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WASTE DISPOSAL PLAN

PART - I

PART-I

The Three R's: Reduce,


Reuse and Recycle

REDUCE

The best way to manage


waste is to not produce it

REDUCE

Buy products in bulk


Avoid over-packaged goods
Avoid disposable goods

REDUCE

Buy durable goods


At work, make two-sided
copies whenever possible

REUSE

It
makes
economic
and
environmental sense to reuse
products. Sometimes it takes
creativity

REUSE

Reuse products for the same


purpose. Save paper and
plastic bags, and repair
broken appliances, furniture
and toys

REUSE

Reuse products in different


ways. Use a coffee can to
pack a lunch; use plastic
microwave dinner trays as
picnic dishes.

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REUSE

Sell old clothes, appliances,


toys, and furniture in garage
sales or ads, or donate them
to charities

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REUSE

Uses reseal able containers


rather than plastic wrap

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REUSE

Use a ceramic coffee mug


instead of paper cups

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REUSE

Reuse grocery bags or bring


your own cloth bags to the
store. Do not take a bag from
the store unless you need
one

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RECYCLE

Recycling is a series of steps


that takes a used material
and
processes,
remanufactures, and sells it
as a new product. Begin
recycling at home and at work

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RECYCLE

Buy products made


recycled material

from

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RECYCLE

Check collection centers and


curbside pickup services to
see what they accept, and
begin
collecting
those
materials

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RECYCLE

Consider purchasing recycled


materials at work

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RECYCLE

Speak to store managers and


ask
for
products
and
packaging that help cut down
on waste

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RECYCLE

Buy products made from


material that is collected for
recycling in your community

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RECYCLE

Use recycled paper


for letterhead, copier
paper
and
newsletters

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THE THREE R'S: REDUCE,


REUSE AND RECYCLE

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CONVENTIONAL WASTE
MANAGEMENT

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CONVENTIONAL WASTE
MANAGEMENT

Waste is traditionally thought


of having no value

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CONVENTIONAL WASTE
MANAGEMENT

Source
reduction
(inc
resource efficiency / minimize
raw material input)

25

CONVENTIONAL WASTE
MANAGEMENT

Waste
prevention
/
minimization of environmental
risks through eco-friendly
designs and products

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CONVENTIONAL WASTE
MANAGEMENT

Structured or reorganized
production processes so that
the waste of one industry is a
valued input to another
(industrial symbiosis)

27

CONSEQUENCES OF
CONVENTIONAL WASTE
MANAGEMENT

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CONSEQUENCES OF CONVENTIONAL
WASTE MANAGEMENT

Over reliance on conventional


type waste management such
as landfills and incineration is
not sustainable (landfills are
maj source of methane
(CH4), a powerful GHG, and
land costs are getting very hi)

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CONSEQUENCES OF CONVENTIONAL
WASTE MANAGEMENT

Limited efforts on reducing


wastes at source

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CONSEQUENCES OF CONVENTIONAL
WASTE MANAGEMENT

Lack of segregation, poor


collection, illegal dumping,
open dumping and burning of
the waste collected from
entire consumer places and
colln pts

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CONSEQUENCES OF CONVENTIONAL
WASTE MANAGEMENT

Limited involvement of private


sector and communities

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CONSEQUENCES OF CONVENTIONAL
WASTE MANAGEMENT

Lack of integrated approach,


and conventionally waste
being thought of having no
value

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CONSEQUENCES OF CONVENTIONAL
WASTE MANAGEMENT

Slums are deprived


municipal services

of

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CONSEQUENCES OF CONVENTIONAL
WASTE MANAGEMENT
HEALTH RISKS

The biggest hazard for


informal sector workers, local
communities
living
near
dumpsites and especially
waste pickers, who most
often operate without any
protective measures, are as
fol

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CONSEQUENCES OF CONVENTIONAL
WASTE MANAGEMENT
HEALTH RISKS

Hospital waste (HIV)


