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IP Multicast Overview

Cisco Advanced Services

2001, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Agenda

Part 1 - Basic IP Multicast


Multicast Applications, Network Components, Addressing, IGMP
Multicast Routing at a High Level

Part 2 - Configuration Example Part 3 - RP Details


Auto-RP, BSR, Anycast
IP Multicast Basics
2002, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Part 1 Basic IP Multicast


Why IP Multicast?

When sending same data to multiple receivers Better bandwidth utilization


Send traffic to where it needs to go

Less host/router processing Receivers addresses unknown Trade-off is state creation and maintenance

Challenges with IP Multicast



Configuration is generally easy Troubleshooting is relatively more complex


Need to worry about state creation and flags Concern is where the packet came from versus where the packet is going in unicast
2002, Cisco Systems, Inc.

IP Multicast Basics

Multicast Applications
Live TV and Radio Broadcast to the Desktop

Corporate Broadcasts

Training

Real-Time Data DeliveryFinancial


IP Multicast Basics
2002, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Nature of Multicast Applications


Usually UDP based
So, no TCP windowing / slow-start WRED does not apply

Duplicate Delivery
During some transition periods, duplicate packet delivery can occur

Reliable Multicast

IP Multicast Basics

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Multicast Network Components


ISP A
ISP B

MSDP
RP
Multicast Source X

DR

Multicast Source Y

RP

ISP B

ISP A

MBGP CGMP
DR

IGMP

PIM-SM

DR

Campus Multicast
End Stations (hosts-to-routers): Switches (Layer 2 Optimization): Routers (Multicast Forwarding Protocol):
IP Multicast Basics
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Interdomain Multicast
Multicast routing across domains
MBGP

IGMP

CGMP, IGMP Snooping or RGMP

Multicast Source Discovery


MSDP with PIM-SM

Source Specific Multicast


PIM-SSM
6

PIM Sparse Mode or Bidirectional PIM

Multicast Network Components


Group Member 3

1. If you send to group address, all members receive it 2. You must be a member of a group to receive data 3. You do not have to be a member of a group to send to a group

D Non Group Member E

Group Member 1
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Group Member 2
7

Multicast Network Components for AT&Ts MVPN Service


CE VRF

Customers RP CE PE Source Customer PIM Adjacency

Global Multicast

PE

Customer PIM Adjacency

mVRF

SPs RP
P

Global
Customer PIM Adjacency PE CE SP PIM Adjacency Receiver

IP Multicast Basics

2002, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Multicast Addressing
IP Multicast Group Addresses
224.0.0.0 239.255.255.255 Class D Address Space

High order bits of 1st Octet = 1110

Reserved Link-local Addresses

224.0.0.0 224.0.0.255 (used typically by routing protocols) Transmitted with TTL = 1 (not forwarded by routers) Examples:
224.0.0.1 224.0.0.2 224.0.0.9 224.0.0.5 224.0.0.13 All systems on this subnet All routers on this subnet RIPv2 OSPF routers ALL PIM ROUTERS

Other Reserved Addresses


224.0.1.0 224.0.1.255 (forwarded by routers, e.g. Auto-RP)
IP Multicast Basics
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Multicast Addressing
Administratively Scoped Addresses
Same as RFC 1918 addresses
239.0.0.0 239.255.255.255

Used to limit scope of multicast traffic Configured via ip multicast boundary on an interface
multicast traffic with the group range specified cannot enter or leave the network

Example ABC Inc. with Divisions A and B


Both A and B use 239.255.0.0/16 range of addresses Boundary routers in A and B are configured with these addresses as administrative boundaries
A and B reuse the same group addresses but cannot talk to each other

ABC Inc. uses 239.0.0.0/8 boundary company wide


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Side Topic Using TTL


Can use TTL thresholds on router interfaces to contain multicast forwarding
S0 is RPF interface S1, S2, E0 are in OIL
Multicast Packet arrives with TTL=5

