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759801 The zombie apocalypse: Gruesome incidents spark metaphors for economic issues NEWS, 9A Clicks worth a

The zombie apocalypse:

Gruesome incidents spark metaphors for economic issues

NEWS, 9A

incidents spark metaphors for economic issues NEWS, 9A Clicks worth a thousand words Benefit for Juliann,

Clicks worth a thousand words

Benefit for Juliann, Cause for Paws, MMI Library Open House

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Cause for Paws, MMI Library Open House CLICK, 1C C M Y K T he T
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The Times Leader

WILKES-BARRE, PA

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MONDAY, JUNE 4, 2012

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SPORTS

SHOWCASE

SPORTS SHOWCASE PHILLIES FA LL Carlos Zambrano home- red and pitched into the eighth inning, and

PHILLIES FA LL Carlos Zambrano home- red and pitched into the eighth inning, and Hanley Ramirez went deep, too, to lead the Miami Marlins to a 5-1 victory over the Philadelphia Phillies on Sunday. 4B

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A NEWS: Local 3A Nation & World 5A Obituaries 8A Editorials 11A

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DIVERSITY

International festival in Mountain Top hailed as good example

fest ival in Mountain To p hailed as good exa mple NIKO J. KALLIANIOTIS/FOR THE TIMES

NIKO J. KALLIANIOTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

Shirley Carey of Nanticoke and friend Stanley Zalot of Red Rock dance to the music of the Swing Masters Polka Band on Saturday evening at the St. Jude Grove in Mountain Top. Some members of the band are, from left, Jack Belovesick, Steve Brill, Danny Wowak and Eddie Biegaj.

All together

Seeking ways for ethnic groups to connect

By STEVE MOCARSKY

smocarsky@timesleader.com

W RIGHT TWP. – An international festival at a lo-

cal church this past weekend was a good step

toward promoting cultural diversity in Moun-

tain Top, but more efforts are needed, some residents say. •The Church of St. Jude hosted an International Fest fea- turing representative cuisine from Germany, Italy, Po- land, Ireland and Latin America as well as music and dance from some of those countries.

According to data from the U.S. Census Bureau, the top ances- tries of Mountain Top residents are German, Polish, Irish, Italian and English, respectively. And Latinos are among the fastest- growing populations in the area.

“I think we hit it pretty close, which is good,” said the Rev. Jer- ry Shantillo, assistant pastor at St. Jude. Shantillo said parish leaders

See ANCENSTRY, Page 12A

Second of a two-part series on diversity issues in two sections of Luzerne County

parish leaders See ANCENSTRY, Page 12A Second of a two-part series on diversity issues in two

Saying goodbye to a holy place

ter and touched upon what a great in- fluence the parish had on his life. “While in seminary I remembered the kind of people the church that come from the church of Swoyers- ville, and I wanted to be a pastor in a church just like it. It made such an im- pression on me that every time I heard the word ‘church’ I thought of you people. And it wasn’t the build- ing, although I love it; it’s you, the liv-

Swoyersville and delivered a homily ing, breathing stones that make it

for the final Mass that elicited laugh-

SWOY ERSVILLE -- Ta king on the conversational tone of someone speaking directly to a dear friend, the Rev. Joseph Pisaneschi stood in front of the Holy Name/St. Mary ’s Parish in

spokorny@timesleader.com

By SARA POKORNY

Memories abound at the Holy Name/St. Mary’s’ final service.

up.”

Sunday marked the final Mass and closing ceremony of Holy Name/St. Mary ’s, which will now join with Ho- ly Trinity on Hughes Street to be- come St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Parish. Though there were many tears as the ceremony came to an end, there were just as many smiles and stories of the past. For some, it was a tough day but an understandable one. “I’m looking at it as progress,” 78-

See CHURCH, Page 12A

Accusers’ credibility may be key

Jury picking in trial of ex-Penn State assistant coach Jerry Sandusky, who is charged with child sexual abuse, begins Tuesday.

By MARK SCOLFORO Associated Press

BELLEFONTE — The case against Jerry Sandusky, whose trial begins Tuesday with jury selection, could boil down to a simple question: Will the young men who claim the former Penn State assistant football coach sexually abused them be viewed as credible wit- nesses?

That’s often the case in criminal trials, legal experts say, but even more in a case with alle-

gations that go back many years and little or no forensic evidence. “In any case I’ve tried like this, the people who are the accusers have to come across exceedingly well,” said veteran Harrisburg defense attor- ney Matt Gover. “And the defense has to demonstrate a theory to the jury that there’s motive for them to lie or fabricate.” Prosecutors allege Sandusky en- gaged in a range of sexual abuse of 10 boys over 15 years, charges he has re- peatedly denied. Eight of those 10 al- leged victims have been identified by investigators, and most, if not all, had been prepared to take the stand

Amendola

at Sandusky’s preliminary hearing, which he waived at the last minute in mid-December. Sandusky’s lawyers will have their grand jury testi- mony to compare against whatever they say on the stand at trial, and have indicated they will try to show some of the accusers have collaborated, hoping to cash in through civil litigation. The defense has sought potentially damaging mate- rial from the alleged victims’ pasts, including any histo- ry of making up stories, criminal arrests and psycholog- ical problems. “Joe Amendola has said during some of the hearings that the defense is going to turn on a claim that some, if not all, of these victims had motives to fabricate these allegations,” said Wes Oliver, a law professor at

these allegations,” said Wes Oliver, a law professor at Sa ndusky See SANDUSKY, Page 12A AIMEE

Sandusky

said Wes Oliver, a law professor at Sa ndusky See SANDUSKY, Page 12A AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES

See SANDUSKY, Page 12A

Oliver, a law professor at Sa ndusky See SANDUSKY, Page 12A AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER Parishioners

AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER

Parishioners closed the service Sunday by kissing the altar at Holy Name/ St. Mary’s.

5 THINGS YOU NEED TO KNOW THIS WEEK

>> CAN’T STAND THE HEAT?: Are you looking for a

cooking reality show with a calm, understated host who guides contestants with positive reinforcement? Keep look- ing. It ain’t happening. Instead, FOX is re-heating another season of its culinary “Survivor”: “Hells’ Kitchen,” with potty mouth host Gordon Ramsay. The cooking and “bleep”- soaked berating begins its 10th season at 8 tonight.

>> BLAST FROM THE PAST: To day’s te ch-savvy

urchins will tell you downloading a movie to your smart- phone or iPad is the coolest thing. (They would be wrong, but that’s another story.) On June 6, 1933, the “coolest”

thing for a different generation debuted when the first

drive-in movie theater opened in Ca mden, N. J. To mark the anniversary of that event, this Wednesday is Drive-In Movie Day. Which you could celebrate by going to a local drive-in … except they’re not open on Wednesday. They are open on the weekends. Which brings us to …

>> FUNNY OR FRIGHTFUL?: So. Yo u’ve fi nally made

it to Friday and want to celebrate Drive-in Movie Day.

There’s quite a double feature opening this week, except chances are they won’t be shown together. Kids will want to see “Madagascar 3: Europe’s Most Want- ed,” which features cartoon animals engaging in family-friendly hi- jinks. Sci-fi fans can check out “Prometheus,” which is a prequel of sorts to the

19 79 fi lm “A lien.”

“Prometheus” will feature face-hug- ging, chest-bursting, killer creature hijinks. Unless you think ther- apy is good for your kids, make sure you choose the right screen.

>> DOWN THE STRECH HE COMES: It’s been 34

years since Affirmed won the last Triple Crown in horse racing. It’s been four years since Big Brown was in a position to do the same. This Saturday, I’ll Have Another hopes to win another in the Belmont Stakes and make history. (Well, the people around him hope to win. The horse probably just hopes for some yummy oats and a nice bath.) Want to see if he can do it? Coverage begins at 4:30 p.m. on NBC.

>> ALL THAT JAZZ: Before Springsteen. Before the Bee Gees. Before the Beatles and Elvis. … There was Benny Goodman. The “King of Swing,” was one of the most iconic musicians of the Big Band era, ranking right up there with To mmy Dorsey and Glenn Miller. If you want to hear the echo of the 1940s in 2012, then head over to the F.M. Kirby Center on Saturday night for the Northeast Philharmonic’s Tribute to Benny Goodman. The show starts at 8 p.m.

F.M. Kirby Center on Saturday night for the Northeast Philharmonic’s Tribute to Benny Goodman. The show
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PAGE 2A MONDAY, JUNE 4, 2012

 

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SCRANTON PREP’S DAY

SCRANTON PREP’S DAY NIKO J. KALLIANIOTIS PHOTOS/FO R THE TIMES LEADER ABOVE: Students listen to remarks
SCRANTON PREP’S DAY NIKO J. KALLIANIOTIS PHOTOS/FO R THE TIMES LEADER ABOVE: Students listen to remarks

NIKO J. KALLIANIOTIS PHOTOS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

ABOVE: Students listen to remarks dur- ing Sunday’s commencement ceremony at Scranton Prep. RIGHT: Tyler Piccotti gives the salutatory speech to the 2012 class. For lists and more photos from area graduations, see a Times Leader special section on July 7.

TIME TO PARTY

see a Times Leader special section on July 7. TIME TO PARTY FRED ADAMS/FOR THE TIMES

FRED ADAMS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

J uliann To mpkins, 3, ro cks to the music of Gone Crazy at a fundraiser in her ben- efi t held Su nday at Ole Ty me Charley’s in Plains Township. Th e little girl has

Cockaye Syndrome. For CLICKS from the event, see page 1C.

HONORED FOR THEIR SERVICE

HONORED FOR THEIR SERVICE FRED ADAMS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER B ob and Lois Gelb laugh as

FRED ADAMS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

B ob and Lois Gelb laugh as the speaker at the Jewish Family Service of Greater Wilkes-Barre brunch tells stories about them as they were honored Sunday for their service to the community. The Gelbs received the 2012 Pearl Kaufman Annual Service Award in recognition for their service to the community and to Jewish Family Service. For CLICKS from the event, see page 9A.

‘Family Feud’ host Dawson is dead

British entertainer, who also was in ‘Hogan’s Heroes,’ had esophageal cancer.

By FRAZIER MOORE AP Te le vision Wr iter

NEW YORK — Richard Dawson brought a saucy, unabashedly touchy-feely style to TV game shows as host of “Family Feud.” The British-born entertainer, who died Saturday at age 79 from complications related to esopha- geal cancer, earlier had made his mark in the unlikely 1960s sitcom hit “Hogan’s Heroes,” which mined laughs from a Nazi POW camp whose prisoners hoodwink their captors and run the place them- selves. But it is as the kissing, wisecrack- ing quizmaster of “Feud” that he will be remembered. The show, which initially ran from 1976 to 1985, pitted a pair of families against each other as they tried to guess the most popular an- swers to poll questions such as “What do people give up when they go on a diet?” Dawson made his hearty, soaring pronouncement of the phrase “Sur- ”

vey says a national catchphrase

among the show’s fans. He won a daytime Emmy Award in 1978 as best game show host. Tom Shales of The Washington Post called him “the fastest, bright- est and most beguilingly caustic in- terlocutor since the late great Grou- cho bantered and parried on ‘You Be Your Life.’ ” The show was so popular it was released as both day- time and syndicated evening ver- sions. And it was quickly validated by

evening ver- sions. And it was quickly validated by AP FILE PHOTOS Richard Dawson, host of

AP FILE PHOTOS

Richard Dawson, host of ’Family Feud,’ is in character in June

1978.

host of ’Family Feud,’ is in character in June 1978. ’Family Feud’ host Richard Daw- son,

’Family Feud’ host Richard Daw- son, center, gives President Re- agan, played by ‘Tonight Show’ host Johnny Carson, a chance at the big money as Queen Eliza- beth (Rose Carr) readies herself at the buzzer during ’Interna- tional Fa mily Fe ud’ sketch on the show in November 1982.

not, tempered any boisterous incli- nations with defiant smoothness. Not Dawson, who was overtly phys- ical, prone to invading his contes- tants’ personal space — and espe- cially the women, each of whom he kissed without exception. At the time the show bowed out in 1985, executive producer Ho- ward Felsher estimated that Daw- son had kissed “somewhere in the vicinity of 20,000.” “I kissed them for luck and love, that’s all,” Dawson said at the time. One of them he kissed was

“Saturday Night Live,” with Bill Gretchen Johnson, an attractive Murray in a satirical homage to young contestant who came on

with members of her family in 1981. She and Dawson began dating, and,

Dawson as a leering, nasty figure who even slapped one contestant

(John Belushi) for getting too fresh. Not that everyone approved. In his classic 1981 cultural analy- sis “Within the Context of No Con- text,” George W.S.

Trow identified “the im- portant moment in the history of television” as the moment when Daw- son asked his contes- tants “to guess what a poll of 100 people had guessed would be the height of the average American woman.” “Guess what they’ve guessed,” sniffed Trow, harping on the mea- ninglessness of such an enterprise. “Guess what they’ve guessed the AVERAGE is.” Obviously, “Feud”

fans would have feuded with Trow’s playing the host of a deadly TV

show set in a totalitarian future, where convicts try to escape as their executioners stalk them. But long before “Feud,” Dawson had gained fame as the fast-talking Cpl. Peter Newkirk on “Hogan’s He-

what month of pregnancy does a roes,” the CBS comedy starring

Bob Crane set in World War II. The show made the ratings top 10 in its

first season, 1965-66, and aired until

woman begin to look pregnant?” She blurted out “September,”

then, too late, realized this was a ri- diculous response. All the better for Dawson, who couldn’t stop laughing — or milk-

ing the moment for continued ler.”

