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759800 C M Y K T he T imes L eader WILKE S-BA RRE, PA timesleader
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759800 C M Y K T he T imes L eader WILKE S-BA RRE, PA timesleader
759800 C M Y K T he T imes L eader WILKE S-BA RRE, PA timesleader

The Times Leader

WILKES-BARRE, PA

timesleader.com

SUNDAY, JUNE 3, 2012

$1.50

CONCEALED WEAPONS: “I want to be able to protect my family if I have to, though I pray that I don’t have to.”

Area packing heat

Safety fears, gun rights prompt action

By SHEENA DELAZIO and JENNIFER LEARN-ANDES sdelazio@timesleader.com jandes@timesleader.com

Deborah Parrent may never feel the need to tuck her Beretta into her purse when she goes out, but she recently obtained a concealed weapon permit just in case. “It’s a right I have, and I don’t

want to lose that,” said the Duryea woman. “I want to

MORE

INSIDE

Concerns about ‘stand your ground.’ Page 14A

Carrying in plain sight not illegal. Page 14A

be able to protect my family if I have to, though I pray that I don’t have to.” She is among an estimated 20,500

Luzerne County residents with concealed-weapon permits. That’s more than 8 percent of the county ’s adult population, and the number is growing. The Luzerne County Sheriff ’s Department issued 5,216 gun per- mits last year – a 2,326 increase from 2010. The county exceeded 50 percent of last year ’s permit issuanc- es by the end of May, with 2,912, according to statistics supplied by Interim Sheriff John Robshaw. Permits cost $20 and are valid for five years. Permit holders may keep

See GUNS, Page 14A

cost $20 and are va lid for five ye ars. Permit holders may ke ep See

DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER

Districts face hard financial courses

Hard-pressed area schools turn to cuts, tax hikes, raiding reserves or all of the above.

By MARK GUYDISH mguydish@timesleader.com

The consequences of austerity cleave through the preliminary budgets of Luzerne County ’s 11 school districts: About 45 posi-

tions cut by furlough or attrition, programs curbed – particularly at the elementary level – class sizes growing, emergency fund bal- ances shrinking and taxes poised to rise for most

county resi- dents. And adminis- trators warn that, despite two years of belt-tightening, the proverbial corner has not been turned. In fact, no corner is even in sight. “I think we’re in a crisis,” Ha- zleton Area Acting Superin-

superintendent

acting

Hazleton Area

Antonelli

Francis

“I think we’re in a crisis, and the crisis could turn into a di- saster.”

tendent Francis Antonelli said, “and the crisis could turn into a disaster.” By state law, all school boards had to pass preliminary budgets by May 31. Board members and administrators stress things are still very fluid and those blue- prints can be substantially al- tered before final adoption – votes that must occur by June 30 – but here are some highlights:

• Property tax increases for Luzerne County residents are on the agenda in eight districts, ranging from a 1.9 percent hike in Dallas to a 4.7 percent jump in Lake-Lehman. Even where taxes weren’t raised, trade-offs were made. Crestwood opted to cur- tail elementary music, art and language offerings, sparking pub- lic outcry. The Wilkes-Barre Area School board rejected a prelimi-

See SCHOOLS, Page 14A

Jerry Sandusky trial could go on for several weeks

About 250 reporters have registered to attend and 29 TV trucks are expected.

By MARK SCOLFORO Associated Press

BELLEFONTE — Before his

Then came allegations, spelled out in a pair of grand ju- ry reports, that a monster was concealed be- neath a veneer of respectabili-

arrest on child molestation ty and charitable leadership, a

man who would target and groom boys systematically to feed predatory sexual desires. Despite Sandusky’s repeated

charges seven months ago, Jerry Sandusky was widely considered a living Penn State sports legend and the founder of an exemplary organization that worked with at- risk children.

exemplary organization that worked with at- risk children. Sa ndusky See TRIAL, Page 8A Hazleton immigrants

Sandusky

See TRIAL, Page 8A

Hazleton immigrants past, present spotlighted

EDITOR’S NOTE: First of a two-part series on recognizing diversity in two parts of Luzerne County.

COMING

MONDAY: A

look at

diversity in

the Moun-

tain Top

area and

how the

region is

celebrating

it.

Local video compares role of Latino residents with groups from the past.

By STEVE MOCARSKY smocarsky@timesleader.com

Immigrant,” was show- cased at what Greater Ha- zleton Chamber of Com- merce President Donna Palermo said was one of the organization’s best- attended networking mix- ers ever, with 159 members

HAZLETON – Backers of and guests registered for

a new video about im- migrants’ roles in Hazle- ton’s past and current revi- talization say it is a step forward in efforts to better integrate Latinos into the community. The video, “Hazleton:

Land of Dreams of the

the event held Wednesday at Capriotti’s Palazzo in McAdoo, just south of Hazleton in Schuylkill County. The 19-minute video focuses on the roles Eu-

See DREAMS, Page 8A

19-minute video focuses on the roles Eu- See DREAMS, Page 8A SUBMITTED IMAGE The title screen

SUBMITTED IMAGE

The title screen for the video ‘Hazleton: Land of Dreams of the Immigrant.’

 

A NEWS Obituaries Local Nation & World

 
  A NEWS Obituaries Local Nation & World   Game 2 B PEOPLE D BUSINESS F

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BUSINESS

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INSIDE

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Devils, Kings battle for title.

Birthdays

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Stocks

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Puzzles

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VIEWS

Books

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Editorials

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THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

Bennett brings down house at Kirby

Classic crooner proves he still has the singing chops to make audience swoon at age 85.

R E VIE W

By BRAD PATTON Times Leader Correspondent

WILKES -BARRE – The F.M. Kirby Center for the Performing Arts capped its silver-anniver- sary season Saturday with a sold-out performance by the golden-voiced Tony Bennett. The legendary crooner, born 85 years ago as Anthony Domin- ick Benedetto in Astoria, Queens, has been delighting audiences with his standards, show tunes and jazz since the early 1950s. After a career lull in the 1970s and an amazing come- back in the late 1980s and early 1990s, Bennett is still on quite a roll, earning two more Grammy awards earlier this year (he now has 16 plus a Lifetime Achieve- ment Award) with his most recent album “Duets II.” Bennett strolled onto the stage at about 8:23, following a six-song set by his daughter Antonia, to the first of many standing ovations from the enthusiastic crowd.

first of many standing ovations from the enthusiastic crowd. AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER Tony Bennett is

AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER

Tony Bennett is greeted Saturday night with a warm welcome at the F.M. Kirby Center after his daughter sang five or six tunes.

