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COURSE

ORIENTATION
ENG021
English for Academic Studies
1
Professor MA. ROVILLA C. SUDAPRASERT
Introduction
Professors Name: Maam Sud/Mabel
Educational Background: BS Devcom;
MA Education
Subject Areas: Educational
Communication; Educational Technology;
Communication
College: College of Arts and Science
(CAS)
Course Syllabus
Course Code: ENG021
Course Title: English for Academic Studies 1
Pre-requisite: None
Co-requisite: None
Credit Unit(s): 3
Class Schedule: 1.5 HOURS PER MEETING /
4.5 HOURS A WEEK
Course
Description
This course is the first of three components of the
English for Academic Studies (EAS) series. It
emphasizes the heart of the reading processthe
comprehension skills - and aims to give the
students a repertoire of strategies and skills to
enable them to understand various types of
expository texts from the literal to the creative
level. Likewise, the course aims to equip the
students with basic listening skills necessary to
their success as college students and future
professionals.
Course
Objectives
A student completing this course should at
the minimum be able to:
1.express an appreciation for reading and its
benefits to his/her life;
2.apply appropriate reading strategies before
reading, during reading, and while reading;
3.use vocabulary strategies to understand
unfamiliar words and to develop his/her
vocabulary;
Course
Objectives
A student completing this course
should at the minimum be able to:
4.apply basic reading strategies to
comprehend the text;
5.use critical reading strategies to gain
deeper insights into varied types of text;
and
6.exhibit understanding of listening texts.
Course Coverage
Week 1
MCL Mission/Vision
Course Overview
Getting to Know One Another
PART 1: READING TO SUCCEED
Plan for Success
Course Coverage
Week 1
PART 1: READING FOR SUCCESS
Chapter 1: Connecting to the Reading
Process (Part 1)
Getting Motivated to Read
Fast Forward to Your Future
The Benefits of Reading
Course Coverage
Week 1
Chapter 1: Connecting to the Reading
Process (Part 2)
Reading is an Interaction
Before Reading
Surveying a Text
Guessing at a Texts Purpose
Predicting
Thinking About Prior Knowledge
Course Coverage
Week 1
While Reading
Active Reading
Monitoring Own Comprehension
After Reading
Thinking Carefully About Ideas Read
Talking About Ideas
Course Coverage
Week 1
While Reading
Active Reading
Monitoring Own Comprehension
After Reading
Thinking Carefully About Ideas Read
Talking About Ideas
Listening 1
Orienting Yourself to the Text
Course Coverage
Week 2
Chapter 2: Asking Questions (Part 1)
Asking Questions to Establish Your Purpose for
Reading
Turning a Heading or a Title into a Question
Stating a Purpose for Reading
Reading to Answer the Question
Marking the Answer
Course Coverage
Week 2
Chapter 2: Asking Questions (Part
2)
Asking Questions to Improve Your
Thinking
Critical Thinking through Blooms
Taxonomy
Course Coverage
Week 2
Chapter 2: Asking Questions (Part 3)
Reading 2-1 (Excerpt from a non-fiction
book): David Blaines Feats of Will by
Roy F. Baumeister and John Tierney
Listening 2
Listening for Specific Information
Course Coverage
Week 3
Chapter 7: Reading and Taking Notes on
Textbook Chapters (Part 1)
Annotating
Organizing Information with Visual Maps
Chapter 7: Reading and Taking Notes on
Textbook Chapters (Part 2)
Cornell Notes
Learning Aids in Textbook Chapters
Course Coverage
Week 3
Chapter 7: Reading and Taking Notes on
Textbook Chapters (Part 3)
Reading 7-1 (Excerpt from a Psychology
textbook): Exploring the Ingredients of
Happiness by Wayne Weiten
Listening 3
Identifying Details
Course Coverage
Week 4
Chapter 3: Developing Your Vocabulary (Part
1)
EASY Note Cards
Context Clues
Chapter 3: Developing Your Vocabulary (Part
2)
EASY as 1, 2, 3
Word Parts
Course Coverage
Week 4
Chapter 3: Developing Your
Vocabulary (Part 3)
Denotation and Connotation
Reading 3-1: Vocabulary A Treasure
Chest for Success by Len Olan
Course Coverage
Week 5
FIRST LONG EXAMINATION
PART 2: READING TO UNDERSTAND
Chapter 4: Finding the Main Idea (Part 1)
The Topic
The Main Idea
The Topic Sentence
Supporting Details
Course Coverage
Week 5
Chapter 4: Finding the Main Idea (Part 2)
The Thesis Statement
Outlines and Visual Maps
Reading 4 1 (Courtesy of Heifer
International) Bringing to an End to World
Hunger Through Unimaginable Things
Course Coverage
Week 6
Chapter 5: Identifying Implied Main Ideas
(Part 1)
The Implied Main Idea from Lists of Details
The Implied Main Idea of Paragraphs
Chapter 5: Identifying Implied Main Ideas
(Part 2)
The Implied Main Idea of Longer Passages
Course Coverage
Week 6
Chapter 5: Identifying Implied Main Ideas
(Part 3)
Connect Your Skills
Reading 5-1 (Online Article): Portion Control:
Change Your Thinking or Change Your Plate? by
Karen Collins
Listening 4
Identifying Main Ideas
Course Coverage
Week 7
Chapter 6: Recognizing Patterns of
Organization (Part 1)
Description
Narration
Process
Cause and Effect
Course Coverage
Week 7
Chapter 6: Recognizing Patterns of
Organization (Part 3)
Connect Your Skills
Reading 6-2: Thou Shalt Covet What
Thy Neighbor Covets by Martin
Lindstrom
Course Coverage
Week 8
SECOND LONG EXAMINATION
Chapter 8: Distinguishing Fact and Opinion (Part
1)
Fact and Opinion
Words That Can Express Opinions (Adjectives,
Qualifiers, Comparatives & Superlatives)
Sources of Information (Expert Opinion, Informed
Opinion, People on the Street)
Course Coverage
Week 8
Chapter 8: Distinguishing Fact and
Opinion (Part 2)
Connect Your Skills
Reading 8-2 (Online Newspaper Article):
You Are Being Lied to About Pirates by
Johann Hari
Course Coverage
Week 9
Chapter 9: Making Inferences (Part 1)
The Process of Making Inferences
Making Inferences Everyday
Making Inferences from Images
Course Coverage
Week 9
Chapter 9: Making Inferences (Part 2)
Paying Close Attention to Details
Understanding How Prior Knowledge
Affects Inferences
Making Tentative Inferences as You
Read
Course Coverage
Week 9
Chapter 9: Making Inferences (Part 3)
Connect Your Skills
Reading 9-1 (News Magazine Article): How to
Find Happiness on Social Networks by Philip
Moeller
Listening 5
Seeing Beyond the Surface Meaning
Course Coverage
Week 10
Chapter 10: Analyzing Authors Tone (Part
1)
What is Tone?
The Authors Purpose
The Authors Point of View
Positive, Neutral, and Negative Tones
More Specific Tone Words
Course Coverage
Week 10
Chapter 10: Analyzing Authors Tone (Part 2)
Figurative Versus Literal Language
Understanding Irony
Chapter 10: Analyzing Authors Tone (Part 3)
Connect Your Skills
Reading 10-1 (Essay): Why I Want a Wife by Judy
Brady
Course Coverage
Week 11
Chapter 11: Evaluating the Authors
Reasoning (Part 1)
The Authors Reasoning
Some New Terms (Issue, Claim, Evidence)
The Relevance of the Evidence to the Claim
Credibility
Course Coverage
Week 11
Chapter 11: Evaluating the Authors
Reasoning (Part 2)
The Types of Evidence
An Authors Assumptions
Reading 11-1: Fifth Period is Facebook: Why
Schools Should Stop Blocking Social Network
Sites by Nicholas Bramble
THIRD LONG EXAMINATION
Course Coverage
Week 12

