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June 2012 www.medicaltribune.com More intensive dialysis improves patient outlook     FORUM Smoke-free
June 2012 www.medicaltribune.com More intensive dialysis improves patient outlook     FORUM Smoke-free
June 2012 www.medicaltribune.com More intensive dialysis improves patient outlook     FORUM Smoke-free
June 2012 www.medicaltribune.com More intensive dialysis improves patient outlook     FORUM Smoke-free
June 2012 www.medicaltribune.com More intensive dialysis improves patient outlook     FORUM Smoke-free

June 2012

June 2012 www.medicaltribune.com More intensive dialysis improves patient outlook     FORUM Smoke-free

www.medicaltribune.com

More intensive dialysis improves patient outlook

More intensive dialysis improves patient outlook     FORUM Smoke-free cities – A step
   
   

FORUM

Smoke-free cities – A step towards healthy environments

Smoke-free cities – A step towards healthy environments

   
   

CONFERENCE

towards healthy environments     CONFERENCE Personalize CVD prevention for women     IN

Personalize CVD prevention for women

   
   

IN PRACTICE

 
Low back pain:

Low back pain:

Current concepts

   
   

NEWS

  Low back pain: Current concepts     NEWS Lutein crucial for early cognitive development

Lutein crucial for early cognitive development

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June 2012

More intensive dialysis improves patient outlook

Elvira Manzano

I ncreasing dialysis frequency and dura- tion may improve overall health and sur-

vival in patients with renal failure compared with conventional dialysis, four studies have found. In one study involving 11,000 patients, the risk for all-cause mortality was 13 percent lower in patients who received daily home hemodialysis compared with those on tradi- tional thrice weekly in-center regimens (HR 0.87, 95% CI 0.78-0.97). [J Am Soc Nephrol 2012;

DOI:10.1681/ASN.2011080761]

The finding was supported by another study demonstrating a 45 percent reduction in mortality for patients receiving intensive dialysis (five sessions a week, each session lasting 7 hours) compared with those on conventional dialysis (HR 0.55, 95% CI 0.34- 0.87). [J Am Soc Nephrol 2012; DOI:10.1681/

AS.2011070676]

In the 420-patient study, 6.1 deaths per 100 person-years were seen in the intensive group versus 10.5 deaths per 100 person-years in the conventional group. “We found that intensive home dialysis is associated with markedly improved patient survival compared with conventional in- center dialysis,” said study author Dr. Gihad Nesrallah, from the London Health Sciences Center in London, Ontario, Canada. “But whether this relationship is causal remains unknown.” The authors noted that patients may find home dialysis more appealing because of less

may find home dialysis more appealing because of less Several studies suggest that increasing the frequency

Several studies suggest that increasing the frequency and duration of dialy- sis may improve the prognosis of patients with renal failure.

dietary restriction, flexible scheduling and lower cost. Meanwhile, another study of 2,800 patients

showed that maintaining the thrice a week schedule but extending the sessions to a mean

of 7.85 hours during overnight clinic stays

provided better mortality outcomes than conventional dialysis. Patients who opted for nocturnal hemodialysis showed a 25 per-

cent reduction in 2-year mortality risk com- pared with matched controls. (HR 0.75, 95%

CI 0.61-0.91; P=0.004). [J Am Soc Nephrol 2012;

DOI:10.1681/ASN. 2011070674] Overnight dialysis also resulted in reduced weight, lower systolic blood pressure and blood phosphorous levels. “Conversion to in-center nocturnal hemo- dialysis (INHD) was associated with favor- able laboratory markers with significantly lower serum phosphorus despite improved

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June 2012

or stable nutritional status,” said the authors, led by Dr. Eduardo Lacson, Jr. from the Fre- senius Medical Care North America, Massa- chusetts, US. “This study supports the notion that therapy with INHD is a viable alternative dialysis regimen.” In the final study, Dr. John Daugirdas from the University of Illinois, Chicago, US and colleagues, showed that six times a week of dialysis decreased patients’ serum phospho- rous levels compared with standard dialysis treatment. High-frequency dialysis also re- duced patients’ need for phosphorous low- ering medications. [J Am Soc Nephrol 2012;

DOI:10.1681/ASN.2011070688]

“Frequent hemodialysis facilitates control of hyperphosphatemia and extended session lengths could allow more liberal diets and freedom from phosphorous binders,” the au- thors said. Thrice-a-week dialysis, lasting 4 hours per treatment, is the standard protocol for end- stage renal disease at most dialysis centers. Extended intervals between dialysis sessions maybe preferred by patients. However, this poses risks as the less frequent the dialysis ses- sions, the greater the gradient between peak and trough solute and water levels. Commenting on the studies, Dr. Elizabeth Oei, associate consultant at the department of renal medicine, Singapore General Hospital, said frequent or longer dialysis is associated

with many benefits, but the association with improved survival requires further analysis. “Daily hemodialysis is more efficient with respect to solute clearance and better blood pressure control. Of note, increased clearance of waste products from the blood has not been shown to improve survival in a key landmark study on dialysis patients (HEMO study).” Compared with conventional dialysis, fre- quent or longer dialysis is however more ef- ficient at removing phosphate, she said. “Pa- tients can benefit from reduced pill burden and superior phosphate control.” Oei noted that despite growing demand, hemodialysis remains a limited resource. She said frequent dialysis is not routinely pre- scribed due to lack of dialysis resource and unfavorable response from patients with re- gard to increasing time attached to the ma- chine. The procedure is expensive and cur- rently, there is no support for subsidized home dialysis programs. “Despite government support, dialysis is still a significant burden to patients who elect to suffer the complications of untreated end stage renal failure than burden their family with long term hefty medical bills,” Oei said. “Until we can meet the basic dialysis re- quirements of the underprivileged, frequent and prolong dialysis may be regarded as a luxury rather than a necessity,” she conclud-

ed.

underprivileged, frequent and prolong dialysis may be regarded as a luxury rather than a necessity,” she
underprivileged, frequent and prolong dialysis may be regarded as a luxury rather than a necessity,” she
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4 June 2012 Forum

June 2012

Forum

Smoke-free cities – A step towards healthy environments

Excerpted from a presentation by Mr. Chris Gray, senior director, International Public Affairs, Pfizer, during the World Congress of Cardiology Scientific Sessions 2012, held recently in Dubai, UAE.

D ubai, host of the 2012 World Congress of Cardiology, has zero-tolerance poli-

cies on drink-driving and drugs, but not for smoking. Though smoking is banned in many pub- lic offices and places such as shopping malls, there are designated smoking areas all over the city. The ban is not difficult to observe even for the most addicted smokers. That is the situation in Dubai, and in many cities around the world. A report by the World Health Federation showed that over half of the world’s total population of 6.7 billion lives in an urban setting. Three out of five people will live in cities by 2030. While city living offers more opportunities, greater access to health care facilities, and governance, the conditions in an urban setting can also amplify problems. Many of today’s sprawling cities face a tri- ple burden of infectious diseases, waves of accidents, injuries and violence, and chronic diseases with the globalization of unhealthy lifestyle practices such as heavy drinking, physical inactivity and smoking. Interestingly, smoking prevalence is high- est in urban areas. An estimated 600,000 in- dividuals worldwide died from second-hand smoke in 2011, and 75 percent of these deaths were among women and children. We see the impact of second-hand smoke as people live together in closer environments. Accord- ing to Dr. Sidney Smith, World Health Fed-

eration presi- dent, where a person lives intrinsically affects their health and life options. The harm- ful effects of smoking – heart attack, stroke and preventable deaths – speak for themselves in many ways. What can we do to advo-

cate for smoke- free cities around the world? We should raise public awareness to bring statistics to a much broader audience. Urban areas can be built, organized, managed, retrofitted and governed in ways that promote health. The number of people protected by com- prehensive smoke-free laws has doubled from 2008 to 2010. Nearly 3.8 billion people live in countries with some kind of anti- smoking measure; 11 percent of the world’s population are protected by national smoke- free laws. Some cities have taken incremen- tal steps and acted as catalyst for develop- ing smoke-free environments. Restaurants

Dubai, like many cities around the world, has banned smoking in public places.

ing smoke-free environments. Restaurants Dubai, like many cities around the world, has banned smoking in public
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June 2012

Forum

worldwide are going smoke-free. We can see it in the Americas and in Southeast Asia. Article 8 of the WHO Framework Convention on Tobac- co Control (FCTC) has become the basis for cities developing smoke-free legislation. Moscow has no national smoke-free leg- islation and sub-national jurisdictions have no authority to adopt and implement smoke- free laws. While Manila has national laws regulating smoking in public places, strict implementation remains a problem. Mexico City set an example for the world when it enforced a comprehensive smoke-free law in 2008. The hospitality industry – restaurants and bars – went up against it and argued that the smoking ban will harm economic inter- ests, employment and productivity. How- ever Mexico’s experience, as well as Hong Kong’s, suggest otherwise. New York City made a tremendous move when it raised the tobacco tax in 2002 and in- stituted a smoking ban in all bars, clubs and restaurants in the city in 2003. As a result, the number of smokers dropped by 300,000 – a reduction that could save 100,000 lives. The ban has been extended to include public golf courses, sports grounds, beaches and plazas. So far, in 2012, 108 tickets have been issued for smoking violations. In the UK, the Liverpool City Council voted to pursue a local act of Parliament to make the city smoke-free became instrumen- tal in the passage of a national smoking leg- islation in 2006. This demonstrates the strong role municipal leaders play to drive national agendas and policies. Activism really has a profound impact on government. In Nueva Vizcaya, a province in the north of Philippines, serious implementation of smoke-free ordinances dramatically reduced tobacco use and exposure to second hand-

smoke in homes, workplaces and on public transportation. A city with a tobacco planta- tion and 400,000 inhabitants succeeded in in- stituting anti-tobacco measures. China, home to one-third of the world’s smokers, outlawed smoking in buses, restau- rants and bars starting in May 2011. Russia plans to implement a similar measure begin- ning in 2015. In the Middle East, where waterpipe to- bacco smoking is a concern, heart experts have emphasized the need to direct resourc- es to prevention strategies to fight heart dis- ease. Saudi Arabia has long-declared the holy cities of Mecca and Medina as smoke- free. Last February, Kuwait imposed a blan- ket ban covering all forms of smoking in all indoor public places, except in shisha par- lors, to protect public health. Acknowledging the ill-effects of tobacco on health, heart societies in Asia went a step further and took on the challenge to become leaders in tobacco control at the recent World Conference on Tobacco or Health 2012 (WC- TOH) held recently in Singapore. Twenty- one country representatives and 16 heart foundations established advocacy priorities all targeted at making Asia Pacific smoke- free by 2040. The move is a major step for- ward and adds momentum to the growing smoke-free movement across the globe. “Tobacco use is not just a problem for in- dividual people or nations; it is a collective health responsibility for mankind,” said Dr. Wael Al Mahmeed, board member, Emir- ates Cardiac Society, which collaborated on the bid to host the 2015 World Congress in Abu Dhabi. “In years to come, we want Abu Dhabi 2015 to be remembered as the place where the world collectively said: ‘enough is

enough’.”

come, we want Abu Dhabi 2015 to be remembered as the place where the world collectively
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June 2012

Philippine Focus

CONFERENCE COVERAGE

2012 Annual Convention of the Philippine College of Emergency Medicine, 17-18 April, Mandaluyong City

Challenges in emergency transfer of pediatric patients

Dr. Yves St. James Aquino

M ost emergency medical service programs do not offer enough training for pediatric patients in

emergency setting, according to Dr. Jonathan Cu, head of the Section of Pediatric Emergen- cy Medicine under the Department of Pedi- atrics in University of the Philippines-Philip- pine General Hospital. According to Cu, emergency medical per- sonnel (EMP) are taught less than 10 hours of pediatric training. Based on a published sur- vey by Seidel JS et al., most paramedics do not have pediatric blood pressure cuffs (24%) nor airway equipment (79%). Cu added that based on another survey done by the Ameri- can Academy of Pediatrics, most emergency medical service providers see one pediatric bulb valve mask ventilation every 1.7 years, intubate a pediatric patient every 3.3 years, and insert intraosseous line every 6.7 years. A study done by Gausche M et al. showed that paramedics were less confident in as- sessing vital signs for patients younger than 2 years, while a study by Bellingan G et al., proved that twice as many patients transport- ed by standard paramedic or ambulance ser- vice died in the first 12 hours after admission.