“We ran six years,” Dawson once quipped, “a year longer than Hit-

dismissive attitude. For one thing, Dawson played the show, and his duties presiding over it, for laughs. On one episode, he posed this question to a contestant: “During

marriage, and four grandchildren.) Producers revived the show as “The New Family Feud,” starring comedian Ray Combs, in 1988. Six years later, Dawson replaced Combs at the helm, but that lasted only one season. Steve Harvey is the current host. Dawson reprised his game show character in a much darker mood in the 1987 Arnold Schwarzenegger film “The Running Man,”

after a decade together, they wed in 1991. (Dawson is survived by Gretchen and their daughter, Shan- non, as well as two sons, Mark and Gary, from his first

At the time the show bowed out in 1985, executive producer Howard Felsher estimated that Dawson had kissed “somewhere in the vicinity of 20,000.” “I kissed them for luck and love, that’s all,” Dawson said at the time.

1971.

laughs from the audience. His swaggering, randy manner (and working-bloke’s British ac- cent) set him apart from other TV quizmasters, who, more often than

Dawson landed roles in U.S. com- edy and variety shows in the early 1960s, including “The Steve Allen Show” and “The Dick Van Dyke Show.”

BOX OFFICE

‘Snow White’ is fairest movie of all

By DAVID GERMAIN AP Movie Writer

LOS ANGELES — “Snow White & the Huntsman” turned out to be a fairer box-office beau- ty than Hollywood anticipated. According to studio estimates Sunday, Universal Pictures’ ac- tion yarn inspired by the fairy-

tale princess debuted strongly at No. 1 with $56.3 million domes- tically. That’s about $20 million higher than industry expecta- tions. Without the built-in business that generally goes with a sequel, “Snow White” was a question mark as a draw for young males

ed $78.6 million overseas for an international take of $274.6 mil-

who typically make up most of the action crowd. The movie wound up drawing a fairly even audience, with female fans ac- counting for 53 percent of view- ers. “We weren’t even thinking we

could do beyond $40 million, es- “Men in Black 3” from the top and its worldwide earnings to

“Snow White” bumped Sony ’s national haul to $802.5 million

$386.9 million. Adding $12.4 million overseas, “The Avengers” pushed its inter-

putting the worldwide total at lion and a worldwide gross of

Overseas, “Snow White” add- ed $39.3 million in 45 markets,

$95.6 million for the movie that stars Kristen Stewart, Charlize Theron and Chris Hemsworth.

pecially for a title where you didn’t know if the males are going to show up. And they did,” said Nikki Rocco, head of distribution for Universal.

$1.36 billion. That raised it past last year’s “Harry Potter” finale at

spot and into second-place with $29.3 million. The Will Smith-

Tommy Lee Jones sequel raised $1.33 billion to put “The Aven-

its domestic total to $112.3 mil- lion after two weekends and add-

gers” at No. 3 in all-time revenue worldwide.

PRASHANT SHITUT President & CEO (570) 970-7158

pshitut@timesleader.com

President & CEO (570) 970-7158 pshitut@timesleader.com An JOE BUTKIEWICZ VP/Executive Editor (570) 829-7249

An

JOE BUTKIEWICZ VP/Executive Editor (570) 829-7249

jbutkiewicz@timesleader.com

DENISE SELLERS VP/Chief Revenue Officer (570) 970-7203

dsellers@timesleader.com

ALLISON UHRIN VP/Chief Financial Officer (570) 970-7154

auhrin@timesleader.com

company

MICHAEL PRAZMA VP/Circulation (570) 970-7202

mprazma@timesleader.com

LISA DARIS VP/HR and Administration (570) 829-7113

ldaris@timesleader.com

DETAILS

LOTTERY

MIDDAY DRAWING DAILY NUMBER – 9-2-9 BIG 4 – 4-2-3-3 QUINTO – 2-3-7-1-3 TREASURE HUNT

06-11-15-17-26

NIGHTLY DRAWING DAILY NUMBER – 3-8-3 BIG 4 – 6-0-8-4 QUINTO – 0-0-2-2-9 CASH 5

11-20-25-26-40

HARRISBURG – No player matched all five winning numbers drawn in Sunday’s “Pennsylvania Cash 5” game, so the jackpot will be worth $450,000. Lottery officials said 64 players matched four num- bers and won $337 each; 2,778 players matched three numbers and won $13 each; and 36,714 players matched two numbers and won $1 each. Wednesday’s Powerball jackpot will be worth at least $177 million because no player holds a ticket with one row that matches all five winning numbers drawn in Saturday’s game. The Powerball numbers were:

09-10-17-29-45

Powerball: 33

OBITUARIES

Casale, Regina Cunningham, Cathe- rine Curham, Donald Frey, Sandra Jasulevicz, Mark Menichini, Charles Misencik, John O’Dell, Pamela Sepela, Dorothy Snyder, Gerald Tyszko, Stanley Yeager, Doris

Page 8A

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BUILDING

TRUST

The Times Leader strives to correct errors, clarify stories and update them promptly. Corrections will appear in this spot. If you have information to help us correct an inaccu- racy or cover an issue more thoroughly, call the newsroom at 829-7242.

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MONDAY, JUNE 4, 2012 PAGE 3A

LOCAL

NEWS IN BRIEF

DALLAS

Fireworks rules reminder

Dallas residents are reminded of the borough ordinance regarding fireworks.

It prohibits the storage, selling,

keeping for sale or discharging of

any kind of fireworks, firecrackers or other things designed for noise- making or pyrotechnic display with-

in the limits of the borough, except

with a special permit from the bor- ough for public exhibitions under the direct supervision of experts. The borough police department will be patrolling and strictly enforc- ing this ordinance. Any person, firm or corporation convicted of violating any of the provisions of this ordinance shall be subject to fines and penalties. For information, call the borough at 675-1389 or the police department at 675-0161.

HAZLETON

Minsec inmate escapes

An inmate escaped from the Min- sec facility through an emergency exit Sunday morning, state police said. An alarm sounded at 8:36 a.m. and Alfonso John Quinones, 38, was missing afterward, state police. Quinones was serving a state sen-

tence for his guilty plea in Monroe County to felony drug charges. He was on pre-release assignment

at Minsec since Oct. 3, 2011. A war-

rant was issued for his arrest. Quinones is an Hispanic, 5 feet, 11 inches, 220 pounds, with brown hair, brown eyes and multiple tattoos. He has ties to Scranton and is originally from Brooklyn, N.Y. Anyone with information about Quinones is asked to contact state police at Hazleton at 570 459-3890 or jsurmick@pa.gov.

WILKES-BARRE

Door, vehicle are shot

A door in an apartment in the

Sherman Hills complex on North Empire Court was shot up Sunday

morning and a vehicle of a resident

of the apartment also was struck by a

bullet, police said. Officers were in the complex in- vestigating a domestic dispute when they heard seven to eight shots and saw four males fleeing into building 316. Police searched the building but could not locate the males. They found three bullet holes in the door of apartment 414. The resi- dents told police they did not who shot the door. Police collected evi- dence. The investigation is ongoing.

HAZLETON

Shots fired in area

City police responded to two re- ports of shots fired in the area of Fourth and Wyoming streets Sat- urday night and Sunday morning. The first report was around 9:42 p.m. Saturday of a person riding an all-terrain vehicles who fired several shots and fled the area. Police said no one was injured and no damage was reported. Around 12:30 a.m. Sunday, police again responded to the area and found numerous spent .233-caliber shell casings and discovered a parked vehicle had been struck numerous times. There were no reported injuries. Anyone with information about the shootings is asked to contact Hazleton city police at 570 459-4940 extension 505. All information will be kept confidential.

PLAINS TWP.

Woman robbed at casino

A woman reported to Plains Town-

ship police on Thursday night that she was robbed in a parking lot at the Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs casino. Township police said Jacqueline Carduff of Lost Creek, Pa., told po-

lice she was walking to her car in Lot

B when a man approached her from

between two parked cars, grabbed her purse and fled. He was described as white, 5 feet, 9 inches, stocky build, with a dark shaggy unkempt beard, and wearing black pants, a black t-shirt with white writing or a picture on the front.

Getting a GRASP on death by drugs

Local woman starts support group

By MATT HUGHES mhughes@timesleader.com

Carol Coolbaugh knows first- hand that losing a child to sub- stance abuse adds another layer of challenge to the trauma of dealing with a child’s death. There’s personal guilt and a so- cial stigma that comes along with it. “You tell people your child died of a drug overdose and peo- ple look at you like he deserved it,” she said frankly. Coolbaugh, of West Pittston, lost her son to a drug overdose

SEEKING HELP

ter of Grief Recovery After a Substance Passing, or GRASP, a support group for family mem- bers and friends of those who have died due to substance abuse or addiction. The group will hold its first meeting June 13. Coolbaugh’s son, Erik Cool- baugh, died of a cocaine and methadone overdose on Jan 22,

three years ago, and now she 2009 after an 18-year battle with

The first meeting of GRASP will be held on June 13, 7 p.m. to 9 p.m., at First Hospital Wyoming Valley on Wyoming Avenue in Kingston. The group will meet bi-weekly after that. Those interested in attending are asked to pre-register by calling Carol Coolbaugh at 991-7199.

wants to help others who have lost loved ones to addiction by offering space to share their ex- periences. She is starting a chap-

drugs that began in the fifth grade. He left three children be-

See COOLBAUGH, Page 12A

grade. He left three children be- See COOLBAUGH, Page 12A DON CA RE Y/ THE TIMES

DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER

Carol Coolbaugh holds a photo of her son Erik, who died three years ago from a drug overdose.

AIMEE DILGER PHOTOS/THE TIMES LEADER Tommy Bretz, Bob Domanish and Tom Bretz restore old fire
AIMEE DILGER PHOTOS/THE TIMES LEADER
Tommy Bretz, Bob Domanish and Tom Bretz restore old fire trucks and then show them in parades and as antiques.
A BURNING PASSION
Former Kingston firefighter and son restore old engines
By JOHN P. ANISTRANSKI
Times Leader Intern
K INGSTON -- One passion has motivated 53-
year-old Tom Bretz for as long as he can re-
call: Fighting fires. • But his days as a King-
ston firefighter ended prematurely in 1998,
when a severe stroke forced him to retire. •
Instead of letting it squelch his passion, Bretz treated re-
tirement as an opportunity to share his love of the fire
service with the person dearest to him —his son Tommy.
• Under the title T. Bretz and Son, Tom and Tommy have
publicly displayed their shared affection for fire truck res-
toration, recently exhibiting two antique engines in the
Memorial Day Parade in Kingston.
Tom Bretz towels off one of the trucks he has restored.
See TRUCKS, Page 6A

Engines, spirits revved up in effort to aid area SPCA

Motorcycle Club holds benefit ride to donate funds to local animal shelter.

By GERI GIBBONS Times Leader Correspondent

in the annual run from the members of the communi- club with organizing and

executing the event effec- tively. Participants were also ve-

SPCA building in Plains,

ty: both animals and peo-

throughout the Valley and ple.”

Peggy Nork, development director of the SPCA of Lu-

Dave “Hoop” Hopper, zerne County, said she was and the opportunity to

exceedingly grateful for the

president of the organiza-

tion, said he embraced the club’s efforts on behalf of

concluding at Bentley ’s, Route 309 Ashley.

“It was well worth it,” said a smiling April Ignatz, Dallas, mingling with other participants while waiting

ry excited about the run for the run to begin.

help.

Information about the motorcycle club can be ac-

The fee for the ride was cessed at wyomingvalley-

PLAINS TWP. -- The annual opportunity to as- the association, especially $15 per rider, $10 per par- motorcycleclub.org/.

Wyoming Valley Motorcy- sist the community.

cle Club held its 16th An-

nual SPCA Benefit Ride on gathering of those with a

love for motorcycles,” said

Sunday, with approximate-

ly 600 participants joining Hooper, “but a benefit to crediting the motorcycle directed to the SPCA.

during these difficult eco- ticipant, which included

food and entertainment.

sales at the event were also

Residents interested in volunteering or financially

The profits from T-shirt assisting the SPCA may

contact that organization at

“We are not simply a nomic times.

“It is an unlikely alliance, but it works,” said Nork,

825-4111.

PAGE 4A MONDAY, JUNE 4, 2012

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MONDAY, JUNE 4, 2012 PAGE 5A

I N

BRIEF

WORLD MOND AY , JUNE 4, 2012 PA GE 5A I N BRIEF AP PHOTO The

AP PHOTO

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge and the Duchess of Cornwall join the queen, unseen, Sunday on board the Spirit of Chartwell for the Diamond Jubilee Pageant on the River Thames in London. Queen Elizabeth II sailed on the luxury barge amid 1,000 ves- sels, mustered to mark her 60 years on the British throne. The pageant was one of the biggest events on the river for centuries.

LONDON

Flotilla honors the queen

I t was the reign that launched a thou- sand ships, a vast flotilla that sailed

down the Thames on Sunday to cele- brate Queen Elizabeth II’s 60 years on the throne. Canal boats, yachts, gondolas and tall-masted ships were among the hun- dreds of vessels that plied the river under gray skies, led by the barge car- rying the woman who has served as British monarch longer than anyone except her great-great-grandmother Victoria. The water-borne pageant down the Thames, the first such procession in more than 300 years, was the central event of a four-day weekend of cele- brations of the queen’s Diamond Jubi- lee. Undeterred by sporadic rain and chilly wind, tens of thousands of spec- tators lined the seven-mile route, which snaked past some of Britain’s most iconic landmarks, including the Tower of London and the Houses of Parlia- ment.

MIAMI

Zimmerman in custody

George Zimmerman, the neigh- borhood watch volunteer charged with murder in the killing of Trayvon Mar- tin, surrendered to police Sunday and was booked into jail after having his bail revoked two days earlier. Zimmerman’s legal team said in a tweet that he was in police custody. Zimmerman’s bail was revoked because the judge said he and his wife lied to the court about their finances so he could obtain a lower bond. On Sunday afternoon, about 40 min- utes before the 2:30 p.m. deadline to surrender, Zimmerman was listed as an inmate on the jail website. He was listed as being held without bail and having $500 in his jail account.

