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THE GARDEN CLUB OF VIRGINIA
THE GARDEN CLUB OF VIRGINIA

VOL LVII, NO. 2, JUNE 2012

Journal

The Garden Club of Virginia exists to celebrate the beauty of the land, to conserve

Members Betty Anne Garrett, The Garden Club of the Middle Peninsula Julie Grover, The Blue Ridge Garden Club, The James River Garden Club Mary Ann Johnson, The Roanoke Valley Garden Club Susan Morten, The Martinsville Garden Club Grace Rhinesmith, The Garden Club of the Middle Peninsula

ExOfficio Members GCV President, Ann Gordon Evans, The Huntington Garden Club GCV Immediate Past Journal Editor, First Vice President, Jeanette Cadwallender, The Rappahannock Valley Garden Club GCV Corresponding Secretary, Betsy Worthington, The Lynchburg Garden Club GCV Photographer, Jane Cowles, The Boxwood Garden Club Journal Advertising Chairman, Katya Spicuzza, Albemarle Garden Club, The Garden Club of the Northern Neck

Editor and Chairman: Jeanette McKittrick, Three Chopt Garden Club

2012-2013

Journal Editorial Board

generations to build on this heritage.

the gifts of nature and to challenge future

From The Editor

Go outside and play! These words evoke memories of a time when we roamed farms and neighborhoods in little gangs, built tree forts, collected tadpoles, picked berries, and skittered like seabirds on the edge of the surf, returning home only to chase lightening bugs and the popsicle man. Now, who has time for the outdoors? Psychologists have determined that spending time in natural settings is associated with elevated mood, increased creativity, ability to focus and better short-term memory. One study showed that just glancing at a photograph of nature delivered enhanced cognitive ability, as compared to looking at pictures of cities. In these pages, you’ll find suggestions for finding nature in some expected and unexpected places, from a patch of native lilies in the Blue Ridge, to an old cemetery in Richmond, to an elevated railroad track in New York City. So, this summer, get smart, turn off that cell phone, the laptop, the TV, and remember what your mother said, “Go outside and play!”

Write to us at Journal@gcvirginia.org.

The Garden Club of Virginia exists to celebrate the beauty of the land, to conserve Members
The Garden Club of Virginia exists to celebrate the beauty of the land, to conserve Members
The Garden Club of Virginia exists to celebrate the beauty of the land, to conserve Members
The Garden Club of Virginia exists to celebrate the beauty of the land, to conserve Members
The Garden Club of Virginia exists to celebrate the beauty of the land, to conserve Members

WWW.GCVIRGINIA.ORG

The Garden Club of Virginia

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The Tuckahoe Garden Club Hits the Big Apple

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............................. Rose Notes .................................................. Club Notes - Elizabeth River

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The Garden Club of Virginia Goes Live Club Notes - Petersburg

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Journal Advertising Chairman:

Journal Advertising Chairman: Jeanette McKittrick 5111 Cary Street Road Richmond, VA 23226 Phone: (804) 288-2512 Email:

Jeanette McKittrick 5111 Cary Street Road Richmond, VA 23226 Phone: (804) 288-2512 Email: journal@gcvirginia.org

Journal Editor:

Ann Gordon Evans

President of the Garden Club of Virginia:

Email copy to the Editor and advertising to the Ad Chairman

January 15 for the March issue April 15 for the June issue July 15 for the September issue October 15 for the December issue

Copy and ad deadlines are:

$5.00.

(USPS 574-520, ISSN 0431-0233) is published four times a year for members by the GCV, 12 East Franklin St., Richmond, VA 23219. Periodical postage paid in Richmond, VA. Single issue price,

The Garden Club of Virginia Journal

The Garden Club of Virginia Journal

Journal Advertising Chairman: Jeanette McKittrick 5111 Cary Street Road Richmond, VA 23226 Phone: (804) 288-2512 Email:

Katya Spicuzza P.O. Box 411 Irvington, VA 22480 Phone: (804) 435-1782 Email: ksspicuzza@yahoo.com

Vol. LVII, No. 2 Printed on recycled paper by Carter Printing Company Richmond, VA

7 The Tuckahoe Garden Club Hits the Big Apple 25 24 ............................. Rose Notes .................................................. Club

Bessie Bocock Carter Conservation Award

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....................... 2012 Horticulture Awards of Merit

Daffodils: A Really Big Show

What a Way to Welcome Spring!

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.................................. de Lacy Gray Medal Award

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Roses, Scoundrels and Monarchs Massey Medal Award

IN THIS ISSUE ...

ON THE COVER ... The too-pretty-to-be-real lily on the cover is one of the beautiful specimens submitted to last year’s GCV Lily Show. Kathy Anderson won the Ronald J. Chiabotta Award for this single stem having the highest bud count. Credit for the photo goes to Casey Rice of the Harborfront Garden Club and former GCV photographer.

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Ex Libris

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Save the Date

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Give the Native Lilies of Virginia a Try

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Lily Show Announcement

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The 78 th Annual Daffodil Show Common Wealth Award Nominations

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www.VAGardenWeek.org

Phone: (804) 644-7776 Fax: (804) 644-7778 Email: gdnweek@verizon.net

Historic Garden Week Office

Kent-Valentine House Phone: (804) 643-4137 Fax: (804) 644-7778 Email: director@gcvirginia.org

OTHER REFERENCES ...

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Horticulture Field Day .............................. Contributions .............................................

F OCUSED O N Y OUR I NVESTMENT O BJECTIVES HORIZON Our objective is to achieve
F OCUSED O N Y OUR I NVESTMENT O BJECTIVES
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Our objective is to achieve
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by adhering to a disciplined
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Active Asset Management

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F OCUSED O N Y OUR I NVESTMENT O BJECTIVES HORIZON Our objective is to achieve
Colonial Heights I Williamsburg I Roanoke I McLean I Lynchburg Richmond I
Colonial Heights
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Williamsburg
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Roanoke
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Lynchburg
Richmond
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Roses, Scoundrels and Monarchs: A New Guide to Richmond’s Hollywood Cemetery By Frances Herrington The James

Roses, Scoundrels and Monarchs:

A New Guide to Richmond’s Hollywood Cemetery

By Frances Herrington The James River Garden Club

R ichmond’s Hollywood Cemetery is one of the nation’s most beautiful cemeteries

and the final resting place of many of the country’s most notable figures,

including United States presidents and major figures of the Civil War. What

many people don’t know is that Hollywood also can claim a number of monarchs as well. In this case monarch does not refer to kings and queens but rather to some of Richmond’s oldest and most noteworthy trees, many of which have been standing since the cemetery’s establishment in 1847.

