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07B2/09 Millenia Institute Sunday, March 08, 2009 Page 1 of 24 2001-2007 The Institute for Motivational Living, Inc.

. All rights reserved.

The DISC system of assessing personality characteristics is based upon the work of Dr. William Marston, one of the foremost psychologists of the twentieth century. Dr. Marston extensively studied the characteristics, patterns and responses of thousands of individuals and as a result developed an assessment to measure four important behavioral factors. The factors he selected were Dominance, Influence, Steadiness and Compliance, from which DISC takes its name. Marston wr ote "The Emotions of Normal People" as a result of his efforts. Scores of individuals hav e built upon the works of Dr. Marston over the last 75 years. Of these, one of the foremost is Dr. Sanf ord Kulkin, Founder and President of the Institute for Motivational Living. DISC is a universal language of behavior that has been validated in over 25 coun tries since Marston introduced the model in 1928. DISC provides a neutral language to allow the disc ussion of individual behavioral differences; it is not a "label" that is placed on individuals. DISC identifies how four behavioral factors interact and emphasizes the strengths and uniqueness of each individual. For over 20 years, The Institute has developed practical, strategic applications for DISC materials for use in both business and interpersonal relationships. The Institute emphasizes the exte nsion of DISC beyond a simple training or educational program into a life-changing experience. The Personality 24 Question Profile from which this report was created represent s the cutting edge in the interpretation of individual responses to the DISC profile. It provides for the greatest depth of analysis of individual responses to the DISC profile instrument, leading to the most accurate, indepth conclusions available. However, it is important to understand that this pu blication is based upon the responses entered by the subject, and is designed to provide accurate a nd authoritative information in regard to the subject matter. It is distributed with the understa nding that the publisher is not engaged in rendering professional psychological services. If ex pert assistance is required, the advice of a professional, competent person should be sought. Page 2 of 24 2001-2007 The Institute for Motivational Living, Inc. All rights reserved.

Attainer Recognizing the value of a good relationship, 07B2/09 is very patient and caring when relating to others. He is even-paced; and 07B2/09 usually remains calm and relaxed, even in situations that may ruffle some others. He likes the role of a peacemaker, when working through problems, 07B2/09 tries to rely on successful strategies that have proven results. A warm, outgoing person, 07B2/09 enjoys having a high level of interaction with others. He usually finds the "silver lining" in a difficult situation, and typic ally enjoys the thrill of trying new things. He has a gift for influencing those around him and is viewed as an instinctive communicator. Others find 07B2/09 easy to approach and enjoy his easy, open rapport. A very creative person, 07B2/09 is often willing to seek out new solutions to problems. He is self motivated and will often work at a fast pace to accomplish his goals. 07B2/09 likes new challenges and he is usually able to make decisions eas ily, even under pressure. Not afraid to take a bold approach, 07B2/09 is willing to challenge the status q uo. He is original and creative, and acts with confidence when implementing new solutio ns. 07B2/09 will tend to use a balance of intuition and facts when making decisions, and once he has made a decision, he will not be afraid to take action upon it. Page 3 of 24 2001-2007 The Institute for Motivational Living, Inc. All rights reserved.

07B2/09's Keys to Motivation: The traits listed on this page are based upon a statistical analysis of personal ity traits displayed by individuals with similar styles. Over the years, thousands of individuals have responded to DISC surveys, and the characteristics of their personalities have been tabulated and recorded. The keywords that are listed below are the traits that a re most often observed in people whose style is similar to yours, although you may or may not exhibit these specific traits. This page is designed to provide a single page, simple summary of the key elemen ts of your style. This information will be quite valuable to individuals with whom you must communicate on a regular basis, for e xample managers, employees, teachers, family members, or members of social groups. You might consider using this page as a di scussion guide regarding how to maximize communication in your relationship. Brief Description of your Style: Attainers are objective, analytical people. They like to be in charge of situati ons, but they also like to offer help and support. Motivated internally by personal goals, Attainers are ta sk oriented but also enjoy people. Because of their dogged determination, they are successful at many things; their calm steady and perseverant character contributes to their success. Tenacious after s tarting a project, they fight hard for their objectives. Independent and questioning in approach, t hey are thorough and possess follow-through. Attainers are practical people who evaluate themselves a nd others by results. Under pressure for these results, they may be blunt and appear non-demo nstrative. They like to finish what they start and do it thoroughly. They prefer to work indepen dently or with just a few people. Attainers do not like to be rushed or pressured; they operate best w hen they work at their own pace. Relying on their own hard work, they do not look to their emotio ns when evaluating situations. They are strong-willed and do not withdraw easily from conflict. Fir m and unyielding after making decisions, Attainers may come across as inflexible. They use facts and fi gures as opposed to feelings to make these decisions. They are team players, but may express desires for freedom from restrictions. Attainers like to be with small groups and make strong ties with a few close people. They are dependable and will always help out friends and family. MOTIVATING GOALS: Personal accomplishment, sometimes at the expense of the group . EVALUATES OTHERS BY: Proven results. INFLUENCES OTHERS BY: Determination, accountability.