he said as he reminisced about

what my real name was, and I

like to sing some of my records

Wilkes-Barre for the first time many years ago. Then he sang a splendid trio of songs: “The Good Life,” “The Shadow of Your Smile” and “One For My Baby (and One More for the Road).” Just when you thought it couldn’t get any better, he brought the house down with “I Wanna Be Around,” earning a rather spirit- ed standing ovation at the sassy song ’s conclusion. He garnered another standing ovation after his next number, “For Once In My Life,” and yet another following “The Best Is Yet To Come.” He then reached the apex of the evening with an absolutely knock out version of “I Left My Heart In San Francisco.” After a few more tunes that gave his stellar band a couple more showcases, he ended his 1-hour, 10-minute performance with “Smile” and “When You’re Smiling.” After several minutes of ap- plause, Bennett came back to the stage twice to acknowledge the crowd, finally waving and a blowing a big kiss to his adoring fans as they cheered wildly and pleaded for more. Special guest for Saturday’s show was Bennett’s daughter, Antonia, who began the concert with six standards of her own, including nice renditions of “Too Marvelous For Words” and “S’Wonderful.” Later in the evening, she joined her father

heim tune that included a funny, touching dance routine.

In the middle of his first num- the early days of his career. “It’s told him. He then changed it to for you,” Bennett then rattled off

ber, “Watch What Happens,” Bennett stopped and thanked the crowd for coming out. His second tune, “They All

Laughed,” showed the singer is road.

still in command of his powerful voice. “Rosemary Clooney and I were the first American Idols,”

true; we were discovered on an amateur hour. Pearl Bailey saw it and booked us. And Bob Hope saw that and took me on the

Tony Bennett, so Bob Hope gave me my name.”

a series of classics, each one worthy of consideration as one

Bennett then sang a wonder- of his signature songs.

ful rendition of “Cold, Cold Heart” followed by equally di-

“He asked me what my name vine versions of “Steppin’ Out”

was and I told him Joe Barrie,” Bennett said. “He told me that was no good, and asked me

and “The Way You Look To- night.” With the simple words, “I’d

He started with “Just In Time” and followed with “Bou- levard of Broken Dreams,”

which he told the crowd was his for a wonderful duet on a Sond-

first recording and his first hit that enabled him to come to

Keith Dzanis

May 31, 2012

K eith Allan Dzanis, 41, of Pittston Township, passed away Thurs-

day, May 31, 2012. Born in Wilkes-Barre on January 6, 1971, he was a son of Margaret Gregori Dzanis and the late Joseph Dzanis. Keith loved the outdoors, fishing and gardening. He was self-employ- ed as a landscaper. He was preceded in death by his father, Joseph Dzanis. Surviving are his mother, Marga- ret Dzanis; grandmother, Lena Gre- gori; brothers, Joseph and his wife, Kathy, Ashley; Mark and his wife, Debbie, Stroudsburg; David and his wife, Marie, Chicago, Ill.; sisters, Cynthia Scott and husband Marty, Tulsa Okla.; Lisa Ahmadifar and husband Christopher, Dallas; and

girlfriend, Emma Netta of Pittston from 9 to 10 a.m. at the funeral

Township.

Funeral services will be held Monday at 10 a.m. from the Antho- ny Recupero Funeral Home, 406 Su squehanna Ave., We st Pittston. Interment will be in We st Pittston Cemetery. Friends may call Monday

will be in We st Pittston Cemetery. Friends may call Monday home. Robert Hildebrand May 31,

home.

Robert Hildebrand

May 31, 2012

R obert D. Hildebrand, 82, sur- rounded by his family, died

peacefully Thursday, May 31, 2012, at his home in Charlton, N.Y. Born in Wilkes-Barre on May 27, 1930, he was the eldest son of the

late Robert W. and Caroline Elterich Hildebrand. Bob was a graduate of city schools and the Perkiomen Prep School of Pennsburg, Pa., and Penn- sylvania State College. He served in the reserves in the Pennsylvania National Guard and field artillery. Mr. Hildebrand was employed by GE in the Te st Engineering Pro- gram, with assignments in various departments throughout the com- pany and later transferred to the Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory in Niskayuna, N.Y., where he retired in

1992.

Bob was a former club secretary and board member of the Guan-Ho- Ha Fish and Game Club on Rector Road in Glenville, N.Y. He was an Endowment Life Member of the Na- tional Rifle Association, American Trap Association and the New York State Trap Association. Bob had a special interest in fam- ily genealogy. He traced his early an- cestors back to 1635, immigrating from England, Prussia and Dresden, Saxony (Germany), where they traveled by the ship Planter settling in Connecticut, New York and Penn- sylvania.

Bob was a member of the Wyom-

ing Valley Genealogy Society and Luzerne County Historical Society of Pennsylvania. He was predeceased by his broth- er, John L. Hildebrand, in 1993. Survivors include his wife of 55 years, Beverly F. (Falkinburg) Hil- debrand; children, Carolyn Hilde- brand, Greenwich, N.Y.; Eric Hilde- brand and his wife, Barbara, Rotter- dam, N.Y.; Rebecca Emerich and her husband, Kevin, and Gregory Hilde- brand and his fiancée, Staci Cassidy, all of Charlton, N.Y. He also leaves behind his cherished grandchildren, Caia Ross, Elias Hildebrand-Willig, Rayna and Austin Hildebrand, Alys- sa and Alex Hildebrand, Nicholas and Jessica Emerich and Alexis and Jocelyn Cassidy; one great-grand- daughter, Clover Ross. Bob also leaves behind several nieces, neph- ews and cousins. Funeral services will be held 11 a.m. Thursday, June 7, at the Lutheran Church of the Good Shepherd, 547 Saratoga Road, Glen- ville, N.Y., with Deron Milleville of- ficiating. Relatives and friends are cordially invited and may call at the Glenville Fu neral Home We dnes- day, June 6, from 5 to 8 p.m. Inter- ment will be held at Sweetman Cemetery, Charlton, N.Y. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made in Bob’s name to the Lutheran Church of the Good Shep- herd. Online condolences may be sent to www.glenvillefuneralhome.com.

condolences may be sent to www.glenvillefuneralhome.com. More Obituaries, Page 7A A ‘paws-itive’ approach for

More Obituaries, Page 7A

A ‘paws-itive’ approach for dogs

Event in West Wyoming focused on keeping canines legal and protected.