S2 and E0 have TTL threshold = 0


S1 TTL threshold = 100

S0
S1 S2

Packet will be forwarded on S2 and E0, not S1


Forward if, current TTL (4) > configured threshold Else, drop.
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E0

11

Receivers Announce Their Presence


Joining a Group
H1 H2 224.1.1.1 H3

Report

Host sends IGMP Report to join group There are several IGMP versions 1,2,3 Useful on routers for testing multicast forwarding
Specify ip igmp join-group X on a loopback interface to simulate a receiver
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Multicast Routing High Level


Shortest Path or Source Distribution Tree
Source 1 Notation: (S, G) S = Source G = Group Source 2
A B D F

Receiver 1

Receiver 2

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Multicast Routing High Level


Shared Distribution Tree
Notation: (*, G) * = All Sources G = Group

D ) (RP

(RP)

PIM Rendezvous Point Shared Tree

Receiver 1

Receiver 2

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Multicast Routing High Level


Shared and Source Trees
Source 1 Notation: (*, G) * = All Sources G = Group Source 2
A B D (RP) F

(RP)

PIM Rendezvous Point Shared Tree Source Tree

Receiver 1

Receiver 2

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Multicast Routing High Level


Characteristics of Distribution Trees

Source or Shortest Path trees


Uses more memory O(S x G) but you get optimal paths from source to all receivers; minimizes delay

Shared trees
Uses less memory O(G) but you may get sub-optimal paths from source to all receivers; may introduce extra delay

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Multicast Routing High Level


Reverse Path Forwarding (RPF)
What is RPF?
A router forwards a multicast datagram only if received on the up stream interface to the source (i.e. it follows the distribution tree).

The RPF Check


The routing table used for multicasting is checked against the source IP address in the packet. If the datagram arrived on the interface specified in the routing table for the source address; then the RPF check succeeds. Otherwise, the RPF Check fails.

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Multicast Routing High Level Example: RPF Checking

Source 151.10.3.21

RPF Check Fails Packet arrived on wrong interface! Mcast Packets

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Multicast Routing High Level A closer look: RPF Check Fails


Multicast Packet from Source 151.10.3.21

RPF Check Fails!


Unicast Route Table Network Interface 151.10.0.0/16 S1 198.14.32.0/24 S0 204.1.16.0/24 E0

S1 E0

X
S0 S2

Packet Arrived on Wrong Interface! Discard Packet!

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Multicast Routing High Level A closer look: RPF Check Succeeds


Multicast Packet from Source 151.10.3.21
S0

S1

S2 E0

RPF Check Succeeds!


Unicast Route Table Network Interface 151.10.0.0/16 S1 198.14.32.0/24 S0 204.1.16.0/24 E0

Packet Arrived on Correct Interface! Forward out all outgoing interfaces. (i. e. down the distribution tree)

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Multicast Routing High Level Why do RPF Checks?


Avoid receiving duplicate packets Happens with PIM-DM flooding Avoid loops Ensures fan-out from source multicasting forwarding AWAY from the source RPF interface always leads back to the source
RPF Interface

S0 S1 E0 S2

Non-RPF Interface

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Multicast Routing High Level


Dense-mode
Uses Push Model
Traffic Flooded throughout network Pruned back where it is unwanted

Flood & Prune behavior (typically every 3 minutes)

Sparse-mode
Uses Pull Model

Traffic sent only to where it is requested


Explicit Join behavior

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Multicast Routing High Level


Currently, there are four multicast routing protocols:
PIM-Dense Mode (Internet-draft)
PIM-Sparse Mode (RFC 2362- v2) PIM-Source Specific Multicast Bidirectional PIM Others (DVMRP, MOSPF, etc.)

What Protocol Independent means


IP Multicast Basics

Doesnt care how the unicast routing table has been built
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PIM-DM Flood and Prune Initial Flooding

Source

Multicast Packets

(S, G) State created in every router in the network!