Conference Calendar

July

3 rd National Prosthetics and Orthotics Convention

July 4-6, 2012 Info: Philippine Academy of Rehabilitation Medicine Telephone: (02) 536 9605 Email: mp_casero@yahoo.com Venue: Manila Hotel, Manila

65 th Annual Convention of the Philippine Association of Nutrition July 9-10, 2012 Info: Philippine Association of Nutrition, Inc. Cellphone: (0920) 286 1532 Email: pan@fnri.dost.gov.ph Website: http://pan.fnri.dost.gov.ph Venue: Dusit Thani Ayala Center, Makati City

According to Cu, a specialized pediatric transport team is ideal to decrease unplanned events and significantly lower mortality rate. “The goal of pediatric intensive care trans- port is early directed therapy or initiation of care for the patient in a pre-hospital setting, and to continue doing that care during trans- port up to the ICU,” said Cu. The initiation of definitive care begins with the arrival of the transport team, said Cu. He added that early protocol-driven treatment, such as aggressive intervention to reverse shock, can increase survival if proper inter- ventions are done.

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Philippine Focus

Definitive care may involve cardiorespira- tory resuscitation, intubation, and ensuring adequate intravenous access. Ideally, the specialized emergency team should include qualified physicians, ground and/or air ambulance capabilities, communica- tion capabilities, and written clinical and oper- ational guidelines. Medical control physicians should have sufficient knowledge and expe- rience in transport medicine and they should be able to consult other subspecialists, send appropriate team, direct stabilization and pro- vide ongoing direction to the transport team.

The team, added Cu, should also include a dedicated pool of nurses, paramedics and in some cases, respiratory therapists. “We must keep in mind that it is not really the degree that is important in doing retrieval but the experience and mixture of expertise,” reminded Cu. He explained that critical care during transport conditions is significantly different from an ICU, and health care profes- sionals who are competent inside the hospital may not perform equally well in a mobile en-

vironment.

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8 June 2012 Philippine Focus

June 2012

Philippine Focus

CONFERENCE COVERAGE

2012 Annual Convention of the Philippine College of Emergency Medicine, 17-18 April, Mandaluyong City

Morning BP surge associated with stroke

Dr. James Salisi

M orning surges of blood pressure are associated with increased incidence

of stroke, a study by Dr. Vernilee Ong con- cluded. A review of 170 patients admitted to the Emergency Department of the Pasig City General Hospital from January to June 2009 revealed that there was higher incidence of stroke in the morning. There was also a sig- nificant difference in the mean number of occurrences of bleeding stroke in the morning and afternoon. Included in the study were patients diagnosed with cerebrovascular disease, hypertension or blood pressure equal to or greater than 140/90 mm Hg, taking antihy- pertensive medications regardless of compli- ance and even those not taking antihyperten- sive medications. According to the study, 99 of these patients had only cerebrovascular disease while 71 patients had other co-morbidities. Data showed that 39 percent of stroke occurred between 8:00 and 11:59 in the morn- ing, with the average peak time at 8:00 am. A total of 63 cerebrovascular events were recorded during this time period. The frequency of stroke throughout the day varied with the second most frequent events happening from 12 noon to 3:59 in the afternoon, followed by the time between 8 and 11:59 in the evening, with 26 and 23 recorded strokes occurring respectively.

According to the study, while morning surges in blood pressure are significant in the occurrence of stroke, the type of stroke is not related to the circadian rhythm. Majority of the patients (60%) diagnosed with stroke were unclassified and thus a correlation between the time of occurrence and the type of stroke could not be made. However, for patients with bleeding stroke, the higher mean incidences were recorded in the afternoon with 4.8 occurrences than in the morning with 4.5 occurrences. Although the occurrence of stroke is multi-factorial, the study suggests that controlling elevated blood pressure in the morning could significantly decrease the incidence of stroke. Furthermore, the study concluded that if antihypertensive therapy is targeted towards controlling blood pres- sure in the morning, the incidence of stroke could be reduced by 50 percent. The study also showed similar findings with past studies in terms of incidence of stroke in relation to sex and age. The inci- dence of stroke is higher among females, 65 years old and above but increases with in- creasing age in both sexes. Vascular diseases rank second most com- mon cause of mortality in the Philippines while cerebrovascular diseases are the most common reason for admission at the Pasig City General

Hospital.

Philippines while cerebrovascular diseases are the most common reason for admission at the Pasig City General
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June 2012

Philippine Focus

CONFERENCE COVERAGE

2012 Annual Convention of the Philippine College of Emergency Medicine, 17-18 April, Mandaluyong City

Rare case of recurrent bleeding in neurofibromatosis

Gabriel Angelo Sembrano, RN

I mmediate diagnosis and early treat-

ment of hemorrhage are vital to improve

the chance of survival of patients with

neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF-1), according to a case study done by Dr. Margarette Anne Velasco of the Department of Emergency Medicine in Makati Medical Center (MMC). This study presented a case of a 66-year- old female Filipino patient diagnosed with NF-1. The patient sought medical attention after experiencing a “sudden onset of left- side low back pain.” Physical examination showed multiple subcutaneous nodules all over her body, and several light brown mac- ules were observed. Upon assessment of the abdomen, bowel sounds were normal, flat and non-tender. The patient had tenderness over the left costovertebral angle and severe pain upon straight-leg-raise (right). During her admission to the emergency room, vital signs were stable but eventually deteriorat- ed. She became hemodynamically unstable after 30 minutes, and in spite of fluid hydra- tion, which included hydroxyethyl starch and sodium chloride 0.9%, the patient remained hypotensive.

Repeat of physical exam revealed general paleness, direct tenderness over the left lower quadrant and direct tenderness over the left low- er quadrant with a palpable mass on the area. Laboratory works confirmed anemia, showing a hemoglobin level of 8.0 g/dL. Emergency whole abdominal CT scan and angiography with contrast were done which showed left retroperitoneal hematoma that was likely due to a ruptured vessel, the author said. Also noted were subcutaneous thickening along the anterolateral compartments of the right thigh and right gluteal region as well as the mixed density foci in some of the muscles in the anterior compartment of the right thigh which may be related to the patient’s clinical status of NF. In spite of the efforts to resuscitate, the patient eventually died due to hypovolemic shock from a massive hemorrhage. The case report aimed to inform physi- cians of the dangers associated with the pro- gression of fast-onset massive hemorrhage to hemodynamic instability in NF-1, which man- dates rapid surgical and medical treatment to avoid the development of a life-threatening condition.

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Philippine Focus

According to the study, “Spontaneous, massive, recurrent hemorrhage in a patient with NF-1 is rare but its early diagnosis to prevent the possibility of progression to hy- povolemic shock is essential.” Velasco describes Neurofibromatosis (NF) as a multisystem genetic disorder that is com- monly associated with cutaneous, neurologic and orthopedic manifestations. NF-1 is rarely associated with spontaneous hemorrhage which is thought to be a result of friable vas-

culature secondary to arterial dysplasia or vascular invasion by the neurofibroma. Velasco says that although bleeding in patients with NF-1 is very rare but possi- ble, prompt diagnosis and early treatment is “crucial to prevent hypovolemic shock, organ failure and mortality.” This case highlights the importance of immediate resuscitation, hemostasis and emergency surgical exploration to improve survival.

highlights the importance of immediate resuscitation, hemostasis and emergency surgical exploration to improve survival.
highlights the importance of immediate resuscitation, hemostasis and emergency surgical exploration to improve survival.
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June 2012

Philippine Focus

CONFERENCE COVERAGE

2012 Annual Convention of the Philippine College of Emergency Medicine, 17-18 April, Mandaluyong City

Preventing renal damage in urologic obstruction

Dr. James Salisi

B ecause of its damaging effect on renal function, urinary tract obstruction is one

of the most important urologic diseases,” said Dr. Victor Federico Acepcion, chair of the Department of Surgery of The Health Centrum in Roxas City. A high index of suspicion and clinical acumen are necessary for effective management of urinary tract obstruction. Prompt recognition, treatment, consultation and treatment can potentially reverse urinary tract obstruction (UTO) and prevent further damage to the kidneys. There are no available data on the incidence and prevalence of urinary tract obstruction in unselected populations; however, previous studies involving selected populations identified possible causes. According to Acepcion, the important etiologies to consider are gynecologic surgery pregnancy, calculi and cancer of pelvic organs. There is no difference between males and females in terms of etiologies up to the second decade of life. Childhood causes are mostly congenital in nature. UTO in adults are mainly acquired; more common causes are strictures due to infection or injury, BPE, tumors, stones, neuropathy caused by diabetes and spinal cord injuries. The nature of the obstruction has an impact on the resultant pathology and subsequent renal dysfunction, said Acepcion.

Obstruction increases pressure in the Bowman’s capsule and subsequently decreases GFR, reduces renal blood flow, impairs renal concentrating function, and leads to progressive and permanent damage to the kidney. In the emergency department, Acepcion explained that most acute UTO are associated with acute unrelenting pain, inability to void, alterations in the pattern of micturition, recurrent UTI, newly-onset and poorly controlled hypertension, and gross or microscopic hematuria. Thorough medical history is important to elicit precipitating factors of UTO, such as sulfonamides that can induce crystal deposition. Certain occupational risk factors like working with asbestos or in shipyards predispose patients to develop UTO. But since the patient presents in the emergency department, investigating and treating potentially life-threatening complications like pulmonary edema, hypovolemia, urosepsis, and hypekalemia should always be foremost in the strategy for effective management, reminded Acepcion. The goal of treatment for patients with UTO is to reestablish urinary flow. Usually this is achieved by transurethral bladder catheterization, which can be both diagnostic and therapeutic. Decision to admit the patient is dependent on the complications of obstruction and the need for surgery. Referral

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June 2012

Philippine Focus

to a urologist is important in patients in need of surgical decompression and upon follow up for definitive therapy. “Complete obstruction with infection can mean the complete destruction of the kidneys

within days,” said Acepcion. Relief of obstruction may restore partial renal function but prolongation of obstruction lessens the likelihood of reversing renal damage, he

added.

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13 June 2012 Philippine Focus

June 2012

Philippine Focus

CONFERENCE COVERAGE

2012 Annual Convention of the Philippine College of Emergency Medicine, 17-18 April, Mandaluyong City

Task force advocates guidelines on leptospirosis management

Gabriel Angelo Sembrano, RN

I n 2010, the Leptospirosis Task Force composed of the Philippine Society of

Nephrology, the Philippine Society for Microbiology and Infectious Diseases and the Philippine College of Chest Physicians released practice guidelines for leptospirosis outbreaks. “These guidelines are important for emergency physicians in diagnosing and treating leptospirosis,” said Dr. Richard Hizon, nephrologist with the National Kidney and Transplant Institute. In diagnosing leptospirosis, early recognition and prompt treatment must be prioritized so that further complications and fatal consequences can be prevented.According to Hizon, gathering extensive information during clinical assessment and epidemiologic history is considered to be more important than waiting for the results of laboratory work. The Task Force recommends that patients should be suspected with leptospirosis if they present with acute fever for at least two days, reside in a flooded area, and manifest at least two of the following symptoms: myalgia, calf tenderness, conjunctival suffusion, chills, abdominal pain, headache, jaundice or oliguria. He adds that categorization of the case to either mild, or moderate to severe is vital.

Hizon explained that practitioners should be on the lookout for certain laboratory findings that serve as markers for severe leptospirosis. These are complete blood count, serum creatinine, liver function tests, bleeding parameters, serum potassium, arterial blood gas, chest radiograph and electrocardiogram. He pointed out that patients with stable vital signs, anicteric sclerae, good urine output, no evidence of meningismus or meningeal irritation, no signs of sepsis or jaundice, and no difficulty in breathing, are considered to have mild leptospirosis and are manageable at home with proper medications as prescribed by the physician. Moderate to severe cases are best managed in healthcare or hospital settings. They usually present with unstable vital signs, jaundice, abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, oliguria or anuria, meningismus or meningeal irritation, sepsis, altered mental states, difficulty in breathing and hemoptysis. Hizon mentioned that doxycycline is the drug of choice in managing leptospirosis. Alternative drugs include amoxicillin and azithromycin. For moderate to severe cases, the drug of choice is penicillin G; and alternative drugs may include parenteral ampicillin, third-generation cephalosporin and parenteral azithromycin dehydrate.