By RALPH NARDONE Times Leader Correspondent

WEST WYOMING – Keeping your pooch legal and protected was the focus of the inaugural “Cause for Paws” event Saturday in Dailey Park. More than 100 pet owners showed up to purchase licenses, get their dogs vaccinated and learn about other ways to protect their pets. Only 15 percent of all dogs in Pennsylvania are properly licens- ed and vaccinated, said state Rep. Phyllis Mundy, who participated in the event along with area pet- conscious organizations. State law requires all dogs to be licensed, Mundy said. The re- quirement protects the pet and the owner and provides much- needed funds for kennel inspec-

Sara Alesso

June 2, 2012

S ara (Arfanella) Alesso, of Pitt- ston, passed away Saturday,

June 2, 2012 at Geisinger Wyom- ing Valley Medical Center, Plains Township. Born in Pittston on October 11, 1922, she was a daughter of the late Salvatore and Santa Bellanca Arfa- nella. In addition to her parents, she was preceded in death by brothers, Angelo and Louis Arfanella; sis- ters, Josephine Bellanco, Grace Bonfanti, Rose Pisano and Mary Colondo. She is survived by husband Sam Alesso, as well as numerous nieces and nephews. A Mass of Christian Burial will be held for Sara on Tuesday at 9:30 a.m. from St. Joseph Marello Parish, (St. Rocco’s R.C. Church) Pittston. Interment services will follow at St. Rocco’s R.C. Cemete- ry, Pittston Township. There will be no calling hours. Funeral services are entrusted to Graziano Funeral Home Inc., Pittston Township. Online condo- lences may be made at graziano- funeralhome.com.

condo- lences may be made at graziano- funeralhome.com. AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER Peggy Nork of the

AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER

Peggy Nork of the SPCA, and Jaime Colarusso hold Mimi as Mi- mi’s owner 4-year-old Sofia Colarusso keeps an eye on Dr. Mark Stair (not in picture) preparing a microchip.

tions, animal shelters and animal licenses for a one-time fee of

control efforts across the state. Mundy, D-Kingston, said she

could not estimate how many neutered.

Mundy said she believes most

dogs across the state are not li-

censed but said the amount of people don’t purchase licenses

because they think it is “inconve- nient” or because they lack

Dog licenses only cost from awareness of the legal require-

lost revenue for Harrisburg could be substantial.

$31.45 for a spayed/neutered dog and $51.45 for a dog not spayed or

$6.45 to $8.45 and are readily ments.

available at the Luzerne County Courthouse, she said. About 40 licenses were purchased at Satur- day’s event. Laura Beers, who works for the county, said that about 28,000 dog licenses were purchased last year. If Luzerne County is like the rest of Pennsylvania, there could more than 150,000 unlicensed dogs in the county, she said. The county collects $1.45 of the fee with the state getting the rest, Beers pointed out. The state

pays the salaries of “dog war- nations.

dens” across the state who can is- sue citations up to $300 for unli- censed or non-vaccinated dogs. Beers said she can tell when the wardens are busy in a certain community because of the influx of license requests. She said owners who use per- manent identifications such as microchips placed under the dog ’s skin can purchase lifetime

“It is the law,” she stressed. Dr. Mark Stair, a veterinarian from Trucksville, assisted volun- teers from the Luzerne County Society for the Prevention of Cru- elty to Animals in providing dis- counted vaccinations and micro- chips. He administered about 60 rabies vaccines and 25 micro- chips to dogs brought in by their owners. He admitted he has to advise a large percentage of his clients about proper licensing and vacci-

“They just don’t realize the im- plications if they don’t,” he said. Stair pointed to the continuing need for owners to spay and neu- ter their pets to fight overpopula- tion. Mundy said the turnout on Sat- urday was “excellent” and she plans to conduct a follow-up in Ja- nuary in her office to continue to promote licensing.

PRASHANT SHITUT President & CEO (570) 970-7158

pshitut@timesleader.com

President & CEO (570) 970-7158 pshitut@timesleader.com An JOE BUTKIEWICZ VP/Executive Editor (570) 829-7249

An

JOE BUTKIEWICZ VP/Executive Editor (570) 829-7249

jbutkiewicz@timesleader.com

DENISE SELLERS VP/Chief Revenue Officer (570) 970-7203

dsellers@timesleader.com

ALLISON UHRIN VP/Chief Financial Officer (570) 970-7154

auhrin@timesleader.com

company

MICHAEL PRAZMA VP/Circulation (570) 970-7202

mprazma@timesleader.com

LISA DARIS VP/HR and Administration (570) 829-7113

ldaris@timesleader.com

DETAILS

WEEKLY LOTTERY SUMMARY

Daily Number, Midday Sunday: 3-1-8 Monday: 4-7-4 Tuesday: 5-1-3 Wednesday: 5-9-0 Thursday: 1-5-4 Friday: 8-4-9 Saturday: 8-3-9

Big Four, Midday Sunday: 9-2-3-9 Monday: 1-7-4-5 Tuesday: 9-6-3-4 Wednesday: 1-9-6-7 Thursday: 5-7-9-6 Friday: 4-0-0-3 Saturday: 3-4-0-1

Quinto, Midday Sunday: 6-1-8-2-9 Monday: 7-9-5-2-6 Tuesday: 2-3-8-9-3 Wednesday: 0-3-8-0-8 Thursday: 9-9-9-4-6 Friday: 3-4-5-8-6 Saturday: 4-5-1-6-9

Treasure Hunt Sunday: 02-14-15-23-24 Monday: 08-13-21-23-29 Tuesday: 09-11-22-26-30 Wednesday: 02-14-17-29-30 Thursday: 08-09-25-27-29 Friday: 02-08-09-10-14 Saturday: 05-12-14-16-19

Daily Number, 7 p.m. Sunday: 7-9-6 Monday: 1-9-8 Tuesday: 7-5-0 (1-9-4, double draw) Wednesday: 5-4-4 Thursday: 5-5-1 Friday: 5-3-8 Saturday: 5-5-5

Big Four, 7 p.m. Sunday: 8-2-1-8 Monday: 5-3-7-8 Tuesday: 3-1-8-9 Wednesday: 9-6-6-2 Thursday: 7-6-2-3 Friday: 4-8-5-3 Saturday: 2-1-3-5

Quinto, 7 p.m. Sunday: 1-5-6-5-5 Monday: 3-9-7-7-5 Tuesday: 1-4-1-7-7 Wednesday: 7-4-0-8-3 Thursday: 9-4-2-2-6 Friday: 3-3-3-0-2 Saturday: 2-6-2-9-7

Cash 5 Sunday: 02-03-24-28-34 Monday: 03-05-08-32-41 Tuesday: 19-20-25-39-42 Wednesday: 06-07-16-29-40 Thursday: 01-07-11-12-24 Friday: 03-04-30-34-39 Saturday: 03-21-25-35-39

Match 6 Lotto Monday: 05-25-30-37-48-49 Thursday: 18-27-31-34-40-42

Powerball Wednesday: 09-10-24-52-56 powerball: 14 Saturday: 09-10-17-29-45 powerball: 33

Mega Millions Tuesday: 02-14-29-53-55 Megaball: 31 Megaplier: 03 Friday: 02-27-38-46-52 Megaball: 45 Megaplier: 03

OBITUARIES

Alesso, Sara Dzanis, Keith Goch, Stephen Hildebrand, Robert Jacobs, Marcella McDonough, John Michelle, Sanai O’Dell, Pamela Sakowski, Therese Snyder, Gerald Sorber, Margaret Swan, George Winnicki, Elizabeth

Page 2A, 7A

Sanai O’Dell, Pamela Sakowski, Therese Snyder, Gerald Sorber, Margaret Swan, George Winnicki, Elizabeth Page 2A, 7A
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THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

 

timesleader.com

 

SUNDAY, JUNE 3, 2012 PAGE 3A

LOCAL

NEWS IN BRIEF

BLACK CREEK TWP.