Receiver
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PIM-DM Flood and Prune

Pruning Unwanted Traffic

Source

Multicast Packets Prune Messages Receiver


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PIM-DM Flood and Prune Results After Pruning

Source

Multicast Packets

(S, G) State still exists in every router in the network!

Flood and Prune process repeats every 3 minutes!!!


IP Multicast Basics
2002, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Receiver
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PIM-DM Evaluation
Most effective for small pilot networks Advantages:
Easy to configuretwo commands Simple flood and prune mechanism

Potential issues...
Inefficient flood and prune behavior Complex Assert mechanism

Mixed control and data planes


Results in (S, G) state in every router in the network

Can result in non-deterministic topological behaviors


No support for shared trees

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PIM-SM (RFC 2362)


Supports both source and shared trees
Assumes no hosts want multicast traffic unless they specifically ask for it PULL MODEL

Uses a Rendezvous Point (RP)


Senders and Receivers rendezvous at this point to learn of each others existence.
Senders are registered with RP by their first-hop router. Receivers are joined to the Shared Tree (rooted at the RP) by their local Designated Router (DR).

Appropriate for
Wide scale deployment for both densely and sparsely populated groups in the enterprise Optimal choice for all production networks regardless of size and membership density.
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PIM-SM Shared Tree Join

RP

(*, G) Join Shared Tree Receiver

(*, G) State created only along the Shared Tree.

Router knows IP address of RP

If the last of the receivers behind this router leaves, then its (*.G) OIL is empty (NULL). The router will send (*,G) Prune towards RP.
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PIM-SM Sender Registration


2. (S, G) State created only 1. Source sends multicast data along the Source Tree. encapsulated in PIM-SM (S,G) Register to RP - unicast 3. Source requests RP to build a tree to it

4. RP sends packet on shared tree RP

Source 5. RP sends (S,G) Join towards Source

6. RP now has an SPT to the source 7. RP sends a (S,G) Register-Stop towards Source 8. Traffic flows SPT to RP and Shared Tree to Receiver
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Shared Tree Source Tree (S, G) Register


(S, G) Join
IP Multicast Basics
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(unicast)

Receiver

PIM-SM SPT Switchover


4. RP sends (S.G) Prune towards Source (S,G) Prune

Source

RP

2. Additional (S, G) State is created along new part of the Source Tree.

Traffic Flow
Shared Tree Source Tree (S, G) Join
IP Multicast Basics
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3. Router is receiving duplicate packets SPT and Shared Tree Router send (S,G) RP-bit Prune toward RP
Receiver 1. Last-hop router joins the Source Tree.
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(S,G) RP-bit Prune

PIM-SM State Refresh


(*, G) State created only along the Shared Tree.

Source

RP

RTR X RTR Y

Receiver

RTR X waits for 3 minute Receiver Before flushing the interface from the (S,G) or (*,G) OIL RTR Y sends (*,G) and (S,G) Joins to RTR X every 1 minute
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PIM-SMEvaluation
Effective for sparse or dense distribution of multicast receivers Advantages:
Traffic only sent down joined branches
Can switch to optimal source-trees for high traffic sources dynamically Unicast routing protocol-independent
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PIM SSM
Assume a One-to-Many Multicast Model.
Example: Video/Audio broadcasts, Stock Market data

Why does PIM-SM need a Shared Tree?


So that hosts and 1st hop routers can learn who the active source is for the group.

What if this was already known?


Hosts could use IGMPv3 to signal exactly which (S,G) SPT to join. The Shared Tree & RP wouldnt be necessary. Different sources could share the same Group address and not interfere with each other.

Result: Source Specific Multicast (SSM)


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PIM SSM
SSM Advantages
Allows immediate use of shortest forwarding path to a specific source, without need to create shared tree.

Eliminates dependence on MSDP for finding sources.