VALUE TO TEAM: Comprehension, objectivity, thoroughness, creative, logical. REACTION TO PRESSURE: Stubborn, frustrated, non-demonstrative. GREATEST FEARS: Being taken advantage of; being pushed out of comfort zone. AREAS FOR IMPROVEMENT: Increase flexibility and compromise; develop clarity of t ask priority; show enthusiasm. Page 4 of 24 2001-2007 The Institute for Motivational Living, Inc. All rights reserved.

07B2/09's Strengths in Leadership: INFLUENCING You are always considered when a leader is needed. know that you possess wonderful insight into systems and people. you because of your charisma and enthusiasm. While sometimes seeming a and warmth soon have others remembering how important you are DIRECTING You probably put people ahead of tasks; but when you start falling behind, you g et moving and take care of what is at hand. You may wait till the last minute, but you usually pick up the pace and meet the deadlines that are necessary for success. PROCESSING You can take an idea or a project and follow through from start to finish. While you prefer changing roles and responsibilities, you will stick to a routine that is necessary to ful fill a need. DETAILING You might surprise others at times with your ability to be detail-oriented becau se you rarely choose to take time to focus on the details. Remember the necessity of the paperwork, a nd you will add to your other stronger traits. Page 5 of 24 2001-2007 The Institute for Motivational Living, Inc. All rights reserved. You have great strengths, and Others are willing to follow bit assertive, your optimism to the team..

CREATING You are more comfortable moving ahead in areas in which you have experience and proven results. Sometimes you prefer to have the pace slowed down a bit so that one project can be completed before another venture is begun. PERSISTING You are one that can work through problems that would sidetrack others. You have developed a focused approach that will not be diverted. You are wonderful at staying on-task and are selfmotivated. You are able to stick to the mission. You have perseverance that othe rs wish they had. Take time to say the little things that will make others know you care about the m. RELATING You are a naturally friendly and caring individual who is very approachable. Oth ers feel very comfortable coming to you and you make friends very easily. You are frequently c alled on when there is a need to network with others to get a project done. Page 6 of 24 2001-2007 The Institute for Motivational Living, Inc. All rights reserved.

07B2/09's Historical Character Matches: Mohandas (Mahatma) Gandhi 1869-1948 Indian Independence Leader Gandhi was born in India. He studied law in London, and worked as a lawyer for s ome time both in London and Bombay. We see the combination of independence and teamwork of the At tainer when he went to South Africa, where he spent 20 years opposing discriminatory legisla tion against Indians. He returned to India in 1914, where he fought to win political rights f or the untouchables, the lowest caste of Hindus. Exhibiting the team-building style of the Attainer, Gandhi drew people together in another struggle, that of independence from Great Britain, by advoca ting a policy of nonviolent non-cooperation to achieve independence. After years of effort, the British fina lly agreed to the independence of India. "You must not lose faith in humanity. Humanity is an ocean; if a few drops of the ocean are dirty, the ocean does not become dirty. Be the change you want to see in the world. You cannot shake hands with a clenched fist." William Penn 1644-1718 U.S. Colonial and Religious Leader Penn was the son of an English admiral, and had the opportunity of both the weal th and fame of a public career in service to the Crown. Being a devout Quaker, he opted instead t o write about his belief that every man should be free to worship God however his heart and consci ence should lead him. This determination to stand for principle and gather supporters are charact eristics of the Attainer. In 1669 he wrote No Cross, No Crown and The Great Case of Liberty of C onscience followed in 1670. British authorities took these to be attacks on the Church of England, and he was sentenced to a year s imprisonment in the Tower of London. Years later, King Charles II made Penn the sole proprietor of the land north of Maryland in payment for loans made by Admiral Pe nn to the crown (the land was named Pennsylvania for the late Admiral). Even here, Penn built re lationships with those around him, and amazed the Indians by not attacking them, choosing instead to befriend them. I expect to pass through this world but once. Any good therefore that I can do, or any kindness or abilities that I can show to any fellow creature, let me do it now. Let me not defer it or neglect it, for I shall not pass this way again.

