Sei sulla pagina 1di 13

N

O E
S

UNIT 2:

MINERAL PROPERTIES
AND MORE
INTRODUCTION

- Technical mining terms


 Editar estilos de texto del patrón  Cuarto nivel
- Characteristics
Segundo nivel
of ores extracted in
 Quinto nivel
Chile
- Mining sites
 Tercer nivel
in Chile
- Specific characteristics and properties of
copper
KEY CONCEPTS AND TERMS

1. 1. Chemical composition
2. 2. Physical properties and composition
3. 3. Diagnostic
COLOR
PHYSICAL
PROPERTIES
SHAPE OR
CLEAVAGE
FORM OF MINERALS

HARDNESS LUSTER
Physical Properties of Cu
Chemical Classification Native element

Cu is red on a fresh surface, dull


Color
brown on a tarnished surface

Streak Metallic red

Luster Metallic, Opaque

Cleavage None

Color, luster, specific gravity,


Diagnostic Properties
malleability, ductility

Chemical Composition Copper, Cu

Crystal System Isometric

Conducts electricity and heat;


Uses wiring, electrical contacts and
circuits; coinage, alloy
Activity 1
Physical Properties of _________

Chemical Classification

Color

Streak

Luster

Cleavage

Color, luster, specific gravity, malleability,


Diagnostic Properties
ductility

Chemical Composition

Crystal System

Uses
IDENTIFY / DIAGNOSE
by the mineral’s physical
properties.
Haga clic en el icono para agregar una imagen

Haga clic en el icono para agregar una imagen


COLOR
Mineral Color
A mineral’s color can be very distinctive at
times. Take azurite (in the picture below),
known for its deep blue color, or olivine,
named for its olive green color. However, not
all minerals come in one specific color. Some,
like quartz, come in many tints and hues. Two
or more different minerals may be a similar
color. Weather can also alter the color of
minerals. The color you see may just be a
coating over the mineral, like rust on a
hematite or surface weathering on clays.
Opaque and metallic minerals tend to come in
certain distinctive colors, while translucent and
transparent minerals seem to experience color
changes from chemical impurities more readily.
PICTURE: Azurite is often distinguished by its
bright blue color.
Haga clic en el icono para agregar una imagen

LUSTER
Luster is a description of how much a
mineral reflects light. There are two
main kinds of luster: metallic (shiny) and
nonmetallic (dull). Luster is also related
to atomic structure and bonding within
the mineral itself: metallic lusters tend
to correspond with ionic bonds and
nonmetallic lusters with covalent bonds.

PICTURE: The amethyst shown here is


an excellent example of vitreous luster.
Haga clic en el icono para agregar una imagen

SHAPE (form)
The external shape of a mineral
crystal (or its crystal form) is
determined largely by its internal
atomic structure, which means
that this property can be highly
diagnostic. Specifically, the form of
a crystal is defined by the angular
relationships between crystal faces
Haga clic en el icono para agregar una imagen

Hardness

Hardness is a mineral’s
resistance to scratching, and
shows the strength of a
mineral’s atomic bonds. For
example, take a human
fingernail. It has a hardness of
2.5 on the Mohs hardness scale,
which is the standard for
measuring a mineral’s hardness;
1 is really soft and 10 is
extremely hard.
Haga clic en el icono para agregar una imagen

Cleavage
Cleavage is the tendency for a mineral
to break into smooth planes. This is
governed again by the internal
structure of the mineral, because
breakages occur along weak planes
between atoms. It is a very good
indicator of a mineral’s identity for this
reason.
Minerals can cleave into thin sheets
(mica), or rods (some types of
asbestos), or octahedrons (fluorite),
or rhombic prisms (calcite), as well as
other forms. Some minerals don’t
cleave; instead, they fracture
unevenly.
Haga clic en el icono para agregar una imagen

ACTIVITY 2

Crear glosario con términos


clasificados de acuerdo a las 5
propiedades fisicas de los
minerals.