After Hurricane Isabel felled thousands of trees in the Richmond area in 2003 the landscape of Hollywood was altered. The James River Garden Club recognized the need for a revision of the guide Notable Trees and Roses-Hollywood Cemetery. In 2010, with assistance from Charlottesville landscape architects Van Yahres & Associates, a club committee updated and revised the guide into a walking tour companion that provides information about 19 notable species of trees and 14 species of roses. The club also updated labels for the notable trees and roses to correspond to the revised guide. Hollywood is a major attraction for visitors to Richmond and the guide is available for a one dollar donation at the cemetery office. Visiting Hollywood’s Palmer Chapel, James River Garden Club members learned about some of the cemetery’s current activities and future projects from David Gilliam, Hollywood’s general manager. Dr. Hunter McGuire, author of Look for An Angel: a Walker’s Guide to the Residents of Hollywood Cemetery, told them of interesting characters buried in Hollywood, including saints, scoundrels and notable and not-so-notable men and women. Dr. McGuire saved the best for last and talked about the contributions of many of Hollywood’s heroines. Whoever knew one could have so much fun in a cemetery?

The 2012 de Lacy Gray Award By Karen Jones GCV Conservation and Beautification Committee Chairman The
The 2012 de Lacy Gray Award
By Karen Jones
GCV Conservation and Beautification Committee Chairman
The Martinsville Garden Club
W e are excited to announce that Virginia
(Gina) Farrar of The Warrenton Garden
Club has been chosen as the winner of
this year’s de Lacy Gray Memorial Medal. Gina has
long lived a true conservation ethic, making her a
perfectly natural choice for the conservation medal
created to honor the memory of de Lacy Thompson
Gray. The award recognizes outstanding effort to
further knowledge and wise use of our natural
resources.
Gina founded The Warrenton Garden Club’s
Gina Farrar accepts the
de Lacy Gray Memorial Medal
from GCV President Kim Nash
Nature Camp in 1983 in an effort to get children
outside and connected to the natural world that sustains us. Her conservation ethic
begins at home. Her own farm in Orlean is the setting for the two-week camp co-
sponsored by her garden club and the Piedmont Environmental Council. Gina serves as
co-director, counselor, nurse and cheerleader. The farm, situated on the Rappahannock
River, will be preserved through a conservation easement.
Some 24 children, ages 8 to 11, attend the camp. Campers explore their
surroundings, study the inter-relatedness of all living things, and gain understanding
of the importance of protecting and preserving these things. Many inspired campers
return as counselors to perpetuate Gina’s important legacy. Gina’s infectious
appreciation for nature, as well as for the importance of clean water, air and land to all
life, is truly a gift to future generations.
In 1999, Gina received the Garden Club of America’s Elizabeth Abernathy Hull
Award. This award recognizes outstanding contributions to the early environmental
education of children. Her willingness to share her farm and her time to inspire
children to appreciate the beauty and fragility of our planet made her a worthy
honoree.
Gina also was the recipient of the 2010-2011 Gulick Conservation Educator
Award. The John Marshall Soil and Water Conservation District conferred the award in
recognition of Gina’s commitment to Nature Camp and for “promoting conservation
education through outdoor adventures.”
The Garden Club of Virginia is lucky to have Gina Farrar, a dedicated and
inspirational member, teaching the next generation about a true conservation ethic by
example. ❁
Mary Hart Darden, 2012 Massie Medalist By Lynne Beeler, Massie Medal Committee Chairman The Martinsville Garden
Mary Hart Darden,
2012 Massie Medalist
By Lynne Beeler,
Massie Medal Committee Chairman
The Martinsville Garden Club
O n May 16, 2012, at a festive banquet
held during the annual meeting at the
Williamsburg Inn, Mary Hart Darden
received the most prestigious award presented by
the Garden Club of Virginia, the Massie Medal for
Distinguished Achievement. Mary Hart exemplifies
the extraordinary dedication to the betterment of
the GCV for which the Massie Medal is given. Her
commitment and vision for the future direction of
the GCV stand as a model for all.
Since 1984, Mary Hart has served The
Nansemond River Garden Club with tireless energy
and enthusiasm. From club president to president of
the GCV, she has tackled countless projects, chaired
numerous committees and, most notably, led the GCV
Massie Medal for
Distinguished Achievement
goes to Mary Hart Darden,
The Nansemond River
Garden Club
into the technological world of the 21 st century.
Under the presidency of Bessie Bocock Carter, Mary Hart, as first vice president,
was given the task of creating a committee to form a website. With conviction and
diligence, Mary Hart oversaw the creation of the GCV database and website. What a
giant endeavor it was to pave the way toward a more efficient communication system.
Mary Hart exemplifies the qualities and dedication for which the Massie Medal
stands. Her devotion to restoration, conservation, horticulture, beautification and
education distinguish her as a leader and a spokesperson for the GCV. For all her
accomplishments and service to the GCV, we are pleased to honor Mary Hart, a
faithful servant, with the Massie Medal. ❁
The Editorial Board welcomes submissions and reserves the right to edit them.
What a Way to Welcome Spring! The 2012 GCV Daffodil Show presented by The Garden Club
What a Way
to Welcome Spring!
The 2012 GCV Daffodil Show
presented by The Garden Club of Gloucester

Daffodils: A Really Big Show

By Lucy Rhame, GCV Daffodil Committee Chairman The Hunting Creek Garden Club, Fauquier and Loudon Garden Club

A total of 108 exhibitors entered 2,130 stems in 1,046 exhibits for what

organizers believe just might turn out to be the biggest daffodil show in the

country this year.

The Garden Club of Virginia joined forces with the American Daffodil Society for the show. It married the GCV’s 78th Annual Daffodil Show with the ADS Mid-Atlantic Regional Show. The joint show was hosted by The Garden Club of Gloucester, chaired by Petie Matheson and Betty Barr Ould. The Gloucester club has hosted its own annual daffodil show for 62 years. The result of the combined effort: a soaring stem count and stunning show. Members from 46 GCV clubs showed up for the show. ADS members came from six states: Virginia, North Carolina, Maryland, West Virginia, Pennsylvania and Connecticut. (An upcoming ADS gathering could determine the year’s largest show.) The joint show took place on March 29 and 30, usually the perfect time except for this year, with its accelerated spring. It could not have been easy to find 12 blooms to enter a club collection, yet The Spotswood Garden Club managed to do just that with a collection that took the blue against six other club entries. When it came time to announce individual GCV Horticulture Awards, Suzi Worsham of The Garden Club of Fairfax and Leesburg Garden Club, Janet Hickman of Hillside Garden Club, Elizabeth Brown of The Garden Club of Gloucester, Jane Vaughan of Hillside Garden Club and Karen Abramson of The Hunting Creek Garden Club made multiple trips to the awards table to collect their silver. Jill Beach of Leesburg Garden Club won the Crenshaw Award in the novice class. Madeline Wallach won the Best Youth exhibit, following in the footsteps of her mother Ginger of the Fauquier and Loudon Garden Club. Jaye DuPaul won the award honoring the hostess club. Please visit the GCV website for details, as well as to see the list of ADS award winners and more. A separate web page shows photos of the best of the best. It might just provide inspiration to venture to Gloucester to participate in next year’s really big show.