Page 7 of 24 2001-2007 The Institute for Motivational Living, Inc. All rights reserved.

When completing your profile, you answered the questions according to a particul ar setting, for example 'Home' or 'Work'. This is because people tend to display different aspects of their personality in differe nt settings. You are typically not the same at work as you are at home or in a social setting. A significant benefit of this report is its ability to measure how others will tend to perceive you and your behavior in various settings. In the setting for which you answered the questions, others will tend to perceiv e you as having certain characteristics. Their perception of these characteristics will change depending on the amount of press ure you experience in any given situation. This is an area where each individual tends to have significant "blind spots". We often don 't realize how we're perceived by others when we are under pressure. The following keywords describe specific values of your DISC scores for two of t he three graphs. An analysis has been generated for Graph 2 (personality under stress) and graph 3 (personality in general). The fol lowing keywords represent characteristics typically displayed by similar graphs. The DISC descriptive keywords generated from an analysis of each graph have been divided in to two lists. The first list, generated from Graph 2, is under the heading "How Others Tend to See Me". It shows your ty pical response to pressure. The second list, generated from Graph 3, is under the heading "How I See Myself". Unless your two graphs are completely different, you should expect to see some repetition of items in each list. However, you should be awar e that the dominant traits are listed first; therefore the placement of each keyword demonstrates its significance. You should particul arly note keywords that are repeated in both lists. Notice whether repeated keywords moved higher or lower from list to list. Keyword Exercise Part 1 HOW OTHERS TEND TO SEE ME The following descriptive keywords were generated from an analysis of Graph 2: T hese keywords describe the specific value of your DISC scores providing a representation of th e characteristics you tend to display when you are responding to pressure. Instructions: Please ask someone to help you complete this exercise. It should b e someone who knows you well in the particular setting for which you answered the questions on your profile. Ask him/her to check the boxes next to the keywords that he/she perceives describe y ou during a time when you were under significant pressure. Please ask him/her to leave blank keyw ords that do not describe you during a pressure-filled time. Consider the impact these characteri stics may have on your relationships. Are there any keywords that come up in both part one and par t two of this exercise? If so, these may be areas for you to consider as being significant to your self-image.

fdRELAXED: Made looser, or less firm and tense e c e fdPOSSESSIVE: Feeling of ownership; desire for possessions c Page 8 of 24 2001-2007 The Institute for Motivational Living, Inc. All rights reserved.

fdCOMPLACENT: Self-satisfied; not desiring significant change e c e fdSELF-ASSURED: Certain; confident c fdQUICK: Prompt to understand/learn; sharp in discernment e c e fdSELF-RELIANT: Having reliance upon or confident in one's own abilities c fdPOISED: Balanced; stable; having ease and dignity of manner e c e fdCONFIDENT: Sure of oneself; feeling certain; bold c fdGENEROUS: Willing to give or share; unselfish; bountiful e c e fdPERSISTENT: Continuing, especially in the face of opposition; persevering c fd"OWN PERSON": Not easily affected by the opinions of others e

c e fdSUPERIOR: Concerned with having the best quality, high-class, expert c Keyword Exercise Part 2 HOW I TEND TO SEE MYSELF The following descriptive keywords were generated from an analysis of Graph 3: T hese keywords describe the specific value of your DISC scores providing a representation of th e characteristics you tend to see yourself displaying (your self-image). Instructions: Please check the boxes next to the keywords that you perceive desc ribe you in general. Please leave blank keywords that do not describe your everyday characteristics. Consider the impact these characteristics may have on your relationships. Are there any keywords tha t come up in both part one and part two of this exercise? If so, these may be areas for you to con sider as being significant to your self-image. fdDELIBERATE: Careful in considering; not rash or hasty; slow; unhurried e c e fdAMIABLE: Having a pleasant disposition; friendly c Page 9 of 24 2001-2007 The Institute for Motivational Living, Inc. All rights reserved.