CAIRO

Court case detains man

Egyptian officials say a dual U.S.- Egyptian citizen has been detained on arrival at Cairo airport because he faces trial in a case of pro-democracy groups receiving foreign funds. The officials said Sherif Mansour was detained Sunday as one of 43 de- fendants, including 16 Americans, on trial in the case that has shaken Cairo’s ties with Washington. The officials spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not al- lowed to speak to reporters. The trial began in February, with only 14 Egyptian defendants attending. Mansour was returning to Egypt to attend the next session, set for Tues- day.

CINCINNATI

Ohio crash kills 3 teens

A car carrying five teenagers went airborne as it sped over railroad tracks in northeast Ohio early Sunday and crashed, killing three of the teens, including the 18-year-old driver who was hours away from his high school graduation, the Ohio State Highway Patrol said. Two others were hospital- ized. All five teens were from Brunswick. The driver was a senior football player whose Brunswick High School gradua- tion ceremony was scheduled Sunday afternoon. The 2001 Chevrolet Cavalier was traveling at a high speed just after midnight when the driver lost control in Columbia Township, troopers at the Elyria post said. The car went airborne and then off the right side of the road- way, then swerved across the left side of the road, hit a ditch and tree, then flipped over onto the roadway, accord- ing to the troopers’ report.

NIGERIAN PLANE CRASH

NIGERIAN PLANE CRASH AP PHOTOS People stand on a part of a wrecked passenger plane in

AP PHOTOS

People stand on a part of a wrecked passenger plane in Lagos, Nigeria, on Sunday. All 153 passengers on board the plane are dead, an aviation official says.

All passengers die

About 153 onboard are dead in Lagos

By JON GAMBRELL and YINKA IBUKUN Associated Press

LAGOS, Nigeria — A passen-

YINKA IBUKUN Associated Press LAGOS, Nigeria — A passen- A man looks at the wreckage of

A man looks at the wreckage of a passenger

plane that crashed into buildings in Lagos,

Nigeria, on Sunday.

“I don’t think there will be any survivors,” said witness Praise Richard. “It would take a miracle.” Richard said he was watch- ing a film when he heard a loud explosion that sounded like a bomb. He rushed out- side and saw massive smoke and flames rising from the crash site around 3:45 p.m. At the crash site, an Asso- ciated Press reporter saw parts of the plane’s seat signs

ger plane carrying more than

150 people crashed in Nigeria’s

largest city on Sunday, killing all passengers aboard, an emer- gency official said. Several char- red corpses could be seen in the rubble of a building damaged by the crash, as firefighters searched for survivors and pulled a dead body from the wreckage.

Nigeria’s Civil Aviation Au- thority Harold Denuren said that all the passengers on

Sunday’s Dana Air flight died. He did not say how corpse from the building that continued to crumble.

many were on the flight.

The Lagos state government said in a statement that

153 people were on the flight going from Abuja to La-

gos. Yushau Shuaib, spokesman for the National Emer- gency Management Agency, said there were likely more casualties on the ground, but the number was un- known. He said they were also still trying to get an offi- cial manifest on the flight. Sometimes flights in Nige- ria issue paper tickets and don’t record all passengers via computer. The plane did not to appear to have nose-dived into a building, but seemed to have landed on its belly. It first crashed through a furniture shop and then into resi- dential buildings next to the workshop in this densely packed neighborhood. The nose of the plane was embedded into the three- story apartment building, damaging only one part of the structure. Fire still smoldered everywhere as sever- al thousand people looked on. A group of men stood atop the landing gear that was smoking and took pic- tures with their mobile phones.

scattered around. Firefight- ers tried to put out the smol- dering flames of a jet engine and carried at least one

A military helicopter flew overhead. The sound of

the crowd was also occasionally punctuated by the noise of aircraft still landing at the airport. Lagos’ international airport is a major hub fo r We st Africa and saw 2.3 million passengers pass through it

in 2009, according to the most recent statistics provid- ed by the Federal Airports Authority of Nigeria.

In August 2010, the U.S. announced it had given Ni-

geria the FAA’s Category 1 status, its top safety rating

that allows the nation’s domestic carriers to fly directly to the U.S. The Nigerian government said it also now has full radar coverage of the entire nation. The presidency said in a statement the crash “has sadly plunged the nation into further sorrow on a day when Nigerians were already in grief over the loss of many other in- nocent lives in the church bombing in Bauchi state.”

A suicide car bomber drove into a north Nigeria

church’s compound Sunday and detonated his explo- sives as worshippers left an early morning service, kill- ing at least eight people and wounding dozens more, officials and witnesses said.

Syrian leader gives defiant address

President Assad alleges a ‘foreign conspiracy’ against his country and denies responsibility for killings.

month of more than 100 people, mostly women and children, in the central township of Houla. The killings in Houla drew interna- tional repudiation of Syria. United Na- tions officials said evidence pointed to pro-government death squads as the killers. But authorities in Syria blamed the massacre on foreign-backed "ter- rorists" seeking to frame Syrian securi- ty services and undermine a U.N. peace

seemed aimed mostly at a domestic au- dience. The president appeared to be preparing Syrians for more hardship af- ter months of violence and economic sanctions have battered and trauma- tized the population. “We are facing a real war from out- side,” Assad said. The Syrian leader offered no new measures to help resuscitate the stalled United Nations-brokered peace plan, widely violated by both sides in

U.N. special envoy Kofi Annan has called on Assad to take “bold and vis- ible steps” to help implement the fal- tering peace plan, which, among other things, calls for withdrawal of govern- ment troops from populated areas. On Saturday, Annan warned of “all- out civ-

By RIMA MARROUCH And PATRICK J. O’DONNELL Los Angeles Times (MCT)

AMMAN, Jordan - Syrian President Bashar Assad offered no new conces-

sions Sunday from his embattled ad- plan.

ministration, instead assailing a "for- eign conspiracy" against Syria and re- jecting any government role in recent “monstrous massacres” across the na- tion. “The truth is that even monsters do not do what we saw, especially in the Houla massacre,” Assad said, referring to the house-to-house executions last

“The crisis is not internal,” Assad the almost 15-month-old conflict.

said, repeating his government’s long- term assertion that foreign powers are stoking the uprising aimed at ending

his rule. “Rather, it is a foreign war with internal tools, and everybody is respon- sible for defending the homeland.” The nationally televised speech be-

fore the newly elected Parliament il war.”

Wisconsin governor’s recall test for voters

By DAVID LIGHTMAN McClatchy Newspapers

WAUKESHA, Wis. - The brawl over whether to re- call Gov. Scott Walker is a taut preview of what’s com-

Can a tough-minded con-

of the larger clashes in servative Republican force

cutbacks in government at the risk of angering public employees unions and still win a swing state such as

ing to campaigns across governor in U.S. history the costs of government. Wisconsin? Will voters

America this year. Wisconsin voters will de- cide Tuesday whether to remove the Republican from office and replace him

edge, but the race is close. race is raising questions

The campaign will mean that will echo across the backlash against a well-fi-

think he’s doing the best he can in a tough time? Or will they rise in a grassroots

with Democrat Thomas Wisconsin. It’s a test case

Barrett, the mayor of Mil- waukee. Under fire for cut- ting budgets at the expense of public employees, Walk- er would be only the third

yanked from office in a re- call election. Walker has an

American politics driving elections for the presiden- cy and control of Congress, highlighting divisions over

Backed by money pouring in from out of state, the

more than who governs country.

nanced Republican effort?

Panetta’s

message

two-fold

U.S. secretary of defense reassures Asian-Pacific nations while mollifying China.

By LOLITA C. BALDOR Associated Press

CAM RANH BAY, Vietnam — U.S.

Defense Secretary Leon Panetta used

a visit Sunday to Vietnam to make

clear Washington’s intent to aid allies

in the Asia-Pacific region develop and

enforce maritime rights in the South China Sea, which Beijing largely claims. On a historic stop in Cam Ranh Bay, the strategic deep water port that was a U.S. base during the Viet- nam War, Panetta could gaze out from the flight deck of the USNS Ri- chard E. Byrd toward the sea and re-

flect on the significance of the harbor, which represents

both a painful past for the American military and a chal- lenging but hopeful future. “The new de- fense strategy that we have put in place for the United States repre- sents a number

of key elements

that will be tested in the

Asia-Pacific re-

gion,” Panetta

told reporters

gathered under

a blazing sun

on the deck of the cargo ves- sel. He said the U.S. would “work with our partners like Vietnam to be able to use har- bors like this as we move our

ships from our ports on the West Coast toward our stations here in the Pacific.” Panetta never mentioned China as he spoke to crew members on the Byrd and later to reporters. But with the South China Sea as a backdrop, he left no doubt that the U.S. will main- tain a strong presence in the region and wants to help allies protect them- selves and their maritime rights. His visit , however, is likely to irrita- te Chinese leaders who are unhappy with any U.S. buildup in the region and view it as a possible threat. Panetta, in remarks Saturday to a defense conference in Singapore, re- jected such claims about the shift in U.S. military focus. But U.S. officials are wary of China’s increased military buildup and expanding trade rela- tions with other countries in the re- gion. “Access for United States naval ships into this facility is a key compo- nent of this relationship (with Viet- nam) and we see a tremendous poten- tial here for the future,” he said. This is Panetta’s first visit to Viet- nam, and his stop at the harbor made him the most senior U.S. official to go to Cam Ranh Bay since the Vietnam War ended. Right now U.S. warships do not go into the harbor, but other Navy ships, such as the Byrd, do. The Byrd is a cargo ship operated by the Navy ’s Military Sealift Command; it has a largely civilian crew. It is used to move military supplies to U.S. forces around the world. Navy warships go to other Vietnam ports, such as Da- nang.

Navy warships go to other Vietnam ports, such as Da- nang. Pa ne tta “The new

Panetta

“The new de- fense strategy that we have put in place … represents a number of key elements that will be tested in the Asia- Pacific re- gion.”

Leon Panetta U.S. secretary of defense

Pacific re- gion.” Leon Panetta U.S. secretary of defense MCT FILE PHO TO In Madison, Wis.,

MCT FILE PHOTO

In Madison, Wis., about three dozen peo- ple gather every day at noon for an hour to sing protest songs in the Capitol.

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PAGE 6A MONDAY, JUNE 4, 2012

NEWS

THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

POLICE BLOTTER

PLYMOUTH TWP. -- Cora Blackwell reported a men’s gold wedding band that was cut down to size was stolen from her windowsill on Main Street between 11 a.m. and 3 p.m. on May 25, state police said.

HANOVER TWP. – Township police reported the following:

• Basheir Edwards19, of Ma- dison Street, Wilkes-Barre, said he was assaulted while walking in Hanover Village around 9

p.m. Saturday. Police were called to Wilkes- Barre General Hospital, where Edwards was being treated. Police observed slight swelling and an abrasion to the left side of his face. He said he will re- contact police when he has additional information. • Two men were treated for injuries suffered in a fight at

The Slate Bar on the Sans Souci at the Sherman Hills complex

Parkway early Sunday morning. on North Empire Court and

choked her, police said. Smith was taken into custody and transported to the Luzerne County Correctional Facility.

The unidentified men were taken by ambulance to Geis- inger Wyoming Valley Medical Center, Plains Township. The suspects in the fight fled the bar

before police arrived. The bar is Montero reported the rear driv- afternoon at the intersection of

awaiting surveillance video for review.

WILKES-BARRE – City

police reported the following:

• Thomas Smith, 23, was

arrested for violating a no-con- tact protection from abuse order Sunday after he went into the apartment of Champaigne Shaw

• The owner of a Mitsubishi

er’s side window was smashed and her purse stolen while it was parked in the Intermodal center on South Washington Street. The owner said she

parked on the second floor around midnight Friday and returned around 2 a.m. Saturday to find the damage. • Kuionna Thomas of We st Maple Street reported Saturday her bank card was stolen from her vehicle while it was parked on South Main Street.

Airport Road and state Route 309, state police said. Sara Motato, 36, of Hazleton was traveling south on Route 309 and failed to bring her 2000 Dodge Caravan to a stop, strik- ing a 2009 Ford F-150 stopped for a red light around 3 p.m., state police said. Neither Motato, the driver of the pickup truck Rodney Allen, 39,of Drums, nor a 3-year-old boy in Allen’s truck were in- jured, state police said.

HAZLE TWP. -- A minivan ran

into the rear of a pickup Sunday

PLAINS TWP. - Township

police reported the following:

• Nicholas Gatto of Duryea reported a man tried to rob him in Lot B of the Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs casino around 11:20 p.m. We dnesday. Gatto said he was standing by his car when the man put his hand to Gatto’s side and said, “Give me your wallet or I’ll kill you.” The man ran away after Gatto told him he didn’t have any money. Gatto described the suspect as white, 5 feet, 9 inch- es, with a stocky build, a dark shaggy beard, wearing black pants, a black t-shirt with white writing or a picture on the front.

TRUCKS

Continued from Page 3A

The Bretzes began their first fire truck refurbishment when Tommy was 14. The truck was a 1940s Ward La- France that Tom first spotted in a park- ing lot in Dallas. He personally approached its owner and eventually he purchased the truck for $5,000. T. Bretz and Son began its first restoration soon after. Tommy Bretz, now 23, has since worked on three restorations with his fa- ther. Still, he describes that first Ward LaFrance as the “biggest work of them all.” To begin, the truck had to be sanded down and repainted. Then the Bretzes had to hunt for antique equipment from the 1940s to properly outfit the truck’s interior. Finally, they entirely rewired the engine so that it could function at full capacity. This restoration was not unmarred by a few arguments and spats. The el- der Bretz acknowledged he and his son “got so close over it.” Tommy said he would “do it all over again,” and he has: He and his father also have refurbished a 1960s Ward La- France and are in the finishing stages of refurbishing a Hahn engine. That Hahn engine symbolizes the centrality of the Bretzes’ shared hobby to their father-son bond. Tommy had long expressed to his fa- ther a dream to restore a Hahn truck — a slight departure from the Ward La- France models on which they had worked in the past. And so Tom, seeing in his son a

they had worked in the past. And so Tom, seeing in his son a AIMEE DILGER/THE

AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER

Tommy Bretz parks one of the fire trucks he and his father have worked to restore.

shared passion for fire engines, devot- ed his energies to finding a Hahn. It be- came an all-consuming desire: “I want to leave this earth knowing you got the Hahn you wanted,” he told his son. Bretz finally fulfilled his son’s wish when he discovered a Hahn for sale at the Atlas Fire Co. in Mount Carmel. T. Bretz and Son are in the process of refurbishing this truck. Bretz recommended a few organiza- tions to those interested in his family ’s hobby:

• The Society for the Preservation and Appreciation of Antique Motor Fire Apparatus in America has been ac- tive since 1958 and has chapters world- wide.

