Sei sulla pagina 1di 30

Memory

Chapter 7

Cache Memories

Memory Challenges

Ideally one desires a huge amount of very fast memory for little
cost, but:

Fast memory is expensive

Cheap memory is slow

The solution on a fixed budget for memory is a hierarchy

A small amount of very fast memory (Think SRAM)

A medium amount of slower memory (Think DRAM)

A large amount of slower yet memory (Think Disk)

Comparing:
Technology Access Time
SRAM

Cost/GB

0.5 5 ns

DRAM
Disk

50 70 ns
5 20 ms

$4,000 - $10,000
$100 - $200
$0.50 - $2

Recall: We used 200ps or 0.2 ns in our pipeline study. Why the difference?

The Memory Wall

Clocks per DRAM access

Logic vs DRAM speed gap continues to grow

Clocks per instruction

Philosophically

How does one UTILIZE the very fast memory effectively?

Think The Principal of Locality

Temporal Locality (Close in Time)


- Memory that has been accessed recently is most likely to be accessed
sooner

Spatial Locality (Close in location)


- Memory that is close to memory that has been accessed recently is
most likely to be accessed sooner

Organize memory in blocks

Keep blocks likely to be used soon in the very fast memory

Keep the next most likely blocks in medium fast memory

Keep those not likely to be used soon in slower memory

Hierarchical Memory Organization

Cache memory

What is cache?

How is it organized?

Likely in place of the last used block

How do we rate the performance of the cache?

An access fails to find the word in the cache

Where does it get placed in the cache?

When a block in main memory is more likely to be needed, that block


replaces a block in the cache.

How do we know it is needed?

Organized in a number of uniform sized blocks of memory that have


a high likelihood of being used.

How is kept current?

A small amount of very high speed memory between the main


memory and the CPU

Based upon Hit rates and Miss rates

Should there be Instruction Caches and Data Caches?

Hierarchical Memory Organization


Registers are the fastest

Cache is the fastest Memory - SRAM

DRAM makes good main memory

Disk is best for the rest (majority)

The Memory Hierarchy

Take advantage of the principle of locality to present


the user with as much memory as is available in the
cheapest technology at the speed offered by the
fastest technology
Inclusive
Processor

4-8 bytes (words)

Increasing
distance
from the
processor
in access
time

L1$
8-32 bytes (block)

L2$
1 to 4 blocks

Main Memory

what is in
L1$ is a
subset of
what is in
L2$ is a
subset of
what is in
MM that is a
subset of is
in SM

1,024+ bytes (disk sector = page)

Secondary Memory

(Relative) size of the memory at each level

The Memory Hierarchy: Pictorially

Temporal Locality (Locality in Time):

Keep most recently accessed data items closer to the processor

Spatial Locality (Locality in Space):


Move blocks consisting of contiguous words to the upper levels

To Processor Upper Level


Memory

Lower Level
Memory

Blk X

From Processor

Blk Y

The Memory Hierarchy: Terminology

Hit: data is in some block in the upper level (Blk X)

Hit Rate: the fraction of memory accesses found in the upper level

Hit Time: Time to access the upper level which consists of


RAM access time + Time to determine hit/miss

To Processor Upper Level


Memory

Lower Level
Memory

Blk X

From Processor

Blk Y

Miss: data is not in the upper level so needs to be retrieve from a


block in the lower level (Blk Y)

Miss Rate = 1 - (Hit Rate)

Miss Penalty: Time to replace a block in the upper level


+ Time to deliver the block the processor

Hit Time << Miss Penalty

How is the Hierarchy Managed?

registers memory

cache main memory

by compiler (or programmer?)

by the cache controller hardware

main memory disks

by the operating system (virtual memory)

virtual to physical address mapping assisted by the hardware (TLB)

by the programmer (files)

Cache

Two questions to answer (in hardware):

Q1: How do we know if a data item is in the cache?

Q2: If it is, how do we find it?

Direct Mapped Caching

For each item of data at the lower level, there is exactly one
location in the cache where it might be - so lots of items at
the lower level must share locations in the upper level

Address mapping:
(block address) modulo (# of blocks in the cache)

First consider block sizes of one word

Caching: A Simple First Example


Cache
Index Valid Tag

Data

00
01
10
11

Q1: Is it there?
Compare the cache
tag to the high order 2
memory address bits
to tell if the memory
block is in the cache

Main Memory
0000xx
0001xx Two low order bits
0010xx define the byte in the
word (32b words)
0011xx
0100xx
0101xx
0110xx
0111xx
1000xx Q2: How do we find it?
1001xx
1010xx Use next 2 low order
1011xx memory address bits
1100xx the index to
1101xx determine which
1110xx cache block (i.e.,
1111xx modulo the number of

blocks in the cache)

(block address) modulo (# of blocks in the cache)

