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A good relation does not

depend how good


understanding we have
But it depends on how
better we avoid
misunderstanding

Kinesiology

Amjad Ali
BSPT,MSPT*

Kinesiology
Kinetic
movement
Ology
discussion
Study of the movement and their
roles in promoting health and
reducing disease

Kinesiology
Kinesiology brings together the fields
of anatomy, physiology, physics, and
geometry, and relates them to human
movement.
Thus, kinesiology utilizes principles
of mechanics, musculoskeletal
anatomy, and neuromuscular
physiology.

Kinesiology

Kinesiology research encompasses


the biochemistry of muscle
contraction and tissue fluids, bone
mineralization, responses to
exercise, how physical skills are
developed, work efficiency.

Kinesiology

What does a Kinesiologist do?


All Specialized Kinesiologist and
Applied Kinesiologist use Manual
Muscle Testing as a tool in their
work, which tests the function of
the muscles, which in turn reflect
the body's overall state of
structural balance.

Kinesiology
Benefits of Kinesiology
Kinesiology does not treat named
diseases, nor does it diagnose them.
It is however used for the relief of
pain, stress and confusion, fatigue
and tiredness, back pain, sports
injuries, personal development and
general wellbeing

Biomechanics
BIOMECHANICS: BIO = LIVING
MECHANICS = FORCES & EFFECTS
The application of mechanics to the
living organism
Mechanical principles that relate
directly to the
human body are used in the study of
biomechanics.
Involves the principles of anatomy and
physics in the descriptions and

Biomechanics is the science that


examines forces acting upon and
within a biological structure and
effects produced by such forces.
Hay (1973)

Biomechanics is the science which


studies structures and functions of
biological systems using the
knowledge and methods of
mechanics.
Hatze (1971)

KINETICS

It examines the causes of motion,


the internal and external forces
that cause motion or cause a body
to remain at rest, and the
interactions between these forces.
There are two branches of kinetics;
STATICS and DYNAMICS

Statics:
Involves all forces acting on the body
being in balance, resulting in the body
being in equilibrium.

Dynamics

involves the study of systems in


motion while unbalanced due to
unequal forces acting on the body.

KINEMATICS
It describes the motion of a body without
reference to the forces causing it.
Kinematics
examines how, when, and where a body
moves.

Electrotherapy

Application of electrical current for


therapeutic purposes

Kinematic chain
A combination

of several joints uniting


successive segments constitutes a kinematic
chain
Distal segments can have higher degrees of
freedom than do proximal ones

Open Kinematic Chain,


In

an open kinematic chain, the distal


segment of the chain moves in space

Closed Kinematic Chain,

whereas in a closed kinematic chain, the


distal segment is fixed, and proximal parts
move

Anatomical Position

The anatomical position is a


standardized method of observing
or imaging the body that allows
precise and consistent anatomical
references.

Anatomical Position
Standing erect,
with palms and feet facing forward,
Is the standard reference
point in which all positions,
movements, and planes are described

Positions and
Directions

Terms of position and direction


describe the position of one body part
relative to another, usually along one
of the three major body planes

Positions and Directions


Superior

Refers to a structure being closer


to the head or higher than another
structure in the body.
Inferior

Refers to a structure being closer


to the feet or lower than another
structure in the body

Positions and
Directions
Anterior

Refers to a structure being more


in front than another structure
in the body
Posterior

Refers to a structure being more


in back than another structure
in the body

Positions and Directions


Medial
Refers to a structure being
closer to the midline or median
plane of the body than another
structure of the body
Lateral
Refers to a structure being farther
away from the midline than another
structure of the body

Positions and Directions


Distal
Refers to a structure being
further away from the root
of the limb than another s
structure in the limb
Proximal
Refers to a structure being
closer to the root of the limb
than another structure in
that limb.

Positions and
Directions
Superficial
Refers to a structure being closer to
the surface of the body than another
structure

Deep
Refers to a structure being closer to
the core of the body than another
structure

Ventral
Towards the front or belly

Dorsal
Towards the back

Rotation
Turning on a single
axis
Circumduction
Tri-planar, circular
motion at the hip or
shoulder
Internal rotation
Rotation of the hip or
shoulder toward the
midline
External rotation
Rotation of the hip or
shoulder away from

Movement
s

Lateral Flexion
Side-bending left
or right

Movements

of the Foot

Inversion
Turning the sole of the
foot inward
Eversion
Turning the sole of the
foot outward
Dorsiflexion
Ankle movement
bringing the foot
towards the shin
Plantarflexion
Ankle movement

Movements

of the Wrist &

Thumb

Radial Deviation
Movement of the wrist
towards the radius or
lateral side.
Ulnar Deviation
Movement of the wrist
towards the ulna or
medial side.
Opposition
Movement of the thumb
across the palm of the

Thank You