• The Schuylkill Historical Fire So- ciety, a local organization open to the public, hosts a museum devoted to the fire service in a company building re- stored in good part thanks to the Bretz- es’ personal efforts. Even with his constant involvement in fire truck refurbishment, Bretz re- fuses to leave his beloved fire service fully behind. He holds a lifetime membership in the Kingston Fire Department and stores his trucks at the South Sprague Avenue station. He also sits as a mem- ber of the Six County Firemen’s Associ- ation and serves as the vice president of the Luzerne County Fire Rescue Training Association.

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AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER

A man surveys the damage to a house along state Ro ute 437 in Fa irview Township after a motorcyclist drove through a basement door and suffered serious injuries.

Township Po lice Chief Joe Intelicato said the motorcyc list was southbound around 6:45 p.m. and failed to negotiate a curve. The motorcycle went off the road and traveled ap- proximately 160 feet, hitting a mailbox and ‘For Sale’ sign before running into the cin- derblock foundation of the house. The unidentified man, who was not wearing a helmet, crashed through a door and landed inside the house. He was taken from the scene by ambulance to an area hospital. His identity and condition were not available.

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THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

NEWS

MONDAY, JUNE 4, 2012 PAGE 7A

Philly parishioners await visit from pope in 2015

City of Brotherly Love is announced as site of the next World Meeting of Families.

By RON TODT Associated Press

PHILADELPHIA — Local offi-

cials and parishioners hailed the

announcement by Pope Benedict

XVI that he plans to visit Phila-

delphia in 2015 when it is the site of the next World Meeting of Families, some adding that it might heal divisions caused by the clergy abuse scandals of re-

cent years.

Benedict announced the venue during a Sunday Mass in Milan celebrating the seventh such gathering of families from around the world. The pope sent

his greetings to Archbishop Char- les Chaput and the Catholics “of

that great city” and said he was

looking forward to meeting them in 2015. Officials said it was too early to confirm the papal calendar. Tra- ditionally papal trips abroad are

usually confirmed first by the lo- cal diocese hosting the trip once the dates are set, a few months before the journey. And the Vat-

ican releases details of such a pil-

grimage only a few weeks before

departure. Since becoming pope, Benedict attended a world fam-

ilies meeting in Valencia, Spain,

but skipped one in Mexico. The announcement of the pa-

pal visit comes as jurors in Phila- delphia are deliberating in the landmark trial of a former Roman Catholic Church official charged with conspiring to hide priest- abuse complaints and endanger- ing children by keeping predators in ministry. Chaput hailed the visit in a statement from Milan, where dio- cesan officials said he received

the icon of the Holy Family,

which is the symbol of The World Meeting of Families.

“I am so grateful to the Holy Fa-

ther

that he has chosen Philadel-

phia

and excited that we will host

the 2015 World Meeting of Fam-

ilies,” Chaput said. “It’s fitting

that this gathering, which cele-

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dals. “I would think we could use a boost,” she said. “Even just the thought of it will, I think, make people a little happier about things.” In 1979, Pope John Paul II drew gigantic crowds of people along the Benjamin Franklin Parkway outside the cathedral when he came to celebrate Mass. Corcoran said she remembers

brates the cornerstone of society, will take place in America’s cra- dle of freedom. The Holy Father’s choice is a gift to the local Church in Philadelphia and to the whole nation.” Chaput, who heads the five- county archdiocese that has about 1.5 million Catholics, also said the visit would highlight the importance of the family, which

he said “is founded on a deep and

loving union between one man the day vividly.

and one woman for mutual sup-

port and the nurturing of chil- ence,” she said. “It was a very

dren” and is “the basic evange- moving event.”

lizing unit of the Church.”

Theresa Pollard, 46, of Mullica Hill, N.J., said she remembers

riage and the family serves not “crowds, cheers and lots of ex- only the Church, but also the citement” from then, and she’s

common good,” he said. In the landmark trial that went to the jury on Friday, Monsignor William Lynn, the former secre- tary for clergy, is the first U.S. church official charged for his handling of child sex-abuse com- plaints. He said he tried to get the Philadelphia archdiocese to ad- dress the problem, only to be re- buffed by his archbishop, the late Cardinal Anthony Bevilacqua. Prosecutors maintain that Lynn could have quit or called police. Some parishioners leaving the Cathedral of Saints Peter & Paul in central Philadelphia after Sun- day Mass said they hoped the pa- pal visit could help heal divisions caused by the church sex abuse scandals of recent years. “I think the divisiveness be- cause of the sex scandal has really impacted the attendance at Mass and just the unity of Catholics in the city,” said Mary Corcoran, who graduated from a Catholic school just up the street. “I think it just might bring some healing to us, having his presence here in the city.” Eileen Jameson, 53, carrying her not-quite-2-year-old grand- daughter Lyla down the cathe- dral steps after her very first Mass, said she thought anticipa- tion of the visit could reinvigor-

ate local Catholics after the scan-

“It was just a beautiful experi-

Catholics after the scan- “It was just a beautiful experi- AP PHOTO Pope Benedict XVI waves

AP PHOTO

Pope Benedict XVI waves as he arrives Sunday to celebrate a Mass in Bresso, near Milan, Italy. The pope is in Milan fo r the seve nt h Wo rld Encounte r of Fa milies.

“Every effort to promote mar-

looking forward to Pope Bene- dict XVI’s visit. “I will be waiting in line,” she said. “I was here to see Pope John Paul as a child, so I’m eager for his arrival — so my whole family will be here.”

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PAGE 8A MONDAY, JUNE 4, 2012

OBITUARIES

THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

PAMELA M. O’DELL, 49, of Madison Street, Wilkes-Barre, died Wednesday, May 23, 2012 . Born February 19, 1963, in Long Is- land, N.Y., she was formerly em- ployed at Riverstreet Manor, Wilkes-Barre, as a certified nurse’s aide and in the home health care industry. Pamela was preceded in death by her husband, Danny O’Dell. Surviving are daughter, Danielle Kyle, Wilkes-Barre; broth- er, Tim Powers, Denver, Colo.; friend Pat Charles. Memorial service will be held at 6 p.m. Friday, June 15, 2012 at the Yeosock Funeral Home, 40 S. Main St., Plains. Friends may call 5 to 6 p.m.

SANDRA FREY, 64, of Berwick, passed away Saturday morning, June 2, 2012, at Bloomsburg Health Care Center, Bloomsburg. Arrangements are pending from Kniffen O’Malley Funeral Home, Inc., 465 S. Main St., Wilkes-Barre.

MARK J. JASULEVICZ, 43, of Mountain Top, passed away on Sunday, June 3, 2012, at his home. Funeral arrangements are pending from the Nat & Gawlas Funeral Home, 89 Park Avenue, Wilkes-Barre.

CATHERINE CUNNINGHAM, of Harding, passed away Sunday, June 3, 2012, in the Highland Ma- nor Nursing and Convalescent Center, Exeter. Arrangements are pending from the Nulton Funeral Home Inc., 5749 SR 309 (Beaumont), Monroe Township.

Gerald F. Snyder

June 2, 2012

G erald F. Snyder, 65, of River Street, Honey Pot section of

Nanticoke, passed away Saturday, June 2, 2012, at Bonham’s Nursing Home, Huntington Township. Born in Nanticoke on October 30, 1946, he was a son of the late Edward and Helen Shipkowski Snyder. Gerald was employed in the con- struction field and worked for vari- ous local construction companies. Preceding him in death were his wife, the former Charlotte Wolfin- ger, and a brother, Edward C. Snyd- er.

Surviving are his daughter, Christine Krieger, and husband Michael, Nanticoke; sons, Edward Wolfinger and his wife, Linda, Nanticoke; Gerald, Hunlock Creek, and Stephen, Shickshinny; brothers Michael and David; sis- ters, Linda Snyder, Barbara Tranell and husband Robbie, Diane Snyd-

er, all of Nanticoke; 12 grandchil- dren; many nieces, nephews, aunts and uncles. Services will be held today at 7:30 p.m. from the Earl W. Lohman Funeral Home Inc., 14 W. Green

St., Nanticoke. Friends may call to-

day from 2 to 4 p.m. and 6 p.m. un- til time of service.

Regina Casale

June 2, 2012

R egina Josephine Cembor Ca- sale, 81, a life-long resident of

Bayonne, New Jersey, who recent- ly relocated to the Back Mountain with her husband, died Saturday at Geisinger Wyoming Valley Medi- cal Center, Plains Township. Born July 14, 1930, in Bayonne,

she was a daughter of the late Stan- ley and Josephine Olsienski Cem- bor. Regina was educated at Our La- dy of Mount Carmel School and graduated from Bayonne High School. She dedicated her life to caring for her husband and sons. Brothers, William, Stanley, Wal- ter, Eddie and Chester Cembor preceded her in death. She will be greatly missed by her husband of 58 years, Alfred S. Casale; sons and daughters-in-law, Alfred S. Casale, Jr., MD and Mary Casale of Shavertown and Donald

W. Casale and Cassie Casale of

Wareton, New Jersey; grandchil- dren, Katherine Casale McNally and her husband, Andrew McNal- ly; and Donald S. Casale; many nieces, nephews, relatives and friends. Celebration of Regina’s Life will held Tuesday with visitation from 4 to 8 p.m. at McLaughlin’s – The Family Funeral Service, 142 South Washington Street in Wilkes-Barre. A Funeral Mass will

be celebrated Friday at the Church of Our Lady of Mount Carmel in Bayonne followed by interment in Holy Cross Cemetery in North Ar- lington, New Jersey. Memorial donations are pre- ferred and may be made to Geisin- ger Heart Hospital, 1000 East Mountain Drive, Wilkes-Barre, PA

18711

Permanent messages and me- mories can be shared with Regina’s family at www.celebrateherlife- .com.

Charles P. Menichini

June 3, 2012

C harles P. Menichini, a resident of Pittston, died Sunday, June 3,

2012, in Pittston. He was born December 4, 1952, in Jenkins Township, a son of There- sa (Grenier) Menichini and the late Queenie Menichini. His wife is Barbara Menichini. He was a 1972 graduate of Pitt- ston Area High School. He was an av id Yankees fan his entire life. He was the proud owner of Music Man Productions, where he was known as “The Music Man.” He was an avid fisherman and boater. He always had a bright smile and an appreciation for life in general. He was owner and operator of Falvo Plumbing & Heating. Surviving, in addition to his mother and wife, are sons, Chris- topher Angelo Menichini, Pittston; Timothy Paul Menichini, Pittston; daughter Kimberly Ann Menichini, Pittston Township; brothers, James Menichini, Pittston Township; John and wife Pamela Menichini, Braden- ton, Fla.; sister Carol and husband Ro bert Marshall, Te mecula, Calif.; grandsons, Dominic Michael Meni- chini, and James and Logan Las- kowski; brothers-in-law, Stephen Falvo, Philadelphia; Robert and Cheryl Falvo, Pittston; David and Joyetta Falvo, Newnan, Ga.; Philip and Fran Falvo, Hughestown. Also

Falvo, Newnan, Ga.; Philip and Fran Falvo, Hughestown. Also surviving are several nieces and ne- phews

surviving are several nieces and ne- phews as well as several great-niec- es and great-nephews. Funeral services are entrusted to Graziano Funeral Home Inc., Pitt- ston Township. Viewing hours will be held at the funeral home on Tues- day, June 5, 2012, from 4 to 8 p.m. Funeral services will be conduct- ed at Graziano Funeral Home. The funeral services will begin at 10 a.m. on We dnesday, Ju ne 6, 2012 . The Rev. Robert Sauer will officiate ser- vices. Interment services will continue at Mt. Olivet Cemetery, Carverton. You may submit online condo- lences and find directions to our fu- neral home by visiting: Graziano- FuneralHome.com.

Donald J. Curham

June 1, 2012

D onald J. Curham, age 85, former- ly of Plymouth, passed away Fri-

day, June 1, 2012, at the family home in Flemington, N.J. Born April 2, 1927, in Plymouth

Township, he was the son of the late James and Katherine Curley Cur- ham. Donald was a graduate of Harter High School and was a member of All Saints Parish, Plymouth. He was a United States Army Veteran serv- ing during the Korean War. Prior to his retirement, he was employed by Drake’s Cake as a salesman. He was a member of the American Legion and the V.F.W. He, along with his brothers, were avid Notre Dame fans. Donald “Duke” was a loving and encouraging father to his entire family. He was preceded in death by his 13 brothers and sisters. Surviving are his sons, David and his wife, Donna, of Washington Township, N.J.; Kevin and his wife, Mei Mii, of Atlanta, Ga.; and Brian and his wife, Joanne, with whom he lived in Flemington, N.J.; and grand- children, Kyle, Cori and Bradley; nu- merous nieces and nephews.