Weston man in fatal crash

S tate police said John Lupcho, 28, of Weston, died from injuries

suffered when the pickup truck he was driving crashed early Saturday morning. Lupcho was traveling east in a 1997 Dodge Ram on the Nuremberg By- pass around 1:45 a.m., state police said. The pickup truck left the road- way, struck a large oak tree, contin- ued traveling before it struck another oak tree, rolled down an embank- ment and ended up on its roof, state police said.

HANOVER TWP.

Drug raid nabs three

Officers from the Pennsylvania

Attorney General’s Office and the Luzerne County Drug Task Force arrested three peo- ple on drug traffick- ing charges during a raid at 7:23 a.m. Saturday at the Hanover Village Apartments. Police said they

recovered marijua- na, scales and cash from the apartment in the 400 block of the apartment com- plex. Edward Charles Earl Jr., 27, of Ha- nover Village, was charged with pos- session with intent to deliver marijua- na, possession of marijuana and crim- inal conspiracy to deliver marijuana; Jeffrey Stephen Albuquerque, 36, of Hanover Village and

Cintron

Stephen Albuquerque, 36, of Hanover Village and Cintron Albuquerque Earl Kingston, was charged with possession with

Albuquerque

Albuquerque, 36, of Hanover Village and Cintron Albuquerque Earl Kingston, was charged with possession with intent
Albuquerque, 36, of Hanover Village and Cintron Albuquerque Earl Kingston, was charged with possession with intent

Earl

Kingston, was charged with possession with intent to deliver marijuana, possession of marijuana and criminal conspiracy to deliver marijuana, and Michelle Cin- tron, 28, of Hanover Village was charged with criminal conspiracy to deliver marijuana. All three were arraigned Saturday before District Judge Joseph Halesey and remanded to Luzerne County Correctional Facility for lack of $25,000 straight bail.

PLAINS TWP.

DEP offers workshop

The state Department of Envi- ronmental Protection invites resi- dential code enforcement officials,

builders, contractors and designers to

a June 12 training workshop in Plains Township on the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code. The workshop will be from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Woodlands Inn and Resort on Route 315. Regis-

tration begins at 8 a.m., and breakfast and lunch will be provided as part of the $40 registration fee. The workshop will focus on best- management practices in sustainable residential construction. Participants will learn about sizing residential HVAC units according to the Manual

J methodology, a protocol used to

determine how much heating and cooling a home requires. The in- structor is Mike Turns, associate

director of the Pennsylvania Housing Research Center. Attendees will receive six UCC continuing education hours for com- pleting the training. For more information or to regis- ter, visit www.dep.state.pa.us or

www.paconstructioncodesacade-

my.org, or call 717-763-0930.

KINGSTON

Free helmets for kids

For the fifth year in a row, the Hourigan, Kluger & Quinn Fund for Children’s Advocacy, also known as HKQ Kids, will give away free bicycle helmets to hundreds of area children during the July 4th fireworks cele- bration at Kirby Park. The HKQ Kids booth in Kirby Park will be open from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. with a total of 1,500 free bike helmets on hand for eligible children. Children must be 12 or under and must be accompanied by an adult to receive a helmet. All free bike helmets distributed by HKQ Kids meet U.S. Consumer Prod- uct Safety Commission standards, and each helmet comes equipped with a user’s manual and CP SC label of certification.

Corridor to expand hiking and biking trail

The Delaware & Lehigh National Heritage Corridor path to grow by 8.5 miles.

By MATT HUGHES mhughes@timesleader.com

WHITE HAVEN – A nonprof- it will blaze a new trail through Luzerne County this summer. The Delaware & Lehigh Na- tional Heritage Corridor is ex- panding its D&L hiking and biking trail by 8.5 miles in Lu- zerne County, and offered a pre- view tour of the project Satur- day.

snakes its way tion for the nonprofit. “Now

this will be the first public ac-

north to a new

trailhead south cess.”

Like the rest of the Heritage Corridor, most of the trail itself is not new; it’s part of a 165-mile

Along the way, network of waterways, canals,

railroad beds and access roads that once supplied the industri-

al furnaces and home hearths of

section of pedes- Greater Philadelphia with an-

trian causeway that once spanned Interstate 81 near Avo- ca – and passes by Moosehead Lake, a pristine 10-acre body of

water previously cut off from production of anthracite in

Northeastern Pennsylvania… and the industrial heritage that

public access. “It’s been isolated forever,”

thracite coal excavated from lo- cal mines. “It’s important to tell Ameri- ca’s story of the discovery and

of Glen Summit in Fairview Township.

the trail crosses a “recycled bridge”

– a repurposed

To see

additional

photos, visit

www.times

leader.com

From a trailhead off Main said Silas Chamberlin, director

of Stewardship and Interpreta-

Street in White Haven, the trail

See TRAIL, Page 12A

Street in White Haven, the trail See TRAIL, Page 12A BILL TARU TIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

Library board member Marla Doddo, left, Dale Freudenberger of D&L National Heritage Corridor, trailgoer Bill Runner of Sha- vertown, and patrol volunteer Rick Burman look over a map.

vertown, and patrol volunteer Rick Burman look over a map. FRED ADAMS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER Crystal

FRED ADAMS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

Crystal Gigliotti-Hughes and Alana Hughes, 5, of Sugar Notch, work on a mural at Barnes & Noble in Wilkes-Barre for the Riverfest.

