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OHSAS 18001 - Occupational

health and safety management


system

Evolution of OHS Standards


Present &
Future

Proactive

Reactive

Yesterday

Prescriptive
& Regulatory

Goal-setting
& Self-regulatory

The Business Case for H&S at Work

Benefits which can be gained over one or more years

Greatly reduced absenteeism


Improved productivity
Savings through better plant maintenance
Reduced compensation claims and accident insurance
Corporate image enhanced
Improved client / supplier relationships
Higher worker morale, motivation and concentration at work
Improved worker retention

Source: Source ILO GB Paper 295/ESP/3, March 2006

Factors affecting OH&S Management System


Escalating risk
Insurance

Technology

Risk Tolerance

Globalization

Societal values

Legislation
Government
NGOs

Neighbor

SAFETY MANAGEMENT

Competition- business

Competition - costs
Corporate culture

Consumer
Customer requirements

Employee
Union

Shareholder

Corporate vision and policy

Stakeholder = Interested Party

employees
customers
investors

NGOs
general public

regulatory
authorities

local community

Organization Roles in OHSMS

Aware of the process of risk creation and their role in


managing it.

Establish a systematic structure to manage hazards from


planning, design, operation and emergency response level

Participation and understanding from all levels of


organization

Line managers have to champion efforts in safety and health


management because it is in their operations where most the
hazards lies

It is not effective for one part of an organization to keep


creating more risks while another part of the organization is
solely responsible and tasked to manage those risks

OHSAS 18001 Under


Review

OHSAS Standards and Certificates surveys conducted in


2003, 2004, 2005 have shown:
significant growth in the worldwide publication of OH&S
standards/documents (44)
Rapid growth in certification against these standards (15185)
Significant growth in the number of countries where these
standards are used and certification is performed (82)

OHSAS was under review by the OHSAS Project Group since


February 2006. Initial Working Draft 1 of OHSAS 18001
prepared by the OHSAS Project Group Secretariat, and
circulated for review, February 2006

Source: OHSAS Project Group

OHSAS 18001 Under Review

Madrid meeting, Oct 2006, to review the received comments

1000+ comments received

To review every comment, and to prepare a response to each comment

A revised draft of 18001

A decision on whether to proceed to publication, or to go for a second round of


consultation

2nd Working draft issued on 28 November 2006.

549 comments received


from 46 groups of commentators
based in 24 different countries
covering all major continents

All comments reviewed during the OHSAS Project Group meeting 26 - 29


March 2007, in Shanghai.

Consensus reached on draft for publication

OHSAS 18001 under review

OHSAS 18001:2007 has been published in


July 2007

The Group will now focus its attention on OHSAS


18002 to be published by mid 2008 and later
competence requirements for auditors.

Transition

The OHSAS Project Group has also recommended a


transition period of 24 months:
by 1 July 2009 no OHSAS 18001:1999 certificates shall be
recognized by the leading certification and accreditation bodies.

This is a longer transition period than ISO 14001, for


instance, due to the various changes and translation issues.

Transition Plan
Any existing accredited certificates issued
to OHSAS 18001:1999 will no longer be
valid. Outstanding nonconformities to the
new standard will become active and will
affect certification/registration.

End of Transition
01/01/2008

01/07/2007

Implementation Time

Preparation Time
Both standards can be used for new and existing clients.
When the Certification/Registration Bodies (CRBs) agree
with the existing and new client organizations on whether
OHSAS 18001:1999 or OHSAS 18001:2007 is to be used
as the audit criteria, the standard being used shall be
identified in the audit plan for initial audit, surveillance or
reassessment.

01/07/2009

All audit plans prepared for existing and new client


organizations should include OHSAS 18001:2007
as the audit criteria.
For existing clients, NCs against new standard
become active on 01/07/2009.

