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The smallest measurement of gravity ever recorded: Physicists examine the gravitational pull between two tiny masses, and how fossil lampreys could shake-up the field of vertebrate evolution.

The smallest measurement of gravity ever recorded: Physicists examine the gravitational pull between two tiny masses, and how fossil lampreys could shake-up the field of vertebrate evolution.

A partire dalNature Podcast


The smallest measurement of gravity ever recorded: Physicists examine the gravitational pull between two tiny masses, and how fossil lampreys could shake-up the field of vertebrate evolution.

A partire dalNature Podcast

valutazioni:
Lunghezza:
30 minuti
Pubblicato:
Mar 10, 2021
Formato:
Episodio podcast

Descrizione

Physicists examine the gravitational pull between two tiny masses, and how fossil lampreys could shake-up the field of vertebrate evolution.In this episode:00:47 Gravity, on the small scaleThis week, researchers have captured the smallest measurement of gravity on record, by measuring the pull between two tiny gold spheres. This experiment opens the door for future experiments to investigate the fundamental forces of nature and the quantum nature of gravity.Research Article: Westphal et al.News and Views: Ultra-weak gravitational field detected07:37 Research HighlightsResearch shows that people often don’t know when a conversation should end, and the cuttlefish that show remarkable self control.Research Highlight: How long should a conversation last? The people involved haven’t a clueResearch Highlight: Arms control: cuttlefish can pass the ‘marshmallow test’10:18 Lamprey evolutionThe larval stage of lamprey growth has long been thought to resemble the kind of early animal that all vertebrates evolved from. However, new research looking at the fossils of lamprey species suggests that this popular hypothesis may be incorrect.Research Article: Miyashita et al.17:38 Briefing ChatWe discuss some highlights from the Nature Briefing. This time, glow-in-the-dark sharks, and scientists’ reflections on the nuclear industry 10 years on from Fukushima.The Guardian: 'Giant luminous shark': researchers discover three deep-sea sharks glow in the darkNature Comment: Nuclear energy, ten years after FukushimaSubscribe to Nature Briefing, an unmissable daily round-up of science news, opinion and analysis free in your inbox every weekday.Video: Deep-sea soft robots
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Pubblicato:
Mar 10, 2021
Formato:
Episodio podcast