A stream of colors

Children’s mural kicks off Riverfest

By GERI GIBBONS Times Leader Correspondent

WILKES-BARRE – Barnes & Noble Book- store in downtown Wilkes-Barre partnered with the Riverfront Parks Committee to give area children the opportunity Saturday to begin creating a colorful and informational mural for the upcoming 2012 Wyoming Val- ley Riverfest. The mural painting, which depicts the trout that inhabit the nearby Susquehanna River, was organized by local artist Jan Lok- uta, a member of the Riverfest planning committee and an advocate for better under- standing of the river and its environment. "We are coming upon the 40th anniver- sary of Hurricane Agnes and it has been only nine months since flooding has challenged our area," said Lokuta. "But, we need to con-

INSIDE: For Click photos from the event, see Page 13A

glad that the event fo- cuses on both adults and children," said Gigliotti-Hughes, as a

tinue to view the river as an asset." This is Lokuta’s fourth year crafting mu- rals that reflect various aspects of the river.

This year’s Riverfest will allow him to over- trout in the mural.

see children with two murals: one depicting the river at Wyoming and one at the bend of the river at Forty-Fort. Lokuta emphasizes the colors chosen for the paintings reflect different characteristics of the river. For example, he looks forward to using more grays in an upcoming mural to reflect morning fog enveloping the water. Crystal Gigliotti-Hughes and her daugh- ter, Alana, took part in Saturday’s painting of the mural, and both were very pleased to par- ticipate in something that has reinforced re- spect for the river and provided fun family time. "We plan to come to Riverfest and I am so

smiling Alana careful- ly applied yellow paint to one of the

John Maday, executive director of the Riverfront Parks Committee, was also present at the event, and was all smiles as he looked at the mural in pro- gress, as well as murals from past years. "This is the essence of Riverfest and, in a sense, its first event," said Maday. Maday credited Lokuta for his hard work in preparing for the event and his ability to share information regarding the watershed in an understandable way. Another mural-painting session is scheduled for this Saturday, also at

See MURAL, Page 12A

3 seeking seat on PA board

John Lombardo, Roseanne Ricotta and Kent Bratlee want to replace Ross Latona.

By MARK GUYDISH mguydish@timesleader.com

YATESVILLE – Three people applied for the Pittston Area School Board seat made available when Ross Latona resigned last month. The board has scheduled a special meeting Tuesday, 6 p.m. for the purpose of appointing a re- placement. The board sought applicants to fill the seat and finish Latona’s term. The deadline for applica- tions passed last week, and The Times Leader requested names of applicants. The three seeking the post are John Lombardo, Ro- seanne Ricotta and Kent Bratlee. Of those, Bratlee is the only one with board experience, according to Times Leader archives. He lost a bid for re-election in the 2009 pri- mary, a year of high turmoil for the board, thanks to the ongoing feder- al corruption probe. Then-Superin- tendent Ross Scarantino and board member Joseph Oliveri both re- signed and pleaded guilty to cor- ruption charges. Only one incum- bent, Bob Linskey Jr., won in the 2009 primary, which also ushered in newcomer Latona. Latona was board vice president when he submitted his letter of re- signation. In it, he said, “Personal commitments have become too great for me to be able to fulfill the requirements of my position on the board.” Bratlee also applied in Novem- ber 2010 to fill a position opened when Michael McAndrew re- signed. That vacancy drew 11 appli- cants, with the board opting for Ri- chard Gorzkowski The board voted to accept Lato- na’s resignation May 19, and by law has 30 days from that date to ap- point a replacement. If the board deadlocks on voting for a replace- ment, or otherwise fails to meet the 30-day deadline, a Luzerne County Court judge would step in and make the decision for them.

Area man’s show more than just talk

the decision for them. Area man’s show more than just talk NIKO J. KALLIANIOTIS/FOR THE TIMES

NIKO J. KALLIANIOTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

Dave Madeira of 94.3 The Talker has begun a local radio talk show weekdays from 6 to 9 a.m.

Dave Madeira takes Imus’ spot on 94.3FM

By ANDREW M. SEDER aseder@timesleader.com

Loyal Don Imus listeners, you’ve got the right station, but the man coming through your speakers doesn’t wear a cowboy hat and isn’t an ordained minister. And the man behind the voice broadcast over the

94.3 FM airwaves Monday through Friday mornings cepts.

does know where Shickshinny is and twice ran – and lost – political races.

at the top of the list. “I walk out of the studio at 9 o’clock totally jazzed. It doesn’t feel at all like work,” Madeira, 45, sa id. He then heads from the ra dio station on We st Mountain three miles away to his house in We st Scranton and begins a shift at his other job as a branding and marketing specialist for Infinity Con-

He jokes that he needs to work both jobs to sup- port his family, which includes wife Melanie and

Dave Madeira was a Back Mountain chiropractor their six children, ages 3 to 18. And while Imus and

other talk show hosts bring their personal lives and

before becoming a political candidate, political

consultant and a branding and marketing specialist. families into the mix, Madeira tries to stay on the

In his new position as morning radio talk show host from 6 to 9 a.m., he said his first three weeks on the air have been a lot of things. But fun is right

issues of the day. His affinity for politics rises to the

See TALK, Page 12A

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PAGE 4A SUNDAY, JUNE 3, 2012

NEWS

THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

HAZLETON AREA COMMENCEMENT

LEADER www.t imesleader .c om HAZLETON AREA COMMENCEMENT CHARLOT TE BART IZEK/ FO R THE TIMES

CHARLOTTE BARTIZEK/ FOR THE TIMES LEADER

Members of the 2012 graduating class at Hazleton Area High School had many different responses to commencement ceremonies Saturday evening.

Grads ready for future

Principal Rocco Petrone tells members of the class of 2002 to never lose faith.

By GERI GIBBONS Times Leader Correspondent

HAZLE TWP. – The grounds of the Hazleton Area High School were awash in a sea of red and white, with 756 eager graduates looking forward to the future. The school’s 20th annual com- mencement provided opportunity for family and friends to acknowl- edge the accomplishments of the graduates. Principal Rocco Petrone, in his remarks to the audience, remind- ed the graduates to always believe in themselves and never lose faith. He reminded students they would

face adversity, but they could use challenges to grow stronger. Petrone thanked the teachers for their hard work in preparing students for graduation and the families for supporting students with unconditional love and sup- port. He said that without support- ive families, graduation would not be possible. “This is not an ending,” said Pe- trone, “but the beginning of the rest of your lives.” Petrone quoted graduate Josie Bachman, a student athlete, who always said, “We are ready!” before running. “You are ready!” Petrone told the graduates, to rousing applause. Superintendent Francis Anto- nelli, Ed.D., called the commence- ment a wonderful occasion for fac- ulty, graduates and families to cele- brate a great milestone in the lives

SPECIAL SECTION

For a complete list of graduates and more photos, see our gradua- tion section on July 7.

of the graduates. “Each class is unique and con-

tributes to the legacy and tradition of this great school,” said Antonel-

li.