Kyle, Cori and Bradley; nu- merous nieces and nephews. Funeral will be held on We dnesday
Kyle, Cori and Bradley; nu- merous nieces and nephews. Funeral will be held on We dnesday

Funeral will be held on We dnesday at 10 a.m. from the S.J. Grontkowski Funeral Home, 530 We st Main Street , Plymouth, followed by Mass of Christian Buri- al at 10:30 a.m. in All Saints Parish, 66 Willow Street, Plymouth. Inter- ment will be in St. Vincent de Paul Cemetery, Larksville. Family and friends may call We dnesday from 8:30 until 10 :30 a.m. Please visit www.sjgrontkowski- funeralhome.com for directions or to submit online condolences.

FUNERALS

ALESSO – Sara, Mass of Christian Burial 9: 30 a.m. Tuesday in St. Joseph Marello Parish, (St. Roc- co’s R.C. Church), Pittston. There will be no calling hours. BARBER – Cora, funeral 11 a.m. today in the Bowman’s Creek Free Methodist Church, corner of routes 29 and 309. Friends may

call 9 to 11 a.m. before the service. BURNS – Justin, Mass of Christian Burial 10 a.m. Tuesday in Queen of the Apostles Church, 715 Hawthorne St., Avoca. Family and friends are asked to go directly to church for Mass. Friends may call 4 to 8 p.m. today in Queen of the Apostles Church. CARLIN – John, funeral 10 a.m. Tuesday in McLaughlin’s, 142 S. Washington St., Wilkes-Barre. Traditional Latin Requiem Mass (Tridentine Rite) at 11 a.m. in St. Michael the Archangel Church, West Scranton. Friends may call 5 to 8 p.m. today COONS – Marjorie, memorial ser- vice 11 a.m. today in the Sheldon- Kukuchka Funeral Home, Inc., 73

W. Tioga St., Tunkhannock.

DONNORA – Julia, funeral 9 a.m. today in the Gubbiotti Funeral Home, 1030 Wyoming Ave., Exe- ter. Mass of Christian Burial at 9:30 a.m. at St. John the Evange- list Church, Pittston. DZANIS – Keith, funeral 10 a.m. today in the Anthony Recupero Funeral Home, 406 Susquehanna Ave., West Pittston. Friends may call 9 to 10 a.m. at the funeral home. GOCH – Stephen, funeral 9 a.m. Wednesday in the George A. Strish Inc. Funeral Home, 105 N. Main St., Ashley. Mass of Chris- tian Burial at 9:30 a.m. in St. Leo’s/ Holy Rosary Church, Ashley. Friends may call 5 to 8 p.m. Tuesday. GROSEK – Anthony Jr., Mass of

Christian Burial 10 a.m. today in

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GUDMAN – Genevieve, celebration of life Mass 11 a.m. Saturday in St. Frances X. Cabrini Church, 585 Mt. Olivet Rd.,(Kingston Town- ship) Carverton. LEMMOND – Charles, funeral 11 a.m. Wednesday in the Dallas United Methodist Church, 4 Parsonage

St., Dallas. Friends may call 4 to 7 p.m. Tuesday in the Harold C. Snowdon Funeral Home Inc., 140

N. Main St., Shavertown.

LEVA NDOWS KI – Ad am, funeral 9:30 a.m. today in Kiesinger Funeral Services Inc., 255 McAl- pine St., Duryea. Mass of Chris-

tian Burial at 10 a.m. at Queen of the Apostles Church, Avoca. MOSS – Sharon, Mass of Divine Liturgy 9 a.m. today in the Holy Transfiguration Ukrainian Church, Center Street, Nanticoke. PRINCIC – Suzanne, blessing ser- vice 7 p.m. Tuesday in the Victor

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SHULTZ – Robert, military funeral 11 a.m. Tuesday in the Harold C. Snowdon Funeral Home, Inc., 140

N. Main St., Shavertown. Friends

may call 4 to 7 p.m. today in the funeral home. SORBER – Margaret, celebration of life Mass noon June 16 in St. Faustina Parish, (Holy Trinity) 520 S. Hanover St., Nanticoke. Friends may call 10:30 a.m. until the time of the Mass.

VA NFLEET – Ca rl, memorial se rvice 6:30 p.m. June 20 in the Eat- onville United Methodist Church. WICKKISER – James, funeral 10 a.m. today in the Charles V. Sherbin Funeral Home, Main Road, Hanover Green, Hanover

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June 3, 2012

John “Mason” Misencik

May 31, 2012

John “Mason” Misencik, 83, of Moosic, passed away Thursday, May 31, at VNA Hospice CMC Hospital, Scran- ton.Tyszko June 3, 2012 John “Mason” Misencik May 31, 2012 He was born in Moosic on

He was born in Moosic on January 17, 1929, and was the son of the late Andrew and Te ssie (Trescavage) Misencik. John was a member of Sacred Heart of Jesus Church, Dupont. He was a graduate of Moosic High School. He was a United States Air Force Veteran, serving during World War II and the Korean War. John at- tended Wilkes College and the Ho- ward Hughes College in California. John worked for Maxson in Old Forge, MetLife Insurance, the West- on Co. and he retired from Lockheed Martin. John was a former member of the VFW Post 8335, Avoca. John is survived by his wife of 59 years, the former Mary (Scyrba) Mis- encik; his sons, Mark and his wife, Donna, of Avoca; Eric and his wife, Kathleen, of Avoca; his sister, Shirley Cook, of Hughestown; granddaught- ers, Melissa and Amanda, and nieces and nephews. John’s family would like to thank the nurses and staff at Geisinger Wyoming Valley Henry Cancer Cen- ter, Dr. Brady and staff, Dr. Gerald Gibbons and staff. They would also to thank John’s neighbors, especially Stephanie Bentler, for their care and support over the years. John will be truly missed by his family and friends.

Funeral services will be held Wednesday, June 6, at 9:30 a.m. from Kiesinger Funeral Services, 255 McAlpine will be held Wednesday, June 6, at 9:30 a.m. from Kiesinger Funeral Services, 255 McAlpine St., Duryea, with a Mass of Christian Burial at 10 a.m. at Sacred Heart of Jesus Church, Dupont, with Father Joseph Verespy officiating. Friends may call Wednesday, June 6, from 8 to 9:30 a.m. Interment will be held at the parish cemetery. Online condolences may be made to www.kiesingerfuneralservices- .com.

Bank robber is cut out from air duct

The Associated Press

OAK LAWN, Ill. — A wig-wear- ing man broke into a suburban Chicago bank vault and nearly made off with $100,000 but got stuck in an air duct and had to be cut out hours later, authorities said Sunday. Charles Estell, 38, was found early Sunday hiding in an air duct in an office next to the bank, ac- cording to Oak Lawn police spokesman Michael Kaufmann. The Chicago man had alleged- ly robbed the suburban bank Sat- urday afternoon, and pointed a gun at bank employees who con- fronted him in the vault, accord- ing to the FBI. “I don’t want to kill or hurt you,” Estell said, according to the criminal complaint. “I just want the money.” He allegedly stuffed $100,000 in a backpack and fled. Employ- ees told authorities it appeared he escaped through the ceiling.

S tanley P. Tyszko, 79, of King- ston, died Sunday, June 3, 2012,

in Timber Ridge Health Care Cen- ter, Wilkes-Barre. He was born in Tunkhannock, son of the late Peter and Sophia Au- gustyn Anuskiewicz Tyszko. He was a graduate of Kingston High School and served in the U.S. Navy in the late 1950s. He was formerly employ- ed as a tailor by United Pants Facto- ry in Swoyersville, and later by Bish- op O’Reilly High School and West Si de Te ch in the maintenance de- partment. He was a member of St. Ignatius Church, Kingston. Stanley enjoyed gardening, golf- ing and fishing, but he most loved spending time with his grandchil- dren. He is survived by his sons, Stan- ley Tyszko Jr., Pringle; Peter Tysz- ko, We st Wyoming, and Ja mie Tysz-

ko, Fort Collins, Colo.; grandchil- Cemetery, Carverton.

dren, Emily and Te a M arie Tyszko, and Sean McDermott; sister, Stella

and Te a M arie Tyszko, and Sean McDermott; sister, Stella Kalinowski, Kingston; nieces and nephews.

Kalinowski, Kingston; nieces and nephews. Funeral will be Wednesday at 9 a.m. from the Kopicki Funer- al Home, 263 Zerbey Avenue, King- ston, with Mass of Christian Burial at 9:30 a.m. in St. Ignatius Church. Interment will be in Mount Olivet

in St. Ignatius Church. Interment will be in Mount Olivet Friends may call Tuesday from 5

Friends may call Tuesday from 5 to 8 p.m. at the funeral home.

Dorothy “Dot” Irene Sepela

June 2, 2012

D orothy “Dot” Irene Sepela, 74, of Nanticoke, passed away Satur-

day evening at home. Born in Wilkes-Barre, she was the daughter of the late Edward and Ruth Hartman Jones. Mrs. Sepela was a graduate of Meyers High School, Class of 1955. During her lifetime, she worked in the garment industry. She also en- joyed crocheting and cooking. She was a member of the former Ply- mouth Presbyterian Church. In addition to her parents, she was preceded in death by her hus- band, Edward F. Sepela Jr., in 2010 and brother Howard Jones. Left to cherish her memory are sons, Richard and his wife, Sharon, Las Vegas, Nev.; Robert and his wife, Jo Ann, Savannah, Ga.; grandchil- dren, Eric, Beth and Shannon Sepe-

la; step-grandchildren, Robert and West Wyoming. Friends may call

Ashlee Pilger; great-grandchild, Kel- len Harris; step-great-grandchild, Isabel Reilly Pilger; brothers Ed- ward “Butch” Jones, David Jones

Wednesday from 6 to 8 p.m. In lieu of flowers, the family re- quest memorial donations be sent to the Nanticoke Food Pantry.

and Jack Jones. Funeral services will be held Thursday at 11:30 a.m. from the Kearney Funeral Home Inc., 173 E. Green St., Nanticoke, with the Rev. James Nash officiating. Interment will be in Memorial Shrine Park,

officiating. Interment will be in Memorial Sh rine Park, Doris Yeager June 2, 2012 Doris Ye

Doris Yeager

June 2, 2012

will be in Memorial Sh rine Park, Doris Yeager June 2, 2012 Doris Ye ag- 76,

Doris Ye ag- 76, of

er,

Mountain Top,

entered into

eternal rest

peacefully at

home on Satur- day, June 2,

2012.

Born on May 16, 1936, she was the daughter of the late Lawrence Willard George Sr. and Dorothy El- izabeth George. Doris was a 1954 graduate of the Newport High School and then from business school in 1956. She worked for the Crestwood Area School District, holding several positions before becoming the business manager for the district and retiring from that post. Doris

was an active member of the

OBITUARY POLICY

The Times Leader publish- es free obituaries, which have a 27-line limit, and paid obituaries, which can run with a photograph. A funeral home representative can call

the obituary desk at (570) 829-7224, send a fax to (570) 829-5537 or e-mail to tlo- bits@timesleader.com. If you fax or e-mail, please call to confirm. Obituaries must be

submitted by 9 p.m. Sunday through Thursday and 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday. Obituaries must be sent by a funeral home or crematory, or must name who is hand- ling arrangements, with address and phone number. We discourage handwritten notices; they incur a $15 typing fee.

Christ United Methodist Church and its Friendship Circle in Mountain Top. She was a member of the East- ern Star and enjoyed traveling and was an avid golfer. Preceding her in death in addition to her parents was her longtime com- panion, Charles Dewald, and a sister, Joan Crawford. Surviving are her son, Wayne Yeag- er, Sl ocum; granddaughters, Ta mmy Jo Gluck and Tonya Sue Ford, both of Wilkes-Barre; four great-grandchil- dren, Cheyanne, Curtis, Charles and Ceandra; a sister and brother; Eileen Kaska, Blythburn, and Willard Ge- orge and wife Barbara, Dorrance. Many nieces, nephews, great-nieces and nephews also survive. Private funeral services will be held at the convenience of the family and are under the direction of McCune Funeral Service Inc., Moun- tain Top.

In Loving Memory Of

Elaine May Gregorowicz

5/1/1942 - 6/4/2010

Memory Of Elaine May Gregorowicz 5/1/1942 - 6/4/2010 Those we lo ve don’t go away, They

Those we love don’t go away, They walk beside us every day, Unseen, unheard but always near, Still loved, still missed and very dear.

Deeply loved and sadly missed by Husband John, Daughter Paula, Family and Friends

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THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

NEWS

MONDAY, JUNE 4, 2012 PAGE 9A

CLICK: GELBS AWARDED FOR SERVICE

CLICK: GELBS AWARDED FOR SERVICE Leah, Johanna and Rabbi Joe Murry Edie Jodz and Eric Hilliard

Leah, Johanna and Rabbi Joe Murry

GELBS AWARDED FOR SERVICE Leah, Johanna and Rabbi Joe Murry Edie Jodz and Eric Hilliard Steve

Edie Jodz and Eric Hilliard

Johanna and Rabbi Joe Murry Edie Jodz and Eric Hilliard Steve and Jacob Gelb FRED ADAMS

Steve and Jacob Gelb

FRED ADAMS PHOTOS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

Steve and Jacob Gelb FRED ADAMS PHOTOS/FO R THE TIMES LEADER Ellen Norman and Sandy Wruble

Ellen Norman and Sandy Wruble

Steve and Jacob Gelb FRED ADAMS PHOTOS/FO R THE TIMES LEADER Ellen Norman and Sandy Wruble

Alyssa and Ava Hilliard

PSU freshmen still upbeat

Incoming class brings a renewed spirit to troubled Penn State University.

