Sei sulla pagina 1di 27

Problems of Adolescence

Presented by

Ann

Meera

What is Adolescence?

It is a vital stage of growth and

development

A period of transition

from childhood to

adulthood

The World Health Organization (WHO) defines an adolescent as any person between ages 10 and 19.

Characterized by rapid

physiological and psychological

change

Characterized by rapid physiological and psychological change

ADOLESCENT

FACE PROBLEMS

IN :

Developing and identity Managing emotions Building relationships

Resisting peer pressure Acquiring information on issues of adolescence Communicating and negotiating safer life

situations

Some common behavior problems in adolescence are :
Some common behavior problems in adolescence are :
Some common behavior problems in adolescence are :
Some common behavior problems in adolescence are :

Some

common

behavior problems in

adolescence

are :

Sex, alcohol and drugs Increased use of communication devices and social media Mood swings Aggression Lying or hiding facts Defying rules and arguing Drastic changes in appearance Decreased communication Spending more times with friends

Adolescence

The period of

adolescence lasts till the

individual becomes a young man or young women. Starts with puberty after 12 years of age. Age 13 and 19 is called teenage. Adolescent is a general term for teenagers of all sex. It is period of life that leads to reproductive

maturity of a person

Adolescent and

Depression

The World Health

Organization (WHO)

defines an adolescent as any

person between

Adolescent and Depression • The World Health Organization (WHO) defines an adolescent as any person between

ages 10 and 19. The transitional stage

from childhood to adulthood. Represents one of

Depression

(major

depressive disorder)

is a common and

serious

medical

illness that negatively

affects how you feel,

• Depression (major depressive disorder) is a common and serious medical illness that negatively affects how

the way you think

and how you act.

It has a cluster of identifiable symptoms It can affect anyone; no one is immune It runs in families It is linked to parts of the brain It is treatable

Adolescent Depression

At this age they try to find who they are and

where they fit socially.

Changing relationship with parents is what cause depression most.

Can

be

extremely

intense

with

hormonal

changes. Emotional instability is a part of adolescence.

Adolescent Development

This transitional period can bring up issues of

independence and self-identity.

many adolescents and their peers face tough choices regarding school, sexuality, drugs, alcohol,

and social life.

Children who are entering adolescence are going through many changes.

  • Physical changes

  • Intellectual changes

  • Social changes

  • Emotional changes

Physical changes

The growth spurt (an early sign of maturation)

Primary sex characteristics (changes in the organs directly related to reproduction)

Secondary sex characteristics (bodily signs of sexual maturity

that do not directly involve

reproductive organs)

Intellectual changes

Higher level of thinking than that of children.

  • Adolescents

think in terms

of

what might be true, rather than just what they see is true.

Emotional changes

Feeling hopeless or empty

Irritable or annoyed mood

Frustration or feelings of anger, even over small matters

Loss of interest or pleasure in normal activities

Loss of interest in, or conflict with, family and friends

Low self-esteem

Feelings of worthlessness or guilt

  • Fixation on past failures or exaggerated self-blame or self- criticism

  • Extreme sensitivity to rejection or failure, and the excessive reassurance

need for

  • Trouble

thinking,

concentrating,

making

decisions

and

remembering things

 
  • Ongoing sense that life and the future are grim and bleak

 
  • Frequent thoughts of death, dying or suicide

  • Feelings of sadness, which can include crying spells apparent reason

for

no

Social changes

Very self conscious

Increased expectations

Changing relationships-consider approval of friends and other adolescents or peers as very important

Area of specific interests and social contacts get widened.

Spot Adolescent Depre

Estimates

from

a

study published

in American Family Physician state that up to 15

percent of children and adolescents have some symptoms of depression.

The symptoms of depression can often be difficult for parents to spot. Sometimes,

depression is confused with the typical feelings

of puberty and teenage adjustment.

According to the American Academy of Child and

Adolescent Psychiatry (AACAP), some signs of adolescent depression include:

Appearing sad, irritable, or tearful

Changes in appetite or weight

A decreased interest in activities your child once found pleasurable

A decrease in energy

Difficulty concentrating

Feelings of guilt, worthlessness, or helplessness

Major changes in sleeping habits

Regular complaints of boredom

Talk of suicide

Withdrawal from friends or after-school activities

Worsening school performance

What Causes Adolescent Depression?

Differences in the Brain

(brains of adolescents are structurally different than the

brains of adults.)

Teens with depression can also have hormone differences

and different levels of neurotransmitters.

(Neurotransmitters

are key chemicals in the brain that affect how brain cells

communicate with one another and play an important role in regulating moods and behavior.)

Inherited Traits (Research shows that depression has a biological

component. It can be passed down from parents to their children.)

Normal process of maturing Independence conflicts with parents Death of loved ones Relationship break up Failure at school Child abuse Chronic illnesses Poor social skills

Making the Diagnosis of Major Depression

Five or more symptoms for two or more weeks

At least one symptom must be change in mood or the loss of interest or pleasure in usual activities

Symptoms cause clinically significant distress or impairment in functioning: socially, academically, or emotionally

Treatment of Major Depression

Medications: antidepressants

Individual psychotherapy

Education and support

Family therapy

Individual responsibility

Family involvement and/or family therapy

Control of negative behaviors: alcohol abuse, substance abuse, eating disorders, and cutting