Simplifies address allocation for global, single source groups when combined with elimination of shared trees.
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PIM Source Specific Mode


Source

Receiver learns of source, group/port Receiver sends IGMPv3 (S,G) Join First-hop send PIM s,g join directly toward Source

A (S, G) Join

Out-of-band Source Directory Example: Web Server

D IGMPv3 (S, G) Join Receiver 1

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PIM Source Specific Mode


Source

Result: Shortest Path Tree rooted at the Source, with NO Shared Tree.

Receiver 1

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Rendezvous Point High Level


RP is key to the operation of PIM-SM How do the multicast routers know about the RP? Three methods are popular
Static RP
Statically configure the RP address on all multicast routers Can have a separate RPs for different groups

Auto-RP
Routers that want to be RPs announce to Mapping Agents Mapping Agents determine RP and inform all routers Uses dense mode groups 224.0.1.39 and 224.0.1.40 to achieve this

BSR
Similar to Auto-RP Candidate RPs announce their intention But Candidate BSRs dont determine the RPs they send all the RP information to all routers and let them decide.
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Agenda

Part 1 - Basic IP Multicast


Multicast Applications, Network Components, Addressing, IGMP Multicast Routing at a High Level

Part 2 - Configuration Example


Auto-RP, BSR, Anycast

Part 3 RP Details

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Configuration Setup
R2(PE)
s1/0 e0/0 10.0.1/24 s1/0 s2/ 0 10.0.4/24 10.0.3/24

R7

AS 13979

s2/0
192.168.1/30 1.1.1.1/32 e0/0 10.0.2/24 s1/0

s3/0

R3 - RR
s3/0

ip igmp join-group 239.1.1.1 R4(PE)

s2/0 10.0.5/24

s4/0

R5
192.168.3/30

R1
e1/0
192.168.2/30 s1/0 10.0.8/24 e0/0 s1/0

e0/0 s3/0

e0/0 5.5.5.5/32

s2/0 s3/0

Multiple Loops pinging 239.1.1.1

R8-RR
s2/0
10.0.9/24

10.0.7/24 s2/0 s3/0

10.0.6/24

s4/0

R9(PE)

R6

PE and P L0 = 12.0.0.N / 32
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Config and Show Commands - 1


All interfaces on PE and P routers are enabled for
PIM. For instance,
interface Serial1/0 ip address 10.0.1.2 255.255.255.0 ip pim sparse-dense-mode

including loopback0

What interfaces are enabled for PIM?


R2#sh ip pim int
Address 12.0.0.2 10.0.1.2 10.0.2.2 10.7.0.2 Interface Mode Loopback0 Serial1/0 Serial2/0 Serial4/0 Ver/ Nbr v2/SD v2/SD v2/SD v2/SD 0 1 1 0 Query DR DR Count Intvl Prior 30 1 12.0.0.2 30 1 0.0.0.0 30 1 0.0.0.0 30 1 0.0.0.0

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Config and Show Commands - 2

To check PIM on the customer interface

R2#sh ip pim vrf test1 int


Interface Mode Ethernet0/0 Tunnel0 Ver/ Nbr Query DR DR Count Intvl Prior v2/SD 1 v2/SD 2 30 30 1 1 192.168.1.2 12.0.0.9

Address 192.168.1.2 12.0.0.2 R2#

To check PIM adjacency


R2#sh ip pim nei
PIM Neighbor Table Neighbor Interface Address 10.0.1.7 Serial1/0 10.0.2.3 Serial2/0 R2#~ Uptime/Expires Ver DR Priority/Mode 00:26:45/00:01:38 v2 1 / 00:26:45/00:01:43 v2 1 /

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Config and Show Commands - 3

To check PIM adjacency on the customer interface


R2#sh ip pim vrf test1 nei PIM Neighbor Table Neighbor Interface Address 192.168.1.1 Ethernet0/0 12.0.0.9 Tunnel0 12.0.0.4 Tunnel0 R2# Uptime/Expires Ver DR Priority/Mode 00:28:37/00:01:42 v2 1 / 00:25:27/00:01:24 v2 1 / DR 00:28:26/00:01:29 v2 1 /

