Sei sulla pagina 1di 10

MOUNT CARMEL COLLEGE OF TEACHER

EDUCATION FOR WOMEN

EDU 102: CHILDHOOD AND GROWING UP

MODULE 2: PROBLEMS OF ADOLESCENTS


- SUICIDAL TENDANCIES
By
CELIN MATHEW
1St B. ED
NATURAL SCIENCE
• Suicide is the second leading cause of death - following
motor vehicle accidents - among teenagers and young
adults.
• On average, adolescents aged 15 to 19 years have an annual
suicide rate of about 1 in 10,000 people.
• Among youths 12 to 16 year of age, up to 10% of boys and
20% of girls have considered suicide.
• Gay and lesbian adolescents are more likely to attempt
suicide than their heterosexual peers.
• Suicide rates are 5 to 7 times higher among First Nations
and Inuit teens.
RISK FACTORS FOR SUICIDE
• Suicidal behavior risk factors have been
classified into 2 separate categories:
1. Predisposing factors
2. Precipitating factors
• Predisposing factors are those that directly increase an
adolescent's risk for suicide. They include the following.

1. Previous Suicide Attempt


2. History of a Prior or Ongoing Psychiatric Disorder
3. History of Sexual or Physical Abuse
4. History or Exposure to Violent Behavior
5. Family History of Suicidal Behavior or Mood
Disorders
6. Biological Factors, Including Male Sex and Gay or
Lesbian Sexual Orientation
• 4 main precipitating or potentiating factors
• Although they are not sufficient in and of themselves to
increase suicide risk, they can synergistically increase the
likelihood of some form of suicidal behavior when they
are present. They include:
1. Substance abuse
2. Access to firearms or other means
3. Social stress, such as interpersonal conflicts with
friends, family, or law enforcement
4. Emotional factors, such as feelings of despair or
hopelessness
WARNING SIGNS
• Withdrawal from family and peers
• Loss of interest in previously pleasurable activities
• Difficulty concentrating on schoolwork
• Neglect of personal appearance
• Obvious changes in personality
• Sadness and hopelessness
• Changes in eating patterns, such as sudden weight loss
or gain
• Changes in sleep patterns
• General lethargy or lack of energy
• Symptoms of clinical depression
• Violent actions, rebellion, or running away
• Drug and alcohol use
• Symptoms that are often related to emotional state (e.g.,
headaches, fatigue, stomach aches)
• Loss of ability to tolerate praise or rewards
PREVENTION
• Getting effective care for mental, physical, and
substance use disorders
• Being able to easily access mental health
services
• Getting support from family and the community
• Learning ways to peacefully resolve conflict
• Having cultural and religious beliefs that
discourage suicide
• A supportive nurturing environment
• Ready access to mental health services
• A school or other social setting that promotes
respect for individual, racial, and cultural
differences
THANK YOU