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OVERVIEW:

  • 1. FACTS ABOUT HONDA MOTORS

  • 2. MOTORBIKE MARKET IN US BEFORE HONDA ENTRY

  • 3. POSITIONING OF HONDA IN US MARKET

  • 4. COMPETITIVE FORCES OF STRATEGY

  • 5. STRENGTH OF HONDA MOTORS

  • 6. STRATEGY OF HONDA IN US (AS PER BCG)

  • 7. COUNTER ARGUMENTS OF STRATEGY MENTIONED IN POINT 6 (BY PASCAL)

  • 8. WHY DIFFERENCES IN THE ANALYSIS ??

  • 9. SUMMARY

OVERVIEW: 1. FACTS ABOUT HONDA MOTORS 2. MOTORBIKE MARKET IN US BEFORE HONDA ENTRY 3. POSITIONING

FACTS OF HONDA:

  • 1. Honda is the world's largest manufacturer of motorcycles as well as the world's largest manufacturer of internal combustion engines measured by volume, producing more than 14 million internal combustion engines each year.

  • 2. Honda surpassed Nissan in 2001 to become the second-largest Japanese automobile Manufacturer. As of August 2008, Honda surpassed Chrysler as the fourth largest automobile manufacturer in the United States. Honda is the sixth largest automobile manufacturer in the world.

  • 3. Honda headquarters: Minato, Tokyo.

  • 4. Trades in: Tokyo Stock Exchange and the New York Stock Exchange, as well as exchanges in Osaka, Nagoya, Sapporo, Kyoto, Fukuoka, London, Paris and Switzerland.

  • 5. Leadership 19481973 Soichiro Honda 19731983 Kiyoshi Kawashima 19831990 Tadashi Kume 19901998 Nobuhiko Kawamoto 19982004 Hiroyuki Yoshino 20042009 Takeo Fukui since 2009 Takanobu Ito

FACTS OF HONDA: 1. Honda is the world's largest manufacturer of motorcycles as well as the

FACTS OF HONDA:

  • 6. With high fuel prices and a weak US economy in June 2008, Honda reported a 1% sales increase while its rivals, including the Detroit Big Three and Toyota, have reported double-digit losses. Honda's sales were up almost 20 percent from the same month last year. The Civic and the Accord were in the top five list of sales.

  • 7. Analysts have attributed this to two main factors.

    • i. First, Honda's product lineup consists of mostly small to mid-size, highly fuel-efficient vehicles. Secondly, over the last ten years, Honda has designed its factories to be flexible, in that they can be easily retooled to produce any Honda model that may be in-demand

ii.

at the moment.

  • 8. The company has assembly plants around the globe located at China, USA, Pakistan, Canada, England, Japan, Belgium, Brazil, New Zealand, Indonesia, India, Thailand, and Turkey.

FACTS OF HONDA: 6. With high fuel prices and a weak US economy in June 2008,

MOTORBIKE MARKET IN US BEFORE

  • 1. Harley Davidson was market leader with $ 6.6m sales in 1959.

  • 2. Bad image of the motorcycle riders, as a trouble maker.

  • 3. British and US companies major supplier of the motorcycles.

  • 4. Target customers were the police, army ..etc

  • 5. Leaking oil and clutch problems were the major issues in the bikes (1959).

MOTORBIKE MARKET IN US BEFORE 1. Harley Davidson was market leader with $ 6.6m sales in

POSITIONING OF HONDA IN US:

  • 1. Positioned themselves as number one company post Japan success.

  • 2. Positioned itself as a customer friendly company with products for common man.

  • 3. Positioned itself as a company that develops innovative products.

  • 4. Positioned itself as a company with quality products with low price.

  • 5. Positioned in terms of value for money.

POSITIONING OF HONDA IN US: 1. Positioned themselves as number one company post Japan success. 2.

COMPETITIVE FORCES & STRATEGY:

NEW MARKET ENTRANTS SUBSTITUTES FIRM COMPETITOR SUPPLIERS CUSTOMERS
NEW MARKET
ENTRANTS
SUBSTITUTES
FIRM
COMPETITOR
SUPPLIERS
CUSTOMERS

FIRM:

Advantage of being the First Mover:

  • 1. Build Honda’s reputation with buyers.

  • 2. Early commitment to new technologies & channels had a cost advantage.

  • 3. First time customers will remain loyal to the firm, with repeated buying.