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June 2012

Philippine Focus

Antibiotic therapy should be given for 7 days, except for azithromycin dihydrate which could be given for 3 days. Hizon stressed that “kidneys are consistently involved in leptospirosis.” Thus, indicated for emergency dialysis are patients

who present with any of the following: uremic symptoms, serum creatinine of >3mg/dL, serum potassium level of >5 meq/L in oliguric patients, pulmonary hemorrhage, blood pH

of >7.2, or fluid overload.

serum potassium level of >5 meq/L in oliguric patients, pulmonary hemorrhage, blood pH of >7.2, or
serum potassium level of >5 meq/L in oliguric patients, pulmonary hemorrhage, blood pH of >7.2, or
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15 June 2012 Philippine Focus

June 2012

Philippine Focus

Dietary factors increase incidence of GERD

Dr. Adrian Paul Rabe

G astroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) has been increasing in re- cent years. Dr. Edhel Tripon, a spe-

cialist in gastroenterology with Sacred Heart Hospital in Malolos, notes that in her practice “more than 50 percent have reflux. The cul- prits are frequently dietary: caffeine, carbon- ated drinks and citrus food.” Concomitantly, esophageal adenocarcinoma has also been in- creasing in incidence. Heartburn is a symptom caused by the re- flux of gastric acid from the stomach into the esophagus, also called GERD. The condition is primarily mechanical: Any condition that decreases the gradient between the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) and the stomach will induce reflux. There may be concomitant regurgitation of acid and gastric contents, causing afflicted patients to experience a sour taste in their mouths. With chronic disease, dysphagia and obstruction can ensue from resulting esopha- geal metaplasia, termed Barrett’s esophagus, and esophageal adenocarcinoma. Recurrent cough is an atypical presentation of severe GERD, sometimes with acid damaging the vocal cords. It is important to establish a clear clinical history and comprehensive physical exami- nation to rule out other causes of heartburn. These confounding diagnoses include pill

of heartburn. These confounding diagnoses include pill esophagitis (commonly from ferrous sulfate tablets,

esophagitis (commonly from ferrous sulfate tablets, potassium supplements, NSAIDs and doxycycline), coronary artery disease and peptic ulcer disease. Because of GERD’s epidemiological pro- file, as well as the presence of confounding diagnoses, many physicians prescribe the routine performance of an esophagogastro- duodenoscopy (EGD). Many of these pa- tients turn out with normal findings, due to the presence of non-erosive reflux disease. Also, heartburn correlates poorly with the presence or absence of esophagitis on EGD. Tripon suggests screening patients for EGD, utilizing it mainly “for those who are elderly or who have refractory symptoms,” and other risk factors. The gold standard of diagnosis is a 24-hour ambulatory pH monitor that detects acid in the esophagus. This, however, may be expen- sive and cumbersome for many patients.

pH monitor that detects acid in the esophagus. This, however, may be expen - sive and
pH monitor that detects acid in the esophagus. This, however, may be expen - sive and
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June 2012

Philippine Focus

The cornerstone of treatment of GERD is the combination of lifestyle modifications and a therapeutic trial of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). Weight loss is the single most important lifestyle change in the treatment of GERD, given the strong correlation between obesity and the disease. Dietary changes are difficult and are frequently unsustained. The PPIs are effective in controlling symp- toms, and as a drug class, PPIs are superior to H2-blockers. Commonly used PPIs include esomeprazole, omeprazole and pantoprazole. Since reflux symptoms tend to be chronic,

PPIs are given indefinitely as necessary for symptom control. Refractory symptoms will need endoscopic or surgical intervention. Heartburn is a symptom that tests the clini- cal mettle of many physicians. Meticulous his- tory and physical examination with judicious use of diagnostic EGD, aggressive reinforce- ment of lifestyle changes and use of PPIs are

all key to treating this condition.

and use of PPIs are all key to treating this condition. Source: Marks JW. Gastroesophageal reflux

Source:

Marks JW. Gastroesophageal reflux (GERD, acid reflux, heartburn). http://www.medicinenet.com/gastroesophageal_reflux_disease_ gerd/article.htm. Accessed 10 March 2012.

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17 June 2012 Philippine Focus

June 2012

Philippine Focus

CONFERENCE COVERAGE

49th Philippine Pediatric Society Annual Convention, 10-13 April, Pasay City

Head size unreliable indicator for congenital hypothyroidism

Gabriel Angelo Sembrano, RN

T he head circumference should not be considered as a “specific and sole indicator for the presence of

congenital hypothyroidism,” according to

a retrospective, case-controlled study con-

ducted by Dr. Erin Cathrina Tayag and Dr. Sylvia Estrada at the Makati Medical Center (MMC). The thrust of the study was to establish if head circumference can be correlated with congenital hypothyroidism or if it can be eventually used as an early indicator for the presence of congenital hypothyroidism. In achieving this, the authors compared head circumferences of all neonates born at the MMC from 2001 to 2010 who tested positive for congenital hypothyroidism on newborn screening to the normal population. They then determined if there is an association of

gestational age, birth weight and birth length

to congenital hypothyroidism. The incidence

of congenital hypothyroidism for the past ten years in MMC was also determined.

From the total number of infants delivered

in the medical center for the period of Janu-

ary 1, 2001 to December 31, 2010, the authors sampled 11 infants with positive congeni-

tal hypothyroidism as determined by new born screening and age-matched with 25 normal newborns that served as the control.

The study group consisting of 3 males and 8 females with 4 dropouts was compared to the control group consisting of 8 males and 17 females. The mean gestational age of the hypothy- roid group was 36.14 weeks versus the con- trol group’s 38.28 weeks. The mean head cir- cumference of the study group was 31.19cm, while the control group was 33.04cm. Among other anthropometric parameters for con- genital hypothyroidism, these numbers were then compared. Based on the results generated (p>0.05), the study found that “there was no signifi- cant difference between the head circum- ference, gender ratio, birth weight, birth length and gestational age between the two groups.” The researchers concluded that the head circumferences of infants with hypo- thyroidism “were not significantly different with the normal population.” Congenital hypothyroidism is uncom- mon but should not be overlooked. Prompt detection is essential in order for important medical treatments to be given early, said the authors. Thus, long term effects are avoided. At the Makati Medical Center, the inci- dence rate of congenital hypothyroidism is 1 for every 1,696 (0.06%) while at the national level, incidence occurs in every 3,324 (0.03%). Head circumference measurement is a useful tool to all clinicians because it pro-

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18 June 2012 Philippine Focus

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Philippine Focus

vides essential information to the identi- fication of possible causes of this disease. However, as the study pointed out, head circumference should not be the sole con- sideration for the detection of congenital hypothyroidism, since this does not present significant difference when normal popu- lation and the hypothyroid patients are compared. Head circumference, especially for new- born infants vary according to disease states,

mode of delivery, presence of edema, mold- ing and structural defects. Hence, making early diagnosis of congenital hypothyroid- ism based on head circumference alone is not reliable, said the study. The authors acknowledge the rarity of this disease. For accuracy of data and representa- tiveness, they recommend that future stud- ies should consider a wider collection of data

on a nationwide scale.

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19 June 2012 Philippine Focus

June 2012

Philippine Focus

CONFERENCE COVERAGE

49th Philippine Pediatric Society Annual Convention, 10-13 April, Pasay City

Alarming statistics on AIDS released

Gabriel Angelo Sembrano, RN

T he Philippines is one of the seven countries in the world that has the highest (more

than 25 percent) increase in incidence during the period of 2001 to 2009,” said Dr. Eric Tayag of the Department of Health (DoH). “In the Asia Pacific, there are varied patterns. The Philippines is described as having a profile 4. HIV incidence is increasing. HIV prevalence is increasing and there are low-age related deaths. Among profiles, profile 4 is the worst”, he added. Tayag mentioned that the National AIDS Registry, which is available at the DoH website, estimated 4,951 as the projected number of people living with HIV (PLHIV) for 2011; but only 2,349 cases were reported. Three years from now, the incidence rate is not anywhere beyond 0.01 percent of the Philippine population and the newly infected adults will be close to 9,900 with children over a hundred cases. In 2015, it is estimated that there would be 439 deaths due to AIDS, with over 9,000 children and adults requiring anti-retroviral treatment. By 2016, the government would need around 500 million pesos for treatment alone, said Tayag. Tayag added that NCR has the most number of cases, followed by southern Luzon, Davao then Cebu. The most common modes of transmission is unsafe sexual intercourse, sharing of contaminated needles, and

mother-to-baby; and rarely, through blood transfusion. Cebu has a prevalence rate of 53 percent in terms of HIV transmission through sharing of needles among people injecting drugs. This means that for every 3,500 drug users who share needles, more than 1,800 are expected to be infected with HIV. Most of these cases are also infected with hepatitis C. Tayag pointed out that there has been a shift in the epidemiological pattern of HIV/ AIDS. From 1984 to 1990, there have been more females who had HIV than males; but from 1991 to 1995, males had outnumbered females. Every year since 2007, the highest number of cases has come from the age range of 22 to 29, most likely through sexual transmission. Since 2007, HIV infection has also shifted from heterosexual to homosexual transmission; and by 2015, it is estimated that men having sex with men (MSM) would make up 3 percent of the total male population in the country. The National AIDS Registry also noted that in the last three years, newly reported cases have mostly been of males, and almost 47 percent of all reported cases have come from the age group of 25 to 35 years. Every 2 years, DOH conducts an integrated HIV behavioral serologic surveillance (IHBSS) which identifies the risk factors responsible for the change in HIV prevalence in the country. It has been found that from the original 10 sentinel sites, the highest HIV prevalence is among MSM which is 2 percent, with 1.9

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Philippine Focus

percent in Metro Manila alone. Tayag added that if it goes beyond 5 percent, this will be considered a concentrated epidemic. Tayag calls for more collaboration to deal with the increasing problem. “We have the right goals. Getting it right

and respecting the rights of people living with HIV will move us close to the global target of zero HIV new infections, zero discrimination and zeroAIDS related deaths. Pilipinas, HIV should not scare you. But the results I have shown you should scare

you,” he said.

related deaths. Pilipinas, HIV should not scare you. But the results I have shown you should
related deaths. Pilipinas, HIV should not scare you. But the results I have shown you should
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21 June 2012 Philippine Focus

June 2012

Philippine Focus

CONFERENCE COVERAGE

49th Philippine Pediatric Society Annual Convention, 10-13 April, Pasay City

Updates on predisposing factors of atopic dermatitis

Dr. Yves St. James Aquino

with these mutations” Boguniewicz clarified. A recent research established second barrier defect in atopic dermatitis at the level of tight junctions, which are important structures that ensure integrity of skin barrier. After evaluating AD and nonatopic subjects, results showed reduced expression of TJ proteins claudin-1 and claudin-23 only in patients with AD. According to the study, collective data suggest an impairment in tight junctions contributes to the barrier dysfunction and immune dysregulation observed in AD subjects. [De Benedetto A.

J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2011 Mar;127(3):773-86.e1-7.] Besides skin barrier dysfunction, another major concern in AD is the increased sus- ceptibility to infections or colonization with microorganisms, including Staphylococcus au- reus and Herpes simplex. According to Boguni- ewicz, even normal appearing skin of patients have heavy bacterial load upon inspection. Staphylococcus typically produce toxins that act as superantigens, as they interact with

a “thousand-fold” greater number of cells

than conventional antigen, resulting in mas-

sive inflammatory response. “This is all toxin- mediated disease when patients’ skin is swol- len, weeping and painful,” said Boguniewicz. Previous studies pointed to abnormalities

in the immune system at the innate level, ie

a deficiency in antimicrobial peptide (human β-defensin-2) expression, as major factor that allows S. aureus to colonize and infect skin of

AD patients.

R ecent studies further establish skin bar- rier disorder and immune dysregulation

as predisposing factors for atopic dermatitis, said Mark Boguniewicz, a pediatric immunol- ogist from the US. Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic inflam-

matory skin disorder characterized by dryness and hyperactive immune response to allergens.

