Sei sulla pagina 1di 12

Traditional Indonesian

Healthy and Beauty Treatments.


Introduction
• Indonesia is the birthplace of
many tropical beauty products
and secrets. Many of today’s
natural treatments for hair, skin,
and even medical cures can be
found in the vast botanical
variety of Indonesia’s 6,500
species. 4,500 of these species
are native to Java.
• Some of the beauty treatments
that are in use today were once
guarded secrets within the
palace walls of the Central
Javanese royal family and are
just recently becoming available
to the public.
Introduction
• One of the biggest allures in the Indonesia spa
experience is often how the spa can
effortlessly blend with the natural setting and
almost become one with nature.
Traditional Indonesian Body
Treatments
• Today the spa philosophy is moving towards a
preventive and pampering approach for their
clients.
• The experience is not focused so much on self
indulgence as a spiritual, harmonious and
natural treatment for the body.
• A balance between inner and outer beauty is
back in vogue and the Indonesian spa
experience helps to gain this harmony.
Balinese massages
• considered a routine staple of everyday life in
local culture. It incorporates traditional
techniques from India and China to relax
pressure points, stimulate nerve endings, and
rejuvenate tired muscles with long mid
pressure strokes.
Mandi susu
• traditional beauty bath that has been used by Javanese
princesses for centuries as an elixir of youth. This bath is
known to make the skin radically soft and pure to the
touch.
• Milk from goat’s, sheep, or cows was often used prior to
the development of modern formulas that have taken out
the taste and the smell of the milk but maintained its
softening proteins. It is suggested that the client soak in a
both of milk for at least 20 minutes and not rinse after the
soaking.
• For a more intense treatment buttermilk or yogurt is used;
however most clients do not like the after smell that is left
on the skin.
Mandi luhur
• a common traditional treatment that is carried
out in many beauty salons and spas in
Indonesia.
• This process is an exfoliation and polishing of
the body that leaves the skin soft, supple and
shiny (lulur is Javanese for “coating the skin”)
• an all over deep heat experience and is
used to warm the body at the first sign
of a chest cough coming on. This
Balinese Boreh treatment is used both as a curative and
a preventative treatment.
• it is recommended for the treatment of
headaches, muscle aches, arthritis, and
chills.
• This century old village recipe uses
ingredients that are more commonly
associated with cooking than beauty
treatments. Sandalwood, cloves, ginger,
cinnamon, coriander, turmeric, nutmeg,
and rice powder are formed into a paste
with galangal water or spice scented oil.
This paste is then applied to the body
producing a heating sensation
• often considered a highlight of
the Indonesian spa visit. A
Floral baths bathtub of warm water is
prepared with petals of jasmine,
gardenia, hibiscus, magnolia
bougainvillea, pinciannna, and
rose. These flower petals are
chosen not only for the
fragrance that they give off but
also for their rich colors.
• Normally the floral bath is not
offered as a treatment by itself,
but as a finale to a spa session. It
is used to savor the cleansing
experience and relax for an
additional 20 minutes.
Herbal wraps
• often used for their healing qualities as well
as the smoothing effects they have on the
skin. An herbal wrap is used to draw out
impurities from the body and heal any
blemishes on the skin’s surface.
Java Wraps
• A mixture of eucalyptus, crushed sea stone or coral,
lime juice, betel leaf, and oil are mixed together into a
paste and then applied to the abdomen area.
• Then a very long cotton cummerbund (about 6 inches
wide and 8-10 yards long) is tightly wrapped around
the body starting from under the breasts until the
lower hip area.
• Someone has to assist in the process as it is almost
impossible to do this by yourself. The cummerbund
almost immobilizes the wearer and is not very
comfortable
Refrences
• Annisa, 2013, Bukti Sejarah Jamu Tradisional Indonesia, viewed 2 December 2016,
http://www.vemale.com/topik/tanaman-obat/42651-bukti-sejarah-jamu-tradisional-
indonesia.html
• Lestarin, widya, Inilah 9 Spa Tradisional Asli Indonesia, 2016, viewed 2 december 2016,
https://www.goodnewsfromindonesia.id/2016/08/30/inilah-9-spa-tradisional-asli-indonesia
• Saputra, dino, 2015, 8 Manfaat Luluran bagi Tubuh, viewed 2 December 2016,
http://manfaat.co.id/manfaat-luluran
• shinoda, evrina, 2013, Pengembangan Jamu Sebagai Warisan Budaya, viewed 2 December
2016,
http://biofarmaka.ipb.ac.id/biofarmaka/2013/Lomba%20Blog%2050%20Pengembangan%20J
amu%20Sebagai%20Warisan%20Budaya.pdf
• Unknown, 2011, Main Differences between Swedish & Balinese Massage, viewed 2
December 2016, http://www.balibisa.com/what-are-the-core-differences-between-swedish-
and-balinese-massage/
• Unknown, 2016, Kenali Ritual Spa Tradisional Khas Jawa, viewed 2 December 2016,
http://www.dewimagazine.com/news-beauty/kenali-ritual-spa-tradisional-khas-jawa
• Wikipedia, 2016, Balinese Massage, viewed 2 December 2016,
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Balinese_massage