fdSTABLE: Not easily thrown off balance; enduring; steady; resisting change e c e fdPOISED: Balanced; stable; having ease and dignity of manner c fdCONFIDENT: Sure of oneself; feeling certain; bold e c e fdGENEROUS: Willing to give or share; unselfish; bountiful c fdSELF-ASSURED: Certain; confident e c e fdQUICK: Prompt to understand/learn; sharp in discernment c fdSELF-RELIANT: Having reliance upon or confident in one's own abilities e c e fdINDEPENDENT: Free from the influence or control of others; self-confident c fdFIRM: Solid; hard; not moved easily; fixed; not fluctuating; steady e

c e fdRIGID: Not bending or flexible; still c Page 10 of 24 2001-2007 The Institute for Motivational Living, Inc. All rights reserved.

07B2/09's Graphs: Graph 1 -Most Graph 2 -Least Graph 3 -Difference Raw Scores: D = 7, I = 5, S = 4, C = 2 Calculated Scores: D = 0.559, I = 2.174, S = -0.746, C = -3.136 Mask, Public Self Behavior expected by others Everyone acts according to how they think other people expect them to act. This behavior is the public self, the person projected to others. Raw Scores: D = 4, I = 4, S = 3, C = 8 Calculated Scores: D = 1.422, I = 0.761, S = 3.921, C = -1.760 Core, Private Self Instinctive Response to Pressure Everyone has learned responses from the past: consequently, these are behaviors which the person accepts about him/herself. Raw Scores: D = 3, I = 1, S = 1, C = -6 Calculated Scores: D = 1.141, I = 1.184, S = 1.458, C = -3.060 Mirror, Perceived Self Self Image, Self Identity

Everyone envisions him/her self in a particular way. Graph 3 displays the mental picture that one has of him/her self, the self image or identity. Page 11 of 24 2001-2007 The Institute for Motivational Living, Inc. All rights reserved.

Each of the three graphs reveals a different snapshot of behavior, depending on the conditions of the environment. Within a given environment, Graph 1 reveals the "Public Self;" Graph 2 displays the "Private Self;" and Graph 3 portrays the "Perceived Self." These three graphs or snapshots are defined in detail below. Graph 1 - Mask, Public Self Behavior Expected By Others Everyone acts according to how they think other people expect them to act. This behavior is the public self, the person projected to others. Sometimes, there is no difference b etween the true person and their public self. However, the public self can be very different fro m the "real" person; it is a mask. Graph 1 is generated by the "Most" choices on The Personality System, and has the greatest potential for change. Graph 2 - Core, Private Self Instinctive Response To Pressure Everyone has learned responses from the past: consequently, these are behaviors which the person accepts about him/herself. Under pressure or tension, these learned behaviors be come prominent. This is the graph which is the least likely to change because these are natural and ingrained responses. A person's behavior under pressure may be drastically different than his/her behavior in Graphs 1 and 3. Graph 3 - Mirror, Perceived Self Self Image, Self Identity Everyone envisions him/her self in a particular way. Graph 3 displays the mental picture that one has of him/her self, the self image or self identity. Graph 3 combines the learn ed responses from one's past with the current expected behavior from the environment. Change in on e's perception Page 12 of 24 2001-2007 The Institute for Motivational Living, Inc. All rights reserved.