Check what is the RP for this group


R2#sh ip pim rp map
PIM Group-to-RP Mappings Group(s): 224.0.0.0/4, Static RP: 12.0.0.3 (?) R2#

For customer facing,


R2#sh ip pim vrf test1 rp map PIM Group-to-RP Mappings Group(s): 224.0.0.0/4, Static RP: 5.5.5.5 (?) R2#
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Config and Show Commands - 4


Is the AT&T RP reachable?
R2#ping 12.0.0.3 Type escape sequence to abort. Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 12.0.0.3, timeout is 2 seconds: !!!!!

Is the customer RP reachable?


R2#ping vrf test1 5.5.5.5 Type escape sequence to abort. Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 5.5.5.5, timeout is 2 seconds: !!!!!

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Config and Show Commands - 5

Lets make R2 a receiver


R2(config)#int loop0 R2(config-if)#ip igmp join-group 239.2.2.2

R2#sh ip igmp g IGMP Connected Group Membership Group Address Interface Uptime Expires Last Reporter 239.1.1.1 Loopback0 02:21:17 stopped 0.0.0.0 239.2.2.2 Loopback0 00:01:43 00:02:12 12.0.0.2 224.0.1.40 Loopback0 02:21:18 00:02:06 12.0.0.2

R2 sends *G Join to RP (R3)


R2#sh ip mro 239.2.2.2
(*, 239.2.2.2), 00:03:50/00:02:08, RP 12.0.0.3, flags: SJCL Incoming interface: Serial2/0, RPF nbr 10.0.2.3 Outgoing interface list: Loopback0, Forward/Sparse-Dense, 00:03:50/00:02:08

What does the RP (R3) think about 239.2.2.2?


R3#sh ip mro 239.2.2.2 (*, 239.2.2.2), 00:14:12/00:02:35, RP 12.0.0.3, flags: S Incoming interface: Null, RPF nbr 0.0.0.0 Outgoing interface list: Serial1/0, Forward/Sparse-Dense, 00:14:12/00:02:35
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Config and Show Commands - 6

Lets have a source behind R4 send to 239.2.2.2


R4#ping 239.2.2.2 Type escape sequence to abort. Sending 1, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 239.2.2.2, timeout is 2 seconds: Reply to request 0 from 10.0.2.2, 48 ms Reply to request 0 from 10.0.2.2, 100 ms Reply to request 0 from 10.0.2.2, 100 ms R4#

Why three responses?


ping to multicast sends pings on all interfaces can control this via extended ping response to ping is unicast

What states do the routers show?


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Config and Show Commands - 7


Look at the state on R4 first hop router
(*, 239.2.2.2), 00:03:41/stopped, RP 12.0.0.3, flags: SPF Incoming interface: Serial4/0, RPF nbr 10.0.4.7 Outgoing interface list: Null
(10.0.6.4, 239.2.2.2), 00:03:41/00:00:26, flags: FT Incoming interface: Serial3/0, RPF nbr 0.0.0.0, Registering Outgoing interface list: Serial4/0, Forward/Sparse-Dense, 00:03:41/00:03:24

(12.0.0.4, 239.2.2.2), 00:03:41/00:00:32, flags: FT Incoming interface: Loopback0, RPF nbr 0.0.0.0, Registering Outgoing interface list: Serial4/0, Forward/Sparse-Dense, 00:03:41/00:03:24

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Multicast Trace
R1#mtrace 1.1.1.1 5.5.5.5 ? Hostname or A.B.C.D Group to trace route via <cr>

R1#mtrace 1.1.1.1 5.5.5.5 Type escape sequence to abort. Mtrace from 1.1.1.1 to 5.5.5.5 via RPF From source (?) to destination (?) Querying full reverse path... 0 5.5.5.5 -1 192.168.3.5 PIM [1.1.1.1/32] -2 0.0.0.0 None Admin. Prohibited !RPF!192.168.3.4 [default] -3 0.0.0.0 PIM [1.1.1.1/32] -4 192.168.1.1 PIM [1.1.1.1/32] R1#