Filaggrin (filament-aggregating protein) is a key protein that facilitates terminal differentia- tion of the epidermis and formation of the skin barrier. Loss-of-function variants (R510X and 2282del4) in the filaggrin gene have been shown as strong predisposing factors for AD, suggest- ing a key role for impaired skin barrier function in the development of atopic disease. [Palmer CNA, et al. Nature Genetics 2006;38:441] Despite initial hypothesis that filaggrin mutation occurs mostly in Caucasian societ- ies, recent data from various countries have shown that mutations do occur in other parts of the world, including Asian countries, said Boguniewicz. Patients with filaggrin mutation have in- creased risk for other diseases, such as asth- ma, allergic rhinitis and food allergy. “As immunologists, we quickly realize that filaggrin mutations couldn’t explain the whole problem, that atopic dermatitis is not

filaggrin deficiency

percent of our atopic [dermatitis] patients

We only have about 12

that atopic dermatitis is not filaggrin deficiency percent of our atopic [dermatitis] patients We only have
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22 June 2012 Philippine Focus

June 2012

Philippine Focus

CONFERENCE COVERAGE

49th Philippine Pediatric Society Annual Convention, 10-13 April, Pasay City

Vitamin D deficiency prevalent despite sun exposure

Dr. James Salisi

skin type, vitamin D NAR in diet, and dura- tion of sun exposure among participants and between vitamin D-deficient and sufficient groups. The study found that even if the duration

of sun exposure among the subjects was ad-

equate, the quality of sun exposure seemed

to be poor to produce enough vitamin D in

the skin. This finding was attributed by the investigators to poor air quality, increased cloud cover during the rainy season, and the improper timing of sun exposure. However the study found no correlation between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level and sun exposure, NAR, height, BMI, and skin type. According to the investigators this can be attributed to the limited number of subjects, which resulted in low variability in the parameters being considered. Only the duration of sun exposure showed a statistically significant difference between the vitamin D-deficient and sufficient groups

with a p value of 0.02. Because vitamin D is im- portant in metabolism and keeping a healthy body, the investigators advised proper sun exposure from 10 AM to 4 PM. If this is not possible, longer exposure to the sun beyond the recommended time of the day, vitamin

D supplementation or vitamin D food forti-

fication would help ensure adequate levels of

vitamin D in the body.

T hirty percent of children aged 4 to 5 years old have vitamin D deficiency, a study by

Dr. Julie Ann Cruz-Formoso et al., revealed. This

is surprising since the Philippines is a tropical

country and receives adequate sunlight to in- duce cutaneous production of vitamin D. Children aged 4 to 5 years old from a day

care center in Pasay were enrolled in the study. They were followed for two months to deter- mine the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency. A total of 85 children were enrolled but only 37 were included in the study. Data on the following were collected: height and weight, body mass index, estimated vitamin

D intake from diet and the nutrient adequacy

ratio (NAR), number of hours spent under the sun and level of 25-hydroxyvitamin D. The investigators measured serum 25-hy- droxyvitamin D levels and the difference in serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels between males and females. They collected informa- tion about the nutrition of the children to determine the vitamin D content in the diet of each participant and to convert this to NAR. The duration of sun exposure as measured in two weekdays and one weekend day was also collected.

They used the above parameters to cor- relate the vitamin D level with height, BMI,

one weekend day was also collected. They used the above parameters to cor - relate the
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23 June 2012 Philippine Focus

June 2012

Philippine Focus

CONFERENCE COVERAGE

49th Philippine Pediatric Society Annual Convention, 10-13 April, Pasay City

The pediatrician’s role in rheumatology

Dr. James Salisi

R heumatologic disorders are one of the most challenging conditions that many

general pediatricians encounter in their practice. Their clinical manifestation and the availability of many laboratory tests make managing pa- tients with suspected rheumatologic disorders complex. Dr. Marietta de Guzman, clinic chief of the Pediatric Rheumatology Center in Texas Children’s Hospital, discussed the pediatrician’s role in diagnosing and managing pediatric rheumatologic disorders, involving a systematic approach that could simplify manage- ment and make pediatrician more relevant and more effective in the delivery of care for children. Thorough medical history and physical examination with an emphasis on muscu- loskeletal system are the foundation of ef- fective management of pediatric patients presenting with joint pains. Joint pain symp- toms, including trigger and aggravating fac- tors, should be investigated. But because of the non-specific nature of many symptoms of rheumatologic diseases, de Guzman em- phasized the importance of a detailed sys- tems review. Checking the child’s family history could provide diagnostic clues. Rheumatic heart disease, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), recurrent febrile illness, HLA-B27 related disorders, and thromboembolic diseases are some of the disorders which have strong ge- netic predisposition.

“There is no excuse for any of us not to do a good physical examination,” de Guz- man said. Musculoskeletal examination should define whether a child with joint pain really has arthritis or enthesitis, which is an inflammation of tendinous or ligamentous attachment to the bone. “The limitation of the financial capability of the patient should always be considered to de- termine what laboratory tests to order,” said the speaker. Cheap and available tests like complete blood count can already describe cytopenia in autoimmune disorders. Urinalysis can direct a pediatrician to a diagnosis of systemic lupus with nephritis in adolescents with cutaneous changes and joint pains. Organ-specific imaging must also be guided by a working diagnosis. While the state of hypereactivity or dysregulation can be checked by qualitative immunoglobulins, complements and autoantibodies. A substantial number of anti-nuclear an- tibody (ANA) tests are being done for no good reason and many of the children test- ing positive for ANA are referred to rheuma- tologists. However ANAs can be positive in 5 to 10 percent of the pediatric population or be causes in 30 to 40 percent by chronic infec- tion, anticonvulsants and liver disease. The same is true with rheumatoid factor. There- fore, there should be a high degree of suspi- cion before ordering these tests in order to avoid unnecessary costs.

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Philippine Focus

The rule of thumb when you have a child with a joint inflammation in the presence of fever, especially of an acute or subacute na- ture, a septic joint should be ruled out first before considering other diseases. The overarching goal of therapy in rheu- matologic disorders is to treat severe mani- festations and to prevent complications. The treatment for Kawasaki disease, for example, is intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG). Cor- ticosteroids are used for those who are non-

responsive to IVIG. Immunomodulation therapy is used for children with SLE and juvenile idiopathic arthritis. The pediatrician’s role includes continu- ous participation in the child’s care after the diagnosis, treatment of the usual infec- tion and surveillance checks like regular ophthalmologic evaluation and TB screen- ing, and provision of preventive care, said

de Guzman.

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25 June 2012 Philippine Focus

June 2012

Philippine Focus

TREATMENT FOCUS: Kidney disease

Glomerulonephritis: An old and deceptive disease

Dr. Adrian Paul Rabe

The vicious cycle of destruction There is no unifying pathophysiology for all GNs but the end stages of their course are the same: chronic kidney disease from glo- merulosclerosis. Many types of glomerular disease involve complement-mediated de- struction and local inflammation. Urine flow is impeded by tubular obstruction from de- bris, as well as interstitial inflammation and fibrosis. These factors also cause tubular dys- function, compromising solute, protein and fluid transport that, in turn, causes edema and electrolyte abnormalities. The proteins from glomerular leakage trigger more inflamma- tion through activating cytokines and reactive oxygen species, exacerbating the destruction. Autoregulation of glomerular filtration is also disrupted, leading to hypertension, damaging normal nephrons. Eventually, these nephrons become sclerosed, paving the way for chronic kidney disease. It is from these processes that GN presents with hematuria, proteinuria, edema and hy- pertension, as well as some electrolyte abnor- malities.

Masquerading as urinary tract infection For work-up, Lagunzad suggests the uri- nalysis, known as the “window to your kid- neys”. Classical findings include hematuria, RBC casts and proteinuria. Unfortunately, many physicians mistake these findings for asymptomatic urinary tract infection and will treat them for months with antibiotics. Other laboratory tests would reveal an

D ue to their vital functions, human kid- neys have an enormous reserve of neph-

rons, numbering nearly 2 million. With this large number, the destruction of nephrons can go unidentified for years, until significant damage causes clinical disease. The prototype disease for this insidious process is glomeru- lonephritis (GN). Dr. Juan Paolo Lagunzad, a nephrologist from St Luke’s Medical Center, Calamba Doc- tors Hospital and Commonwealth Hospital and Medical Center, explains that “the lat- est data in the Philippines ranks GN as the second most common cause of end-stage renal disease, next only to diabetes. IgA ne- phropathy is the most common primary glo- merular disease among adults, not only in the Philippines but in Asia and worldwide as well. Membranoproliferative (MPGN) is a close second. Among pediatric patients, the most common is still minimal change disease (MCD).”

(MPGN) is a close second. Among pediatric patients, the most common is still minimal change disease
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Philippine Focus

inflammatory process. C3 levels may be de- creased while circulating immune complexes and rheumatoid factor are positive. Erythro- cyte sedimentation rate (ESR) may also be el- evated. Secondary causes of GN could be de- tected. Lupus nephritis, for instance, would show a positive ANA and anti-dsDNA, on the background of the constellation of clinical findings of systemic lupus erythematosus. The gold standard of diagnosis of GN is the renal biopsy. Tissue samples from the biopsy are viewed under light or electron microsco- py with or without special staining. Lagunzad recommends that “renal biop- sies ideally should be done on all patients suspected to have glomerular disease wheth- er primary or secondary. I say ideally but not absolutely necessary for all cases, although some nephrologists may beg to differ. But personally for me, when in doubt, do biopsy.” Preparation for a renal biopsy involves an initial scan to assess kidney architecture. If the renal cortex is still more than 1 cm, bi- opsy may be done without incurring the risk of bleeding when the medulla is sampled. Bleeding parameters such as the PT/PTT should not be significantly prolonged. The patient may be observed for 24 to 48 hours after the biopsy both clinically and ultra- sonologically to check for presence of hema- tomas or hematuria.

Managing the cause and effects Once the type of GN has been identified, targeted treatment is utilized. “For primary GN, the general treatment principle is to arrest glomerular damage de- pending on the patient’s clinical manifesta- tions,” Lagunzad advises. Treatment may in- clude ACE inhibitors or angiotensin 2 receptor blockers for proteinuric and/or hypertensive patients; corticosteroid or immunosuppres- sive treatment for immune-mediated GNs. “For secondary GNs (eg, SLE, Hep B, malig-

nancy-associated, drug-induced), treating the cause and/or withdrawing the offending agents will usually address the GN as well,” he adds. Supportive therapy is warranted to address the various complications of GN. Correct- ing electrolyte abnormalities prevents the ar- rhythmias that may ensue. Edema can also be debilitating, and is treated with modifications in salt and fluid intake, as well as through ju- dicious use of diuretics. Dialysis is an option for patients with renal failure. “Some medications have shown promise in the treatment of selected populations of GN patients. In IgA nephropathy, for example, fish oil may improve outcomes. Monoclo- nal antibodies such as rituximab, and eculi- zumab have been used for membranous GN. For most of other interventions, studies have shown conflicting, if not disappointing, out- comes,” explains Lagunzad.

The difficulties of prognostication The outcome of GN is very varied, ranging from excellent to ominous, depending ulti- mately on the type of GN and the presenting stage of the disease. Some cases of MCD can resolve spontaneously, never to recur again. On the flipside, focal segmental glomerulo- sclerosis of the collapsing variant is almost synonymous to end-stage kidney disease at the outset, even in the best of hands. GN is a disease that must be identified early for proper diagnosis and treatment to be given. Remember that there’s more to pus cells in urine, especially when there are RBCs

and protein.

cells in urine, especially when there are RBCs and protein. Sources: Cohen RA and Brown RS.

Sources:

Cohen RA and Brown RS. Microscopic hematuria. N Engl J Med 2003;

348:2330-2338.

Hricik DE, Chung-Park M and Sedor JR. Glomerulonephritis. N Engl J Med 1998; 339:888-899. Glomerular diseases (Chapter 283). Harrison’s Principles of Internal Medicine, 18th edition. McGraw-Hill: USA, 2012.