FINAL EXAMINATION
Textbook

Dole, I. G. & Taggart, L. (2014).


Connect: College reading (2nd
ed.). Australia: Wadsworth,
Cengage Learning.
Course
Evaluation
CLASS STANDING - 70%
Classroom Activities
- Listening Exercises - 10%
- Reading Exercises - 10%
- Quizzes and Independent Practice - 10%
- Recitation, Group Work, and Assignments - 10%

Long Examinations - 30 %

FINAL EXAMINATION - 30%

TOTAL = 100%
Course
Evaluation
The final grade of the student is interpreted as
shown on the table below.

Abov
91.51 87.01 82.51 78.01 73.51 69.01 64.51 60.00 Below
AVERAGE (%) e
96.00 91.50 87.00 82.50 78.00 73.50 69.00 64.50 60.00
96.00

FINAL GRADE
1.00 1.25 1.50 1.75 2.00 2.25 2.50 2.75 3.00 5.00
OTHER GROUNDS TO FAIL THE COURSE:
Intellectual dishonesty (cheating, plagiarism) during
exams and other requirements.
Absence of 20% from total number of school days
regardless of class standing (MAXIMUM OF 6
UNEXCUSED ABSENCES FOR A 4.5 HR/ WEEK
COURSE) - Section 1551 CHEDs manual of
Regulations for Private Educational Institutions
15 minutes allowance for tardiness
30 minutes considered absent
3 lates = 1 absence
OTHER GROUNDS TO FAIL THE COURSE:
Late enrollees are considered absent.

Only those with excused absence are allowed


to take a missed long test or submit a
requirement.

Other grounds as stipulated in the MCL


Student Catalogue, and other relevant
policies and regulations that may be
promulgated from time to time.
Other Course
Policies
HOMEWORK, WRITTEN REPORTS AND REACTION
PAPERS
All homework and other assigned coursework must be
submitted on time.

COURSE PORTFOLIO
All exercises and requirements for the course are to be
compiled by the students as part of their portfolio. The same
must be made available for inspection by the Instructor before
the end of the term.
Other Course
Policies
HONOR, DRESS, AND GROOMING CODE

Other provisions stipulated in the MCL Student Catalogue will


be enforced in and out of the classroom. Students who have
violated the dress code policy and other related offenses will
not be permitted to attend classes without being cleared by the
Student Affairs Office or the Guidance Office.
Classroom Rules

Always come ON TIME.


Maintain the seating arrangement.
DO NOT DISARRANGE the
chairs unless instructions are
given.
RESPECT the one speaking.
LISTEN. You will have your
chance to speak.
Classroom Rules

Keep our room CLEAN.


Put your cellphone in SILENT
MODE.
Do NOT use any GADGET (e.g.
phone, tablet, laptop, netbook)
while inside the classroom unless
needed for activity/exercise.
Course Materials
Course Syllabus
Textbook: Connect: College Reading, 2nd
edition by Ivan Dole & Leslie Taggart
Listening Modules from Insight Into IELTS by
Vanessa Jakeman & Clare McDowell (to be
photocopied at the photocopying station)
The more you read, the more things you
will know. The more that you learn, the more
places you'll go.

- Dr. Seuss, "I Can Read With My


Eyes Shut!"
One of the most sincere forms of respect is
actually listening to what another has to say.
--Bryant H. McGill
THANK YOU