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Agenda

Part 1 - Basic IP Multicast


Multicast Applications, Network Components, Addressing, IGMP Multicast Routing at a High Level

Part 2 - Configuration Example


Auto-RP, BSR, Anycast

Part 3 RP Details

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Rendezvous Points (RPs)


Meeting Place for Source and Receivers Last hop routers join the RP First hop routers register towards RP
Designated routers send Register Messages towards RP

RPs can be
Manually configured - Static RPs Dynamic via Ciscos Auto-RP Dynamic via BSR

One RP can support several groups A single group cannot have more than one active RP If RP is not known, group will become dense

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Static RPs
Hard-coded RP address
When used, must be configured on every router All routers must have the same RP address

RP fail-over not possible (except if Anycast RPs are used)

Command
ip pim rp-address <address> [group-list <acl>] [override]

Optional group list specifies group range


Which multicast groups should this RP be used for? Default is all 224.0.0.0/4

Override keyword overrides Auto-RP information


w/o override - Auto-RP learned info takes precedence
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Auto-RP Overview
A way to let routers in a PIM domain dynamically learn about active RPs Basic Idea
Routers wishing to be RPs for a group(s) multicast a Candidate RP message
To group address 224.0.1.39 (Cisco-RP-Announce)

A Mapping Agent (MA) gets these and selects one MA multicasts this RP info to all other routers
To group address 224.0.1.40 (Cisco-RP-Discovery)

Routers cache this Group-to-RP mapping 224.0.1.39 and 224.0.1.40 operate in dense mode

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Auto-RPFrom 10,000 Feet

Announce

A
Announce

B
Announce

Announce

Announce

MA

MA

Announce

RP-Announcements multicast to the Cisco Announce (224.0.1.39) group


Announce
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Announce

C-RP 1.1.1.1

Announce

C-RP 2.2.2.2

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Auto-RPFrom 10,000 Feet

MA

MA

C-RP 1.1.1.1

C-RP 2.2.2.2

RP-Discoveries multicast to the Cisco Discovery (224.0.1.40) group


Discovery
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Redundancy via Auto-RP


Mapping Agent selects an RP with the highest IP address More than one candidate RP is announced for a group
If primary fails, then the candidate with next highest IP address becomes the RP for that group

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Sparse-Dense Mode
Problem Chicken & Egg
Mapping agent sends RP announcements to group 224.0.1.40 Routers need to send joins to Auto-RP group 224.0.1.10 to receive this announcement They have to send *G Join to the RP

But they need to know the RP to be able to that

Same issue applies to C-RP announcements Solution sparse-dense


Configure interfaces to be sparse-dense If RP is known, interface uses sparse-mode If RP is not known, interface uses dense mode

This allows Auto-RP groups to run in dense mode and all other groups in sparse-mode

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Auto-RP Configuration
ip pim send-rp-discovery loopback0 scope 16
Makes this router a mapping agent Need to configure pim in the loopback interface

ip pim send-rp-announce loopback0 scope 16


Makes this router a Candidate RP Scope is a TTL value

You can specify an ACL with send-rp-announce ACL specifies group range for which this router is CRP

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BSR Overview
A single Bootstrap Router (BSR) is elected
Multiple Candidate BSRs (C-BSR) can be configured
Provides backup in case currently elected BSR fails

C-RPs send C-RP announcements to the BSR


C-RP announcements are sent via unicast BSR stores ALL C-RP announcements in the RP-set

BSR periodically sends BSR messages to all routers


BSR Messages contain entire RP-set and IP address of BSR Messages are flooded hop-by-hop throughout the network away from the BSR