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ADVERTORIAL

Stronger immunity for adults aged 50 and up

Most elderly people may be deficient in trace minerals such as iron, copper and folic acid, pre- disposing them to anemia and weakened im- mune system. The link between aging and impaired im- mune responses has been reflected in some theories, which include increased exposure to free radicals that may cause cumulative dam- age to healthy cells. Another theory claims that thymic size decreases as we age, which results in decreasing ability to produce progenitor cells. 1 Research has shown that only about 35% of the elderly retain the immune function typical of younger adults. 2 Nutrition is important in maintaining a healthy immune system and certain vitamins and miner- als play a significant role in this process. Research data have proven that certain nutri- ents selectively influence the immune response, proving that micronutrients are required at ap- propriate intakes for the immune system to func- tion optimally and contribute to the body’s natu- ral defenses. 3 A randomized, double-blind, placebo-con- trolled trial done in 2003 compared the effective- ness of multivitamin and mineral supplements against placebo. Involving 130 community- dwelling adults stratified by age and presence of type 2 diabetes, the study showed that regular intake of a multivitamin and mineral supplement for a year reduced the incidence of participant- reported infection and work absenteeism com- pared with placebo. 4 According to recent nationwide nutrition sur- vey, Filipino adults consume less than the daily

recommended amounts of iron and some vita- mins, which may predispose them to poor im- mune function. The survey conducted by the Food and Nutrition Research Institute (FNRI) of the Department of Science and Technology covered a total of 3,044 households all over the country. 5 For adults aged 50 and above, antioxidants and trace elements may be beneficial to enhance or support the immune system. 2 Folic acid en- hances red blood cell formation, preventing ane- mia while promoting cell growth and division. 6 Zinc, iron and copper have important influences on immune function, 4,7 and antioxidants such as vitamins A, C and E promote good wound heal- ing. 6 In addition, folic acid, copper, selenium and vitamins B 12 , C and E work together to support the activities of immune cells. 7 The elderly are clearly at risk for nutrient deficiency and poor immune status. To avoid the short- and long-term effects of poor nutri- tion, Filipino adults should improve their diet through a wide variety of food sources, and in certain cases, through vitamin and mineral supplementation.

References:

1. J Lata, H. Ageing: physiological aspects. JK Science, 2007;(9)3:11. 2. Dickinson, A.

The Benefits of Nutritional Supplements: Immune Function in the Elderly. Council for Responsible Nutrition, 2002. 3. Maggini, E et al. Contribution of selected vita- mins and trace elements to immune function. doi:10.1017/S0029665108006939.

4. Barringer, T et al. Ann Intern Med, 2003;138:366-71. 5. Constantino, M. Pinoy

Diet Lacks Essential Nutrients. Article accessed from www.fnri.dost.gov.ph last No- vember 10, 2011. 6. Dickinson, A. The Benefits of Nutritional Supplements: Rec- ommended Intakes of Vitamins and Essential Minerals. Council for Responsible Nutrition, 2002. 7. Chandra, RK. Nutrition and the immune system from birth to old age. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 2006.

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Philippine Focus

MARKET WATCH

Safe sunscreen for babies

I n choosing sunscreen for children, opt for products with broad spectrum protection, which protects against both ul-

traviolet A and B. At present, there is no evidence of toxicity from absorption of sunscreen ingredients in infants and young children. However, using products containing ingredients that do not penetrate the skin, such as zinc oxide and titanium ox- ide, may be safer. Specialists recommend choosing a brand that is made and tested for children’s and babies’ skin; ones that contain less al- cohol and fragrances that may cause irritation. Infants younger than 6 months of age should be kept out of direct sunlight, while infants 6 months or older should wear sunscreen for protection. Johnson’s Baby Daily Sun Protection Lotion, with SPF 15/PA+ or SPF 30/PA++, provides broad spectrum UVA/UVB protection with natural sunflower extract. Besides sun protection, the lotion also keeps baby’s skin moisturized all day. Comes in 50-mL and 100-mL bottles.

Besides sun protection, the lotion also keeps baby’s skin moisturized all day. Comes in 50-mL and

Essential nutrients for energy and overall health

D emographics like active adults and the elderly may benefit from nutritional supplements that address

nutrient gaps. Enercal Plus is high in quality protein for muscle build-up and repair, containing whey that has higher bioavailabilty and digestibility than casein. Enercal also promotes good heart health as it con- tains 0g trans fat and low cholesterol at 20mg per serv- ing. It also meets the American Heart Association and National Cholesterol Education Program criteria for to- tal calories from fats. It contains 29 essential nutrients, including immune-boosting nutrients such as vitamins A, C and E, zinc and β-carotene. Enercal contains nutritionally balanced caloric distribution by allowing versatile option of 1.5kcal/mL for total nutrition support or 1.0kcal/mL for nutritional supplementation and by providing balanced caloric distribution of macronutrients as recommended by local rec- ommended energy and nutrient intake. One serving also provides approximately the same energy as one complete meal, with 1 serving of 4 scoops equivalent to 240kcal or a serving of 6 scoops equivalent to 360kcal.

as one complete meal, with 1 serving of 4 scoops equivalent to 240kcal or a serving
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29 June 2012 Philippine Focus

June 2012

Philippine Focus

MARKET WATCH

Potent extracts for better circulation

C irculan is a soft gel capsule that combines four potent extracts. These are Hawthorne Berry extract (Crataegus oxaycantha) 50 mg, garlic oil (Allium sativum)

150 mg, gingko biloba extract 5 mg, lemon balm extract (Melissa officinalis) 10 mg – each one is known for its health promoting properties, working together to enhance the body’s circulation. Circulan is approved by the local Food and Drug Administration as a food supplement to promote good blood circulation which may aid in:

to promote good blood circulation which may aid in: • Improving overall circulation • Enhancing memory

• Improving overall circulation

• Enhancing memory and concentration

• Improving sleep and rest

• Relieving numbness or tingling of the extremities

• Boosting resistance to infection

• Maintaining youthful energy and vitality

• Looking and feeling younger

Specialist highlights importance of pneumococcal vaccine

D r. Catherine Weil-Olivier, professor at Paris VII University, recommended that vaccinations against pneumococcal disease should be a high priority,

as she spoke during the 49 th Philippine Pediatric Society Convention. “Cases on Pneumonia across the globe have peaked to an alarming level when, in fact, children do not have to die of Pneumonia,” said Dr. Weil- Olivier. She presented studies on the impact of Pfizer’s pneumococcal con- jugate vaccine (PCV), which currently has the broadest serotype coverage among all PCVs. In the Philippines, Pneumonia is considered the number one killer of Filipino children un- der the age of five. Pneumonia is the leading cause of morbidity and the 5th leading cause of mortality in the country. The Philippines ranks 10th in the world with the most number of cases amongst children. “PD causes high-cost hospitalization and requires antibiotics, which are more costly and less efficacious in terms of public health,” said Dr. Weil-Olivier. “Definitely vaccination has a cost, but if you look at the cost of the vaccination versus the cost of what you have prevented, directly and indirectly, then vaccination is highly beneficial.” The WHO also identifies vaccination as one of the preventive measures likely to have sig- nificant impact in decreasing the number of pneumococcal disease victims.

of the preventive measures likely to have sig - nificant impact in decreasing the number of
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ADVERTORIAL

MIMSCME: Masterclass in Oncology inspires hope in lung cancer treatment

The Philippine Society of Medical Oncology, in partnership with MIMSCME, recently hosted the MIMSCME Masterclass on Oncology, enti- tled “Inspiring Hope: Updates in the Treatment of Lung Cancer” at the Medical City Auditorium last April 20, 2012. This activity was in continu- ing support of PSMO’s efforts to improve the quality of care for cancer patients through CME, knowledge enhancement, and skills develop- ment. With Dr. Gerard Cornelio as course director, the masterclass was attended by medical on- cologists and pulmonologists interested in lung cancer. Course and discussion flow, which cov- ered all stages of treatment from assessment to prevention, was discussed by Dr. Ellie May Be- larmino-Villegas, vice president of PSMO. Dr. Camilo Roa of the University of the Phil- ippines College of Medicine-Philippine General Hospital (UPCM-PGH) presented updates in the initial assessment, diagnosis and staging of lung cancer. Dr. Roselle De Guzman, assistant pro- fessor with the Manila Central University- Filemon D. Tanchoco Medical Foundation, discussed updates in the medical manage- ment of epidermal growth factor (EGFR) mu- tant lung cancers, emphasizing the need to move beyond treatment based on clini- cal characteristics alone and transition toward more routine molecular testing. Targeted therapies in lung cancer were dis- cussed by Dr. Denky Shoji De la Rosa from the

were dis- cussed by Dr. Denky Shoji De la Rosa from the University of the East

University of the East Ramon Magsaysay Memo- rial Medical Center. The topic included bevaci- zumab as featured in AVAiL trial, cetuximab that was studied in the FLEX trial, as well as ALK tyro- sine kinase inhibitor and crizotinib. Genomic profiling for personalized medicine was discussed by pathologist Dr. Michelle Her- nandez-Diwa, clinical associate professor from UPCM-PGH. Dr. Ramon Tudtud, director of the Cebu Can- cer Institute-Perpetual Succor Hospital, talked

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June 2012

Philippine Focus

about non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) man- agement, emphasizing the interlinking rela- tionship of histology, predictive biomarkers and maintenance therapy. Dr. Annielyn Ong-Cornel focused her discus- sion on the importance of chemoprevention. According to Ong-Cornel, prevention should go beyond smoking cessation and include under- standing of molecular changes in premalignant lesions, identification of high-risk subjects and validation of secondary endpoint biomarkers. Dr. Felycette Gay Martinez-Lapus, PSMO president, expressed satisfaction with the out- come of the partnership with MIMSCME, a well- attended event that was considered as PSMO’s midyear convention. With the event’s huge suc- cess, talks are underway for a similar MIMSCME- PSMO event in 2013. Roche Philippines sponsored a lunch sympo- sium that provided further discussions on non- small cell lung cancer, with presentations from Dr. Ong-Cornel and Dr. Antonio Villalon, head of the Cancer Institute in St. Luke’s Medical Center, Global City. The sponsored dinner symposium showcased the cobas® EGFR mutation test and Ventana Medical System, the latest on molecu- lar and tissue diagnostics.

showcased the cobas® EGFR mutation test and Ventana Medical System, the latest on molecu- lar and
showcased the cobas® EGFR mutation test and Ventana Medical System, the latest on molecu- lar and
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32 June 2012 Conference Coverage

June 2012

Conference Coverage

World Congress of Cardiology Scientific Sessions 2012, 18-21 April, Dubai, UAE

Personalize CVD prevention for women

Radha Chitale

C ardiovascular disease prevention is im- portant among women but the ideal

approach, which includes personalized risk stratification and assessment, is not reflected in current risk assessment models. “The global risk assessment tools that we use today – they don’t care about the dynamic nature of risk factors within individuals and populations,” said Dr. Dilek Ural, Department of Cardiology, Faculty of Medicine, Kocaeli University, Kocaeli, Turkey. “It is impossible with these tools to evaluate temporal lifelong changes in individuals.” More than 8.6 million women die of CVD yearly but their risk of cardiac morbidity or mortality is underestimated. Women often present with heart disease differently than men do. While major risk fac- tors for heart disease and stroke are similar between men and women, many of the non- major risk factors differ. Hypertension, diabetes, psychological stress and lack of physical activity are more important determinants of CVD in women. Additionally, these risk factors are distrib- uted with significant differences through- out the world. For example, high cholesterol is a major problem among women in North America, Europe and Australia. High blood pressure is a common contributor to CVD among African women, and diabetes and obesity are the culprits among women in the Middle East.

and obesity are the culprits among women in the Middle East. Over 8.6 million women die

Over 8.6 million women die of CVD each year around the world.