By GENARO C. ARMAS Associated Press

STATE COLLEGE— High school senior Wilton Smith wasn’t scared off from attending Penn State because of the child sex abuse crisis that enveloped the university. Instead, he’s more convinced than ever that he can make a difference in college. Penn State already had the char- acteristics Smith sought for col- lege: An honors program, a pre-med program, and a large enrollment with high-profile sports teams. Plus, Smith’s older sister, Amanda, just graduated in May. “If anything, it encouraged me more to come to Penn State be- cause I wanted to be part of the class that restored the honor at the university,” said Smith, a student at Cedar Cliff High School in Camp Hill, during a break on a recent visit to campus with his father for an honors program orientation. Despite fears of a hit to Penn State’s reputation — and enroll- ment — President Rodney Erick- son has said the school is on pace to have its largest incoming freshman class in six years. The incoming Class of 2016 would be the first group of freshmen to enroll since former assistant football coach Jer- ry Sandusky was accused in No- vember of molesting boys and us- ing his charity to recruit victims. The fallout roiled the state and its flagship university. Two top admin- istrators were charged with a cover- up. Hall of Fame football coach Joe Paterno was ousted by the trustees, a move that sparked outrage among the school’s numerous alumni and a

sparked outrage among the school’s numerous alumni and a AP PHOTO Cedar Cliff High School senior

AP PHOTO

Cedar Cliff High School senior Wilton Smith, left, and his father, Scott, pose in front of the Penn State student union building during an orien- tation visit in State College.

raucous protest of thousands of col- lege students on downtown streets.

“The university is much bigger than the whole scandal,” Scott

Mainly, though, the roughly Smith added. “To me, that’s his

40,000 who attend the main cam- pus in State College tried to lie low through the scurrilous rumors and media firestorm. Dozens took part in charity efforts to raise money and awareness for child abuse research and treatment. Thousands showed up a candle- light vigil for victims of child abuse

in November; thousands again graduate applications to all Penn

showed up for a vigil after Paterno

died in January. They lined the percent, according to figures pro-

streets in mourning days later for his funeral procession. High school students like Smith and their families took note. The scandal was an “isolated in- cident, a bad incident. But it wasn’t the university,” said Smith’s father, Scott. “To me, it was Sandusky. Could others have been complicit? I guess so, but I don’t think it’s right to hold that against any of the stu- dents who were here or who are coming here.

State campuses is up more than 2

problem that needs to be taken care of legally.” Sandusky has maintained his in- nocence while awaiting a trial that is scheduled to start Tuesday with jury selection and could still bring more sordid details of the case to light. Still, the number of total under-

vided by the university. Applica- tions are up at the main University Park campus by 5 percent, as well as among transfers, by 7 percent, and international undergraduates, by 24 percent. At branch campuses, applications are down 5 percent. And more than 8,300 students have committed to begin attending University Park — the main cam- pus, where Sandusky had worked — this summer or fall, up roughly 5 percent from a year ago.

Zombie talk spreads

Several gory incidents prompt reports

So many strange things have

gory incidents prompt reports So many strange things have AP FILE PHOTO A sign promoting zombie

AP FILE PHOTO

A sign promoting zombie preparedness displays in a hardware store in Omaha, Neb., in 2011.

high cost of housing or the de- pletion of a retirement account — they look to metaphors like the zombie. “They’re mindless drones fol- lowing basic needs to eat,” Ha-

English professor at Misericor- dia University in Dallas, Pa., who studies how we process comic-book narratives. Economic anxiety around the planet doesn’t help matters, ei-

ther, with Greece, Italy and milton says. “Those economic

issues speak to our own lack of

Spain edging closer to crisis ev-

thing we’ve created — and ery day. Consider some of the control.”

They’re also effective messen-

terms that those fears produce:

therefore brought upon our-

zombie banks, zombie econo- gers. The Centers for Disease

Control got in on the zombie ac- tion last year, using the “apoc-

strengthened after the 9/11 at- about things beyond their con- alypse” as the teaser for its

tacks, says Patrick Hamilton, an

trol — be it the loss of a job, the

mies, zombie governments. When people are unsettled

Zombies represent America’s fears of bioterrorism, a fear that

emergency preparedness blog.

By VICKI SMITH and TAMARA LUSH Associated Press

TAMPA, Fla. — First came Miami: the case of a naked man eating most of another man’s face. Then Maryland, a college student telling police he killed a man, then ate his heart and part of his brain. It was different in New Jersey, where a man stabbed himself 50 times and threw bits of his own intestines at police. They pep- per-sprayed him, but he was not easily subdued. He was, people started say-

ing, acting like a zombie. And to be figured out. Maybe it’s no limits.

the whole discussion just kept growing, becoming a topic that

the Internet couldn’t seem to a daily basis.

ble Friday morning when his 18-

made headlines in recent days year-old son quipped that a

that The Daily Beast assembled a Google Map tracking “instanc- es that may be the precursor to a zombie apocalypse.” And the federal agency that tracks dis- eases weighed in as well, insist- ing it had no evidence that any zombie-linked health crisis was unfolding.

“zombie apocalypse” was immi- nent. Symbolic of both infection and evil, zombies are terrifying in a way that other horror-movie iconography isn’t, says Eliza- beth Bird, an anthropologist at the University of South Florida. Zombies, after all, look like

The cases themselves are any- us. But they aren’t. They are

thing but funny. Each involved real people either suspected of committing unspeakable acts or having those acts visited upon them for reasons that have yet

nothing new, either; people do horrible things to each other on

some baser form of us — slowly rotting and shambling along, in- tent on “surviving” and creating more of their kind, but with no emotional core, no conscience,

“Vampires have kind of a ro- mantic appeal, but zombies are doomed,” Bird says. “Zombies can never really become human again. There’s no going back. “That resonates in today’s

world, with people feeling like liberate combination and weap-

onization of pathogens, parasit- es and disease. It will, many believe, be some-

a virus that escapes from some secret government lab, or one that mutates on its own. Or maybe it’ll be the result of a de-

But what, then, made search terms like “zombie apocalypse” trend day after day last week in multiple corners of the Internet, fueled by discussions and post- ings that were often framed as humor? “They’ve heard of these zom-

gnomes, they all but beg the bie movies, and they make a

joke about it,” says Lou Manza, a psychology professor at Leba- non Valley College in Pennsyl-

comparison. Violence, we’re used to. Can- nibalism and people who should fall down but don’t? That feels like something else entirely.

whole thing at the breakfast ta-

stop talking about. The actual incidents are hor- rifying — and, if how people are talking about them is any indi- cation, fascinating. In an Amer- ica where zombie imagery is used to peddle everything from tools and weapons to garden

we’re moving toward an end- ing,” she says. “Ultimately they are much more of a depressing figure.” The “moving toward an end-

ing” part is especially potent. selves.

For some, the news stories fuel a lurking fear that, ultimately, hu-

vania, who learned about the manity is doomed.

Speculation varies. It could be

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MONDAY, JUNE 4, 2012 PAGE 11A

SERVING THE PUBLIC TRUST SINCE 1881

Editorial

WORLD OPINION

Without peacekeepers, more civilians will die

T HE LATEST ratchet- protecting civilians is not so

far from that used in advance

Syria has led to un- of military intervention last

ing-up of tension in

precedented interna- year in Libya. And yet this

time there is almost no inter-

tional condemnation of the

Bashar al-Ass ad regime. Yet national appetite for military

action. The only concrete peace plan is that of the U.N./Arab

ing up and is unlikely to be League envoy Kofi Annan,

forced out except by interna- which is for a ceasefire and

tional military intervention – which will not be forthcoming. Certainly the massacre at Houla was horrible even by the standards of this conflict:

more than 100 people killed, clearly woefully inadequate;

the reality of the situation re- mains depressingly un- changed: the regime is not giv-

talks. A ceasefire should be the first step: the priority is to pre- ve nt more civilian deaths. Ye t the current force of 250 U.N./ Arab League observers is

many of them children. They join the estimated 13,000 Syr-

they made no difference to the tragedy unfolding in Houla.

ians who have died in the past

The international commu-

15

months, most at the hands

nity must find a way to beef up

of

the regime.

that peacekeeping effort. A

The United Nations Securi- ty Council’s response was its

civil war will not only result in many more deaths, as fighting

toughest condemnation yet, a in parts of Lebanon already heartening development giv- suggests, it could destabilize

en that Syria’s ally Russia had blocked previous tougher dec- larations. Its language about

London Evening Standard

the whole region.

QUOTE OF THE DAY

London Evening Standard the whole region. QUOTE OF THE DAY “I got the clear feeling that

“I got the clear feeling that she is really enjoying things.”

Alan Watson The member of the House of Lords, who has written a book about Queen Elizabeth II, said the monarch seemed in a buoyant mood during a recent

ceremony he attended and that Brits look forward to marking her 60 years on the throne Tuesday during a Diamond Jubilee celebration.

Germany sets example

fact they had already set up a joint venture. German electronics titan Siemens also has ceased its in- volvement in nuclear power. The company is starting to transform itself into a “green”

er. The country ’s goal is to close all of its 17 reactors by 2022.

And its industry and society company, investing in research

are all moving toward that and development for new pow-

er grids and power storage, as well as in offshore wind farms. The economic effects of the spread of renewable natural en- ergy, such as wind, solar and biomass, deserve close atten- tion. According to the German government’s estimates, natu- ral energy created 380,000

its industry. Germany ’s major jobs, including work in the utilities, E.ON AG and RWE, manufacturing to distribution

canceled their participation in Britain’s nuclear plant con- struction project, despite the

The Asahi Shimbun, Tokyo

same goal, creating new jobs and businesses on the way. Japan can learn much from Germany ’s example: to act promptly based on a clear-cut government goal and plan, and seize the fruits of those labors. What symbolizes Germany ’s change is the action taken by

I T HAS BEEN almost a full

year since Germany chose

to return to the path of

phasing out nuclear pow-

services.

Act now to free Afridi

T HE SENTENCING of

who helped track

furthest thing from treason. It

a doctor in Pakistan was a courageous, heroic and

patriotic act which helped to lo- cate the most wanted terrorist in the world – a mass murderer who had the blood of many in- nocent Pakistanis on his hands,” U.S. senators Carl Le- vin and John McCain said in a

down terrorist leader

Osama bin Laden is proof there’s an element in the Pakis- tani elite that still supports ex- tremists. A tribal court in Khyber, a

lawless district full of extre- joint statement.

mists, sentenced surgeon Shak- eel Afridi for treason, after he agreed to collect DNA for the

Pakistan needs to arrange an immediate pardon and Afridi’s release.

United States to verify the pres- ence of bin Laden. Instead of being sentenced to

If Pakistan doesn’t act quick- ly, the United States should se- riously reconsider funding such

33

years in jail for treason, Afri-

a regime, which has received

di

should have been hailed as a

$18 billion from it since 2001.

national hero. “What Dr. Afridi did is the

Calgary Herald, Canada

Editorial Board

PRASHANT SHITUT President and CEO/Impressions Media

JOSEPH BUTKIEWICZ Vice President/Executive Editor

MARK E. JONES Editorial Page Editor

Editor MARK E. JONES Editorial Page Ed itor Oh, Canada, please forgive us for being neglectful

Oh, Canada, please forgive us for being neglectful neighbor

Oh, Canada, please forgive us for being neglectful neighbor DURING ONE of his stand- up routines,

DURING ONE of his stand- up routines, comedian and late-night host Jon Stewart told a joke that encapsulat- ed the often misunderstood relationship between the United States and Canada.

COMMENTARY

DOUGLAS MACKINNON

I am willing to bet that if you gave our

percent of U.S. natural gas imports, and it is the world’s second-largest holder of pet- roleum reserves after Saudi Arabia. Sounds like an amazingly important friend to me. If I were the government of the Unit- ed States, I’d have FTD on speed-dial and be sending Canada fresh flowers and compli-

Said Stewart: “A Canadian came up to me members of Congress the same pop quiz, the ments every day.

and asked, ‘What do Americans really think vast majority would fail.

about Canada?’ And I was like, ‘We don’t.’” Bingo. Joke, truth and a growing problem, all spelled out in two words. In many ways, there is no country on Earth more important to the current and future welfare of the United States than Canada – and yet, many Americans and U.S. elected officials barely give our neighbor to the north any thought at all. They should. Full disclosure: I consider Canada my second home country. My ancestors went from Scotland to Nova Scotia, with my grandfather and others eventually making their way down to Boston. To this day, I might have more relatives in Canada than the United States, and I am quite proud of them and their country. Speaking of my family to the north, I re- member that when my cousins would visit me in Boston, they could not only name every state in the United States, but also

every capital of every state. Embarrassingly, $1.4 billion in goods and more than 400,000 equation.

over the years since, when I have asked

friends and colleagues (including high-level nations – per day.

government officials) if they could just name all the provinces in Canada (knowing the

capitals and territories was way too much to the single largest foreign supplier of energy

ask), the most any could do was name four to eight of the 10 provinces.

Want to talk about investment? The Unit- ed States is Canada’s largest foreign investor, and it is the fifth largest in our nation. Finally, let’s focus for a moment on current events and national security. Canada and the United States share the largest land border in the world – an important factoid for a host of reasons. Not the least of which being the recent news that U.S. law enforcement and Homeland Security officials face an average of 55 encounters per day with “known or suspected terrorists” on U.S. watch lists. A number of those encounters take place on the U.S.-Canada border. As the world and the world’s economies spin more and more out of control, it would

remember and publicly acknowledge the strategic role Canada plays in our survival. We could not have a better ally, and ye t we insult the country and its people on a regular basis with our ignorance and indifference. For our own good, it’s time to change the

Douglas MacKinnon is a former White House and Pentagon official and author of the recently pub- lished books “Rolling Pennies In The Dark” and “Vengeance Is Mine.” Readers may send him email at douglas.mackinnon@snrdenton.com. He wrote this for the Baltimore Sun.

