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Health Care

Competency
Development
Professionalism
Professionalism in Healthcare

Professionalism is a part of the American College of


Healthcare Executives Competencies Assessment
tool. The assessment examines the ability of a
person to align to the personal and organizational
conduct with ethics and standards that demonstrate
their professionalism. They must have the ability to
continuously learn and improve upon themselves
for the sake of the patients and the community they
serve.
Patient rights and responsibilities

• A patient has the right to refuse services


• A patient has the right to designate family as defined
for themselves
• Healthcare organizations must make patients aware of
those rights
• Patients have a right to grieve to hospital or
regulatory agencies.
• Patients are responsible for sharing past health
conditions to ensure they receive the best care
• Patients are responsible in participating in their care
plan
Source: Hall, Robert T. 2000. An Introduction to Healthcare Organizational Ethics. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2
000. eBook Collection (EBSCOhost), EBSCOhost (accessed April 6, 2016).
Ethics committee’s roles, structure and
functions

• Hospitals who have an ethics committee in place that handles clinical


matters should also address organizational ethics
• Committee members should have clinical and non-clinical backgrounds
• Committee may be more respected because members backgrounds are both
clinical and non -clinical
• Members should hold either a MBA, MPH, or MHA degrees
• Committee should not include members from the organizational
management function

Source: Duncan, S. (2014). Guidance for Healthcare Ethics Committees. Journal Of The Medical Library Association, 102(2), 133-133
1p. doi:10.3163/1536-5050.102.2.018
Cultural and spiritual diversity for patients
and staff as they relate to healthcare needs

• Organizations should adopt the CLAS standards-National Standards


for Culturally and Linguistically Appropriate Services in Health Care
to help them become more cultural diverse and communicate with
their patients
• Create competencies for staff to assist them with being cultural
competent
• Ensure that patients are aware of the patient bill of rights; to create a
bill of rights that is cultural inclusive
• Allow for an environment where patients and families can share freely
• Create a grievance process and ensure patients and staff are aware of
the process
• Work with the patients and community when developing care services

Source: Seeleman, C., Essink-Bot, M., Stronks, K., & Ingleby, D. (2015). How should health service o
rganizations respond to diversity? A content analysis of six approaches. BMC Health Services Research, 151-18.
doi:10.1186/s12913-015-1159-7
Organizational business and personal
ethics

• The Joint Commission requires organizational


ethics standards since 1995
• Patient Rights and Organizational Ethics are apart
of the accreditation process for healthcare
organizations and
• Medical ethics are under the jurisdiction of the
medical committee
• The Joint Commission states a hospital has an
“ethical responsibility to the patients and
communities they serve”
Source: Hall, Robert T. 2000. An Introduction to Healthcare Organizational Ethics. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2
000. eBook Collection (EBSCOhost), EBSCOhost (accessed April 6, 2016).
Conflict of interest situations as defined by
organizational bylaws, policies and procedures

• Anyone working for an organization should abide by the bylaws


and polices created
• Adhere to organization policies when accepting gifts to prevent
the appearance of conflicts of interest
• Use acceptable principles for reporting accounting information
• Protect assets of the organization
• Be cultural aware of the needs of the patients and their families
• Provide appropriate medical care to ensure no one is turned away

• l, Robert T. 2000. An Introduction to Healthcare Organizational Ethics. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2000. eBook Collection (EBSCOhost), EBSCOhost (accessed April 6, 2016).
Resources

MONROY, M. (2015). Patient language services: Your responsibilities. Contemporary OB/GYN,

60(9), 38-40 2p.

Duncan, S. (2014). Guidance for Healthcare Ethics Committees. Journal Of The Medical Library Association, 102(2), 133-133 1p.

doi:10.3163/1536-5050.102.2.018

Seeleman, C., Essink-Bot, M., Stronks, K., & Ingleby, D. (2015). How should health service organizations respond to

diversity? A content analysis of six approaches. BMC Health Services Research, 151-18. doi:10.1186/s12913-

015-1159-7

Hall, Robert T. 2000. An Introduction to Healthcare Organizational Ethics. Oxford: Oxford University Press,

2000. eBook Collection (EBSCOhost), EBSCOhost (accessed April 6, 2016).