can occur, but it is usually gradual and based on the changing demands of one's environment. Different Graphs Indicate Change or Transition If Graph 1 is different than Graph 2, the demands of the environment are forcing behavior that is not congruent with the core, or instinctive behavior. In such a situation, a per son trying to modify his/her behavior to meet the demands of the environment will most likely experie nce stress. If Graph 1 is different than Graph 2, but similar to Graph 3, the individual has been able to successfully alter his/her behavior to meet the demands of the environment witho ut altering his/her core. This individual is probably fairly comfortable with the behavior shown in Graph 3 (Perceived Self), and is probably not experiencing stress. If Graph 1 is different than Graph 3, an individual may be in a period of growth (and some discomfort) while he/she attempts to alter behavior to meet the demands of a new environment. A person's behavior may fluctuate during this period of adjustment. Similar Graphs Indicate Few Demands For Change An individual who perceives the current demands of the environment (Graph 1) to be similar to his/her past (Graph 2) will have little need to change his/her self-p erception (Graph 3). This may be due to any of the following factors: The behavior demanded by the present environment is similar to demands in the pa st. This individual controls what others demand of him/her. The behavior demanded by the present environment is different than demands in th e past. However, instead of altering behavior, this person has chosen to augment style. To accomplish augmentation, this individual has surrounded him/herself with people of complime ntary styles, thus creating a team with combined strengths. Page 13 of 24 2001-2007 The Institute for Motivational Living, Inc. All rights reserved.

07B2/09 is an objective, and analytical person. He likes to be in charge of situ ations, but he is also willing to offer help and support to others he respscts.. Motivated internally b y personal goals, 07B2/09 is task oriented but also enjoys people. Because of his dogged determina tion, he is often successful at many things; his calm, steady and perseverant character contribute s to his success. Tenacious after starting a project, he will fight hard for his objectives. Indep endent and questioning in approach, 07B2/09 is thorough and possesses follow-through. 07B2/09 is a practical person who evaluates himself and others by results. Under pressure for these results, he may be perceived as overly frank and forthright, and possibly appear to be nondemonstrative emotionally. 07B2/09 likes to finish what he starts and do it thor oughly. He prefers to work independently or with just a few people. 07B2/09 does not like to be rushed or pressured; he operates best when he works at his own pace. Relying on his own hard work, 07B2/ 09 does not look to his emotions when evaluating situations. 07B2/09 tends to be strong-willed an d does not withdraw easily from conflict. Firm and unyielding after making decisions, 07B2/09 may tend to come across as i nflexible. He uses facts and figures as opposed to feelings to make these decisions. 07B2/09 is an strong team player, but may express a desire for freedom from restrictions. He preferes to be with s mall groups and make strong ties with a few close people. He is dependable and will always help out friends and family. Your D and S plotted above the midline, your style is identified by the keyword "Attainer". General Characteristics Steady and persistent Driven to complete goals Loyal to vision Builds on tried and tested methods Value To Team Steady and self motivated Takes personal responsibility for goals Strong completion rate of high quality work Manager who builds group relations Sticks to mission statement Possible Weaknesses May get frustrated with others and pull away May tend to micro-manage important projects May not give enough attention to helping others reach potential Lack of willingness to delegate tasks to others Greatest Fear

Being pushed and controlled out of their comfort zone Page 14 of 24 2001-2007 The Institute for Motivational Living, Inc. All rights reserved.

Motivated by Team goals being reached Being able to lead with strong supporters Being able to rely on proven methods Loyalty and help from others; rallying to their vision My Ideal Environment Team environment with few conflicts Supportive atmosphere for ideas Working closely "hands on" with others Manageable projects that get completed Remember, an Attainer may want: Team results, a non-confrontational environment, people to direct; help in reaching their vision, positive working conditions, strong loyalty from relationships When communicating with an Attainer, DO: Build a favorable, friendly environment Give opportunity for them to share their vision Share testimonials from others relating to proposed ideas Allow time for independent work Develop a participative relationship Create incentives for quality and results of work When communicating with an Attainer, DON'T: Push them out of comfort zone Over promise without following through Question their motives or integrity While analyzing information, an Attainer may: Be a good listener; proceed with a plan Build upon proven methods Understand key concepts and goals Discuss the situation with others Attainers possess these positive characteristics in teams: Participative managers "hands on" Motivate the team by self participation Driven and determined Rely on methods that will work Create an atmosphere of well-being Will support others in authority over them Steady and reliable Work well with other people Strive for quality Accomplish goals through people Page 15 of 24 2001-2007 The Institute for Motivational Living, Inc. All rights reserved.