Don Bayzick, assistant to the su- perintendent, said he was especial- ly grateful the weather had al- lowed for an outdoor ceremony. Originally, the ceremony was to be held on Friday night, but was post- poned because of rain. Graduates Sara Wisniewski and Zachary Bradley, who will both be attending Luzerne County Com- munity College in the fall, said they looked forward to continuing

their education and eventually en- tering the workforce. “It took a lot of work, but we are finally here,” said Bradley, a mem- ber of the National Honor Society. George Joseph, whose daughter graduated with honors, said that the graduation was his “very proudest moment,” and that he was looking forward to his daugh-

ter continuing her education at Penn State University in the fall. “The district has done a good job preparing our graduates for the future,” said Joseph, commending district teachers for a job well done. Graduate Virginia Pereyra, when asked what graduation meant to her, quoted Gandhi and said, “Be the change you wish to be.” Pereyra said she intends to do just that.

Calif. towns eye retreat from sea

In the U.S., the starkest ex- ample can be found in Alaska, where entire villages have been forced to move to higher ground or are thinking about it in the face of melting sea ice. Several states along the Atlan- tic coast have adopted policies meant to keep a distance from

LOS ANGELES — Ye ars of the ocean. They include no-

ferocious storms have threat- ened to gnaw away the western tip of a popular beachfront park

two hours drive north of Los sea advances, homeowners

Angeles. Instead of building a promise not to build seawalls

500-foot-long wooden defense next to the pier to tame the tide, the latest thinking is to flee. Work is under way to gauge the toll of ripping up parking lots on the highly eroded west

end of Goleta Beach County California’s 1,100-mile coast is

armored. In Southern Califor- nia, where development is

land away from lapping waves. sometimes built steps from the

Up and down the California ocean, a third of the shore is

dotted with man-made barriers. While such buffers may pro- tect the base of cliffs, and the land and property behind them, they often exacerbate the prob- lem by scouring beaches, mak-

But after futile attempts to ing them narrower or even

curb coastal erosion — a prob- lem expected to grow worse with rising seas fueled by glob- al warming — there is growing acknowledgment that the sea is relentless and any line drawn in the sand is likely to eventually wash over. “I like to think of it as getting out of the way gracefully,” said David Revell, a senior coastal

scientist at ESA PWA, a San struction of another hard struc-

Francisco-based environmental ture, park officials, working

consulting firm involved in Go- leta and other planned retreat projects. The issue of whether to stay

or flee is being confronted to higher ground. Demolish 150

around the globe. Places exper- imenting with retreat have adopted various strategies.

parking spaces and allow the acre of asphalt to be reclaimed by the beach.

with environmentalists, came up with a Plan B: Move gas, wa- ter and sewer lines out of the risk zone. Relocate a bike path

Park and moving a scenic bike path and buried utility lines in-

build zones, setbacks or rolling easements that allow develop- ment but with a caveat. As the

By ALICIA CHANG and JASON DEAREN Associated Press

Until recently, the thought of bowing to nature was almost unheard of.

and must either shift inland or let go. Over the past half-century, the weapon of choice against a shrinking shoreline has been building a seawall or other de- fense. Roughly 10 percent of

coast, some communities are deciding it’s not worth trying to wall off the encroaching ocean. Until recently, the thought of bowing to nature was almost unheard of.

causing them to disappear. This is one reason state coastal regulators in 2009 turn- ed down a proposal by Santa Barbara County to fortify an eroding section of Goleta Beach park lashed by periodic storms. A rock wall was built as a temporary stopgap, but a long-term solution was needed. After the state rejected the con-

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NATION

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WORLD

SUNDAY, JUNE 3, 2012 PAGE 5A

I N

BRIEF

WORLD SUND AY , JUNE 3, 2012 PA GE 5A I N BRIEF AP PHOTO Tropical

AP PHOTO

Tropical storm near Philippines

A man wades in a submerged pier Saturday as tropical storm Mawar hit the area in suburban Navotas City, Philippines, Saturday. Mawar has de- veloped just northeast of Manila. This system is expected to move north- eastward today and strengthen into a category 1 typhoon with winds be- tween 74 and 95 mph.

KABUL, AFGHANISTAN

Raid frees hostages

B ritish and other NATO forces stormed a cave tucked in the moun-

tains before dawn Saturday and res- cued two foreign female aid workers and their two Afghan colleagues being held hostage by Ta liban-linked mil- itants. Helicopters, flying under the cover of darkness, ferried the rescue team to extreme northeastern Afghanistan where they suspected the hostages were being held. After confirming the workers were there, they raided the site, killed several militants and freed the hostages, ending their nearly two- week ordeal. The four who were rescued work for Medair, a humanitarian non-govern- mental organization based near Lau- sanne, Switzerland.

MISHAWAKA, IND.

Kids hear couple’s shooting

An Indiana man has been charged with murder in the deaths of his broth- er and sister-in-law, who authorities say were fatally shot in their home while their children listened. The St. Joseph County Prosecutor’s Office filed two murder charges and a weapons charge Saturday against 41- year-old Steven Clippenger of South Bend. He’s being held without bond. Prosecutors also charged a woman they say was Clippenger’s accomplice. Forty-year-old Jenifer Leveque is charged with assisting a criminal and giving a handgun to a felon. She’s being held on $60,000 bond. Police say Matthew and Lisa Clip- penger were fatally shot at their Mis- hawaka home early Saturday as their children listened. They say Steven Clippenger was paroled in 2010 after serving 20 years in prison for murder.

BEIRUT

Russian help is sought

Washington reached out to Syria’s most important ally and protector Saturday, urging Russia to join a coor- dinated effort to resolve the deadly conflict as the violence spilled across the border into Lebanon, a senior State Department official said. The international community has been frustrated by the failure of a U.N.- brokered peace plan to stop the blood- shed. Fears also have risen the violence could spread and provoke a regional conflagration. Already clashes have broken out between pro- and anti-Syrian groups in northern Lebanon, with at least eight people killed late Friday and early Saturday, Lebanese security officials said.

TROMSO, NORWAY

Clinton visits Arctic Circle

Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton trekked north of the Arctic Circle on Saturday, a region that could become a new international battle- ground for resources. Clinton’s trip to northern Norway is her second to the area in a year. She is bringing a message of cooperation to one of the world’s last frontiers of un- explored oil, gas and mineral deposits. She’s also underscoring the region’s rising significance as melting icecaps accelerate the opening of new shipping routes, fishing stocks and drilling op- portunities. To safely exploit the riches, the U.S. and other countries near the North Pole are trying to work together to address issues.

Life sentence for leader

Mixed ruling for Mubarak for failing to stop killing of protesters in Egypt.