Please remember that each club is responsible for its own test collection orders this year. The collection is listed on the GCV website, along with information. Bulbs can be ordered through Brent and Becky’s Bulbs, www.brentandbeckysbulbs.com, with orders due by June 30. Ask about Bloomin’ Bucks, a program through which Brent and Becky’s shares sales proceeds with 501(c)3 not-for-profit organizations such as the GCV and many member clubs. For a list of other retail suppliers, visit www.daffodilusa.org. Feel free to contact Lucy Rhame with questions; call (571) 225-1228 or email lrhame@aol.com.

The 2012 Recipients of the Horticulture Award of Merit

By Barbara Holland, GCV Horticulture Committee, The Garden Study Club

T he Garden Club of Virginia honored twelve members with the Horticulture Award of Merit at its annual meeting in Williamsburg in May. The Horticulture Award of Merit was established in 1960 for individual members

of the Garden Club of Virginia who have achieved significant accomplishments in

horticulture, both personally and in the community at large. Jane Cheadle, The Mill Mountain Garden Club

Jane shares her knowledge not only by leading in-club workshops and writing articles for the club’s newsletter, but also by teaching by example at community horticultural events. She regularly receives her club’s annual horticulture award.

Caroline Rann Darracott, The Augusta Garden Club

For years, Carrie has written articles for the Augusta GC’s Weeder’s Reader. In addition to these articles, she has conducted horticulture classes for her club. As current president, she led this year’s community service project of maintenance of the gardens at the Woodrow Wilson Presidential Library and Museum. One of the early garden restoration projects of the GCV, the gardens were designed in 1932-34 by Charles F. Gillette.

Kathleen Glass, The Rappahannock Valley Garden Club

Leeny has a protected native plant habitat on her property where she has cautiously tamed the wilderness of her home’s setting, allowing natives to retain their habitat. She generously shares her knowledge of horticulture and is the go-to member when there is a need for a plant or information for any horticulture exhibit. If an unusual specimen is needed for exhibit, she most likely has it and is willing to share.

Cynthia D. Hall, The Garden Club of the Eastern Shore

Cissy has chaired the Grounds Committee at Ker Place (National & Virginia Historic Landmark) in Onancock. For several years, she’s been the liaison to the GCV Restoration Committee, working on the restoration of the gardens, fences and walkways at Ker Place. She is a most generous gardener, sharing unusual bulbs and plants, as well as sound gardening advice. In 2010, she opened her gardens to the GCV during its annual Horticulture Field Day.

Joyce Moorman, The Brunswick Garden Club

Joyce helped develop a plan of restoration and beautification of Oakwood Cemetery in Lawrenceville. She supervised the implementation of new plantings and construction of a new memorial garden that honors the charter members of The Brunswick Garden Club.

Dana Parker, The Virginia Beach Garden Club

Holding both a B.S. and M.S. in horticulture, Dana’s background enhances and enriches her contribution of time and energy to the GCV Common Wealth Award- winning wild flower garden at the Virginia Aquarium, which benefits from the hands- on care she provides. Dana has served as president of the board of directors of the

Susan Wright, Hillside Garden Club Susan has served as the chairman of the historic Anne Spencer Garden, which is the major attraction of the historic home of this Harlem Renaissance poet. She also served on the board of directors and the garden maintenance committee of the Awareness Garden, which honors families, friends and caregivers whose lives have been touched by cancer.

Susan Wright , Hillside Garden Club Susan has served as the chairman of the historic Anne

Lorraine has been a gardener since early childhood and was a “green” gardener long before it became popular. She and her husband have been involved in agriculture and the future of agriculture all around the world. They’ve participated in USDA programs and international research as they traveled abroad to obtain firsthand information for future planning.

Lorraine Warren Strickler, The Spotswood Garden Club

Since 2005, Myra has received her club’s horticulture award five times. As president of her club, she was involved in the multi-club behind-the-scenes effort to link GCV with the Martinsville/Henry County Historical Society, which resulted in the GCV awarding a landscape restoration project for the Henry County Courthouse.

Myra Stegall, The Garden Study Club

Patsy, a horticulture judge, has given demonstrations to her club and other garden clubs about grooming flowers for shows. She has served as horticulture judge for local fairs as well.

Patsy Smith, Winchester-Clarke Garden Club

Actively involved in all things horticultural, Jennifer has been a member of the Albemarle GC since 1997. She co-chaired the club’s Nellie Hough Garden Course, which is offered to the community every fall. Under her leadership, the course featured outstanding speakers and it had the largest enrollment to date. Recently, her garden was featured in Virginia Gardener.

Jennifer N. Rinehart, Albemarle Garden Club

In 1964 and 1965, Nancy was president of the Tuckahoe GC. At her home in Richmond, Nancy amassed a large and varied collection of dahlias. Today she is 93 and still continues to play an active role in her club. Because of Nancy, dahlias bloom in many Richmond gardens.

Nancy Cann Purcell, The Tuckahoe Garden Club of Westhampton

Norfolk Botanical Garden and for three years chaired the rare plants booth for the club’s annual fundraiser.

10 WWW.GCVIRGINIA.ORG The Garden Club of Virginia

The Garden Club of Virginia appreciates responsible advertising and reserves the right to accept or reject submitted advertisements. Inclusion in the Journal is not to be construed as an endorsement by the Garden Club of the advertised goods or services.

The Garden Club of Virginia appreciates responsible advertising and reserves the right to accept or reject

The Bessie Bocock Carter Conservation Award

By Anne Beals The Rappahannock Valley Garden Club

  • 2012 marks the third time the Bessie Bocock Carter Conservation Award has been presented. Through a generous contribution from her family, Bessie Carter’s name will be henceforth

associated with what she considered one of the Garden Club of Virginia’s most important pursuits – that of preserving and enhancing the natural resources of the commonwealth for the benefit of all of its citizens. The Carter family wished for this to be a monetary award meant to promote cooperative projects among the various clubs in the GCV and other community groups and for the projects to be seminal and ongoing. In concert with the Garden Club of the Northern Neck, this year’s award goes to the Northern Neck Land Conservancy for its project intended to protect the vital habitat of the Cat Point Creek Watershed. Cat Point Creek Watershed is a 48,000- acre area connecting the Potomac and Rappahannock Rivers, and is listed by the Nature Conservancy as one of only a few “last great places” remaining in the coastal

plain of Virginia. It is a resource for a vast number of flora and fauna, containing one of the largest eagle habitats in the state and providing a migratory stopover for many other avian species. The Northern Neck Land Conservancy aims to help preserve the area through education and the implementation of conservation easements. The conservancy will protect natural resources and prevent new pollutant sources by limiting development through landowner outreach, student engagement and public education. The Garden Club of the Northern Neck will partner with the Northern Neck Land Conservancy in the project by teaching environmental best practices to Westmoreland and Richmond County fourth grade science classes and distributing informative educational placemats to area restaurants, describing the value of protecting land and the Cat Point Creek habitat. The Garden Club of Virginia is honored to be able to present this pres-

tigious award to the Garden Club of the Northern Neck and the Northern Neck Land Conservancy.

