arendt. Dear Miss Arendt, I read in a recent article by Tom Wicker of a paper that you read at the Boston Bicentennial Forum. As a member of the Foreign Relations Committee of the Senat
Literary Hub5 min letti
A Letter From Dorothy Gallagher to Her Late Husband Ben Sonnenberg
Tell me this: Do you think that in the years since you died my life has continued as before? Do you think that I still walk through our rooms, that my clothes hang in the closets, our pictures crowd the walls, the bookcases are crammed full, all our
Literary Hub5 min letti
Rebecca Solnit on Black Swans, Slim Chances, and the 2020 Presidential Election
I own a painting of a black swan by the artist Selene Perez of Creativity Explored, which I love because it’s a powerful painting of a bird that looks crowded by the paper it’s on—it looks as though it wants to straighten its neck and spread its wing
Literary Hub10 min letti
From Napoleon to Trump, on the Tyrant As Troll
Which world leader do you think the following remarks describe? “He was a liar, a rowdy, an egoist; brutal, sensual, shameless; his whole bearing had some­thing magnificently vulgar, parvenu-like.” “He gave offense in society by his uncouth barrack-m
Literary Hub10 min letti
What Happens When Literary Events Move Online?
1. Literary Events in Days of Yore One Saturday each month, the gallery-esque space of a United Methodist Church serves as an intimate venue to showcase writers from all around, its white walls and deep hardwood floors the perfect backdrop for the Ar
Literary Hub13 min letti
I’ll See You Frankfurt: On Missing the Biggest Bookish Gathering in the World
Many of your favorite writers are published all over the world. They are published all over the world because of people who license the rights to their books to international publishers. “License” is a boring word, so is “foreign rights,” “subsidiary
Literary Hub5 min letti
Every Mr. Darcy* Ranked
Lords and ladies, today is the 25th anniversary of the day Mr. Darcy first came out of the lake on the BBC adaptation of Pride and Prejudice. You know exactly what I’m talking about. You may have worn your tapes through replaying it since then, but n
Literary Hub4 min lettiSociety
The Anticommunist Cuban Exiles Who Struck Terror in Miami
The news director of a Little Havana radio station, WQBA “La Cubanísima,” speaks out against terrorism and violence in Miami. Not the terrorism and violence for which Miami is known, the inner-city brutality, the Scarface hype. It’s the terrorism and
Literary Hub5 min lettiScience
Rick Bass on Salvaging America’s Forest Arks Against the Coming Fire
The explosive, continuous breath of fire that is recycling our drying-out forests in the American Southwest into the ash and smoke we take into our lungs, our bodies, must burn, and will. There are ecosystems in the Southwest that are being re-made b
Literary Hub13 min letti
I’ll See You in Frankfurt: On Missing the Biggest Bookish Gathering in the World
Many of your favorite writers are published all over the world. They are published all over the world because of people who license the rights to their books to international publishers. “License” is a boring word, so is “foreign rights,” “subsidiary
Literary Hub22 min letti
In Praise of Readings: A Brief History of the Book Events I Have Attended
1. Galway Kinnell, Wendell Berry, Donald Hall, and Sharon Olds at Rackham Auditorium, Ann Arbor, Michigan, January 29, 1987 On this cold winter evening, Rackham Auditorium, a majestic Art Deco hall on the campus of the University of Michigan, was pac
Literary Hub8 min letti
Insider or Outsider? A Brief History of the Classification of Black Music
In The Death of Rhythm and Blues, Nelson George writes about the question of assimilation versus self-sufficiency as a primary strategy for empowerment for American Blacks. For George, both are necessary, “but only assimilation, the strategy that dil
Literary Hub7 min letti
How Does the Great Dolly Parton Write a Song?
“All of those little pieces of your past, they’re all important. That’s why I’m so thankful I can write songs. I can capture all those memories in my songs and keep those memories alive.” Songwriting always came easily to Dolly Parton. Her father rec
Literary Hub8 min letti
On Jewish Community and Identity in Jacques Derrida’s Algeria
His name was not even Jacques Derrida. I am looking for his grave. The cemetery at Ris-Orangis, the Paris outer suburb where Derrida spent much of his adult life with his wife, the psychoanalyst Marguerite Aucouturier, is as nondescript as the suburb
Literary Hub5 min letti
How Audre Lorde’s Experience of Breast Cancer Fortified Her Revolutionary Politics
On Labor Day 1978, during a routine self-exam, Audre Lorde detected a lump in her right breast. From that initial discovery, to the eventual harrowing diagnosis of malignancy and the ensuing mastectomy, The Cancer Journals bears witness to Lorde’s ra
Literary Hub5 min letti
A Young John Berryman Writes R.P. Blackmur About His Favorite Poets
To R. P. Blackmur [Princeton, MS] M.4. Memorial Court Oct 8th, 1936 Dear Blackmur, God knows why I didn’t write long since—find in my papers two typed pages to you on July 10 but unfinished, and dull in any case. Was ill most of the summer, then in C
Literary Hub2 min letti
Susan Choi: “Have a Very Large Storage System for All That Garbage”
Writing can be lonely work; WMFA counters that with conversation. It’s a show about creativity and craft, where writer and host Courtney Balestier talks shop with some of today’s best writers and examines the issues we face when we do creative work.
Literary Hub5 min letti
The Accidental Hobby: On the Books That Made Me a Birder
Fifteen years ago, I accidentally became a birdwatcher. I didn’t just start watching birds calmly: they engulfed my world, my bookshelves, my vocabulary, my jokes and even my aesthetic sensibilities. My unlikely transformation is the subject of my fi
Literary Hub4 min lettiPolitics
Voting Isn’t Guaranteed—Black Women Know That Better Than Anyone
The coronavirus pandemic is dramatically disrupting not only our daily lives but society itself. This show features conversations with some of the world’s leading thinkers and writers about the deeper economic, political, and technological consequenc
Literary Hub2 min lettiPolitics
Read from the 2020 Cundill History Prize Shortlist
On September 22nd, McGill University, in partnership with Literary Hub, History Extra, Literary Review of Canada, and History Hit, announced the shortlist for the Cundill History Prize. The prize, founded in 2008 by the late Peter Cundill, recognizes
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