By HAMZA HENDAWI Associated Press

CAIRO — Hosni Mubarak was sen- tenced to life in prison Saturday for fail- ing to stop the killing of protesters during the uprising that ousted him, offering his opponents a measure of justice. But he and his two sons were acquitted of cor- ruption in a verdict that did not satisfy public demands for accountability after what the chief judge called 30 years of “darkness” under the old regime. The mixed ruling set off street protests and by nightfall, a large crowd of up to 10 ,000 wa s back in Cairo’s Ta hrir Sq uare, the birthplace of the uprising, to vent an- ger over the acquittals. Similar protesters were held in other cities, including the Mediterranean port city of Alexandria and Suez on the Red Sea.

“Justice was not served,” said Rama- dan Ahmed, whose son was killed on Jan. 28, the bloodiest day of last year’s upris- ing. “This is a sham,” he said outside the courthouse. Protesters chanted: “A farce a farce, this trial is a farce” and “The people want execution of the murderer.” Mubarak, 84, and his ex-security chief Habib el-Adly were both convicted of complicity in the killings of some 900 pro- testers and received life sentences. Six top police commanders were acquitted of the same charge with chief Judge Ahmed Rifaat saying there was a lack of concrete evidence. That absolved the only other represen- tatives of Mubarak’s hated security forces aside from el-Adly. It was a stark remind- er that though the head has been re- moved, the body of the reviled security apparatus is largely untouched by genu- ine reform or purges since Mubarak was

untouched by genu- ine reform or purges since Mubarak was AP PHOTO Egypt’s ex-President Hosni Mubarak

AP PHOTO

Egypt’s ex-President Hosni Mubarak lies on a gurney inside a barred cage in the police academy courthouse in Cai- ro, Egypt, Saturday.

ousted 15 months ago. Many of the senior security officials in charge during the uprising and the Mub- arak regime continue to go to work every day at their old jobs.

British monarch spends day at races to kick off jubilee events

A day fit for a queen

By JILL LAWLESS Associated Press

LONDON — It was a royal day at the races, as Queen Elizabeth II watched a horse with the courtly name of Cam- elot win the Epsom Derby on Saturday — the kickoff to a four-day celebration of the British monarch’s 60 years on the throne. Later in the weekend the queen will make a trip down the River Thames, and then take in a concert — all accom- panied by tens of thousands of her subjects, coming out to fete a monarch whose long- evity has given her the status of the nation’s favorite grand- mother. An armada of vessels — from historic sailboats and barges to kayaks, lifeboats and military launches — was mus- tering along the Thames ahead of Sunday’s river pageant. The queen aboard the royal barge will lead the flotilla of 1,000 boats — described by orga- nizers as the biggest gathering on the river for 350 years. Diamond Jubilee festivities officially began Saturday with a 41-gun salute fired by the King’s Troop, Royal Horse Artillery at Horse Guards Parade in central London. The 86-year-old monarch and her husband, Prince Phi- lip, visited Epsom racecourse south of the capital for the Derby, one of the year’s biggest horse-racing meetings. The queen waved to the 130,000- strong crowd as she was driven down the racecourse in a Ben- tley bearing the Royal Stan- dard — the car’s sun roof kept shut under gray skies — before settling down to watch the races from the royal box.

before settling down to watch the races from the royal box. AP PHOTO Britain’s Queen Elizabeth

AP PHOTO

Britain’s Queen Elizabeth II, center, reacts as she looks out from the balcony at the end of the Epsom Derby horse race at Epsom racecourse in England.

Dressed in a royal blue coat and matching hat over a blue- and-white floral dress, the queen was accompanied by members of the royal family

including her sons Prince Andrew and Prince Edward

and Andrew’s daughters Prin- of the British Army’s Red

cess Beatrice and Princess Eugenie.

The royals were treated to an aerial display by members

Devils parachute team before the main event — the racing.

Pa.’s gas leadership is seen as secure

State known as cost-effective place to do business despite drop in natural gas prices.

By KEVIN BEGOS Associated Press

PITTSBURGH — Like a run- ner who’s gotten a big head start in a race, Pennsylvania may be set to dominate natural gas pro- duction in the Marcellus Shale region for many years, experts say. With billions of dollars already invested in leases, wells and re- lated infrastructure, the state is a cost-effective place to do busi- ness. And a plunge in wholesale prices has made being thrifty a must for some companies, deal- ing a potential blow to would-be upstart New York. Fadel Gheit, an oil and gas ana- lyst with Oppenheimer & Co. in New York City, says he expects Pennsylvania to be the center of activity for the next few years, if not longer. “The industry will always stay with what they’ve got,” said Gheit, adding that for many com- panies, there’s less risk sticking with a state — and with regula- tions — they know. New York, he added, is generally seen as a more liberal state than Pennsyl- vania, and thus more prone to im- posing stricter rules on drilling. An existing base of suppliers also helps, Gheit said, as well as a growing network of pipelines linking the Pennsylvania wells to regional and national hubs. Shell Oil Co. has also chosen western Pennsylvania as the site for a huge new petrochemical plant because that region has more of a type of gas that can be turned into industrial and con- sumer products, such as plastics. The industry has been so excit- ed about prospects in Pennsylva- nia that there’s a large backlog of partly finished wells that will keep companies busy for years. In Pennsylvania thousands of wells have been put into produc- tion over the past four years, but about 2,000 more have been drilled but not completed, leav- ing plugged holes in the ground. The backlog means it is far cheaper for a company to bring those wells into production than to start others from scratch in neighboring states. A new report from Bentek En- ergy, which examines national industry trends, estimates that even if companies stopped drill- ing new wells in northeast Penn- sylvania, production could grow by 31 percent over the next 16 months as the partly drilled wells get hooked up.

Tips on how to safely watch Venus without damaging your eyes

Tips on how to safely watch Venus without damaging your eyes AP FILE PHOTO Transit of

AP FILE PHOTO

Transit of Venus, when the planet Venus passes between the Earth and the Sun, is seen in June 2004.

The Associated Press

LOS ANGELES — Yes, it’s true. Yo u can damage your eyes by staring at the sun. People need to remember that as

they turn to the skies to watch the sil- houette of Venus march across the face of the sun on Tu esday from the We stern Hemisphere (Wednesday from the East- ern Hemisphere). Known as a transit of Venus, this won’t happen again until

2117.

There are a few ways to protect your- self:

• Wear special viewing glasses such

as solar eclipse glasses. You can buy noon from the Western Hemisphere sun sets.

them online or at your local museum. Alternatively, you can go to a hardware

store and get a pair of welder’s glasses, but make sure it’s number 14 or darker. Or make a pinhole projector with card- board. Do not watch the transit with regular sunglasses.