GCV Members and Officers Lois Spencer, Kim Nash, Karen Jones and Carol Carter, with Carol Hughes, Northern Neck Land Conservancy

  • 2012 The 78th Annu

“A Really Big Show”

March 29 – 30,

Artistic Awards

Sponsored by the Gar

The 78th Annu “A Really Big Show” March 29 – 30, Sponsored by the Gar
Inter Club Class 240 Early Colonial: Blue The Hampton Roads Garden Club
Inter Club Class 240
Early Colonial: Blue
The Hampton Roads Garden Club
The 78th Annu “A Really Big Show” March 29 – 30, Sponsored by the Gar
The 78th Annu “A Really Big Show” March 29 – 30, Sponsored by the Gar

Inter Club Class 240B Late Georgian: Blue The Virginia Beach Garden Club

The 78th Annu “A Really Big Show” March 29 – 30, Sponsored by the Gar
The 78th Annu “A Really Big Show” March 29 – 30, Sponsored by the Gar

Inter Club Class 240C Waterfall: Blue The Charlottesville Garden Club

The 78th Annu “A Really Big Show” March 29 – 30, Sponsored by the Gar
The 78th Annu “A Really Big Show” March 29 – 30, Sponsored by the Gar

Inter Club Class 240D Free Form: Blue The Tuckahoe Garden Club of Westhampton

The 78th Annu “A Really Big Show” March 29 – 30, Sponsored by the Gar
The 78th Annu “A Really Big Show” March 29 – 30, Sponsored by the Gar
The 78th Annu “A Really Big Show” March 29 – 30, Sponsored by the Gar

Individual Class 241 Landscape Design: Blue and The Hunter Hankins Savage Award (Best Arrangement by a Novice) - Kate Zullo, The Garden Club of Gloucester

Individual Class 243, Assemblage: Blue Fran Zabikki, The Garden Club of Gloucester

The 78th Annu “A Really Big Show” March 29 – 30, Sponsored by the Gar
The 78th Annu “A Really Big Show” March 29 – 30, Sponsored by the Gar

Individual Class 242 Designer’s Choice: Blue, The Flower Show Chairman’s Cup, The Sandra Sadler Baylor Award and The Decca Gilmer Frackelton Award - Matilda Bradshaw, The Mill Mountain Garden Club

For more photos and a complete list of winners, Grateful appreciation extended to Mary Wynn and Charles McDaniel

al

Daffodil Show

NUMBER OF HORTICULTURE EXHIBITORS: 108 NUMBER OF HORTICULTURE STEMS: 2,130 NUMBER OF ARTISTIC EXHIBITORS: 81 NUMBER OF ARTISTIC ENTRIES: 79

al Daffodil Show NUMBER OF HORTICULTURE EXHIBITORS: 108 NUMBER OF HORTICULTURE STEMS: 2,130 NUMBER OF ARTISTIC
al Daffodil Show NUMBER OF HORTICULTURE EXHIBITORS: 108 NUMBER OF HORTICULTURE STEMS: 2,130 NUMBER OF ARTISTIC

Jr. Artistic Class 246, 7-9 yr. olds, Parade Float:

Blue -

Alex Barbee

Jr. Artistic Class 247, 10-12 yr. olds, Nautical Arrangement:

Blue -

Lisa Sadler

den Club of Gloucester

al Daffodil Show NUMBER OF HORTICULTURE EXHIBITORS: 108 NUMBER OF HORTICULTURE STEMS: 2,130 NUMBER OF ARTISTIC
al Daffodil Show NUMBER OF HORTICULTURE EXHIBITORS: 108 NUMBER OF HORTICULTURE STEMS: 2,130 NUMBER OF ARTISTIC
al Daffodil Show NUMBER OF HORTICULTURE EXHIBITORS: 108 NUMBER OF HORTICULTURE STEMS: 2,130 NUMBER OF ARTISTIC

Individual Class 245, Miniature: Blue Peggy Robbins, The Garden Club of Gloucester

al Daffodil Show NUMBER OF HORTICULTURE EXHIBITORS: 108 NUMBER OF HORTICULTURE STEMS: 2,130 NUMBER OF ARTISTIC
Individual Class 244, Parallel: Blue Darla Carroll, The Garden Club of Gloucester ADS Best in Show
Individual Class 244,
Parallel: Blue
Darla Carroll,
The Garden Club
of Gloucester
ADS Best in Show
“Gay Tabor”
Gold Ribbon to
Richard E. Zell
al Daffodil Show NUMBER OF HORTICULTURE EXHIBITORS: 108 NUMBER OF HORTICULTURE STEMS: 2,130 NUMBER OF ARTISTIC

Horticulture Awards

al Daffodil Show NUMBER OF HORTICULTURE EXHIBITORS: 108 NUMBER OF HORTICULTURE STEMS: 2,130 NUMBER OF ARTISTIC
al Daffodil Show NUMBER OF HORTICULTURE EXHIBITORS: 108 NUMBER OF HORTICULTURE STEMS: 2,130 NUMBER OF ARTISTIC

The Garden Club of Virginia Cup (most blue ribbons), ADS Purple Ribbon (best collection of five different standard) to Mitch and Kate

Carney, Boonesboro, MD

ADS Miniature Gold Ribbon (best miniature daffodil), for entry Shillingstone 8w-w to Olivia Welbourn, Owings Springs, MD

al Daffodil Show NUMBER OF HORTICULTURE EXHIBITORS: 108 NUMBER OF HORTICULTURE STEMS: 2,130 NUMBER OF ARTISTIC
al Daffodil Show NUMBER OF HORTICULTURE EXHIBITORS: 108 NUMBER OF HORTICULTURE STEMS: 2,130 NUMBER OF ARTISTIC

The Jacqueline Byrd Shank Memorial Trophy and the GCV Louise Morris Goodwin Bowl to Karen Cogar, The Huntington Garden Club

go to www.gcvirginia.org and see Flower Shows. and Hilldrup Transfer and Storage for support of the GCV Flower Shows.