Jagged metal (tetanus)
Smoke (PCBs)
Lead (neutral damage)
Violence (knife cuts)

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CONSEQUENCES OF
CONVENTIONAL WASTE MGMT

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INTERNATIONAL TRENDS OF
WASTE MANAGEMENT

The desire to reduce the


nuisance,
health
and
environmental consequences
of waste gives rise to laws
and regulations that restrict
the conduct of households as
well as businesses in the
waste management sector

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INTERNATIONAL TRENDS OF
WASTE MANAGEMENT

As
per
international
standards
an
individual
generates 2 kg waste per day

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INTERNATIONAL TRENDS OF
WASTE MANAGEMENT
These rules may have
anticompetitive effects, and a
recurring theme in the
country submissions is the
need
for
competition
advocacy to ensure that this
legislation is designed so as
to
allow
for
effective
competition, which can help
to
achieve
these
environmental objectives at a
lower cost

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TURKISH MODEL OF
WASTE MANAGEMENT

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TURKISH MODEL OF WASTE


MANAGEMENT

Today, in Turkey, still about


the half of the total population
of 73.7 Million is not served
with
waste
disposal
/
recovery and waste water
treatment services

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TURKISH MODEL OF WASTE


MANAGEMENT

Turkeys objective of an EU
integration and thus shaping
all of its waste management
regulations
and
policies
towards harmonization with
EUs standards

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TURKISH MODEL OF WASTE


MANAGEMENT

Turkeys economic growth


forecasts,
the
raising
awareness in the industry for
an
integrated
waste
management approach

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TURKISH MODEL OF WASTE


MANAGEMENT

The Turkish market can be


fragmented into the main two
sub markets integrated solid
waste
management
(including
waste-to-energy
units) and waste water
treatment

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TURKISH MODEL OF WASTE


MANAGEMENT

Today, there exist only two


incineration
plants,
five
composting plants and only
about 50% of the packaging
waste recycled

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TURKISH MODEL OF WASTE


MANAGEMENT
Prevention
Preparing for re-use
Recycling,
Other recovery
Disposal

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TURKISH MODEL OF WASTE


MANAGEMENT
Bio fuel production from
waste via gasification-Fischer
Tropsch (second generation)
is a virgin subject for Turkey
and, based on the favourable
EU laws and regulations,
representing
a
lucrative
market rich for future

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TURKISH MODEL OF WASTE


MANAGEMENT
CURRENT SITUATION AND FUTURE
OUTLOOK

Primary
and
Secondary
Legislation with regard to
waste
management
and
waste water treatment has
been clearly set and the
underlying regulations have
been mainly adopted from
the
existing
EU
environmental directives

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TURKISH MODEL OF WASTE


MANAGEMENT
CURRENT SITUATION AND FUTURE
OUTLOOK

That is, in order to ensure


effective
implementation,
monitoring and auditing of the
current legislation, there is a
need for strengthening the
institutional structure and
capacity building

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TURKISH MODEL OF WASTE


MANAGEMENT
CURRENT SITUATION AND FUTURE
OUTLOOK

Especially, due
to
the
repeated implementation of
the audit, permission and
sanction
processes
by
different institutions in the
country
a
healthy
environment
management
plan cannot be applied to the
environment

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TURKISH MODEL OF WASTE


MANAGEMENT
CURRENT SITUATION AND FUTURE
OUTLOOK

In Turkey, aspects such as


permission,
monitoring,
auditing, sanctioning and
reporting
are
still
unsatisfactory and have a
non-integrated structure

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TURKISH MODEL OF WASTE


MANAGEMENT
CURRENT SITUATION AND FUTURE
OUTLOOK

Turkeys waste management


industry in future. Turkeys
municipal waste per capita is
around 407 kg / per year and
municipal waste water per
capita 182 liters / day which
have been more or less
constant for the last few
years

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COMPARISON B/W TURKEY AND OTHER