Personal Growth Areas for Attainers: Do not overly micro-manage Try new methods and ideas Exercise control over your actions, words and emotions Be able to delegate and release to others Be more open and optimistic Consider and evaluate ideas from other team members Don't let your goals dominate the team vision This next section uses adjectives to describe where your DISC styles are approxi mately plotted on your graph. These descriptive words correlate as a rough approximatio n to the values of your graph. (For exact adjectives that relate to your graph, see the I ML Introduction to Behavioral Analysis Certification Guide pgs. 20-21) D Measures how decisive, authoritative and direct you typically are. Words that may describe the intensity of your D are: FORCEFUL Full of force; powerful; vigorous RISK TAKER Willing to take chances ADVENTURESOME Exciting or dangerous undertaking DECISIVE Settles a dispute, question, etc INQUISITIVE Inclined to ask many questions; curious I --Measures how talkative, persuasive, and interactive you typically are. Words that may describe the intensity of your I are: CONVINCING Persuading by argument of evidence OBSERVING Perceptive; watches over and guards PERCEPTIVE Able to make or see fine distinctions; discerning REFLECTIVE Meditative; thoughtful FACTUAL Having the nature of fact; real; actual LOGICAL According to the principles of logic, reasoning S Measures your desire for security, peace and your ability to be a team player. Words that may describe the intensity of your S are: NON-DEMONSTRATIVE Not showing feelings openly and frankly DELIBERATE Careful in considering; not rash or hasty; slow; unhurried AMIABLE Having a pleasant disposition; friendly STABLE Enduring; steady; resisting change C Measures your desire for structure, organization and details. Words that may d escribe the intensity of your C are: "OWN PERSON" Not easily affected by the opinions of others PERSISTENT Continuing, especially in the face of opposition; persevere INDEPENDENT Free from the influence or control of others; self-confident How You Communicate with Others We have just reviewed the do's and don'ts of communication with your specific st yle. After

reviewing this section of the report, you may now feel, "Yes, this is what I wou ld like. This is how I wish people would treat me and work together to give me the information that is important to me." Equally important is that you now see that THE WAY SOMETHING is said can be as i mportant to what is said. And unfortunately, we all have a tendency to communicate the same way that we like Page 16 of 24 2001-2007 The Institute for Motivational Living, Inc. All rights reserved.

to hear something, instead of the way we need to verbalize. Your style is predominately a "D" style, which means that you prefer receiving i nformation telling you RESULTS. But, when transferring that same information to a client or co-worker, you may need to translate that into giving them precise facts, or just the end result, o r how they are a part of the solution and we need to work as a team. This next section of the report deals with how other three dominant styles. Certain styles have a natural le certain other styles seem to be speaking different languages dy adept at speaking your "native" language, we will examine how to e other three dominant languages people will be using. your style communicates with the tendency to communicate well, whi all together. Since you are alrea best communicate and relate to th

This next section is particularly useful for a dominant "D" style as you may hav e the tendency to be more aggressive in your communication than what others would like. The Compatibility of Your Behavioral Style Two "D" styles will get along well only if they respect each other and desire to work as a team to accomplish a set goal. Care must be taken not to become overly competitive or ov erly domineering with each other. A "D" likes the "I" style, because an "I" is a natural encourager to the "D". So metimes an "I" will not be task oriented enough for the "D" in a work situation, unless the "D" sees the value of how the "I" can be influential to achieve ultimate results. A "D" and an "S" normally work well together because the "S" does not threaten t he "D", and will normally work hard to achieve the desired goal. Sometimes personal relations can be strained because the "D" sometimes comes across as too task oriented and driven. A "D" and a "C" must be careful not to become too pushy and too detail oriented, respectively. However, a "D" needs the detail attention of the "C" style, but sometimes has a hard time of effectively communicating this need. How the "D" Can Enhance Interaction With Each Style D with D If there is mutual respect, you will tend to see each other as driving, visionar y, aggressive, competitive and optimistic. So long as they agree on the goal to be accomplished , they can focus on the task at hand and be extremely efficient. If mutual respect does not exist, y