The James River, Thomas Jefferson, Charles Gillette: Could there be any better reasons to preserve a garden? Overlooking the James River in Lynchburg’s Rivermont Historic District is Riverside Park. The Miller-Claytor House, built in 1791 and listed in the National Registry of Historic Places, is the cornerstone of the park. There, it is said, Thomas Jefferson ate a tomato, thereby dispelling the myth of the poisonous love apple. When the house was moved to the park in 1936, The Lynchburg Garden Club commissioned Charles Gillette to design the garden. The club subsequently won the Massie Medal in 1947 for the “beautiful creation and permanent maintenance of the

Submitted by The Lynchburg Garden Club

Renovation of the Miller-Claytor House Garden in Riverside Park

Visitors to Paradise Creek Nature Park will be dazzled by this magnificent entrance garden showcasing over 3,200 low-maintenance native shrubs and groundcover. The project includes funding for native plants along a looped system of forested park trails, creating an interactive tree trail with educational markers, seeding park frontage with wildflowers, and seeding a unique earthworks mound with wildflowers and native warm season grasses. This regional waterfront park, one of the last undeveloped urban parcels of its size in the heart of Hampton Roads, will provide the only public access to the creek and conserve 40 acres of forest and wetlands. It is a partnership of the non-profit Elizabeth River Project, the City of Portsmouth, and the surrounding community, and is the cornerstone project of the creek-wide restoration “Paradise Found.” The park was a creek bed, filled in the 1950s, where invasive plants thrived. Visitors will learn how to reclaim a degraded urban site through enhancement of the land’s habitat value through forestry management, invasive species control and the addition of native plants. Educational signage will promote environmental stewardship, conservation and horticulture, and demonstrate how to restore and maintain wildlife habitat enhancement areas.

Submitted by The Garden Club of Norfolk and The Elizabeth River Garden Club

A Welcome to Paradise

education. Each is making a positive impact on the local communities served. committee wishes to congratulate each of the finalists:

The

The Princess Anne Garden Club. The winner of the $11,500 award will be chosen by ballots cast by each of the GCV member clubs at the Board of Governors meeting in October. The projects chosen as finalists are diverse, but each exemplifies the criteria for the award in the areas of conservation, beautification, horticulture, preservation and

Norfolk/The Elizabeth River Garden Club, The Lynchburg Garden Club and

three finalists for the 2012 Common Wealth Award: The Garden Club of

T he Common Wealth Award Committee is pleased and excited to present the

By Betsy Worthington, Common Wealth Award Chairman The Lynchburg Garden Club

Common Wealth Award Nominations

garden of the Miller-Claytor House for educational benefit to the community.” Sadly, today both the park

garden of the Miller-Claytor House for educational benefit to the community.” Sadly, today both the park and the garden are in need of rejuvenation. In 2008 the Lynchburg Garden Club partnered with the City of Lynchburg to begin renovations. A beautiful stone patio has been installed in the garden and the front and rear walks reworked. Still needed are landscaping, railings and signage. A new brochure of notable public gardens in central Virginia also will feature the garden. The Common Wealth Award will allow the Miller-Claytor Garden to be brought back to life and thus be rediscovered by its visitors.

First Landing State Park Trail Center Exhibits

Submitted by The Princess Anne Garden Club

First Landing State Park has a new Trail Center, completed in August 2011. This Silver LEED Certified Trail Center is the gateway to a phenomenal natural and historic area. Located in Virginia Beach, Virginia, First Landing is a National Historic Landmark and National Natural Landmark by virtue of its colonial, native American, and Civilian Conservation Corps history, and its globally rare maritime forest ecosystem. This Trail Center, with a 900 square-foot exhibit area, is the orientation point for the 1.8 million visitors the park sees annually. The proposed exhibits will encourage visitors, through digital, interactive, and hands-on media, to explore the cultural history and human impact on nature, and their impact on meaningful conservation connections with the outdoors. Due to insufficient funding for these exhibits from the Commonwealth of Virginia, The Princess Anne Garden Club has pledged $50,000 toward these exhibits and also has committed to assist in raising the additional funds needed for the entire exhibit execution. The Common Wealth Award would help the PAGC make these crucial environmental exhibits a reality and continue to recognize the Garden Club of Virginia for its dedication to education and conservation.

The nominations for the Common Wealth Award are presented as submitted.

T H e G ARD e N C Lu B O f V IRGINIA Presents the
T H e G ARD e N C Lu B O f V IRGINIA
Presents the
70
TH
“Where the Past and the Present Intersect”
June 20-21, 2012
Sponsored by the Garden Club of Fairfax
Assisted by the North American Lily Society
The Church of the Good Shepherd
9350 Braddock Road
Burke, Virginia 22015
Open to the Public:
Wednesday, June 20
Thursday, June 21
2:00 PM - 6:00 PM
10:00 AM - 1:00 PM
Artistic Classes
Inter Club Classes:
Class 51A
Class 51B
Class 51C
Class 51
Woodlawn Plantation – An Early Georgian Arrangement
The Pope-Leighy House – A Horizontal Line Arrangement
The Virginia Declaration of Rights – A French Rococo Arrangement
Pohick Church - A Late Colonial Arrangement
Open Classes
Class 52
Reston - A Moribana Arrangement in the Oriental Manner,
featuring water
Class 53
Class 54
Class 55
Dulles International Airport – A Western Line Arrangement
Centreville – A Pave Arrangement
Seven Corners – A Mille Fleurs Arrangement
for more information contact show Co-Chairmen:
Anna Fortune
Tricia Kincheloe
703-969-5205 or anna@fidk.com
703-861-1388 or trixielee29@cs.com

Sh ow

A NNUAL L ily

Give the Native Lilies of Virginia a Try!

By James A. McKenney Potomac Lily Society and North American Lily Society

  • L ilies are cold-adapted plants, yet on the east coast of North America, only three lily species extend north of Virginia. Those are Lilium canadense, L. superbum and L. philadelphicum. If you have ever seen a wild lily in Virginia, chances are

it was one of those. But Virginia is home to four (some would say five) other species:

Lilium michauxii, Lilium grayi, Lilium pyrophilum, Lilium catesbaei and that possible fifth one, L. iridollae. These are rarely seen. A well-timed trip along the Blue Ridge Parkway, however, can be rewarded by sighting Lilium grayi in bloom; and L. michauxii, while uncommon, is still out there to be seen. Many growers shy away from the so-called “species” lilies because they have heard that they are more difficult to grow. Many of them are, but two of the lilies native to Virginia are well adapted to our local conditions. Lilium canadense and L. superbum are commercially available, so why not give them a try? It turns out that both are relatively easy to grow if you first forget everything you thought you knew about growing lilies. Don’t think about planting these lilies in dirt. Instead, make up a mixture of partially composted wood chips and something gritty. Prepare a raised frame six or eight inches high. To be safe, cover the bottom with wire mesh to keep out rodents. Fill it with the compost/grit mixture. The frame should rest on the surface of the ground and not be sunk into the ground. Plant the bulbs a few inches down. If you’re good with potted plants (in other words, if you are attentive about watering), these lilies can do well in pots.