All routers select the RP from the RP-set


All routers use the same selection algorithm; select same RP

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BSRFrom 10,000 feet

PIMv2 Sparse Mode


BSR
D
A

C-RP

B E

C-RP

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BSRFrom 10,000 feet

G
BSR Msgs

PIMv2 Sparse Mode


BSR Msgs

F
BSR Msgs

BSR
A
BSR Msgs

C-RP

B E

C-RP

BSR Msgs Flooded Hop-by-Hop


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MSDP Concept
Simple but elegant
Utilize inter-domain source trees
Reduces problem to locating active sources RP or receiver last-hop can join inter-domain source tree

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MSDP Concepts
Works with PIM-SM only
RPs knows about all sources in a domain
Sources cause a PIM Register to the RP Can tell RPs in other domains of its sources
Via MSDP SA (Source Active) messages

RPs know about receivers in a domain


Receivers cause a (*, G) Join to the RP

RP can join the source tree in the peer domain


Via normal PIM (S, G) joins

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MSDP Overview
MSDP Example
Domain E
MSDP Peers Source Active Messages SA SA RP

r
Join (*, 224.2.2.2)

Domain C
RP

Domain B SA
RP SA

SA

SA

RP

SA SA Message 192.1.1.1, 224.2.2.2 RP

SA Message 192.1.1.1, 224.2.2.2

Domain D

s
Domain A

Register 192.1.1.1, 224.2.2.2


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MSDP Overview
MSDP Example
Domain E
MSDP Peers RP

r
Domain C
RP

Domain B
RP RP

Domain D
RP

s
Domain A

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MSDP Overview
MSDP Example
Domain E
MSDP Peers Multicast Traffic RP

r
Domain C
RP

Domain B
RP RP

Domain D
RP

s
Domain A

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MSDP Overview
MSDP Example
Domain E
MSDP Peers Multicast Traffic RP

r
Domain C
RP

Domain B
RP RP

Domain D
RP

s
Domain A

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MSDP Overview
MSDP Example
Domain E
MSDP Peers Multicast Traffic RP

r
Domain C
RP

Domain B
RP RP

Domain D
RP

s
Domain A

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Anycast RP Overview
Uses single statically defined RP address
Two or more routers have same RP address
RP address defined as a Loopback Interface. Loopback address advertised as a Host route.

Senders & Receivers Join/Register with closest RP


Closest RP determined from the unicast routing table.

Can never fall back to Dense mode.


Because RP is statically defined.

MSDP session(s) run between all RPs


Informs RPs of sources in other parts of network RPs join SPT to active sources as necessary
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Anycast RP Overview

Src

Src

RP1

MSDP
SA SA

RP2 B 10.1.1.1

Rec

X
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A 10.1.1.1

Rec

Rec

Rec

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Anycast RP Overview

Src

Src

RP1

RP2 B 10.1.1.1

Rec

X
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2002, Cisco Systems, Inc.

A 10.1.1.1

Rec

Rec

Rec

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Anycast RP Configuration

RP1 A
ip pim rp-address 10.1.1.1

MSDP

RP2 B
ip pim rp-address 10.1.1.1

Interface loopback 0 ip address 10.0.0.2 255.255.255.255

Interface loopback 0 ip address 10.0.0.1 255.255.255.255

Interface loopback 1 ip address 10.1.1.1 255.255.255.255 ! ip msdp peer 10.0.0.1 connect-source loopback 0 ip msdp originator-id loopback 0

Interface loopback 1 ip address 10.1.1.1 255.255.255.255 ! ip msdp peer 10.0.0.2 connect-source loopback 0 ip msdp originator-id loopback 0

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More Information
White Papers

Web and Mailers


Cisco Press

CCO Multicast page: http://www.cisco.com/go/ipmulticast Questions: cs-ipmulticast@cisco.com Customer Support Mailing List: tac@cisco.com
IP Multicast Basics
2002, Cisco Systems, Inc.

RTFB = Read the Fine Book


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