Direct Mapped Cache

Consider the main memory word reference string

Start with an empty cache - all


blocks initially marked as not valid

0 miss
00

01

00
00
00
00

Mem(0)

4 miss
4
Mem(0)
Mem(1)
Mem(2)
Mem(3)

0 1 2 3 4 3 4 15

1 miss
00

Mem(0)

00

Mem(1)

2 miss
00
00
00

3 hit
01
00
00
00

8 requests, 6 misses

Mem(4)
Mem(1)
Mem(2)
Mem(3)

Mem(0)
Mem(1)
Mem(2)
4

01
00
00
00

3 miss
00
00
00
00

hit

Mem(4)
Mem(1)
Mem(2)
Mem(3)

Mem(0)
Mem(1)
Mem(2)
Mem(3)
15 miss

01
00
00
11 00

Mem(4)
Mem(1)
Mem(2)
Mem(3)

15

MIPS Direct Mapped Cache Example

One word/block, cache size = 1K words


31 30

Hit

Tag

...

13 12 11

20

...

2 1 0

Byte
offset
Data

10

Index
Index Valid

Tag

Data

0
1
2
.
.
.
1021
1022
1023

20

32

What kind of locality are we taking advantage of?

Handling Cache Hits

Read hits (I$ and D$)

this is what we want no challenges

Write hits (D$ only)

What is the problem here?

Strategies
allow cache and memory to be inconsistent
- write the data only into the cache block (write-back the cache
contents to the next level in the memory hierarchy when that cache
block is evicted)
- need a dirty bit for each data cache block to tell if it needs to be
written back to memory when it is evicted

require the cache and memory to be consistent


- always write the data into both the cache block and the next level in
the memory hierarchy (write-through) so dont need a dirty bit
- writes run at the speed of the next level in the memory hierarchy
so slow! or can use a write buffer, so only have to stall if the write
buffer is full

Read / Write Strategies


Read Through: Word read from memory
No Read Through: Word word from cache after block is read from memory
Write Through: Word written to both Cache and Memory
Write Back: Word written only to Cache
Write Allocate: Block is loaded on a write miss, followed by a write hit
Write No Allocate: Block is modified on a write miss but not loaded

Write Hit Policy


Write Through

Write Miss Policy


Write Allocate

Write Through *

Write No Allocate *

Write Back *

Write Allocate *

Write Back

No Write Allocate

Write Buffer for Write-Through Caching


Cache

Processor

DRAM

write buffer

Write buffer between the cache and main memory

Processor: writes data into the cache and the write buffer

Memory controller: writes contents of the write buffer to memory

The write buffer is just a FIFO

Typical number of entries: 4

Works fine if store frequency (w.r.t. time) << 1 / DRAM write cycle

Memory system designers nightmare

When the store frequency (w.r.t. time) 1 / DRAM write cycle


leading to write buffer saturation
- One solution is to use a write-back cache; another is to use an L2 cache

Another Reference String Mapping

Consider the main memory word reference string

Start with an empty cache - all


blocks initially marked as not valid

0 miss
00

00
01

Mem(0)

0 miss
Mem(4)

01
00

01
00

0 4 0 4 0 4 0 4

4 miss
Mem(0)

4 miss
Mem(0)

00
01

00
01

0 miss
0

01
00

0 miss
0
Mem(4)

01
00

Mem(4)

4 miss
Mem(0)4

4 miss
Mem(0)

8 requests, 8 misses

Ping pong effect due to conflict misses - two memory locations


that map into the same cache block

Sources of Cache Misses

Compulsory (cold start or process migration, first reference):

First access to a block, cold fact of life, not a whole lot you can do
about it

If you are going to run millions of instruction, compulsory misses


are insignificant

Conflict (collision):

Multiple memory locations mapped to the same cache location

Solution 1: increase cache size or block length

Solution 2: increase associativity

Capacity:

Cache cannot contain all blocks accessed by the program

Solution: increase cache size

What about the relationship between cache size and block length?

Handling Cache Misses

Read misses (I$ and D$)

stall the entire pipeline, fetch the block from the next level in the
memory hierarchy, install it in the cache and send the requested word
to the processor, then let the pipeline resume

Write misses (D$ only)


1.

stall the pipeline, fetch the block from next level in the memory
hierarchy, install it in the cache (which may involve having to evict a
dirty block if using a write-back cache), write the word from the
processor to the cache, then let the pipeline resume or (normally used
in write-back caches)

2.

Write allocate just write the word into the cache updating both the
tag and data, no need to check for cache hit, no need to stall or
(normally used in write-through caches with a write buffer)

3.

No-write allocate skip the cache write and just write the word to
the write buffer (and eventually to the next memory level), no need
to stall if the write buffer isnt full; must invalidate the cache block
since it will be inconsistent (now holding stale data)

Multiword Block Direct Mapped Cache

Four words/block, cache size = 1K words


31 30 . . .