Although both of these lilies will survive in the shade, for best growth place the frame in a sunny area for most of the day. As long as the plants are making active growth, water them regularly. Regular watering in late summer after the plants have bloomed is not so important. Don’t forget to feed them occasionally. Keep in mind that these lilies are on a different cycle than most garden lilies. With garden lilies, you can plant bulbs in November and have good blooming stems the following June. Lilium canadense and L. superbum, on the other hand, start out very slowly and build themselves up over the years. Expect them to take three years to produce large blooming stems. When the time comes, you’ll soon discover that it’s a rare lily show judge who does not melt at the sight of a well grown stem of any of our native lilies. Start planning now, and that could be your lily!

Mr. McKenney has contributed this article to the Journal at the request of the GCV Lily Committee.

Lilium canadense

Lilium canadense

Save the Date! Save the Date! GCV Flower Arranging School Demonstrations by nationally renowned designer Tasha
Save the Date!
Save the Date!
GCV Flower Arranging School
Demonstrations by nationally renowned designer Tasha Tobin
Tuesday, September 18, 2012
at the Robins Pavilion, University of Richmond
Registration and Coffee: 9 a.m.
Program begins at 10 a.m.
Ticket information and online registration
available on the GCV website.
Tickets go on sale July 1 online and by mail.
Boxed lunches included.
For more information, contact: Kate Zullo, zphyr94@aol.com
Interested in becoming a GCV artistic judge? Don’t miss our Introduction to the
Artistic Judging Program following the Flower Arranging School at 1:00 pm.

Paper Mulberry Tree Planting at Poplar Forest, Bedford County

Paper Mulberry Tree Planting at Poplar Forest, Bedford County sponsors a maintenance workshop for the GCV

sponsors a maintenance workshop for the GCV restoration properties. The manual’s pages summarize some of the best plant care, maintenance, landscaping and general information gleaned from the workshops, as well as from GCV landscape architect William D. Rieley and his associates with their extensive knowledge. The manual has been provided to each of the GCV restoration properties to assist in the ongoing care of our Virginia historic landscape treasures. The manual’s guidance covers the basics of soil content, testing, fertilizing, mulching, growing, plant care, and care of built landscape. It is organized for ease of use so any gardener can readily find information about a topic of concern. It is beautifully detailed, with illustrations and photographs, including many from renowned photographer Roger Foley. It also contains a seasonal guide to keep all of us gardeners on track. The references, websites and directories offer a treasure trove of resources. As Ralph Waldo Emerson wrote in 1848, “When I go to the garden with spade, and dig a bed, I feel such exhilaration and health that I discover that I have been defrauding myself all this time in letting others do for me what I should have done with my own hands.” With the Garden Maintenance Manual at his side, he would have known exactly what to do and when.

GCV Restoration Committee, and it was the committee’s hope that the manual’s publication would benefit all gardeners. Every two years, the GCV Restoration Committee

treasured family Bible. The manual offers a cornucopia of gardening information culled from the Garden Club of Virginia’s experience maintaining more than 40 restoration properties under its safekeeping. It is, of course, a detailed resource guide for all those maintaining historic properties, but it is more: a go-to tool for any gardener. The manual is the cumulative effort of the

status, like cherished family recipes or even the

Garden Maintenance Manual could achieve icon

T he Garden Club of Virginia’s recently published

By Molly H. Sammler, GCV Library Committee The Petersburg Garden Club

Garden Maintenance Manual

A Review of the Garden Club of Virginia’s

Ex Libris

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The Tuckahoe Garden Club Hits the Big Apple By Martha Moore The Tuckahoe Garden Club of

The Tuckahoe Garden Club Hits the Big Apple

By Martha Moore The Tuckahoe Garden Club of Westhampton

L ast fall, 33 members of

Richmond’s Tuckahoe

Garden Club of

Westhampton visited New York City for a tour of five gardens. The tour began with lunch at Bergdorf Goodman’s Heaven on Seven and a magnificent view of Central Park’s fall foliage. Next stop was the Conservatory Garden, part of the Central Park

Conservancy, for a delightful tour with Sara Cedar Miller, the official photographer and historian for the conservancy and author of Seeing Central Park: The Official Guide to the World’s Greatest Urban Park. Next stop was the Metropolitan Museum of Art, where members learned about the weekly process of creating the large flower arrangements in the front hall, and enjoyed a tour focusing on flowers in art throughout the galleries. The rooftop garden provided a breathtaking view of Central Park. That evening, a cocktail party was held at the home of a member’s son, followed by dinner at a French restaurant on the Upper East Side. Morning brought the highlight of the trip, a tour of the High Line, a park built on an elevated 1930s freight rail structure on Manhattan’s West Side. Guides told the history and described the design elements of the garden. In neighboring Chelsea, the group crowded into Spruce, a garden shop, for a demonstration of their signature floral arrangements. Following was a trip to the Brooklyn Botanic Gardens and its Japanese, Italian, rose and herb gardens. After dinner at the 21 Club, the group enjoyed Anything Goes.

On the final morning, the group met for coffee and an enchanting presentation by interior designer Amanda Nisbet, followed by some free time for shopping. Afternoon brought a visit to the Cloisters Garden. Transfixed with medieval tapestries and exhibits, the group saw the herb gardens suddenly come alive with a crashing thunderstorm on the Hudson River. Later came a visit to Bette Midler’s Swindler Cove Park, a crown jewel of the New York Restoration Project. The creative use of native plants and extensive mulch paths suggested ideas for Richmond’s city parks. The trip demonstrated how these New York entities parallel the stated purpose of The Tuckahoe Garden Club, “to encourage the knowledge and love of gardening; to protect the environment through education and conservation; and to promote restoration and community improvement.” Inspired by the designs and plant ideas seen in New York, members have been using this experience for motivation in their own gardens and community. The Tuckahoe Garden Club is thinking big!

Tuckahoe Garden Club in the Big Apple

GCV Goes “Live” with the Virginia Historical Society By Suzanne Wright, GCV Restoration Committee, The Petersburg

GCV Goes “Live” with the Virginia Historical Society

By Suzanne Wright, GCV Restoration Committee, The Petersburg Garden Club, Mary Ann Johnson, GCV Restoration Committee, Roanoke Valley Garden Club, Karen Kennedy, Rieley and Associates

  • I n 1997, the GCV entered into a partnership with the Virginia Historical Society to preserve the archives of our restoration projects for posterity. Since that time, more than six thousand documents, photos and slides have been transferred from

the basement of the Kent-Valentine House to the VHS. Once catalogued and digitized, they were uploaded to a dedicated GCV website hosted by the VHS. The information focuses on the development of each restoration rather than the appearance of the historic sites today. Images with descriptive captions and written narratives accompany each property. The narratives add depth and understanding to the restoration work of the GCV, and the images include not only photographs and slide representations, but also landscape plans, plant lists and letters. VHS Vice President of Collections E. Lee Shepard and his team of experts have worked tirelessly with members of the Restoration Committee to make this project a reality. While the goal is eventually to include every restoration, the archives of 21 properties are now “live” and accessible not only to GCV members, but to the entire world. Please visit www.vahistorical.org/gardenclub/introduction.htm to view the stories behind the GCV’s contributions to historic gardens in Virginia.

