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Tablet

RE-DEFINING LITERACY
Reading and writing were the
original definitions of literacy.
However, due to the
advance in technology
over the years, literacy
is now more along the
lines of applying what is
learned from reading,
writing, and technology
as well.

TECHNOLOGICAL LITERACY IS
The ability of an individual, working
independently and with others, to
responsibly, appropriately and
effectively use technology tools to
access, manage, integrate, evaluate,
create and communicate information.

INFORMATION LITERACY IS
The ability to effectively
evaluate and organize
information from
several different
sources.

TERMS

Information Literacy - The


ability to create, understand,
and retrieve information
quickly.

INFORMATION PROBLEM #1: OVERLOAD

More new
information has been
produced in the last
30 years than in the
previous 5,000.

Reuters Magazine (1997, March/April)

INFORMATION PROBLEM #1: OVERLOAD

The amount of new


information stored on
paper, film, magnetic,
and optical media
doubled in three
years..
How Much Information, 2003, http://www2.sims.berkeley.edu/research/projects/how-much-info2003/execsum.htm#summary

QUALITY

In a study of 500 sites


used by Colorado high
school students to do
research, only 27% of the
sites were judged to be
reliable for academic
research!

Ebersol, Samuel, Uses and Gratifications of the Web among Students,


Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, 6(1): September 2000,
www.ascusc.org/jcmc/vol6/issue1/ebersole.html
Colhoun, Alexander. "But - - I Found It on the Internet!" Christian
Science Monitor. 25 April 2000: 16.

ACRL: Information Literacy Standards

1. The information literate student


determines the nature and extent of
the information needed.
2. The information literate student
accesses needed information
effectively and efficiently.
http://www.ala.org/acrl/ilintro.html

ACRL: Information Literacy Standards


3. The information literate student evaluates
information and its sources critically and
incorporates selected information into his
or her knowledge base and value system.
4. The information literate student, individually
or as a member of a group, uses
information effectively to accomplish a
specific purpose.
http://www.ala.org/acrl/ilintro.html

ACRL: Information Literacy Standards

5. The information literate student


understands many of the economic,
legal, and social issues surrounding
the use of information and accesses
and uses information ethically and
legally.

http://www.ala.org/acrl/ilintro.html

TERMS

Computer Literacy - This refers


to the skills required to
perform a variety of tasks
related to computer language
and use.

TERMS CONTINUED

Media Literacy the ability to


access, evaluate, and produce
media products.

THE NEED FOR MEDIA LITERACY


"Our young people need to
be educated to the highest
standard in this new
information age, and
surely this includes a clear
awareness of how the
media
shapes,
. .Media literacy
caninfluences,
give people the
power to
and defines
their
lives
recognize the difference
between
entertainment,
television that is just bad and the information they
need to make good decisions.

MEDIA LITERACY: CRITICAL SKILLS


& KNOWLEDGE FOR THE 21ST
CENTURY
Media literacy empowers people to be
both critical thinkers and creative
producers of an increasingly wide range
of messages using image, language, and
sound. It is the skillful application of
literacy skills to media and technology
messages. As communication
technologies transform society,
they impact our understanding of
ourselves, our communities, and our
diverse cultures, making media literacy
an essential life skill for the 21st

TERMS CONTINUED

Visual Literacy - The ability to


create, interpret, process,
and utilize information
presented visually.

WHY TEACHVISUAL LITERACY?


Images can be very powerful in our national and
individual consciousness;
Visual literacy involves problem-solving and
critical thinking skills that can be applied to all
areas of learning.
Understanding the implications of images makes
a viewer more resistant to manipulative uses of
images in advertisement and other contexts
(Messaris, 1995)

VISUAL LITERACY QUOTES:

"Without an understanding of media


grammars, we cannot hope to achieve a
contemporary awareness of the world in
which we live."
Marshall McLuhan