The American Heart Association made an important amendment to their guidelines in 2011 by changing the criteria for risk status from a 10-year coronary heart disease event risk of 20 percent to a 10-year cardiovascular disease event risk of 10 percent. This change was the result of studies show- ing women are more prone to stroke as a result of heart disease and may present with disease about 10 years later than male counterparts. Ideally, Ural said cardiovascular preven- tion and assessment tools should incorpo- rate genetic factors, vascular age, lifelong exposure to multiple risk factors and country- based socioeconomic factors in order to per- sonalize risk stratification and management

for women.

factors and country- based socioeconomic factors in order to per - sonalize risk stratification and management
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33 June 2012 Conference Coverage

June 2012

Conference Coverage

World Congress of Cardiology Scientific Sessions 2012, 18-21 April, Dubai, UAE

Salt tax lowers CV mortality

Radha Chitale

R educing daily salt intake via voluntary salt reduction in industrially processed foods

or through a tax on high-salt foods may help cut cardiovascular disease mortality, according to preliminary research conducted in the US. “Elevated blood pressure is the leading risk factor for death globally,” said lead researcher Dr. Thomas Gaziano of the Harvard School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts, US. “Salt is associated with increased blood pressure in cardiovascular disease.” Gaziano and colleagues also sought to re- duce the economic burden of hypertension while improving quality and quantity of life through low-cost salt reduction methods. This type of approach could be important in low- and middle-income countries and the fast-developing BRIC (Brazil, Russia, India, China) nations where hypertension is poorly controlled, if it is diagnosed at all. The World Health Organization and other global agencies recommend a daily salt in- take of 5 grams or less. The mean daily salt intake in BRIC countries is 10 grams. In some countries, daily salt intake exceeds 16 grams. The researchers modelled the efficacy and financial viability of reduced salt intake through a voluntary 9.5 percent decrease in the salt content of manufactured foods and a 40 percent tax on salty foods, similar to a to- bacco tax. Similar models have been used in the UK. Both methods reduced daily sodium intake but voluntary salt reduction was more effec- tive with a 10 percent decrease in sodium in-

take. The salt tax led to a 6 percent decrease. Although some mean daily salt intake re- mained over the recommended value, Gazia- no said both approaches would lead to about a 3 percent reduction in the rate of cardiovas- cular death and save costs by reducing the number of treatments for heart attacks and stroke. For example, the incidence of heart attacks and strokes would fall by 1.7 percent and 4.7 percent in China, respectively, and by 1.47 percent and 4 percent in India. The total cost for either method of salt re- duction was less than US$50 per person over their lifetime. Gaziano estimated that high blood pres- sure accounts for about 10 percent of the global healthcare expenditure – about US$450 billion with up to a trillion USD expected over the next 10 years in new blood pressure- related events such as stroke and heart attack, not including the cost of lost productivity due to absence from work or early death. “Even modest reductions in salt consump- tion could lead to improvements in CVD mor- tality and save overall healthcare costs,” he said. A separate model emphasizing improved screening and treatment for high-risk hyper- tensives whose systolic blood pressure was over 140 and whose 10-year cardiovascular event risk was over 20 percent proved to be a more expensive but still cost effective method of reducing cardiovascular fatalities by about 3 percent in low- and middle-income countries. The results of this preliminary study are expected to be published later this

year.

in low- and middle-income countries. The results of this preliminary study are expected to be published
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June 2012

Conference Coverage

Personal Perspectives

Personal Perspectives ‘‘ My favorite topic at WCC was echocardiography during inter- vention. I was surprised

‘‘ My favorite topic at WCC was echocardiography during inter- vention. I was surprised that the session was ticketed because it was not mentioned on the website. It would have been better if ticketed sessions were highlighted on the website beforehand.

Dr. Amuthan Vivekanandan, cardiologist, India

beforehand. Dr. Amuthan Vivekanandan, cardiologist, India ‘‘ There were a variety of presentations at this WCC

‘‘

There were a variety of presentations at this WCC – from basic science to interventional cardiology. Many sessions that I was interested in were concurrent and that made it difficult for me to attend.

Dr. Abdulwasea Derhim Alduais, cardiologist, Yemen

attend. Dr. Abdulwasea Derhim Alduais, cardiologist, Yemen ‘‘ This is a well-or ganized conference, with lectures

‘‘

This is a well-organized conference, with lectures presented from many topics. It would have been more interesting if great- er emphasis was given to yoga and its ability to reduce stress.

Amandah Hoogbruin, professor of nursing, Kwantlen Polytechnic University-Surrey, British Columbia, Canada

Polytechnic University-Surrey, British Columbia, Canada ‘‘ This is my first time attending the WCC. It has

‘‘

This is my first time attending the WCC. It has been very reward- ing, both from the point of view of content and meeting people. I’m into public health and prevention, so I’ve been going to ses- sions on physical activity, tobacco control and nutrition.

Trevor Shilton, director of cardiovascular health, Heart Foundation of Australia, Perth, Australia

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35 June 2012 Conference Coverage

June 2012

Conference Coverage

World Congress of Cardiology Scientific Sessions 2012, 18-21 April, Dubai, UAE

India becoming CVD capital of the world

Rajesh Kumar

I ndia is acquiring the dubious distinction of being known as the diabetes and cardiovas-

cular disease (CVD) capital of the world, ac- cording to a US expert. Professor Prakash Deedwania of the Uni- versity of California, San Francisco, US, was commenting on the findings of the Indian Heart Watch (IHW) study that assessed the country’s growing CVD epidemic and identi- fied reasons behind it. The study found that lifestyle (physical activity, diet and smoking) and biological (obesity, diabetes, high blood pressure and el- evated cholesterol) risk factors for CVD were at higher levels in India than in developed re- gions such as the US and Western Europe. Conducted between 2006 and 2010 and in- volving 6,000 men and women from 11 cities across India, it is the largest ever study prob- ing CVD risk factors in the country. It was led by Deedwania and Dr. Rajeev Gupta of Fortis Escorts Hospital, Jaipur, India. While 79 percent of the polled men and 83 percent of the women were found to be physi- cally inactive, 51 percent of men and 48 per- cent of women were found to have high-fat diets. About 60 percent of men and 57 percent of women were found to have a low intake of fruit and vegetables, and 12 percent of men and 0.5 percent of women smoked. “These results…must prompt the [Indian] government to develop public health strate- gies that will change lifestyles, if these risk factors are to be controlled,” said Deedwania. As for the biological and metabolic risk factors, the IHW also found overweight and obesity in 41 percent of men and 45 percent of women. High blood pressure was reported

in 33 percent of men and 30 percent of wom- en, while high cholesterol was found in one- quarter of all men and women. Diabetes or metabolic syndrome was also reported in 34 percent of men and 37 percent of women. Urban development is playing a role in the development of CVD risk factors, the IHW found. Smoking, high fat intake and low fruit/vegetable intake were shown to be more common in less developed cities, while physi- cal inactivity was seen to be more prevalent in highly-developed cities with their better transport networks. Accordingly, metabolic risk factors such as obesity, high blood pressure and high cho- lesterol were seen to be more prevalent in highly developed cities that had easy access to cheaper fast foods/refined foods. Even literate middle-class urban Indians had a low awareness and control of the CVD risk factors, the IHW study results showed. Of the approximately one-third of study par- ticipants found to have hypertension, only 57 percent were aware of their status, 40 percent were on treatment and only 25 percent had adequate blood pressure control. In contrast, more than 75 percent of people with hypertension in high and middle-income countries are aware of their health status and more than 50–60 percent actually have their blood pressure under control. “These results show that improving ur- ban planning and overall living conditions are critical to curb the CVD epidemic in In- dia,” said Gupta, adding that basic amenities, healthcare facilities and health literacy also needed to improve so people could take re-

sponsibility for their own actions.

facilities and health literacy also needed to improve so people could take re- sponsibility for their
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June 2012

Conference Coverage

World Congress of Cardiology Scientific Sessions 2012, 18-21 April, Dubai, UAE

High-dose nicotine patch safe for heavy smokers

Rajesh Kumar

S mokers who have been smoking more than 40 cigarettes daily can be safely treat-

ed with a high-dose nicotine patch, according to Professor Richard Hurt, professor of medi- cine and director of nicotine dependence cen- ter at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, US. Current dosing recommendations based on patient’s smoking rate suggest a dose of 7-14 mg/day for those smoking less than 10 ciga- rettes daily, 14-21 mg/day for those on 10 to 20 cigarettes daily, and 21-42 mg/day for smok- ers of 21 to 40 cigarettes daily. [Mayo Clin Proc

2000;75:1311-1316]

Hurt said the initial dose can be estimated on the basis of either the patient’s smoking rate or blood cotinine levels, and the adequa- cy of the nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) can be assessed either by patient response or by the replacement rate of blood cotinine. A higher percentage of blood cotinine replace- ment may increase patch therapy’s efficacy and improve withdrawal symptoms. Nicotine gum, patch, lozenge, inhaler, bu- propion, varenicline and the combinations thereof can be used as first-line pharmaco- therapy, while clonidine and nortriptyline are suitable for second-line. Of these, the patch and varenicline and/or bupropion can be used as “floor” medications, along with short act- ing NRT products for withdrawal symptoms, said Hurt.

act - ing NRT products for withdrawal symptoms, said Hurt. Smokers who have been smoking more

Smokers who have been smoking more than two packs of cigarettes a day may be safely treated with high-dose nicotine patches.

Patient involvement is the key to tobacco cessation and the selection of medicines and their doses should be guided by cardiologists’ clinical skills and knowledge of pharmaco- therapy, he added. One study comparing 24-week extended therapy of transdermal nicotine patch dose of 21 mg/day with 8-week standard therapy showed a dose-response to patch therapy. [Ann Int Med 2010;152:144-151]

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June 2012

Conference Coverage

In this 568-patient study, smoking absti- nence was the same in the two groups by week 8. However, the extended therapy achieved a delayed relapse to smoking. At week 24, extended therapy produced higher rates of point-prevalence abstinence (31.6 percent vs. 20.3 percent; [95% CI, 1.23 to 2.66]; P=0.002), prolonged abstinence (41.5 percent vs. 26.9 percent; [95%CI, 1.38 to 2.82]; P=0.001), and continuous abstinence (19.2 percent vs. 12.6 percent; [95% CI, 1.04 to 2.60]; P=0.032) versus standard therapy. Extended therapy also reduced the risk for lapse (hazard ratio, 0.77 [95% CI, 0.63 to 0.95]; P=0.013) and increased the chances of recovery from lapses (hazard ratio, 1.47 [95% CI, 1.17 to 1.84]; P=0.001). At week 52, extended therapy produced higher quit rates for prolonged abstinence only (P=0.027). No differences in side effects and adverse events between groups were found at the extended- treatment assessment. In a randomized placebo-controlled trial involving varenicline therapy in 714 smok- ers with stable cardiovascular disease, patch therapy achieved 47 percent abstinence, com- pared to 14 percent on placebo (95% CI 4.18- 8.93). [Circ 2010;121:221-229] Citing the case study of a 58-year-old smoker with chest pain who was put on two 21mg patches every morning, Hurt said a follow-up phone call 2 weeks later revealed he was experiencing cravings for cigarettes in the evenings, which had increased his use of reliever nicotine inhaler. A 14mg patch at 4pm resolved the issue and the patient was encouraged to use high-dose patches until he could comfortably abstain, and then reduce the morning dose. “For smokers with coronary heart disease, stopping smoking decreases all cause mortal-

ity by 36 percent,” he concluded.

smokers with coronary heart disease, stopping smoking decreases all cause mortal- ity by 36 percent,” he
smokers with coronary heart disease, stopping smoking decreases all cause mortal- ity by 36 percent,” he
smokers with coronary heart disease, stopping smoking decreases all cause mortal- ity by 36 percent,” he
smokers with coronary heart disease, stopping smoking decreases all cause mortal- ity by 36 percent,” he
smokers with coronary heart disease, stopping smoking decreases all cause mortal- ity by 36 percent,” he
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38 June 2012 In Practice

June 2012

In Practice

Low back pain: Current concepts

Dr. Eugene Wong Consultant Spine & Orthopedic Surgeon Kuala Lumpur

Dr. Eugene Wong

Consultant Spine & Orthopedic Surgeon Kuala Lumpur

Low back pain (LBP) is a common and chal- lenging health problem in primary care. There is a point prevalence of 15 to 30 percent and a lifetime prevalence of between 50 and 85 per- cent. [Spine (Phila Pa 1976) 2001;26(22):2504- 13; discussion 2513-4] Nonspecific low back pain (NSLBP) com- prises approximately 85 percent of all back pain diagnoses and affects 80 percent of adults. It is associated with enormous ex- pense in terms of healthcare expenditures, and work- and disability-related losses. Mean direct and indirect costs for LBP care are twice as high for patients with chronic LBP when compared with acute LBP. The severity of LBP (high disability and moderate-to-severe limi- tations in daily living) and depression are the two most important predictors of costs. Currently, there is a shift in the clinical model of LBP from a biomedical ‘injury’ to a multifactorial biopsychosocial pain syndrome which erupts periodically over the course of a lifetime of an individual. The consensus of clinical guidelines sug- gests that acute NSLBP patients should be re- assured of a good prognosis, educated in self- care, remain active and use over-the-counter medications as a first line of symptom control. Many patients with low back pain have at least one red-flag sign. Red-flag signs have a

poor test specificity. Thus, the evaluation of LBP should take into account the whole clini- cal presentation of the patient. The key is to have a high index of suspicion in high-risk patients or when more than one red flag is present. (Table 1) Diagnostic and therapeutic management of LBP vary tremendously among GPs. A recom- mended approach to diagnosis and treatment is provided in Tables 2 and 3. An ideal ap- proach in managing LBP patients should be multidisciplinary and inter-professional. GPs could focus on pain management through medication, red-flag screening, encourage- ment to stay active and reassurance. Physi- cal therapy could focus on pain management, general exercise and encouragement to stay active. Occupational therapy could focus on disability prognosis, yellow-flags manage- ment (Table 4) and return to activity param- eters. Patients with yellow flag signs require cog- nitive behavioral therapy, the aim of which is to change patients’ thoughts and beliefs about their pain. Adequate information and good communication between the primary care physician and patient is a prerequisite for a successful psychosocial intervention, but this will not guarantee a change in the way pa- tients behave and how they deal with their pain problem. The key to treatment success is that patients become active processors of in- formation, and not passive reactors. Patients should be active collaborators when changing misconceived thoughts and behaviors (Table 5). [Spine (Phila Pa 1976) 2008;33(1):81-9]

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39 June 2012 In Practice

June 2012

In Practice

A high proportion of patients recover from acute back pain. Reductions in pain and dis- ability have to be more than 50 percent to be consistent with recovery from LBP. [Spine (Ph- ila Pa 1976) 2011;36(26):2316-23] When should LBP cases be referred to a spine surgeon? Indications would include patients with no response after 6 weeks of conservative treatment, patients with radicu- lar syndrome, presence of nerve root tension signs, suspicion of a pathologic change, cauda equina syndrome and MRI showing disc pro- trusion or prolapse. To rationalize the approach of LBP and to take account of emerging scientific evidence, clinical guidelines on the management of LBP have been issued in various countries. This

Table 1: Red flags

Cancer

• Age >50 or <17.