GCV Goes “Live” with the Virginia Historical Society By Suzanne Wright, GCV Restoration Committee, The Petersburg
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The 37 th
COLLECTION
2012
RICHMOND RACEWAY COMPLEX
600 E. Laburnum Ave. - Richmond, VA 23222
Friday, March 30 th , 10-7
Saturday, March 31 st , 10-7
Sunday, April 1 st , 10-5
The 20 th
Spring Market
2012
THE
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presents...
&

Thursday, November 29 th , 10-7 Friday, November 30 th , 10-7 Saturday, December 1 st , 10-7 Sunday, December 2 nd , 10-5

Hill Mansion was a crown jewel at the

Club Notes

Hill Mansion was a crown jewel at the Club Notes Regional Tourism Petersburg Area Photo provided

Regional Tourism

Petersburg Area

Photo provided by:

Mansion

Centre Hill

— Molly Sammler

and underwritten major repairs to the wrought iron fence and drainage systems surrounding the property. Funds raised from the PGC’s annual Splashes of Spring event have supported repairs to the intricate leaded window at the front entrance of Centre Hill. The south façade leaded window and transom were meticulously cleaned, repaired and conserved.

and shrubs surrounding the mansion,

overlooking the Appomattox River. The Garden Club of Virginia has provided plantings of historically appropriate trees

entrance to Petersburg. Robert Bolling IV built the impressive Federal style house in 1823, which sits high on a hill

During the early 19th century, Centre

restoration work at Centre Hill Mansion.

GCV Lily Show in 2010. This year PGC voted to use the funds to support the restoration efforts at historic Centre Hill Mansion and has established an ongoing fund for preserving this historic treasure in Petersburg. The PGC’s efforts support the GCV

annual event have in the past gone toward hosting state flower shows, including the

and an elegant seated lunch for more than 200 garden enthusiasts. Profits from the

held in the early spring at the Country Club of Petersburg, provides an elaborate silent auction, a raffle, a guest speaker,

event for over ten years. The event,

been hosting its Splashes of Spring

T he Petersburg Garden Club has

The Petersburg Garden Club

Rose Notes By Rachel Hollis, GCV Rose Chairman The Spotswood Garden Club M any gardeners hesitate
Rose Notes
By Rachel Hollis, GCV Rose Chairman
The Spotswood Garden Club
M any gardeners hesitate to grow roses because they do not want to spray,
fertilize, deadhead or water on a regular basis, but all of that is not necessary.
Over ten years ago, Texas AgriLife Extension Service of Texas, Texas A&M
System, set out to determine if roses could be grown under the following conditions:
-
Little or no watering
-
Reduction of fertilizer and pesticide use
-
Landscaping for energy conservation
-
Reduction of landscape waste entering landfills
Field trials were conducted in a number of locations in Texas and, after ten years,
23 roses have been given the Earth-Kind designation. Similar state agricultural programs
are taking place in Ohio and the Midwest. Soon the Atlantic region will be included.
Knock Out Roses are seen by some as the roses of the future because they are
relatively easy to grow and flower profusely from spring to late fall. Knock Outs are
actually shrub roses, and only the original cherry red carries the Earth-Kind label.
The GCV Rose Committee met in April and decided to offer two collections
of three roses each, one for the exhibitor and one for those who wish to grow
environmentally friendly roses. The Rose Committee hopes that something from these
two collections will fit every garden and every lifestyle. Your club Rose Chairman will
have the ordering information available soon. Google Earth-Kind roses and look at the
examples. Most of these have been around for years. Weeks Wholesale Nursery, from
which the GCV orders all rose collections, is also on the internet.
Consider entering a specimen or two at the GCV Rose Show hosted by The
Boxwood Garden Club on October 2-4 in Richmond. Several classes in the schedule
are appropriate for Earth-Kind roses. ❁
Club Notes
The Elizabeth River Garden Club
T he Elizabeth River Garden Club held a demonstration of contemporary floral
design to raise money to support the Elizabeth River Project’s restoration of
Paradise Creek Nature Park in Portsmouth. Martha Perkins was appointed
chairman of the event, which was held at the Portsmouth Service League. The
decorating committee artfully transformed the building into a veritable garden.
Three excellent flower arrangers from the club, who among them have 100 years
of arranging experience, performed the demonstration. EAnn Stokes, Jean Knapp,
and Judy Perry, assisted by Wanda Russo, Cathy Robertson and Jan Meredith, each
made five beautiful arrangements before a group of 70 attendees. The arrangements
included waterfall, landscape, parallel, abstract, free style and other contemporary
designs. Refreshments were served, and three lucky attendees went home with beautiful
arrangements.
This demonstration was both a fun learning process and a successful fundraiser.
Over $2,800.00 was raised for conservation efforts. ❁
— Susan Comer
Horticulture Field Day 2012 Richmond Area Gardens along the James River from the 18th Century to
Horticulture Field
Day 2012
Richmond Area Gardens along the James River
from the 18th Century to the 21st

Harborfront Garden Club

Ann Gordon Evans

Nancy K. Dickerson Kathleen Foley Dickinson Susan T. Garrett Brenda Gilman Kay B. Goldberg Jean F. Haire Ann C. Hankins Lucy G. Harman Mary Lawrence Harrell Pearl Harrell Elizabeth M. Holsinger Patricia R. House Barbara B. Jacob Elizabeth B. Johnson Sara Ann Johnson Judith Landolt-Korns Jacqueline Lane Ellen H. Lee Mrs. Brandon C. Martin Mary Jane Naismith Cleta Norcross Caroline Hooff Norman

C O N T R I B U T I O N S

Given in January, February and March 2012

Annual Fund

Provides essential ongoing support necessary to maintain GCV operations.

Albemarle Garden Club The Garden Club of Gloucester GCV Massie Medal Com- mittee Hubard Family Trusts Anonymous Joan M. Baker Anne G. Baldwin Garland L. Bigley Deborah Bonnewell Leslie Booth Elizabeth Randolph Brown Martha Ware Bryan Mary Anne Burke Gwendolyn B. Carter Joyce C. Childress Lynn White Cobb Elizabeth R. Cronly Mrs. Robert Dart Betty Delk Nancy A. Dempsey

....................................