COUNTRIES FOR MUNICIPAL WASTE
GENERATED (KG/CAPITA-YEAR), 2010
Turkey
Bulgaria
Hungary
Slovenia
Greece
Sweden
Belgium
Norway
Finland
European Union (27 countries)
Portugal
England
Italy

Source : EUROSTAT

10
0

20
0

30
0

40
0

50
0

60
0

70
0

80
0

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FUTURE DEVELOPMENT
Based on the expected
population growth scenarios
and thus expected increase
in both the future amount of
municipal
waste
and
municipal waste water, these
expenditures are estimated
to further increase to a yearly
amount of 6.5-12.5 bn TL and
4.0-8.9 bn TL for the period
2013-2023

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FUTURE DEVELOPMENT

According
to
Figure,
Turkey with a per capita
average of 407 kg / year
of generated municipal
waste, is in the lower half
of the list of European
countries and is below
the EU 27 average of 502
kg / year

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KEY SECTOR OF WASTE


MANAGEMENT
The
waste
management
sector in Turkey can be
mainly divided into the key
sectors Municipal Solid Waste
and Industrial Solid Waste.
The waste water treatment
sector can be mainly divided
into the key sectors Municipal
Waste water and Industrial
Waste water

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POLICY AND REGULATION WITHIN THE


WASTE MANAGEMENT INDUSTRY

In Turkey, Primary Legislation


consisting
of
laws
is
constituted in the Turkish
Parliament and executed by
the Turkish Government,
whereas
the
Secondary
Legislation
consisting
of
regulations,
communiqus
and circulars are constituted
and
executed
by
the
corresponding Ministry in
charge

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SWEDISH MODEL OF WASTE


MANAGEMENT
The
Waste
Framework
Directive1
has
been
incorporated into Swedish law
by
the
Swedish
Environmental Code and the
Swedish Waste Ordinance

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SWEDISH MODEL OF WASTE


MANAGEMENT

The Environmental Code has


been applied in Sweden since
1999 and aims to promote a
sustainable
development
which ensures present and
future generations a healthy
and sound environment.

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SWEDISH MODEL OF WASTE


MANAGEMENT

Principally, the Ordinance


contains provisions regarding
the
duties
of
the
municipalities with regard to
waste disposal

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SWEDISH MODEL OF WASTE


MANAGEMENT

Municipalities also have an


obligation to develop a
municipal waste management
plan,
local
waste
management regulations and
a
municipal
waste
management system

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SWEDISH MODEL OF WASTE


MANAGEMENT
THE RESPONSIBILITY OF
MUNICIPALITIES

In Sweden the right of


municipal
selfdetermination is laid
down in the Swedish
Constitution
and
therefore
municipalities
may
themselves
decide
how to organize their
waste management
activities
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SWEDISH MODEL OF WASTE


MANAGEMENT
THE RESPONSIBILITY OF
MUNICIPALITIES

Cooperation between
municipalities is, for
example,
possible
within
a
joint
committee or local
government
federation

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SWEDISH MODEL OF WASTE


MANAGEMENT
THE RESPONSIBILITY OF
MUNICIPALITIES

Approximately
70
percent
of
the
collection
of
household waste is
outsourced by way of
public procurement to
private undertakings
in accordance with
the Swedish Public
Procurement Act

65

SWEDISH MODEL OF WASTE


MANAGEMENT
THE RESPONSIBILITY OF
MUNICIPALITIES

Municipalities
are
contracting
authorities and are
therefore obliged to
apply
the
public
procurement
rules
when they purchase
goods and services
and when they allow
an external party to
perform a part of
their
operational
responsibility
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SWEDISH MODEL OF WASTE


MANAGEMENT
THE RESPONSIBILITY OF
MUNICIPALITIES

Many municipalities
provide
curbside
collection
of
packaging
and
newspapers
to
apartment buildings
as an extra service
and at on extra cost

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SWEDISH MODEL OF WASTE


MANAGEMENT
THE RESPONSIBILITY OF
MUNICIPALITIES

About
30
municipalities
also
provide
the
same
service
to
singlefamily houses

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