Sei sulla pagina 1di 14

Research Questions & 

Hypotheses
The process of introducing a problem
 Stimulate reader interest in the problem
 Demonstrate the importance of the problem

 Provide current status of the problem

 Introduce any relevant theory examined in the 
study
 Place the study within the context of literature

 Identify the population to study
Introductory section organization
Purpose statement

 How you frame and state the research problem is 
critical to the entire research project…it is the 
foundation for the remainder of your work. 
 Clearly express the problem as a purpose statement 
and/or research question(s) to be answered
 Clearly state a hypothesis (if appropriate)
Form for the
       problem statement

 The problem statement can be written as either a 
question or as a declarative statement
 Research questions are interrogative sentences

 They may be used following a general statement of 
purpose to identify sub­problems that will be 
answered 
 Research questions are generally used in lieu of 
hypotheses and indicate the use of non­experimental 
study designs
research questions can be used along with a general 
statement of purpose to identify sub­problems that will be 
answered 

 The purpose of this study was to determine the 
characteristics of students who use the Health and 
Wellness Center five or more times per week.
 What is the gender profile of students who use the HWC five 
or more times per week?
 What is the racial/ethnic profile of students who use the 
HWC five or more times per week?
 What is the BMI of students who use the HWC five or more 
times per week?
 What is the attitude toward wellness of those students who 
use the HWC five or more times per week? 
variables

 Dependent  Variable– the variable that is measured 
or observed…outcome variable
 Ask “What is dependent upon what?”

 Independent Variable – variable being examined or 
tested
 Control  Variable – variable whose potential to 
impact the dependent variable has been removed or 
“controlled for” by the study design or statistical 
manipulation 
What is a hypothesis?

 Expresses the relationship between two or more 
variables
 States the predicted outcome of a test

 A hypothesis can be tested (proved or disproved)
Directional and nondirectional hypotheses

 Nondirectional hypotheses:  predict a difference 
between groups, but do not specify what the difference 
might be
 Null hypothesis (Ho ): statement of no difference
 The means or scores are not different

 Alternative hypothesis (Ha ): statement of difference
 The means or scores are different in a predicted direction
examples

 Nondirectional:  There will be a difference in contraceptive 
knowledge level of students that participated in an 
abstinence­only sexuality education program and the 
contraceptive knowledge level of students who participated 
in an abstinence­based sexuality education program.
 Null Hypothesis:   There will be no difference in the 
contraceptive knowledge level of students that participated 
in an abstinence­only sexuality education program and the 
contraceptive knowledge level of students who participated 
in an abstinence­based sexuality education program.
 Alternative Hypothesis: The contraceptive knowledge 
levels of students that participated in an abstinence­only 
sexuality education program will  be lower than the 
contraceptive knowledge level of students who participated 
in an abstinence­based sexuality education program.
Hypothesis testing

 Is the difference in contraceptive knowledge levels 
between the two groups of students large enough to 
convince us that it is the result of the differences 
between the two types of education programs and not 
simply chance or normal variation.
 Most often test the null hypothesis (there is no 
difference between the contraceptive knowledge levels 
of the two groups)
 Use statistical tests to determine the probability  that 
the null hypothesis is true
Hypothesis testing
 Type I Error
 Rejecting a true H0

 Type II Error
 Failure to reject a false H0
 Note: a H0 is never “accepted”

 p­values
 Standard is 5%
Timelines
Most research proposals include a fairly detailed 
anticipated schedule for the planned research 
project. 
1.Create a list of all the steps from planning the 
study through the dissemination of results
2.Create a calendar that shows when each of 
these steps is expected to begin and end
3.Set deadlines along the way that will help 
ensure that the project stays on track toward 
timely completion
Part I: Article analysis
 Problem or purpose?
 Hypotheses ?
 Nondirectional, null, or alternative

 Dependent variable
 Independent variable(s)

 Part II: Your research question & timeline