Hit
Tag

13 12 11

20

...

4 32 10

Byte
offset

Data
Block offset

Index
Data

Index Valid Tag


0
1
2
.
.
.
253
254
255

20

32

What kind of locality are we taking advantage of?

Taking Advantage of Spatial Locality

Let cache block hold more than one word

0 1 2 3 4 3 4 15

Start with an empty cache - all


blocks initially marked as not valid

0 miss
00

Mem(1)

1 hit

Mem(0)

00

Mem(0)
Mem(2)

01
00
00

3 hit
00
00

Mem(1)
Mem(3)

Mem(1)

Mem(0)

4 miss
5
4
Mem(1) Mem(0)
Mem(3) Mem(2)

4 hit
01
00

Mem(5)
Mem(3)

00
00

2 miss
Mem(1) Mem(0)
Mem(3) Mem(2)
3 hit

01
00

Mem(5)
Mem(3)

15 miss
Mem(4)
Mem(2)

8 requests, 4 misses

1101
00

Mem(5) Mem(4)
15
14
Mem(3) Mem(2)

Mem(4)
Mem(2)

Miss Rate vs Block Size vs Cache Size

Miss rate goes up if the block size becomes a significant fraction


of the cache size because the number of blocks that can be held in
the same size cache is smaller (increasing capacity misses)

Block Size Tradeoff

Larger block sizes take advantage of spatial locality but

If the block size is too big relative to the cache size, the miss rate
will go up
Larger block size means larger miss penalty

- Latency to first word in block + transfer time for remaining words

Miss Exploits Spatial Locality


Rate

Average
Access
Time

Miss
Penalty

Increased Miss
Penalty
& Miss Rate

Fewer blocks
compromises
Temporal Locality

Block Size

Block Size

In general, Average Memory Access Time


= Hit Time + Miss Penalty x Miss Rate

Block Size

Multiword Block Considerations

Read misses (I$ and D$)

Processed the same as for single word blocks a miss returns the
entire block from memory

Miss penalty grows as block size grows


- Early restart datapath resumes execution as soon as the requested
word of the block is returned
- Requested word first requested word is transferred from the
memory to the cache (and datapath) first

Nonblocking cache allows the datapath to continue to access the


cache while the cache is handling an earlier miss

Write misses (D$)

Cant use write allocate or will end up with a garbled block in the
cache (e.g., for 4 word blocks, a new tag, one word of data from
the new block, and three words of data from the old block), so
must fetch the block from memory first and pay the stall time

Cache Summary

The Principle of Locality:

Program likely to access a relatively small portion of the address


space at any instant of time
- Temporal Locality: Locality in Time
- Spatial Locality: Locality in Space

Three major categories of cache misses:

Compulsory misses: sad facts of life. Example: cold start misses

Conflict misses: increase cache size and/or associativity Nightmare


Scenario: ping pong effect!

Capacity misses: increase cache size

Cache design space

total size, block size, associativity (replacement policy)

write-hit policy (write-through, write-back)

write-miss policy (write allocate, write buffers)

Measuring Cache Performance

Assuming cache hit costs are included as part of the normal CPU
execution cycle, then
CPU time = IC CPI CC
= IC (CPIideal + Memory-stall cycles) CC

CPIstall

Memory-stall cycles come from cache misses (a sum of readstalls and write-stalls)
Read-stall cycles = reads/program read miss rate
read miss penalty
Write-stall cycles = (writes/program write miss rate
write miss penalty)
+ write buffer stalls

For write-through caches, we can simplify this to


Memory-stall cycles = miss rate miss penalty

Impacts of Cache Performance

Relative cache penalty increases as processor performance


improves (faster clock rate and/or lower CPI)

The memory speed is unlikely to improve as fast as processor cycle


time. When calculating CPIstall, the cache miss penalty is measured in
processor clock cycles needed to handle a miss

The lower the CPIideal, the more pronounced the impact of stalls

A processor with a CPIideal of 2, a 100 cycle miss penalty, 36%


load/store instrs, and 2% I$ and 4% D$ miss rates
Memory-stall cycles = 2% 100 + 36% 4% 100 = 3.44
So

CPIstalls = 2 + 3.44 = 5.44

What if the CPIideal is reduced to 1? 0.5? 0.25?

What if the processor clock rate is doubled (doubling the miss


penalty)?

Reducing Cache Miss Rates #1

Allow more flexible block placement

In a direct mapped cache a memory block maps to exactly one


cache block

At the other extreme, could allow a memory block to be mapped


to any cache block fully associative cache

A compromise is to divide the cache into sets each of which


consists of n ways (n-way set associative). A memory block
maps to a unique set (specified by the index field) and can be
placed in any way of that set (so there are n choices)
(block address) modulo (# sets in the cache)