Should we care? Yeah. Nobody likes being taken for grant- ed. Especially your best and most trusted ally in the world. As President Barack Obama and Mitt Romney prepare to duke it out for the presi- dency, foreign policy will become a growing and much more contentious subject. Either or both, for altruistic or selfish political reasons, can score some easy points – and maybe win some votes in the process from the millions of Americans with Cana- dian ancestry – if they simply remember to insert Canada into the foreign policy debate. Why should they? Well, for starters, ac-

cording to our State Department, the United be wise for our leaders to more frequently

States and Canada share the world’s largest and most comprehensive trading relation-

ship. Canada is the leading export market for

36 of the 50 U.S. states and is a larger market

for U.S. goods than all 27 countries of the European Union. The equivalent of about

people cross the border between our two

Energy (and lack thereof) is on everyone’s mind of late. OK, how about this: Canada is

to the United States. It provides more than

20 percent of all U.S. oil imports and 18

MAIL BAG

LETTERS FROM READERS

Crestwood mom feels money trumped education

I am the proud parent of a Fairview Ele- mentary School student. I found the May 24 school board meeting to be

heartbreaking. Dozens of students and parents were begging for their programs, teachers and nurses to be saved. It all fell on deaf ears. I compare it to “How the Grinch Stole Christmas.” Presents weren’t taken, but hopes and dreams were stolen. The dream of becoming an Ivy League student or a star athlete was squashed. The hope of becoming a talented musician or having excellent teachers such as Mrs. Johnson and Mr. Krokos was shattered.

We teach our kids to wo rk hard and it will pay off. The students of Crestwood School District learned differently that night. They learned that their fate is some- what based on a few elected officials who decide that money is more important than a well-rounded education. I pose a few questions:

• Do the board members think that the residents of Crestwood School District do not have or cannot afford $36 a year to ensure the quality of education to which

SEND US YOUR OPINION

Letters to the editor must include the writer’s name, address and daytime phone number for verification. Letters should be no more than 250 words. We reserve the right to edit and limit writers to one published letter every 30 days.

Email: mailbag@timesleader.com

Fax: 570-829-5537

Mail: Mail Bag, The Times Leader, 15 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 1871 1

we are accustomed?

• Did the board members stick around

after the meeting to see the numerous

students crying due to their decisions?

• Do the board members see the big

picture? Fewer people would move to Crestwood and property values would decrease. In five years, will we have a foot- ball team, band or cheerleaders? My daughter is in second grade and her education is a priority. She loves school and wants to excel. She loves to sing and wants to play the drums. I hope she gets the chance to have at least, if not more of, the opportunities I had. Isn’t that what we all want for our kids?

Kerry Casarella

White Haven

Writer believes Stilp will be effective legislator

A pproximately 33 years ago in Harris- burg I frequently ran into Eugene Stilp. It was often at a local luncheonette

near the Governor’s Mansion. Stilp became a political activist at that time in response to the nuclear accident at Three Mile Island. He saw TMI as a natural result of the policies and practice of the Nuclear Regu- latory Commission, and he effectively mobilized many people against the irre- sponsible rule of the NRC. He would laugh and joke about his devel- oping role, but always was serious about the need for integrity in government. Decades later Gene Stilp brings this same commitment to his candidacy this year for U.S. Congress. He will be an effective representative for the residents of the 11th Congressional District. Approachable, clear-minded and forthright, he will give us something we haven’t received from the Republican in- cumbent.

Richard J. Yost South Abington Township

MALLARD FILLMORE

haven’t received from the Republican in- cumbent. Richard J. Yost South Abington Township MALLARD FILLMORE DOONESBURY

DOONESBURY

haven’t received from the Republican in- cumbent. Richard J. Yost South Abington Township MALLARD FILLMORE DOONESBURY
C M Y K
C
M
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PAGE 12A MONDAY, JUNE 4, 2012

NEWS

THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

job: Getting the drugs, getting the money for the drugs.” Getting the money for the drugs led Erik into numerous encoun- ters with law enforcement. From a first arrest on disorderly conduct charges in 1997 Erik started up a ladder of escalating charges. He was charged with drug offenses in 2001, followed by criminal tres- passing charges in 2005, theft and forgery charges in 2006 and retail theft charges in 2007. Coolbaugh said Erik was steal- ing to feed his addiction during re- lapses, but he was also trying to get his life back on track. He had

dispel the stigma associated with an apartment and a job that he

it. That can in turn bring more help to addicts. “Breast cancer wasn’t even talk- ed about a few years ago,” she said. “…You get out there and you talk about it, the stigma leaves.” Erik began experimenting with

cigarettes and alcohol and soon his apartment and a depression

that ended in relapse, Coolbaugh

moved on to marijuana and harder

drugs like LSD, his mother said. said. When he died three months

liked, but was laid off in October due to budget cuts. “He had just bought his kids toys,” Coolbaugh said. “He was so excited because he had money from working.” The layoff led to eviction from

hind. Coolbaugh has shared her son’s story many times. She listed the cause of death in his obituary and tells it to students as a speaker for the D.A.R.E. program. Coolbaugh believes unequiv- ocally that addiction is a disease and thinks that by speaking about her son’s death she can shine a light on substance abuse and help

Continued from Page 3A

COOLBAUGH

He yo-yo’d in and out of addic- tion treatment as he struggled with addiction to heroin and other drugs, trying everything from out- patient counseling to long- and short-term rehab and methadone. “It wasn’t that he didn’t want to get better, and I think that’s what people don’t understand,” Cool- baugh said. “I think people think they’re just out there living the life, but it’s a job when you have an addiction like that. It’s a full-time

later, Erik had cocaine, metha- done and marijuana in his system. Coolbaugh said her son’s death has made her an advocate, and she hopes that in addition to finding and offering comfort to survivors she can find allies in her aware- ness campaign. “I’m hoping that in GRASP I’ll find somebody else out there who has that desire to do something and try to change things,” she said.

to do something and try to change things,” she said. AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER Helen Kopetchny,

AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER

Helen Kopetchny, the eldest member of the Holy Name/St. Ma- ry’s in Swoyersville, closes the doors to the church on Sunday.

in the beginning procession, bringing up the baptismal book. Aria was the last child to be bap- tized in the church on April 15 and the Lispis were married there in May. Though these me- mories of the church stick out in Sarah’s mind, there’s an annual event she will never forget. “The bazaar,” she said with a smile. “I always loved to go, as far (back) as I can remember.” The first communion book was carried by May Fredericks, the confirmation book by Do-

Florence Balog ’s life. The 72- nald Reynolds, and one of the

longest-married couples from the church, Lottie and Daniel Chipego, carried in the book of matrimony. They have been mar-

married and later held funeral ried for 64 years.

year-old has been a member of the parish for 64 years. She re- ceived all sacraments, except baptism, there, and was also

year-old Eleanor Dolan of Exeter, who initially belonged to Holy Name, said. “Father Pisaneschi was right. It’s not about the church, but the people in it. Of course I was upset and change is difficult, but you just have to go with the flow.” The church was a major part of

Continued from Page 1A

CHURCH

services for her husband who passed away in 1985 at the church. Her memories of the par- ish are numerous, and mainly of the joyous variety. “We were a very active parish. I remember we were one of the first to have an elevator and air conditioning. I was a choir mem-

ber. I loved the May Crowning words:

every year; it’s a wonderful group of people, and is the only parish I’ve known all these years.” Sarah Lispi, 27, and Lee Lispi, 28, and their only months-old daughter Aria were one of many

Helen Kopetchny, the oldest member of the parish at 96, shut and locked the doors for the final time. Spirits were high among par- ishioners as they made their way to the new location for a contin- ued celebration, with much thanks to Pisaneschi’s closing

“If I have one thing to say to you today it would be this: God is not through with us yet. He has a story to complete, a story to write and every one of our names are in that book.”

ANCESTRY

Continued from Page 1A

decided to have an international festival this year “to celebrate the diversity of the parish and the community.” The decision of which ethnicities to feature “was based on our knowledge of the ethnic groups here and people who were willing to help,” he said. “In future years, we may want to introduce cultures that we don’t have (represented) here to help broaden our appreciation of the world around us, to give people an experience of different cultures around the world,” Shantillo said.

of different cultures around the world,” Shantillo said. NIKO J. KALLIANIOTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER Members of

NIKO J. KALLIANIOTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

Members of the El Ballet De Floklorico, Scranton, perform at the St. Jude Parish Grove in Moun- tain Top. From left are Jori Vega, Hugo Vargas, Alvaro Garcia, Gio Vega and Jose Gonzalez.

FOREIGN-BORN IN MOUNTAIN TOP

Europe Asia Africa Latin America Northern America 1.8 % foreign born 7.3% foreign born 2.5%
Europe
Asia
Africa
Latin America
Northern America
1.8 % foreign born
7.3% foreign born
2.5% foreign born
15.8%
25%
75%
49.1%
Fairview
Rice
Nuangola
Twp.
Twp.
Borough
3.1% foreign born
Wright
0% foreign born
8.6%
28.6%
Twp.
Dorrance
Twp.
62.9%
4.1% foreign born
3.5% foreign born
0.5% (Northern
America)
12.5%
1.4% (Northern America)
22.4%
58.2%
56.3%
18.5%
28.7%
MOUNTAIN TOP
FAIRVIEW
RICE
1.3% (African)
WRIGHT
LUZERNE COUNTY
DORRANCE

8.6%

91.4%

35.1%

Source: U.S. Census Bureau

Mark Guydish/The Times Leader

central Luzerne County that in- cludes the townships of Dorrance, Fairview, Rice and Wright and the borough of Nuangola. The com- bined population is 16,373.

Churches predominate Moghul pointed out that there are civic and community groups in Mountain Top in which people can socialize, such as the Kiwanis

agreed

that socializing through

church activities, which she con- siders a good thing, is predomin- ant there. “But there could also be more tolerance,” Moghul said. “When it comes to (Nirmul’s) minority, there is simply not enough knowl- edge here. People here are not ex- posed to larger groups of minori- ties. I would like to see more socia- lizing than just (through) the churches.” If prejudice does exist in Moun- tain Top, Moghul said neither she nor her late husband, who was Pa- kistani, experienced any, despite

husband’s dark skin. “If it was there, it was very subtle. In New

England, it was not as subtle,” she said, noting she and her husband

moving to Mountain Top in 1970. Moghul, a retired journalist who wrote for the Mountaintop Eagle weekly newspaper, said she found Census Bureau data about foreign-born residents of Moun- tain Top interesting.

dents – 567 – were born in another country, compared to 4.1 percent in Luzerne County, 5.6 percent in Pennsylvania and 12.7 percent in the United States. Most of them – 322 – live in Fairview Township. And most of those in Mountain Top – about 58 percent – are from Asia.

By the numbers Moghul was surprised that there could be more than 500 for- eign-born residents in the com- munity. The data comes from the bu- reau’s 2010 American Community Survey five-year estimates, which carry a significant margin of error for smaller-population communi-

WHERE WE’RE FROM

Claimed ancestry; totals may exceed 100% due to multiple ancestries. Mountain Top (Nuangola and Dorrance,
Claimed ancestry; totals may exceed
100% due to multiple ancestries.
Mountain Top (Nuangola and Dorrance,
Fairview, Rice and Wright Townships).
Luzerne County
24.3%
German
18.6% 24%
Polish
23.4%
21.4%
Irish
19.9%
14.7%
Italian
17.1%
9%
English
6.9%
5.6%
Slovak
5.8%
5%
Welsh
4.9%
3.9%
Russian
3.
1%
3.3%
American
3.3%
3.1%
Lithuanian
3.4%
2.9%
Dutch
2.8%
French
2.2%
(non- Basque)
1.3%
Hispanic
1.7% 6.7%
1.4%
Ukrainian
1.2%
1.2%
Hungarian
0.8%
Less than 1.2 percent: Scottish, Swedish,
Czech, Scotch-Irish, Norwegian, Arab,
French Canadian, Portuguese, Greek, Swiss,
West Indian (non-Hispanic origin),
Subsaharan African, and Danish

Source: U.S. Census Bureau Mark Guydish/The Times Leader

Steve Mocarsky, a Times Leader staff writer, may be reached at

970-7311.

Offering perspective Two foreign-born members of Mountain Top on the Move – an organization formed in 1986 to ad- dress quality-of-life issues that cross municipal boundaries –

agree that the festival is a positive step towards promoting diversity. Nirmala Nirmul, a retired social worker from Wright Township who had a counseling practice there, said “Any effort to integrate people and to eliminate this mis- understanding and sense of differ- ence is a step in the right direc- tion.” “It’s a very nice thing St. Jude’s is doing,” agreed Anneliese Moghul, a German immigrant from Fairview Township. “It’s ve- ry connecting for everybody.”

A problem in the community,

said Nirmul, who was born in South Africa, is that people tend to pay more attention to how dif-

ferent people are than to how sim- ilar they are.

“I work so hard to try to intro-

duce diversity in the town, but it’s just not there when you look at a cross-section of any organization in the town,” she said. She believes more non-church- based efforts toward integration are needed.

Seeking other venues Nirmul noted that churches are usually the focal points of social activity in Christian communi- ties. But in any community that is not Christian, the church is not a

focal point of people’s social lives, she said. For example, people of the Hin- du faith, of which Nirmul is a fol- lower, do not gather in any kind of house of worship. “We have to look at other ways of encouraging integration,” Nir- mul said. “The onus falls on every- body to participate in the process. You can’t hold any one group re- sponsible.” She pointed to international festivals that used to be held in the 1970s through the 1990s at the

ties such as the municipalities that make up Mountain Top. That becomes evident when

lived in New Hampshire before considering that the bureau re-

ports no foreign-born Mountain Top residents from Africa while Nirmul, her husband and three children were born in South Afri- ca. Moghul also was impressed to learn that of the foreign-born resi-

According to the bureau, 3.5 dents in Mountain Top, 77 per-

109th

Wilkes-Barre as a type of event and a women’s club. But she percent of Mountain Top resi- cent are naturalized U.S. citizens,

that can draw all members of a community together. “It would be worth reviving it. It was a healthy practice,” she said. But Nirmul admits that doing something similar in a communi- ty such as Mountain Top would be no easy task, because there is no central downtown area for the four townships and one borough of which the community is com- prised. “The problem is that it’s not a town, so no one authority takes on the responsibility of bringing ev- eryone together. There is no com- munity center, there is no central

focal point for a town,” she said. her thick German accent and her

Mountain Top is generally con- sidered a 58-square-mile region in

compared to only 45 percent in Luzerne County. Moghul and her late husband immigrated to the United States in 1958 and became naturalized ci- tizens in 1962. She considers be- ing able to speak English “ex- tremely important” for any immi- grant. And despite her advocacy for increased tolerance, she ad- mits there’s one thing about some immigrants that disturbs her. “I have a low level of tolerance for Latinos who want everything bilingual,” she said.