Main changes

The new version is better aligned to ISO 9001:2000 and ISO


14001:2004, keeping its same clauses order and most of
the changes of ISO 14001:2004.
This will encourage Management System integration and
possibly increase the interest to OHSAS.
OHSAS 18001:2007 is also more focused on results, than on
paper exercise.
The importance of "health" has now been given greater
emphasis balanced with "safety".
Focus on occupational safety, not getting distracted with
assets, security etc

OHSAS 18001

4.2.
OH&S POLICY
4.3.PLANNING

PLAN

4.3.1. PLANNING FOR HAZARDS IDENTIFICATION,


RISK ASSESSMENT AND DETERMINECONTROL (HIRADC)
(RISK MANAGEMENT)

4.3.2.Legal &
Other
Requirement

4.3.3.OBJECTIVES AND PROGRAMMES

DO

4.4.1.
Resource,
roles, responsibility,
accountability
and authority

4.4. IMPLEMENTATION AND OPERATION


4.4.3.
4.4.2. Competence
Communication,
Training
Participationn
Awareness
Consultation

4.4.4.
Documen
tation

4.4.5
Control of
Document

4.4.6.
Operational
control

4.4.7.
Emergency
Response and
preparedness

4.5. CHECKING AND CORRECTIVE ACTION

CHECK
ACTION

4.5.1.Performance
Measurement and
Monitoring

4.5.2. Evaluation of
compliance

4.5.3.Incident investigation,
noncornformity,
corrective action
and preventive action

4.5.4
Control of
record

4.5.5
Internal Audit

4.6.MANAGEMENT
REVIEW
13

Definitions
OHSAS 18001:2007

OHSAS 18001:1999

3.1 Acceptable risk:


risk that has been reduced to a level
that can be tolerated by the
organization having regard to its
legal obligations and its own OH&S
policy (3.16)

3.17 Tolerable risk:


risk that has been reduced to a
level that can be endured by the
organization having regard to its
legal obligations and its own
OH&S policy

Definitions
OHSAS 18001:2007
3.6 Hazard:
source, situation, or act with a
potential for harm in terms of
human injury or ill health (3.8), or
a combination of these

OHSAS 18001:1999
3.4 Hazard:
source or situation with a
potential for harm in terms of
human injury or ill health,
damage to property, damage to
the workplace environment, or
a combination of these

Definitions
OHSAS 18001:2007
3.7 Hazard identification:
process of recognizing that a
hazard (3.6) exists and defining its
characteristics

OHSAS 18001:1999
3.5 Hazard identification:
process of recognizing that a
hazard (see 3.4) exists and
defining its characteristics

Definitions
OHSAS 18001:2007
3.8 Ill health:
identifiable, adverse physical or mental
condition arising from and /or made
worse by a work activity and/or workrelated situation.

OHSAS 18001:1999
New definition

Definitions
OHSAS 18001:2007

OHSAS 18001:1999

3.9 Incident:
work-related event(s) in which an injury or ill
health (3.8) (regardless of severity) or fatality
occurred, or could have occurred

3.6 Incident:
event that gave rise to an accident or
had the potential to lead to an accident.

NOTE 1 An accident is an incident which


has given rise to injury, ill health or
fatality.
NOTE 2 An incident where no injury, ill
health, or fatality occurs may also be
referred to as a near-miss, "near-hit",
"close call" or "dangerous occurrence".
NOTE 3 An emergency situation (see
4.4.7) is a particular type of incident

NOTE 1 An incident where no ill


health, injury, damage, or other loss
occurs is also referred to as a nearmiss. The term incident includes
near-misses.

Definitions
OHSAS 18001:2007
3.23 Workplace:
Any physical location in which work
related activities are performed under
the control of the organization
NOTE When giving consideration to
what constitutes a workplace, the
organization (3.17) should take into
account the OH&S effects on
personnel who are, for example,
travelling or in transit (e.g. driving,
flying, on boats or trains), working
at the premises of a client or
customer, or working at home

OHSAS 18001:1999
Not defined

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