Joan B. Pollard Pam Pruden Gail F. Pruden Jane M. Purrington Brenda Quayle Kim Raines Sally B. Rawls Ann R. Reed Mary R. Reed Cynthia S. Shook Marion Simpson Laura D. Smart Mrs. Page D. Styles Elizabeth B. Tankard Jane M. Testerman Kathryn A. Trakas Amy Vanhoose Kathryn Q. Wafle Mrs. H. Conrad Warlick Beth Oast Williams Katherine Wray

Donor

Donor

In Honor of

The Boxwood Garden Club

..............................

Kimbrough K. Nash

Casey Rice

Three Chopt Garden Club

............................... The Tuckahoe Garden Club of Westhampton

.......................

Leila Jones

Lena Scott

Sue Taylor

An Appreciative Friend

.........................................

Tata Kellam

Lee Snyder

Betty Sundin ................................... Julie MacKinlay Kimbrough K. Nash Kimbrough K. Nash

Dianne Nea Spence

....................................

Dorothy Bumgardner Donna Lawhon Karen Jones Margaret Clement Kimbrough K. Nash

Maureen D. Stiner Elizabeth Zimmerman

........................................

Julie MacKinlay

Nancy St. Clair Talley Nancy St. Clair Talley Elizabeth Hunter Hairston

.............................

Donor

In Memory of

The Rappahannock Valley Garden Club

........................ Nancy St. Clair Talley

Towlesey Castles

Gail Braxton

.........................................

Donor

................................

..............................

Frank and Lucy Ellett

..................................

Freed.....................................

Nan C.

Ina R. Ingram

....................................

Elizabeth Hunter Hairston

Garden Club of Virginia Endowment

Supports the ongoing preservation of the historic Kent-Valentine House, headquarters of the Garden Club of Virginia and Historic Garden Week.

Mimi and Kemp Dozier

Judy Perry

The Ashland Garden Club

Donor

In Honor of

The Blue Ridge Garden Club

.................................

Linda Holden

Anne Vanderwarker

The Brunswick Garden Club

................................. The Garden Club of the Eastern Shore

Joyce Moorman

.....................................

Lynn Gas

Kimbrough K. Nash

The Garden Club of Fairfax

..............................

Kimbrough K. Nash Diane Wilkinson

The Garden Study Club

.....................................

Myra Stegall

The Nansemond River Garden Club The Warrenton Garden Club ..........................

Mary T.

.........................

The Williamsburg Garden Club

............................... Rieley & Associates

Ann Milliman

Deedy Bumgardner

.....................................

Jeanette Cadwallender

.........................

GCV Development Committee

Kincheloe............................................

Jr. ......................

Jan Grimes

Barbara B. Luton

......................................

Kimbrough K. Nash

Donor

In Memory of

The Little Garden Club of Winchester The Junior Century Club of Winchester

....................

Nancy St. Clair Talley Nancy St. Clair Talley Nancy St. Clair Talley

Mary Nelson Thompson

Mary Hart Darden Ann Gordon Evans Mary Ross Fisher

Hylah and McGuire Boyd

.............................

Nancy St. Clair Talley Nancy St. Clair Talley .............................. Towlesey Castles

Deedy Bumgardner

..................................

Jeanette and Nick Cadwallender

Louisa Hunt Coker Mr. and Mrs. Walter W. Craigie,

..................................

Nancy St. Clair Talley Nancy St. Clair Talley Nancy St. Clair Talley Nancy St. Clair Talley Nancy St. Clair Talley Nancy St. Clair Talley Nancy St. Clair Talley Nancy St. Clair Talley Nancy St. Clair Talley Nancy St. Clair Talley Nancy St. Clair Talley

Nancy F. Bowles

...................

...................................

...................................

.................................... Carter Frackelton .................................... Tom and Jean Gilpin

.................................

Dorothy H. Glaize

................................... Mary Bruce H. Glaize

................................

Mrs. James C. Godwin

................................ Mr. and Mrs. Peter Dun Grover

Donor

.................................

GCV Conservation Fund

Supports GCV clubs in local and statewide conservation projects.

Donor

In Memory of

The Garden Club of Fairfax

......................................

Barbara Holland

Bessie Bocock Carter Conservation Award Fund

Peggy Valentine

In Memory of

The Garden Club of Fairfax

......................................

Patt Cole

Virginia Brown Guild

.................................

Nancy St. Clair Talley

Patt Cole

......................................

........................................... Beverley G. King

Eugenia Diller

.........................................

Towlesey Castles

Nancy St. Clair Talley Nancy St. Clair Talley Nancy St. Clair Talley Nancy St. Clair Talley Nancy St. Clair Talley Nancy St. Clair Talley Nancy St. Clair Talley Nancy St. Clair Talley Nancy St. Clair Talley

Katherine Turner Mears

................................

Helen Turner Murphy

......................................

Kimbrough K. Nash

..................................

Judy Perry

..........................................

Helen Pinckney

......................................

Charles and Ann Reed

.................................

Fleet Davis

William D. Rieley

.....................................

Restoration

Supports GCV Restoration projects across the Commonwealth.

Donor The Lynchburg Garden Club

Donor

In Honor of

The Garden Club of the Eastern Shore

...........................

DeLane W. Porter

The James River Garden Club ............................ The Princess Anne Garden Club

Kimbrough K. Nash

..................................

Judy Perry

The Tuckahoe Garden Club of Westhampton

..................Suzanne

Munson

Dootsie Wilbur

....................................

Donor

In Memory of

Dolley Madison Garden Club

...........................

Nancy St. Clair Talley Nancy St. Clair Talley Nancy St. Clair Talley Nancy St. Clair Talley

Susan Claytor

.......................................

Susan Claytor

Kimbrough K. Nash Mrs. FitzGerald Bemiss Mr. and Mrs. Everett U. Crosby Fleet Davis Rieley & Associates

Betty G. Schutte

.....................................

Common Wealth Award Fund

Provides monies to individual clubs for local civic beautification efforts.

Donor

In Honor of

The Garden Study Club

.................................

Periodicals Postage Paid

574-520

At Richmond, Virginia And Additional Offices

Forwarding Service

Requested

Periodicals Postage Paid 574-520 At Richmond, Virginia And Additional Offices Forwarding Service Requested 70 Annual Lily

70 th Annual Lily Show, Fairfax

F lower Arranging School,

September 18

September 24

Conser vation Workshop

University of Richmond

July 15

Journal Deadline

The Garden Club of VirGinia

Calendar 2012

at http://gcvirginia.org. See website for further additions.

Dates and events as posted on the GCV website

June 20 – 21

WWW.GCVIRGINIA.ORG

The Garden Club of Virginia