Field Artillery Armory in

SANDUSKY

Continued from Page 1A

Widener University School of Law. John E.B. Myers, a law professor at the University of the Pacific in Sacramento and author or editor of eight books on child abuse, said the core issues in the Sandusky case are the same as many others. “I think the overall issue is and al- ways has been the child’s credibili- ty,” he said, adding that the issue of memory will come into play, as al- leged victims are now adults. Legal and scientific research also shows an interesting fact about ju- ries in abuse cases, Myers said. “The one thing the literature is clear about is that women tend to believe children more than men do,” he said. The sex abuse case led Penn State’s board of trustees to fire the legendary Joe Paterno as head foot- ball coach; leaders later said he hadn’t done enough after he fielded

leaders later said he hadn’t done enough after he fielded AP PHOTO From left, Centre County

AP PHOTO

From left, Centre County Sheriff Denny Nau, attorney Karl Rom- inger, former Penn State assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky and attorney Joe Amendola leave the Centre County Courthouse Annex in Bellefonte on Tuesday after a closed-door meeting with the judge in Sandusky’s child sexual abuse case.

an abuse allegation from a team as- sistant. The university’s president was also ousted, and two adminis- trators were charged with lying to a grand jury. At word of Paterno’s fir-

ing, students rioted in the streets of

College, and Paterno’s treat-

ment remains a sore spot for many alumni and fans. The expected testimony of Mike

State

holes their testimony — and by pre- senting evidence and testimony es- tablishing witnesses had motives to lie. “You’re not going to have all eight (testify) in a credible man- ner,” Peruto said. “I don’t believe that there’s going to be eight vic- tims painting a picture. It’s never

The Attorney General’s Office will have to counter any contradic- tions or gaps in their witnesses’ me- mories with a demonstration that they do recall the heart of the matter — the alleged criminal acts for which Sandusky will be on trial, said David A. Harris, a University of Pittsburgh law professor. The exist-

McQueary, an assistant coach who was a graduate assistant a decade ago when he says he witnessed what appeared to be Sandusky sexually assaulting a boy, could be a critical part of the prosecution’s case. Sand- usky lawyers will undoubtedly try to undercut his credibility through the use of his grand jury testimony, his testimony at a hearing in the related perjury case of the two university ad- ministrators, and statements about what he saw made at the time and in the intervening years. Prosecutors recently had to amend the charges against Sandus- ky to allege that the incident McQueary said he saw occurred in February 2001, not in March 2002 as previously indicated. “One of the real questions, it seems to me, that the prosecution

has to face is whether they put veloped a strategy to counter them, ironclad for the prosecution, the

McQueary on” the stand, Oliver Harris said.

Before they deliberate, jurors will probably get an instruction from the judge that tells them they can be- lieve all, some or none of a given wit-

fense attorney in Philadelphia, said Sandusky’s lawyers can try to attack witnesses’ credibility through cross-

said. “If the jury is left with the im- pression that the independent wit- ness is making up stuff, then why would people who stand to benefit from this not make stuff up?”

ence of multiple accusers should that easy for the prosecution.

Some of them get cold feet, some of them really mess up on details, and the way the details are driven home by the lawyers is going to make a difference.” Peruto said any conventional wis- dom that the charges are a slam- dunk could work against the prose- cution. “You can never count a jury as a layup in any case,” he said. “The more potential jurors read the case is

help prosecutors, he said. “View it as silt in a riverbed,” Har- ris said. “Their testimony will build up in layers. So even if there are indi- vidual problems with the testimony of particular witnesses, the picture will fill in as a whole.” Prosecutors, who unlike the de- fense have had access to the accus- ers during trial preparation, presum- ably know where any weaknesses in their testimony will be, and have de-

more potential for rebellion.”

A. Charles Peruto Jr., a veteran de-

examination — looking to shoot ness’ testimony, Gover said.

SPORTS

C M Y K
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S E C T ION B

THE TIMES LEADER

timesleader.com

MONDAY, JUNE 4, 2012

NBA PLAYOFFS

Celtics tie series with OT thriller

PRO GOLF

Flop turns out to be a winner for Woods

Tiger Woods’ come-from-behind victory ties him with Jack Nicklaus for most PGA Tour wins.

By DOUG FERGUSON AP Golf Writer

DUBLIN, Ohio — Tiger Woods picked the right place to match Jack Nicklaus for career PGA Tour wins, and with a shot that even left Nicklaus amazed. Two shots behind with three holes to

play, his ball in an impossible spot be- hind the 16th green,

Woods holed a flop shot from 50 feet away that turned bogey into birdie and sent him on his way to a stunning comeback Sunday in the Memo- rial. Woods made three birdies on his last four holes for a 5-under 67, matching the lowest score of the final round, and he finished in style.

He hit 9-iron to just in- side 10 feet, and raised his putter — a pose that Nicklaus made famous for so many years — well before the ball tumbled into the cup. It was his fifth win at Muirfield Village, and the 73rd of his PGA Tour career to match Nicklaus at No. 2 on the all-time list. Sam Snead won a record 82 times. For Woods, it was a dramatic end to his worst three-tournament stretch as a pro, and it came with the U.S. Open looming. He started the day four shots behind and wound up with a two-shot victory over Andres Romero (67) and Rory Sab- batini, who was in control of the tourna- ment until he fell victim again to some old magic by Woods. Woods said he didn’t miss a shot all day, though that flop shot stands out. “The most unbelievable, gutsy shot I’ve ever seen,” Nicklaus said from the TV booth. “Look at the position he was in. If he’s short , the tournament is over. If he’s long, the tournament is over. He puts it in the hole.”

Jack Nicklaus On Tiger Woods flop shot on 16 Sunday

“The most

unbeliev-

able, gutsy

shot I’ve

ever

seen.”

“The most unbeliev- able, gutsy shot I’ve ever seen.” AP PHOTO Tiger Woods, left, shakes hands

AP PHOTO

Tiger Woods, left, shakes hands with his caddie Joe LaCava after making a birdie putt on the 18th hole during the final round of the Memorial Sunday.

the 18th hole during the final round of the Memorial Sunday. 93 CELTICS 91 HEAT Celtics

93

CELTICS

91

HEAT

the final round of the Memorial Sunday. 93 CELTICS 91 HEAT Celtics recovered after blowing an

Celtics recovered after blowing an 18-point lead in regulation to move two games away from a third trip to the NBA finals in five years. Kevin Garnett added 17 points and 14 rebounds for the Celtics, while Paul Pierce scored 23 points before fouling out. James had 29 points and Dwyane Wade scored 20 for the Heat , who host Game 5 on Tues-

By BRIAN MAHONEY AP Basketball Writer

BOSTON — Rajon Rondo had 15 points and 15 assists, and

scored the final three points of the Boston Celtics’ 93-91 overtime

victory over the Miami Heat on day.

Game 5 will be Tuesday night in

Sunday night that evened the

Eastern Conference finals at two Miami, while Game 6 will be

games apiece. Getting a huge break when Le- Bron James fouled out for the first time since joining the Heat, the

Thursday in Boston. If necessary Game 7 will be Sat- urday night in Miami.

Rajon Rondo scores 15 points and dishes out 15 assists as Boston wins Game 4.

15 points and dishes out 15 assists as Boston wins Game 4. AP PHOTO Boston Celtics

AP PHOTO

Boston Celtics forward Paul Pierce (34) is double-teamed by Miami Heat forward Shane Battier, rear, and guard Dwyane Wade, left, during the first quarter of Game 4 in the Eastern Confer- ence finals play- offs series in Boston on Sun- day.

BELMONT STAKES

A hectic week for trainer

Doug O’Neill says as long as I’ll Have Another is fine everything else is good.

By RICHARD ROSENBLATT AP Sports Writer

NEW YORK — Nothing ever

comes easy in the nerve-racking weeks before the Belmont Stakes with a Triple Crown on the line.

Doug O’Neill, the trainer of I’ll Have Another, is learning just how difficult it is to avoid all the roadblocks as he prepares his Kentucky Derby and Preakness win- ner for a chance to become the first Triple Crown cham-

pion in 34 years. “Welcome to New York,” rival trainer Dale Romans said. While I’ll Have Another has been a picture of perfection dur- ing his morning gallops around Belmont Park, oblivious to what’s going on around him, it’s been one thing after another for Te am O’Neill. Traffic jams. Suspensions. Na- sal strips. Visas. Detention barns. Loose horses. And it’s still nearly a week be- fore the race. “I’ve been looking under my car every morning before I start it up,” O’Neill kidded. The 44-year-old trainer shrugs off — at least publicly — the criticism thrown his way for nu- merous drug and medication vi- olations, including a 45-day sus- pension issued last week in Cali- fornia. He prefers to accentuate the positive, praising the talent of his chestnut colt and insisting he takes care of his horses as well as any other trainer. The other problems? “It’s all about the horse. As long as the horse is going great, we’re all doing good,” he said. “If he was battling and then I was getting a lot of stuff from other areas, it would be difficult. As long as he’s doing good, ev- erything else is just talk.” Even when New York’s racing and wagering board ordered all Belmont horses moved to a de- tention barn to beef up security beginning Wednesday, O’Neill didn’t take it personally. “With a horse like I’ll Have Another, you’re under a really strong microscope,” he said. “It’s all just trying to show the public we care for the horses and that when you put your hard-earned money on one of the horses you can know they’re all clean and pure and ready to go.”

can know they’re all clean and pure and ready to go.” O’Neill Be lmont Stakes 4:30

O’Neill

Belmont

Stakes

4:30 p.m.

Saturday

NBC

FRENCH OPEN

Strange Sunday

Stakes 4:30 p.m. Saturday NBC FRENCH OPEN Strange Sunday AP PHOTO Novak Djokovic hits a return

AP PHOTO

Novak Djokovic hits a return in his fourth round match against Andreas Seppi at the French Open in Roland Garros stadi- um in Parison Sunday .

Djokovic, Federer struggle but still advance

By HOWARD FENDRICH AP Te nnis Wr iter

PARIS — There was a moment, a little past 4 p.m. on a dank and dreary Sunday at the French Open, when the gray sky above appeared to be falling on some of the best of the best. A listless Novak Djokovic, looking ve- ry little like someone ranked No. 1 and bidding to become the first man in 43 years to win four consecutive Grand Slam titles, was trying to work his way out of a two-set deficit against 22nd-seed- ed Andreas Seppi of Italy on Court Phi- lippe Chatrier. Even more astonishingly, a flum- moxed Roger Federer, owner of a record 16 major championships, was trudging to the sideline after dropping his first set against 109th-ranked David Goffin of Bel- gium, a 21-year-old kid thrilled merely to

be sharing Court Suzanne Lenglen with his idol. Goffin, it must be noted, was a “lucky loser” — a player beaten in qual- ifying who got to make his Grand Slam debut only because someone else with- drew. By that point, one significant upset al- ready was complete Sunday: The No. 1- seeded woman, Australian Open cham- pion Victoria Azarenka, was headed home after losing to No. 15 Dominika Ci- bulkova of Slovakia 6-2, 7-6 (4), busting a racket on the way out the door. Asked afterward what she’ll do to re- cover from the defeat, Azarenka replied sarcastically, “I’m going to kill myself,” then added: “This tournament is over for me. What’s to recover from?” It seemed reasonable, if ever so briefly, to ask in the afternoon whether the tour- nament might soon be over in the fourth

round for Djokovic and Federer, too. In the end, of course, the answer was no. For quite some time, Djokovic missed shots this way and that, then shook his head or yelled at himself or spread his arms wide with palms up as if to ask, “What’s going on here?” He finished with 81 unforced errors in all, exactly his total for his first three matches combined. But Seppi’s not nearly as accustomed to these stages or stakes, and Djokovic pulled out

a 4-6, 6-7 (5), 6-3, 7-5, 6-3 victory, his 25th in a row at a major tournament.

nothing is

working,” Djokovic said. “I could not get into the rhythm.” He began to turn things around by breaking serve to begin the third set, and he kept on doing that, nine times in all.

“One of those days where

See OPEN, Page 3B

times in all. “One of those days where See OPEN, Page 3B NIKO J. KALLIANIOTIS/FOR THE

NIKO J. KALLIANIOTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

Tom Biscotti eyes his long shot during Sunday’s tournament championship match at Wyoming Valley Country Club in Hanover Township.

LOCAL GOLF

Biscotti, Mikiewicz unbeatable at Wyoming Valley CC Classic

By PAUL SOKOLOSKI psokoloski@timesleader.com

HANOVER TWP. – The whole field at the Wyoming Valley Country Club Classic was taught a lesson. Trying to beat the team of Tom Biscotti and John Mikiewicz is like pulling teeth. Or at least it was this weekend, when Bis- cotti, a dentist, and Mikiewicz, a teacher, partnered to win the WVCC match play championship by easily besting the terrific tandem of Art Brunn Jr. and Steve Skiro, 3 and 2 in the finals Sunday. “This was the greatest golfing moment of

my life,” Biscotti said. “My kids were here … this is something I’ll never forget, beating some of the great amateur players in the en- tire area.” His emotion was especially heartfelt, con- sidering the tandem was in contention for another golf tournament title two weeks ago before losing a heartbreaker at the very end. “We wanted to come out and get some re- venge,” said Mikiewicz, who works at the Abington Heights middle school. “We really

See GOLF, Page 3B

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PAGE 2B MONDAY, JUNE 4, 2012

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