ou will tend to see the other D as argumentative, dictatorial, arrogant, domineering, nervous and hasty. Relationship Tip: Each of you must strive to achieve mutual respect, and communication, setting th is as a goal to be accomplished will help immensely. You must also work to understand the realms an d boundaries of each other's authority, and to respect those boundaries. D with I You will tend to view I's as egocentric, superficial, overly optimistic, showing little thought, too selfassured and inattentive. You'll dislike being "sold" by the I. Your task orienta tion will tend to lead you to become upset by the High I's noncommittal generalizations. Page 17 of 24 2001-2007 The Institute for Motivational Living, Inc. All rights reserved.

Relationship Tip: You should try to be friendly, since the I appreciates personal relationships. B e complimentary, when possible. Listen to their ideas and recognize their accomplishments. D with S You will tend to view the S as passive, nonchalant, apathetic, possessive, compl acent and nondemonstrative. D's tend to perceive S's as slow moving. They will tend to see yo ur approach as confrontational, and it may tend to be overwhelming to the High S. Your quick pa ce of action and thinking may cause a passive-aggressive response. Relationship Tip: Avoid pushing; recognize the sincerity of the High S's good work. Be friendly to them, they appreciate relationships. Make every effort to be more easy going when possible, adapting a steady pace will reduce unnecessary friction in the relationship. D with C Your tendency will be to view the C as overly dependant, evasive, defensive, too focused on details and too cautious and worrisome. D's often feel that High C's over analyze and ge t bogged down in details. Relationship Tip: Slow down the pace; give them information in a clear and detailed form, providin g as many facts as you can. In discussions, expect the C to voice doubts, concerns and questions ab out the details. Remove potential threats. Whenever possible, allow time for the C to consider is sues and details before asking them to make any decisions. Communication Tips Worksheet: Changes in your graphs indicate your coping methods The human personality is pro foundly influenced by changes in our environment. Typically, people change significantly from graph one to graph two as a result of stressors or environmental changes. Recognizing the dif ferences or changes between these two graphs (our public self, our private self) helps us and others understand our instinctive coping mechanism and indicates how to better adapt in the future. Instructions: Each of your graphs illuminates different aspects of your personal ity. A closer look at those changes reveals valuable insight. Please refer to your first two graphs an d, if necessary, reference data throughout your profile. Compare the D, I, S, and C points on gra

phs one and two. Answer the following questions with a checkmark in the appropriate space. Finall y, read the analysis of your answer and consider how your environment affects your decisions, motivat ions, actions and verbal messages. D Changes: de Compare graph 1 and 2. When you look at graph 2, is your or lower fdc than the D in D higher fec

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graph 1? Consider how high or low the letter moves. Higher = Desires more contro l in stressful situations. If the D goes up considerably, you can become very controlling when you become stressed. Lower = Desires less control in stressful situations. If the D goes do wn considerably, you may want someone else to lead you and you will follow. I Changes: Compare graph 1 and 2. When you look at graph 2, is your ec than the I in I higher fd or lowerfd

cegraph 1? Consider how high or low the letter moves. Higher = Desires more soci al influence in stressful situations. If the I goes up considerably, you may try to use your com munication skills to smooth things out. Lower = Desires less social influence in stressful situations . If the I goes down considerably, you rely less on a verbal means of a resolution. S Changes: Compare graph 1 and 2. When you look at graph 2, is your S higher fdor lowerfd

cein graph 1? Consider how high or low the letter moves. Higher = Desires a more secure environment in stressful situations. If the S goes up considerably, you may tend to avoid any conflict and wait till a more favorable environment is available before making a ny changes. Lower ec than the S = Desires a less secure environment in stressful situations. If the S goes down considerably, you become more impulsive in making decisions. C Changes: ec than the C Compare graph 1 and 2. When you look at graph 2, is your C higher fdor lowerfd

cein graph 1? Consider how high or low the letter moves. Higher = Desires more i nformation to make a decision in stressful situations. If the C goes up considerably, you will probably not want to make a decision until you have more information. Lower = Desires a less informat ion to make a decision in stressful situations. If the C goes down considerably, you may make decisions based more on a gut feeling. Which one of your points makes the most dramatic move up or down?