  • 4. Moving first makes preemptive strike, making imitation hard / unlikely.

Disadvantage of being the First Mover:

  • 1. If pioneering leadership is more costly than imitating leadership.

  • 2. When imitator’s products are primitive and follower wins over disenchanted buyers from leader with better products.

  • 3. When demand side of market is skeptical about the benefits of the new technology introduced.

  • 4. When due to market evolution late movers and fast followers respond suddenly to the market changes with better version products.

FIRM: Advantage of being the First Mover: 1. Build Honda’s reputation with buyers. 2. Early commitment

COMPETITOR / MARKET ENTRANTS:

  • 1. Harley Davidson, USA

  • 2. BSA, UK

  • 3. Triumph, UK

  • 4. Norton, UK

  • 5. Motto-Guzzi, Italy

British motorcycle company sales decreased in US from 49% in 1959 to 9% in 1974.

Reasons:

  • 1. Loss in Market Share

  • 2. Profitability decline in a large scale economy and disadvantages in technology, distribution and marketing.

COMPETITOR / MARKET ENTRANTS: 1. Harley Davidson, USA 2. BSA, UK 3. Triumph, UK 4. Norton,

SUBSTITUTES:

  • 1. Anyone planning to buy a motorcycle ONLY, would not be expecting a substitute. The substitute can be assumed in forms of same type of product by different companies.

  • 2. Anyone planning to buy a motorcycle as a TRANSPORT medium, can find substitutes in the terms of car, bus, trains.

CUSTOMERS:

  • 1. As mentioned, initial customers for motorcycles were army, police, and the trouble makers, with a very limited portion of the gentlemen. negative image of bikers.

  • 2. Honda extended the motorcycle concept over the common man with proper designs and marketing strategies.

SUBSTITUTES: 1. Anyone planning to buy a motorcycle ONLY, would not be expecting a substitute. The

STRENGTH OF HONDA MOTORS:

  • 1. It start with the roles which the founders played. Honda was an inventive genius with a large ego and a volatile temperament. His main concerns were not about the profitability of the company or its products, but rather to show his innovative ability by producing better engines. Fujisawa on the other hand thought about the financial section of the company and how to market the ideas. He often challenged Honda to come up with better engines. By specializing in their own abilities the two of them were able to pool together resources and function effectively as a team.

  • 2. The company utilized its market position. Strengths in design advantages and production methods meant they were able to increases sales in Japan even though there was no organization within the company. Once there was a large enough demand for its products, mainly the supercub, Honda both in Japan and in America, moved from a sale on consignment basis to one that required cash on delivery. This seemed a very risky decision to make at the time but within three years they had changed the pattern within the motorcycle industry by shifting the power relationship from the dealer to the manufacturer.

STRENGTH OF HONDA MOTORS: 1. It start with the roles which the founders played. Honda was

STRENGTH OF HONDA MOTORS:

  • 3. Cultivated a "success against all odds" culture into the company. This was tested when he sent two executives to the U.S with no strategy other than to see if they could sell something. The weaknesses within an organization can become irrelevant if the strategy is strong and there is good leadership.

  • 4. ―Fortune favors the brave.‖

An element of luck also helped Honda follow an emerging strategy. Restrictions placed on funds by the government for the U.S venture forced Honda to take an alternative route. If they had all the funds necessary they may well have gone through the normal distribution channels. Honda entered the US market right at the end of the motorcycle trade season. When leaking oil and clutch problems occurred on their bikes it did not affect Honda as hard as it would have had they entered in the beginning of the season. Also people noticing the Supercubs led the company to produce a bike which was not at first supported by senior management.

STRENGTH OF HONDA MOTORS: 3. Cultivated a "success against all odds" culture into the company. This

HONDA STRATEGY IN US (BY BCG):

  • 1. Success of Honda was fueled by success in the Japan market. Heavy demand of the products in the domestic market led to Honda experiencing economies of scale as the cost of producing motorbikes declined with the level of output. This provided Honda to achieve a highly competitive cost position which they used to penetrate into the US market. The philosophy: High volumes per model provide the potential for high productivity as a result of using capital intensive and highly automated techniques.

So, they developed high model volumes.

  • 2. The company also moved away from other companies who relied upon distributors to

sell their bikes, when the company set up its headquarters in the west coast of America.

  • 3. Honda had a "policy of selling, not primarily to confirmed motorcyclists but rather to members of the general public who had never before given a second thought to a motorcycle―.

