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114: Computers & Cameras = Tax Deduction?: When you purchase a computer or camera for your business, are you unsure about how much you can deduct as a business expense since you use them for personal reasons as well?  The answer to that tax question awaits you below!
 
The...

114: Computers & Cameras = Tax Deduction?: When you purchase a computer or camera for your business, are you unsure about how much you can deduct as a business expense since you use them for personal reasons as well?  The answer to that tax question awaits you below!   The...

A partire dalBrilliant Business Moms with Beth Anne Schwamberger


114: Computers & Cameras = Tax Deduction?: When you purchase a computer or camera for your business, are you unsure about how much you can deduct as a business expense since you use them for personal reasons as well?  The answer to that tax question awaits you below!   The...

A partire dalBrilliant Business Moms with Beth Anne Schwamberger

valutazioni:
Lunghezza:
15 minuti
Pubblicato:
Oct 22, 2015
Formato:
Episodio podcast

Descrizione


When you purchase a computer or camera for your business, are you unsure about how much you can deduct as a business expense since you use them for personal reasons as well?  The answer to that tax question awaits you below!
 
The Background
In Episode 107 we talked about Assets and Depreciation, and that information was the background information needed to help you understand this episode a little better.  Here's the cliff notes version.  An asset is something that provides benefit to your business for more than a year.  Computers and Cameras are assets, but paper and ink are not.
Normally when you purchase an asset, the IRS wants you to depreciate it, which means you record the expense over the period of time that you will be using the asset instead of recording the entire expense in the year you purchased it.  Splitting up the cost over several years is called depreciation.
Computers and Cameras
When it comes to some smaller "entertainment use" equipment, the IRS has some different rules.  These items - such as computers, cameras, and video recording equipment - are called  "listed property" by the IRS.
Business Use vs. Personal Use
The first thing you need to do is determine what percentage of the time you are using that equipment for business versus personal use.
Let's take the example of a camera that you purchase for your business.  You might use the camera for personal reasons such as taking pictures of your kids, but you also use that camera for product and blog photography.  The IRS wants you to create a log and track how much you use your camera for your business and how much you use the camera for personal purposes.
This splitting up of business and personal use for purchases was also discussed in our episode on Business Expenses for Bloggers, specifically materials and supplies.
Some Examples
As an example, let's say we purchase a camera for $2,000 and use it 75% of the time for the business.  Normally you would take 75% of the cost of the camera, $1,500, and depreciate that amount over the next several years.  The $500 is personal so that is not a tax deduction for your business.
But, if you use the camera over 50% of the time for your business, and in our example we did, the IRS has a rule where they will let you take that full business expense portion as a tax deduction in the year you purchased the item, instead of depreciating the cost over several years.  They call this a Section 179 Deduction.  All this basically means is that you can expense the business portion of the cost of the equipment all in one year, instead of spreading it out over several years through depreciation.
What if you don't use the equipment over 50% of the time for your business?  You can still depreciate the business portion, but you can't elect the Section 179 Deduction to take the expense all in the first year.
The Exception
If you have a computer that you keep exclusively in your IRS qualified home office, then 100% of that computer cost can be taken as a Section 179 deduction.  You can deduct the full cost of the computer as a business expense in the year you buy it, instead of depreciating it over the next 5-7 years.
A second example:  Let's say you buy a laptop for your business, but because it's mobile, you don't use it exclusively in your home office.  We'll say it cost $1,000, you keep a log, and you use it 90% of the time for business.  Because you use it over 50% of the time for business, you can elect the Section 179 deduction at the end of the year.  So 90% of the cost, or $900, can be deducted as a business expense on your tax return in the year you purchased the computer, instead of depreciating it and spreading out the cost over the next few years.  The 10%, $100, is just a personal expense, and is never a business tax deduction.
Don't Worry!
Electing Section 179 deductions takes place on Form 4562.  There is a maximum Section 179 deduction, but the maximum was $500,000 for 2014!
Don't get worried about all of these ru
Pubblicato:
Oct 22, 2015
Formato:
Episodio podcast