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WHY USE THE DSM 5?

Guidebook for clinicians


standard reference for
clinical
practice in the mental health
field.
a tool for collecting and
communicating accurate
public
health statistics on mental
disorder morbidity
and mortality rates

WHY USE THE DSM 5?


serve as a textbook for students
early in their profession who need

a structured way to understand


and diagnose mental disorders as well
as
for seasoned professionals encountering
rare disorders for the first time.

3 major sections of the


DSM-5

DSM IV-TR
Multi Axial Classification
System

DSM-5
Section II Disorders

The Big Changes in Specific


Disorders

The Big Changes in Specific


Disorders

The Big Changes in Specific


Disorders
Obsessive-Compulsive and Related
Disorders
Hoarding disorder
Trichotillomania (urge to pull ones
hair)
Excoriation (skin picking)
Body dysmorphic disorder (body is
seen as unusually defective)

Dissociative Disorders

The Big Changes in Specific


Disorders
Substance-Related and Addictive
Disorders
Gambling Disorder

Major and Mild Neurocognitive


Disorder
Paraphilic Disorders

DSM IV

DSM 5

Disorders Usually First


Diagnosed in Infancy,
Childhood, or Adolescence

NEURODEVELOPME
NTAL DISORDERS

Mental Retardation
Learning Disorders
(Academic Skills Disorders)
Motor Skills Disorder
Communication Disorders
Pervasive Developmental
Disorders
Attention-Deficit and
Disruptive Behavior
Disorders
Feeding and Eating
Disorders of Infancy or
Early Childhood
Tic Disorders
Elimination Disorders
Other Disorders

Intellectual
Disabilities
Communication
Disorders
Autism Spectrum
Disorder
AttentionDeficit/Hyperactivity
Disorder
Specific Learning
Disorder
Motor Disorders

Neurodevelopmental
Disorders
a group of conditions with onset in the
developmental period. The disorders typically
manifest:
early in development, often before the child
enters grade school
are characterized by developmental deficits
that produce impairments of personal, social,
academic, or occupational functioning.

Autism Spectrum Disorder

ASD is characterized by:


1) Deficits in social
communication
and social
interaction

2) Restricted
repetitive
behaviors,
interests, and
activities

ASD (from DSM-IV to DSM-V)


ASD now encompasses the previous
DSM-IV TR autistic disorder (autism),
Aspergers disorder, childhood
disintegrative disorder (CDD or
Hellers syndrome), and pervasive
developmental disorder not
otherwise specified (PDD NOS).

DSM IV

Pervasive
Developmental
Disorders
Autistic Disorders
Retts Disorders
Childhood
Disintegrative Disorder
Aspergers Disorder

DSM V

Autism Spectrum
Disorder (ASD)

Attention
Deficit
Hyperactiv
ity
Disorder
(ADHD)

Attention Deficit/hyperactivity
disorder (ADHD)

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder


(ADHD)
Inattention (6 or more)

Hyperactivity-Impulsivity
(6 or more)

Fails to give close attention to


details

Often fidgets

Difficulty sustaining attention

Often leaves seat in situation


when remaining seated is
expected

Does not seem to listen

Often runs or climbs in


inappropriate situations

Does not follow through on


instructions

Difficulty in playing or engaging


in leisure activities quietly

Difficulty organizing tasks

Often on the go as if driven


by a motor

Avoids tasks requiring sustained


mental effort

Talks excessively

Often distracted

Blurts out answers before


questions are completed

Forgetful

Difficulty waiting his or her turn

Other symptoms
Wandering off task
Lacking persistence
Being disorganized

Desire for immediate


rewards, social
intrusiveness
Impaired motor and
verbal inhibition
Impulsive on decision
making
Cannot wait or defer
gratification
Greater disregard of
future consequences
Excessive task irrelevant
movements
Poor emotional selfregulation

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity


Disorder (ADHD) under DSM V
Modified as a disorder that can continue
into adulthood.
Symptom criteria have had to appear
before age 12, instead of before age 7
(previously noted in DSM IV TR).
This disorder is placed in the
NEURODEVELOPMENTAL DISORDERS
chapter to reflect brain developmental
correlates with ADHD