HONDA STRATEGY IN US (BY BCG): 1. Success of Honda was fueled by success in the

HONDA STRATEGY IN US (BY BCG):

  • 4. The small, lightweight Honda Supercub sold at under 250 dollars compared to the bigger American or British machines which were retailing at around 1000 to 1500 dollars.

  • 5. In 1960 Honda's research team comprised of around 700 designer and engineer staff compared to the 100 or so employed by their competitors showing the value which the company placed on innovation. Production per man-year was 159 units in 1962, a figure not reached by Harley-Davidson until 1974.

  • 6. Honda was following a strategy of developing region by region. Over a period of four to five years they moved from the west coast of America to the east coast.

  • 7. Honda paid to advertising when the company spent heavily on the advertising theme you meet the nicest people on a Honda" thereby disassociating themselves from the rowdy, hell's angels type of people.

According to analysts . Honda portrays itself as a firm dedicated to being a low cost producer, utilizing its dominant position in Japan to force entry into U.S market, redefining that market by putting the nicest people image and exploiting its comparative advantage via aggressive advertising and pricing.

HONDA STRATEGY IN US (BY BCG): 4. The small, lightweight Honda Supercub sold at under 250

COUNTER ARGUMENTS BY PASCAL:

―There was a smooth entry into the U.S market which led to an instant success.‖

Honda entered the American market at the end of the motorcycle trade season showing their impotence to carry out research in the new market. As they entered the market at the wrong time sales were not as good as they should have been and any success was not going to be instantaneous.

―Honda was superior to other competitors in productivity.Honda was successful in Japan with productivity but circumstances indicate that the company was not superior. The lack of funding from the ministry of finance and the pouching back of profits into inventory meant they had a tight budget to follow.

―Honda had smooth policy of developing region by region, moving from west to east.Hondas advertising was still in Los Angeles in 1963, four years after setting up their subsidiary.

―Honda had a deliberate strategy of disassociating themselves from the hells angels type of people by following the nicest people advertisement policy.This was not an intentional move since there were disputes within the company with the director of sales eventually persuading to management against their better judgment.

COUNTER ARGUMENTS BY PASCAL: ―There was a smooth entry into the U.S market which led to

COUNTER ARGUMENTS BY PASCAL:

―Honda pushed into the U.S market with small lightweight motorbikes‖

The intended strategy was one of promoting the larger 250cc and 350cc as Honda felt

that this was what the market wanted since Americans liked all things large. The bikes

were unreliable which led to the promotion of the supercubs. These bikes salvaged the reputation of the company. An idea which hardly came from an inspired idea but one of desperation.

For these analysts ….

The impression that it was through an incidental sequence of events which led to Honda gaining a strong hold in the U.S market, mainly through the unexpected discovery of a large untapped segment of the market while at the same time trying to retain the interest of the current market.

COUNTER ARGUMENTS BY PASCAL: ―Honda pushed into the U.S market with small lightweight motorbikes‖ The intended

WHY DIFFERENCE IN ANALYSIS ???

2 models were used for the analysis:

Andrew Model Emergent Strategy

Andrew Model: (used by BCG)

Andrew came up with the idea that there were two stages to corporate strategy,

formulation and implementation. Formulation involved looking at the market, competitors and resources and formulating a corporate strategy which would be implemented throughout each process of the organizational structure. This model was also supported by Porter.

This is how the BCG saw Honda, as a corporation, who had looked at the market, formulated a strategy to cope with the environment and competition pressures and implemented it, making all Hondas plans and activities deliberate.

Emergent Model: (used by Pascal)

The model shows a realized strategy made up from a an intended strategy together

with an emergent strategy which is not planned but emerges in relation to activities within the environment.

Pascal seemed to think that in Hondas case a substantial proportion or the companies corporate strategy was emergent and less was actually intended strategy.

WHY DIFFERENCE IN ANALYSIS ??? 2 models were used for the analysis: • Andrew Model •

TO SUMMARIZE … ..

  • 1. The success of Honda was not the result of senior management coming up with all the answers. In fact senior executives in most Japanese manufacturing companies do not take their strategic positions too seriously.

  • 2. Salesman, cleaners and those working on the manufacturing floor all contribute to the company is run and thereby influence its strategic position. It is this ability of an organization to move ideas from the tom to the bottom and back again in continuous dialogue that the company values the greatest.

TO SUMMARIZE … .. 1. The success of Honda was not the result of senior management