• History.

• Unexplained weight loss of >10 kg within 6 months.

• Failure to improve with therapy.

• Pain persists for more than 6 weeks.

• Pain at rest or at night.

Infection

• Severe pain.

• Persistent fever.

• History of intravenous drug abuse.

• Recent bacterial infection.

• Urinary tract infection or pyelonephritis.

• Pneumonia.

• Wound (eg, decubitus ulcer) in spine region.

• Immunocompromised state.

• Systemic corticosteroids.

• Organ transplant.

• Diabetes mellitus.

• Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV).

• Pain at rest.

Cauda Equina Syndrome

• Urinary incontinence or retention.

• Saddle anesthesia.

• Anal sphincter tone decreased or fecal incontinence.

• Bilateral lower extremity weakness or numbness.

• Progressive neurologic deficit.

• Major motor weakness.

• Major sensory deficit.

Significant herniated nucleus

pulposus

• Major muscle weakness (strength 3

of 5 or less).

• Foot drop.

Vertebral fracture

• Prolonged use of corticosteroids.

• Age greater than 70 years.

• History of osteoporosis.

• Mild trauma over age 50 (or with

osteoporosis).

• Recent significant trauma at any age.

Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

• Abdominal pulsating mass.

• Atherosclerotic vascular disease.

• Pain at rest or nocturnal pain.

Gastrointestinal/ Genitourinary

• Abdominal tenderness.

• Rebound tenderness.

• Diarrhea/constipation.

• Anuria, oliguria, polyuria.

• Abnormal menses, dyspareunia.

General (weak test specificity)

• Vertebral tenderness.

• Limited spine range of motion.

Table 2: Recommendations for diagnosis of LBP

• History taking and physical examination to exclude red flags.

• Diagnostic triage (nonspecific LBP, radicular syndrome, specific pathologic change).

• Physical examination for neurologic screening.

• Radiographs not useful for nonspecific LBP.

• Consider psychosocial factors if there is no improvement.

brings us to the question: is there a need for such a guideline to address the issue of LBP in the local population? LBP can be managed successfully in the primary care setting through a program of activity modification, reassurance, short- term symptom control and alteration of in- appropriate beliefs about the correlation between back pain and impairment. Mul- tiple evidence-based guidelines exist, but a fundamental concern is the current lack of knowledge on the best ways to change the

behavior of clinicians.

on the best ways to change the behavior of clinicians. Table 3: Recommendations for treat ment

Table 3: Recommendations for treatment of LBP

Acute or Subacute Pain

• Reassure patients (favorable prognosis).

• Advise to stay active.

• Prescribe medication if necessary – paracetamol, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents, muscle relaxants or opioids.

• Discourage bed rest.

• Do not advise back-specific exercises.

Chronic Pain

• Refer for exercise therapy.

Table 4: Yellow Flags

Psychiatric disorders

• Anxious, depressed, social withdrawal.

• Misconception of danger of back disorders.

• Somatization; poor sleep because of back pain.

Socioeconomic issues

• Occupation related (heavy lifting, unsociable working hours, high mental workload, prolonged time off work, dissatisfaction with work, lack of work support, problems

with claims or compensation, and no economic gain from resuming work).

• Economic/ social hardships (eg, death in the family, divorce or loss of income).

Behavior

• Inappropriate or limited belief of improvement or ability to work.

• Expectation that passive treatment (physical agents, extended bed rest) is better than active participation (exercise, walking, working).

• High fear-avoidance behavior scale score.

• High kinesiophobia scale score.

Miscellaneous

• Confusion about diagnosis and prognosis.

• Misunderstandings about the cause of pain.

• Negative experience with previous intervention for back pain.

Table 5: Aims of a cognitive behavioral approach

• Combat demoralization by assisting patients to change their view of their pain from overwhelming to manageable.

• Assist patients to reconceptualize themselves as active, resourceful and competent.

• Help patients in coping strategies and techniques to help them adapt and respond to pain and the resultant problems.

• Teach patients how to anticipate problems proactively and generate solutions.

• Attribute successful outcomes to their own efforts.

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News

Lutein crucial for early cognitive development

Rajesh Kumar

sor Sanja Kolaček, professor of pediatrics at the Children’s Hospital Zagreb, Croatia and the vice-president of the Croatian Pediatric Society. Lutein is only available through dietary sources and cannot be made by the body. Therefore, women of child bearing age and expectant and breastfeeding mothers should be encouraged to eat a wide variety of foods as part of a balanced diet, including lutein- rich foods such as green, leafy vegetables and eggs, said Kolaček. For infants, breast milk is the best source

of lutein and breast feeding exclusively for up to six months can prevent a lot of problems

in them, including growth issues such as the

child growing too fast, or not growing fast enough. Supplementing breast feeding with other foods is usually recommended no earlier than four months and no later than six. “Where mothers need to provide a formula

at any age during the first year of the child’s life, [fortified formula] is the right option compared to cow’s milk,” she added. “Cow’s milk should not be the infant’s ba-

sic diet as it does not provide all the nutrients

necessary for the child’s physical and cogni- tive development.” Kolaček said doctors should never rec- ommend elimination diet to prevent a dis- ease. If a woman or child needs to eliminate nuts, dairy products, fish or eggs due to

a health condition, they should try to

substitute the nutrients they might be miss- ing out on. Both Johnson and Kolaček were recently

hosted in Singapore by Abbott Nutrition.

M illions of children under five years of age fail to reach their full cognitive po-

tential each year, mainly due to lack of ad- equate nutrition essential for development during the early years of life. While the role of iron, iodine, choline, zinc and omega-3 fatty acids is well established, lutein is now being acknowledged as another important nutrient crucial in the early cogni- tive development, said Dr. Elizabeth Johnson, research scientist at the Jean Mayer USDA Hu- man Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University in Boston, Massachusetts, US. Johnson cited her study involving the ex- amination of brain tissues of 30 healthy in- fants who had died in the first year of their lives due to sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) and other reasons. “We found that lutein is not only present in all the four regions of the infant brain (frontal cortex, hippocampus, auditory cortex and oc- cipital cortex), but it is there in preference to other carotenoids,” she said. Lutein is an inte- gral part of the eye’s retina too. Also, 60 percent of all carotenoids in the infant brains turned out to be in the form of lutein. This proportion was double than what earlier studies have found in the adult brains. Researchers found this level of concentration surprising, considering only a sixth of all the carotenoids found in the human diet are usu- ally in the form of lutein. If the brain is soaking it up from across the blood-brain barrier and accumulating it, clearly it is needed for something, said profes-

soaking it up from across the blood-brain barrier and accumulating it, clearly it is needed for
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June 2012

News

Feeding difficulties can persist into adulthood

Rajesh Kumar

F eeding difficulties can have a lasting

impact on a child’s phys- ical and mental develop- ment and the condition can persist into adoles- cence and adulthood if not treated early, accord- ing to an expert. Dr. Glenn Berall, chief of pediatrics at North York General Hospital in Toronto, Ontario, Canada and a leading expert on the subject, cited a study that looked at children diagnosed with feeding difficulties at age one or two, followed them up at

nine years of age and com- pared them with their classmates who did not have such prior diagnosis. The researchers found that prevalence of feeding difficulties was three times as high in children with prior diagnosis. Recent studies also support the idea that the condition per- sists if not addressed early, said Berall. He

was hosted in Singapore recently by Abbott Nutrition and spoke to GPs and pediatri- cians about his experiences. While habitually picky eaters who are otherwise well nourished are not a concern, eating difficulties become troublesome when they cause consequences, be they nutritional (iron and calcium deficiency), developmen-

they nutritional (iron and calcium deficiency), developmen - About 20 to 30 percent of all children

About 20 to 30 percent of all children have some level of feeding difficulty.

tal or emotional and behavioral. Studies have shown that children who have feeding prob- lems have a higher prevalence of depression, anxiety and delinquency, Berall said. About 20 to 30 percent of all children are believed to have some level of feeding diffi- culty, and the rate is up to 80 percent in those with autism and other neuro-developmental problems. Being the first line of care, GPs will be the first ones to encounter these cases. They usu- ally check the level of severity, sub-category that the condition falls into and the level of parental anxiety associated with the child’s feeding problems, Berall said.

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Some doctors use the diagnostic toolkit called Identification and Management of Feed- ing Difficulties (IMFeD) to identify and man- age the condition themselves or to refer the child to a specialist. The kit classifies common feeding difficulties as: limited appetite, sen- sory food aversion, underlying medical condi- tion, fear of feeding, neglect and undue care- giver concern. Berall said common caregiver styles (controlling, responsive, neglectful and indulgent) also need to be understood before deciding on the right treatment approach. Some children will do well with the food rules (see box). The highly selective eaters are afraid of trying new foods and can re- spond well to spicy foods, whereas the more serious ones will require a longer work up. While parents and GP work together to resolve the issue, adding a balanced supple- ment such as PediaSure to the child’s diet won’t suppress their appetite or interfere with feeding, added Berall. Instead, it could help recover their growth and relieve the parents’ anxiety by providing reassurance that their child is getting better nutrition. “That will help parents follow the food guidelines to make sure the whole treatment package is a success,” he said. Children with high selectivity and fear of feeding also take a long time to respond. Adding a supple- ment to their diet, given at the end of the day, will help balance their nutrition in the mean-

while.

The food rules

• The parent decides where, when, and what the child eats, but the child de- cides how much is eaten.

• Avoid distraction at mealtime. Use a high chair to help confine the toddler to the feeding environment.

• Avoid juice and milk and provide only water for thirst

• Do not get overly excited or animated (eg, flying airplanes into the mouth).

• Eating should begin within 15 min- utes of the start of the meal and last no longer than 30-35 minutes.

• Do not cook at short notice to pander to the child’s whim.

• Respect the child’s tendency to “neo- phobia” and offer a food repetitively before giving up on it.

• Encourage independent feeding: The toddler should have his or her own spoon.

repetitively before giving up on it. • Encourage independent feeding: The toddler should have his or
repetitively before giving up on it. • Encourage independent feeding: The toddler should have his or
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News

Healthcare system overhauls needed, say experts

Radha Chitale

M edical experts and government of- ficials said coordinated government

efforts across Southeast Asia, as well as fundamental changes in value systems, are necessary to improve awareness of chronic diseases and access to care, during a gather- ing to discuss the state of healthcare in the Asia Pacific region. “It’s a mix of what individuals need to do and how one can influence their behaviors to- wards a certain set of values, and how to sup- port the initiative towards achieving [health] objectives,” said Dr. Anil Kapur, managing director of the World Diabetes Foundation, at a summary roundtable during the Economist Healthcare in Asia conference, held recently in Singapore. Activity from local governments to initi- ate policy is important to understanding the importance of chronic disease, said Profes- sor Garry Jennings, director of the Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Institute, a cardiovascu- lar and metabolic research centre in Austra- lia. Dr. Gilberto Lopes, senior consultant medical oncologist and assistant director for Clinical Research at the Johns Hopkins Sin- gapore International Medical Centre, noted that coordinated programs such as the Global Alliance Vaccine Immunization (GAVI) pro- gram have successfully created funds and generated new markets for low-cost drugs in the developing world.