What does that tell you about how you react to pressure? How could your coping method help or hinder you in making decisions? How will you use this information to help you see possible blind spots in your r eaction to pressure? Page 19 of 24 2001-2007 The Institute for Motivational Living, Inc. All rights reserved.

07B2/09's Action Plan Action Plan Worksheet for the Attainer This worksheet is a tool to enable effective communication between you and other s with whom you interact on a regular basis. The goal is to help you maximize your strengths and minimize the effects of potential limitations. It addresses work-related and general characteristics that are common to your style as a whole, and is not derived directly from your specific graphs. Instructions: Step 1: The items listed below are areas to reflect upon between you and your cl osest contacts. After printing out this report, give this page to another person who knows you w ell (associate, team member, teacher, family member, friend) and ask them to read each item. They sho uld consider whether or not they perceive the item to describe your traits. Then, circle eith er Yes or No beside each item. Open dialogue is encouraged and any blind spots (areas of your person ality that you are blind to) should be discussed. Since communication is a two-way street, it is re commended that two people complete one another's worksheets. Goal oriented Yes No mlkjmlkjLow tolerance for error Yes No mlkjmlkjSees the big picture Yes No mlkjmlkjDoesn't analyze details Yes No mlkjmlkjOrganizes well Yes No mlkjmlkjBored by trivia Yes No mlkjmlkjSeeks practical solutions Yes No mlkjmlkjRash decision maker Yes No mlkjmlkjMoves quickly to action Yes No mlkjmlkjTends to be rude / tactless Yes No mlkjmlkjDelegates work Yes No mlkjmlkjManipulative and demanding Yes No

mlkjmlkjInsists on production Yes No mlkjmlkjEnds justifies the means Yes No mlkjmlkjStimulates activity Yes No mlkjmlkjConsumed by the task / job Yes No mlkjmlkjThrives on opposition Yes No mlkjmlkjDemands excessive loyalty Yes No mlkjmlkjCompetent and steady Yes No mlkjmlkjNot goal oriented Yes No mlkjmlkjPeaceful and agreeable Yes No mlkjmlkjNeeds additional self motivation Yes No mlkjmlkjGood administrative ability Yes No mlkjmlkjDifficulty starting tasks Yes No mlkjmlkjYes mlkjYes mlkjPage 20 of 24 2001-2007 The Institute for Motivational Living, Inc. All rights reserved.

Avoids conflicts NomlkjSometimes careless or inefficient NomlkjGood under pressu re Yes No mlkjmlkjDiscourages others' ideas Yes No mlkjmlkjFinds the easy way Yes No mlkjmlkjObserver rather than participant Yes No mlkjmlkjAvoids conflicts NomlkjSometimes careless or inefficient NomlkjGood unde r pressure Yes No mlkjmlkjDiscourages others' ideas Yes No mlkjmlkjFinds the easy way Yes No mlkjmlkjObserver rather than participant Yes No mlkjmlkj Page 21 of 24 2001-2007 The Institute for Motivational Living, Inc. All rights reserved.

Step 2: Now, select three items that would benefit most from focused attention. Discuss and determine specific outcomes and determine a reasonable timeframe for their achie vement. Write the details in the spaces provided, along with notes helpful to achieving specific o utcomes. Set a date 60-90 days from now for a discussion with your contact to review your progress. The person who works with you on this is important to your growth and should help you stay acco untable to your plan. 1. The first item upon which I will focus: Specifics to address: Specific actions I will take on this item in the next 60 to 90 days: Review date: 2. The second item upon which I will focus: Specifics to address: Specific actions I will take on this item in the next 60 to 90 days: Page 22 of 24 2001-2007 The Institute for Motivational Living, Inc. All rights reserved.

Review date: 3. The third item upon which I will focus: Specifics to address: Specific actions I will take on this item in the next 60 to 90 days: Review date: Page 23 of 24 2001-2007 The Institute for Motivational Living, Inc. All rights reserved.

Page 24 of 24 2001-2007 The Institute for Motivational Living, Inc. All rights reserved.