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Presented by:

Regina Raymundo Albay


October 8,2012
What does a student that is not engaged
look like?
What do they do? When do you see them disengaged?
Subject, time of day, specific teacher
What do they say?
How do they relate to their peers?
How do they make you feel as a teacher?

Unaddressed learning problems
Undiagnosed disability
Neglect (no one at home to provide basic
necessities, abandon by one or both parents)
Safety Issues (drugs, gangs, abuse in home)
Poor performance in class
Repeat offender (multiple Discipline Complaint
Reports)





Be prepared to discuss
student behavior and
or progress, both
positive and negative
with parent/guardian.
Prepare a binder with
parent contact
information, interest
inventory, progress
and report cards.
Student
Teacher
Parent
When providing information about a student,
do not use the students name when speaking
with another person and or writing informal
memos, emails, etc.
Conduct all conversations concerning
students privately.

Teach with
emotion and
universalize that
every individual
has a unique
learning style,
explore what that
style is for every
student.
Practice and
Rehearse all
targeted skills
Provide visuals for
visual learners


Use humor,
music, play,
games,
puzzles, plays,
and
cooperative
learning
activities.


Stay calm with a matter of fact attitude (NEVER
YELL OR LOOSE CONTROL)

Allow movement in the class/stretching short
breaks

Have students work in small groups to manage
productivity and accountability

Develop whole class incentives





Create an
atmosphere of
mutual respect
Provide clear and
consistent
boundaries
Discipline in a
formal/polite
manner
Look for patterns
of misbehavior
and intervene
(antecedent)
Clear expectations
with consistent
and specific
classroom rituals
and routines.
Teach social skills
and allow for
rehearsal of these
skills.
How do you take care of yourself?

Who is your support system?

Can you leave work when you go home?

Be specific in your
praise, do not
connect it to a
reward.
Stress that your
students are
making choices.
Directions should
be phrased as
directives not
quest ions.
Phrase statements
as guesses and let
students react to
the guess.
James M. Kaufman,
http://www.people.virginia.edu/~jmk9t
Council for Children with Behavioral
Disorders http://www.ccbd.net/
Whole Brain Teaching www.youtube.com