Lopes said such networks that increase ac- cess to vaccines in poor countries could be useful models for increasing access to oncol- ogy medications. “It is clear today we do have a large popu- lation of patients that we cannot cure, who have pain and discomfort, and can be pal- liated with simple, cheap medications,” he said. “Coordination and funding at the na- tional level can help relieve patient suffering [in palliative care or survivorship care].”

‘‘

Coordination and

funding at the

national level

can help relieve

patient suffering

Other government initiatives such as sub- sidies to make food affordable, contracts between governments and health non-gov- ernmental organizations, bulk-purchasing medications to bargain prices down and tak- ing advantage of corporate social responsi- bility programs may also improve patient outcomes. But even when a country has funds or guide- lines for improving access to care, Dr. Mary Gospodarowicz, president-elect of the Union for International Cancer Control and medical director of the Cancer Programme at Princess Margaret Hospital in Toronto, Canada, said

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June 2012

News

those resources may lie unused because governments may lack metrics and specific measurable goals to evaluate progress. “While everyone wants to show decreased mortality and [improved] survival from can- cer, you need interim surrogate measures that can be shown to be making progress,” she said. Continual lack of access to primary and specialist care, accurate diagnoses, and the ablity to follow through from diagnosis to treatment may be prevalent due to distance from care, poor insurance coverage or even cultural factors that might keep patients from following screening or treatment rec- ommendations.

Kapur said harnessing technology would be critical when reaching out to the develop- ing world, particularly using mobile technol- ogy, to bring advanced equipment to prima- ry care settings. He also said schools are key environments for improving awareness of health. Empha- sizing healthy eating and physical activity among children will help prevent diabetes in the future. “People behave in a certain way because those are the values that society accepts,” Kapur said. “If we have to bring about a change in outcomes, then we have to adjust the values society has for certain

behaviors.”

we have to bring about a change in outcomes, then we have to adjust the values
we have to bring about a change in outcomes, then we have to adjust the values
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46 June 2012 Calendar

June 2012

Calendar

June

10th International Conference of the Asian Clinical Oncology Society

13/6/2012 to 15/6/2012 Location: Seoul, Korea Tel: (82) 2 3476 7700 Fax: (82) 2 3476 8800 Email: office@acos2012.org Website: www.acos2012.org

15th International Congress of Infectious Diseases

13/6/2012 to 16/6/2012 Location: Bangkok, Thailand Tel: (617) 277 0551 Fax: (617) 278 9113 Email: info@isid.org Website: www.isid.org/icid/

International Society for Stem Cell Research

13/6/2012 to 16/6/2012 Location: Yokohama, Japan Tel: (847) 509 1944 Fax: (847) 480 9282 Email: isscr@isscr.org Website: www.isscr.org/annual_meeting_home.htm

World Conference on Interventional Oncology

14/6/2012 to 17/6/2012 Location: Chicago, Illinois, US Tel: (1) 202 367 1164 Fax: (1) 202 367 2164 Email: info@wcioonline.org Website: www.wcio2012.org

67th Annual Meeting of the Canadian Urological Association

23/6/2012 to 27/6/2012 Location: Banff, Alberta, Canada Info: Canadian Urological Association Tel: (1) 450 550 3488 Fax: (1) 514 227 5083 Email: info@iseventsolutions.com Website: www.cuameeting.org

15th World Congress of Pain Clinicians

27/6/2012 to 30/6/2012 Location: Granada, Spain Info: Kenes International Tel: (41) 22 908 0488 Fax: (41) 22 9069140 Email: wspc2012@kenes.com Website: www.kenes.com/wspc

ESMO 14th World Congress on Gastrointestinal Cancer

27/6/2012 to 30/6/2012 Location: Barcelona, Spain Info: European Society of Medical Oncology Tel: (770) 751 7332 Fax: (770) 751 7334 Email: meetings@imedex.com Website: www.worldgicancer.com

July

30th International Congress of Psychology

22/7/2012 to 27/7/2012 Location: Cape Town, South Africa Tel: (27) 11 486 3322 Fax : (27) 11 486 3266 E-Mail: info@icp2012.com Website: www.icp2012.com

17th World Congress on Heart Disease 2012

27/7/2012 to 30/7/2012 Location: Toronto, Ontario, Canada Info: International Academy of Cardiology Tel: (1) 310 657 8777 Fax : (1) 310 659 4781 E-Mail: Klimedco@ucla.edu Website: www.cardiologyonline.com

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47 June 2012 Calendar

June 2012

Calendar

Upcoming

European Society of Cardiology Congress 2012

25/8/2012 to 29/8/2012 Location: Munich, Germany Info: European Society of Cardiology Tel: (33) 4 9294 7600 Fax: (33) 4 9294 7601 E-Mail: ascoregistration@jspargo.com Website: www.escardio.org/congresses/esc-2012

15th Biennial Meeting of the European Society for Immunodeficiencies (ESID 2012)

3/10/2012 to 6/10/2012 Location: Florence, Italy Tel: (41) 22 908 0488 Fax: (41) 22 732 2850 Email: esid@kenes.com Website: www.kenes.com/esid

42nd Annual Meeting of the International Continence Society

15/10/2012 to 19/10/2012 Location: Beijing, China Tel: (41) 22 908 0488 Fax: (41) 22 906 9140 Email: ics@kenes.com Website: www.kenes.com/ics

National Diagnostic Imaging Symposium

2/12/2012 to 6/12/2012 Location: Orlando, Florida, US Info: World Class CME Tel: (1) 980 819 5095 Email: office@worldclasscme.com Website: www.cvent.com/events/national-diag-

nostic-imaging-symposium-2012/event-summary-

d9ca77152935404ebf0404a0898e13e9.aspx

Asian Pacific Digestive Week 2012

5/12/2012 to 8/12/2012 Location: Bangkok, Thailand Tel: (66) 2 748 7881 ext. 111 Fax: (66) 2 748 7880 E-mail: secretariat@apdw2012.org Website: www.apdw2012.org

World Allergy Organization International Scientific Conference (WISC 2012)

6/12/2012 to 9/12/2012 Location: Hyderabad, India Info: World Allergy Organization Tel: (1) 414 276 1791 Fax: (1) 414 276 3349 E-mail: WISC@worldallergy.org Website: www.worldallergy.org

Organization Tel: (1) 414 276 1791 Fax: (1) 414 276 3349 E-mail: WISC@worldallergy.org Website: www.worldallergy.org
Organization Tel: (1) 414 276 1791 Fax: (1) 414 276 3349 E-mail: WISC@worldallergy.org Website: www.worldallergy.org
Organization Tel: (1) 414 276 1791 Fax: (1) 414 276 3349 E-mail: WISC@worldallergy.org Website: www.worldallergy.org
Organization Tel: (1) 414 276 1791 Fax: (1) 414 276 3349 E-mail: WISC@worldallergy.org Website: www.worldallergy.org
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48 June 2012 After Hours

June 2012

After Hours

One doctor tells of his evolving culinary creations at home in addition to crafting healthy
One doctor tells of his evolving
culinary creations at home in
addition to crafting healthy
traditional meals for the whole
family. Rajesh Kumar reports.
D r. Poh Beow
Kiong
d i e
is
a
h a r d
foodie. His day job as
a
urology
consultant
at
Singapore’s Changi
day job as a urology consultant at Singapore’s Changi General Hospital keeps him quite busy. But
day job as a urology consultant at Singapore’s Changi General Hospital keeps him quite busy. But

General Hospital keeps him quite busy. But on occasional weekday eveningsandtheweekends, Poh takes on the role of a kitchen maestro, whipping up quick, healthy dinners for the family. “Some find cooking to be a chore,” he says, “But I find it therapeutic. It relaxes me after a long day at work.” Besides, the family doesn’t like to eat out. “Occasionally, when we do, it is on days when our kids go for swimming lessons. We buy takeouts rarely,” said Poh. While he has not developed a signature style, Poh said his cooking has undergone a sort of evolution over the years. “Ten years ago, we used to eat a lot of fried food and used more oil in our cooking. Now, we are more health conscious and tend to steam our fish, vegetables and even chicken, rather than fry them.” While healthy eating is the norm, Poh occasionally indulges in fatty food and believes cer- tain traditional recipes shouldn’t be altered, no matter how calorie dense the dish may be.

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49 June 2012 After Hours

June 2012

After Hours

“Chinese fatty pork cooked in duck soya sauce, for example. That is an extremely greasy but sumptuous dish. And trying to cook it with anything other than fatty pork is pointless,” he said. “Obviously, you don’t eat such food regu- larly and need to burn off the extra calories through vigorous exercise. Else, the coro- nary arteries will clog up,” cautioned Poh. “But many special dishes, and the way they are cooked, are a part of our cultural heritage that needs preserving …You ask your mum how these are cooked, write down the recipes, add your tweaks over the years and pass them on to the next genera- tion. That should never be lost!” Is there a favorite dish he likes more over others?“My mother’s home cooked popiah is the best,” Poh said excitedly. Like chilly crab, popiah is among Singapore’s iconic dishes and that is prepared by wrapping a choice of cooked fillings in paper thin crepe, usually bought ready made from the market. Dried shrimps and cooked pork, vegeta- bles, mushrooms, crab meat and other in- gredients can be mixed with boiled radish to make different fillings. The crepe is used as it

is and rolled up like a sushi roll after dabbing it with sweet sauce, hot chilli paste and stuffing the fillings before cutting the rolls into pieces. Poh’s culinary skills have endeared him to his family and the mother-in-law. He en- courages his fellow physicians to try their hand at cooking and offers to share the rec- ipe for a healthy snack, which anyone with negligible cooking skills can master:

Take a chunk of egg tofu. Pan fry it, drain the excess oil on kitchen paper and cut into pieces. Chop and fry some garlic to pleasant golden brown color, sprinkle on tofu pieces and, voila! The natural sweetness of the egg tofu and light pungency of the fried garlic work so well together that you may not need a dipping sauce. Just make sure not to over- cook the garlic, or it will taste bitter. The cooking process continues even after you turn off the heat. As the garlic turns light brown, turn the heat off and drain out the excess oil before it overcooks. It’s not easy to brown the egg tofu. Pat it dry with kitchen paper, drizzle oil on a really hot pan and leave it to sizzle on one side for several

minutes before turning it over.

pan and leave it to sizzle on one side for several minutes before turning it over.
Photo credits: Changi General Hospital
Photo credits: Changi General Hospital
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50 June 2012 Humor

June 2012

Humor

“I have good news and bad news. The bad news is that the DNA tests

“I have good news and bad news. The bad news is that the DNA tests showed that it was your blood they found at the crime scene. The good news is your cholesterol is down to 120!”

“You're a very lucky man Harry, you could have broken your nose!”

“You're a very lucky man Harry, you could have broken your nose!”

“I'm sick of being sick Doctor. Is there an illness other than the one I
“I'm sick of being sick Doctor.
Is there an illness other than
the one I have that I might
enjoy?”
“The place is empty. Everybody called in sick!”
“The place is empty.
Everybody called in sick!”
“I've terrible news. You are not a hypochondriac!”
“I've terrible news.
You are not a hypochondriac!”
“I thought you told me to go on a diet just to be mean!”
“I thought you told me to go
on a diet just to be mean!”
“Enjoy your vacation. I'll tell you the bad news when you get back!”
“Enjoy your vacation.
I'll tell you the bad news
when you get back!”
Publisher : Ben Yeo Deputy Managing Editor : Greg Town Senior Editor : Naomi Rodrig
Publisher : Ben Yeo Deputy Managing Editor : Greg Town Senior Editor : Naomi Rodrig
Publisher : Ben Yeo Deputy Managing Editor : Greg Town Senior Editor : Naomi Rodrig
Publisher : Ben Yeo Deputy Managing Editor : Greg Town Senior Editor : Naomi Rodrig
Publisher : Ben Yeo Deputy Managing Editor : Greg Town Senior Editor : Naomi Rodrig
Publisher : Ben Yeo Deputy Managing Editor : Greg Town Senior Editor : Naomi Rodrig

Publisher

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