• Peer through telescopes outfitted

with special filters at viewing parties hosted by museums, observatories and astronomy clubs.

• Tune in online. NASA, Slooh.com

and the Exploratorium in San Francisco are among those that plan live webcasts. The drama unfolds Tuesday after-

(Wednesday morning from the Eastern Hemisphere.) Venus will appear as a small black dot gliding across the disk of the sun. As in a solar eclipse, do not stare directly at the sun; wear special protective glasses. The entire transit, lasting 6 hours and

40 minutes, will be visible from the western Pacific, eastern Asia and east- ern Australia. Skywatchers in the United States, Canada, Mexico, Central America, and the northern part of South America will see the beginning of the show before the

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OBITUARIES

SUNDAY, JUNE 3, 2012 PAGE 7A

JOHN T. “JACK” MCDO- NOUGH, of Wilkes-Barre, passed away on Wednesday, May 30, 2012 , at Geisinger Wyoming Valley Med- ical Center, Plains Township. He was born March 12, 1939, a son of the late John and Mary McDer- mott McDonough. A graduate of St. Mary ’s High School and a Navy veteran, he was formerly employ- ed at General Electric in Allen- town. Surviving is his sister, Mary Ann Frank, Ashburn, Va. Private funeral services will be held. Condolences can be sent to the family at www.eblake- collins.com.

can be sent to the family at www.eblake- collins.com. PAMELA M. O’DELL , 49, of Madison

PAMELA M. O’DELL, 49, of Madison Street, Wilkes-Barre, died Wednesday, May 23, 2012. Funeral arrangements are pending from the Yeosock Fu neral Home, 40 S. Main Street, Plains Township.

THERESE SAKOWSKI, 60, of Nanticoke, was taken to heaven on Friday, May 25, 2012. Born in Brooklyn, N.Y., on April 23, 1952, she was a daughter of the late John and Mary Sakowski. Therese and her husband, Michael, were resi- dents of Nanticoke for the past 17 years. She was his beloved wife for almost 40 years and the most amazing mother. Everyone that knew her will always remember her kind-hearted nature and un- ending care for others. Currently retired, she spent many years dedi- cated to caring for others as a nurs- ing assistant. Although no longer physically here, her spirit will live on forever! Surviving are her hus- band, Michael; daughter, Marie, N.Y. Memorial service will be held at a later date. Arrangements are by Ye osock Fu neral Home, Plains Township.

Margaret Sorber

May 29, 2012

M argaret “Peg” Sorber, 82, resi- dent of Swamp Road, Hunlock

Creek, passed away Tuesday, May 29, 2012 in Hospice Community Care, Wilkes-Barre. “Peg ” died Tuesday, having bravely dealt with brain cancer. The memory of her kindness, compas- sion and love of life cannot be dimmed by any disease. She was born in Wilkes-Barre to the late William and Ruth Sponauer. Her family lived in Hunlock Creek, where Peg graduated from Harter High School. Something that most of you do not know is that she was the Valedictorian. She has been a devout Catholic since birth, and lived her faith daily. She was a member of the St. Frances Church, Nanticoke, and St. Mi- chael’s Church, in S.C. She was predeceased by her hus- band, Andrew; parents; and sisters, Helen and Catherine. She is survived by her son, An- drew, Hunlock Creek; daughters, Becky Kowalek, Nanticoke, and Lin- da Sue, at home; grandchildren, the loves of her life, Andy Jr., Jeffrey, Kayla and Mike; siblings, Ruth Ma- cEwen, Woodbridge, Va.; Patricia Pegarella, Hunlock Creek; and Bill, Palmyra, Pa.; and a faithful cousin, Margaret Welch. Following her husband’s early death, Peg pursued her dream of be- coming a Special Education teach- er, enrolling at Bloomsburg Univer- sity. Graduating Cum Laude at age 56, Peg began her teaching career at the Garrison Elementary. She taught for 12 years before retiring. Peg missed her students, so she con- tinued to substitute until 2011,

working three or four days a week. terwards to celebrate her life. Kind-

ly RSVP to 417-4401, 735-2365 or

Her love of Myrtle Beach, music, shows, travel and eating out with family and friends remained strong through her life – and don’t forget the casino! She and her faithful com- panion Linda traveled abroad to 48 of the 50 states. Being a dedicated community

person, Peg has served on the Lake Road, Hunlock Creek.

Memorial contributions may be made to the Catherine McAuley House, 121 Church St., Plymouth, PA 18651. Arrangements are by the Clark Piatt Funeral Home Inc., 6 Sunset

are by the Clark Piatt Funeral Home Inc., 6 Su nset boards of the ARC and

boards of the ARC and URS, volun- teered at the White Haven Center, Special Olympics and the Catherine McAuley House. There are not enough words to describe this beautiful person. She made those she met feel special with her smile and sense of humor. She could always take your pain away, but carry her own pain in a special way, always listening and nurturing others, especially on the phone. She would not want any of her family or friends to feel sad or pain, but to share her happiness of eternal life, perhaps with a glass of wine. Life is so tender, so fragile, so precious! A Celebration of Life Mass will be held on Saturday, June 16, 2012 at 12 p.m. at the St. Faustina Parish (Holy Trinity), 520 S. Hanover St ., Nanticoke. Visitation with the fam- ily will be at 10:30 a.m. until the time of the Mass. The family would like to invite ev- eryone to Peg’s famous backyard af-

542-7439.

Gerald Snyder

June 2, 2012

G erald F. Snyder, 65, of River Street, Honey Pot section of

Nanticoke, passed away Saturday, June 2, 2012, at Bonham’s Nursing Home, Huntington Township. Born in Nanticoke on October 30, 1946, he was a son of the late Edward and Helen Shipkowski Snyder. Gerald was employed in the con- struction field and worked for vari- ous local construction companies. Preceding him in death were his wife, the former Charlotte Wolfin- ger, and a brother, Edward C. Snyd-

er. Surviving are his daughter, Christine Krieger, Nanticoke; sons, Edward Wolfinger and his wife, Linda, Nanticoke; Gerald, Hunlock Creek, and Stephen, Shickshinny; brothers, Michael and David; sisters, Linda Snyder, Barbara Tranell and husband, Don- nie; Diane Snyder, all of Nanticoke; 12 grandchildren; many nieces, ne- phews, aunts and uncles. Services will be held Monday at 7:30 p.m. from the Earl W. Loh- man Funeral Home Inc., 14 W. Green St., Nanticoke. Friends may call Monday from 6 p.m. until time of service.

OBITUARY POLICY

The Times Leader publish- es free obituaries, which have a 27-line limit, and paid obituaries, which can run with a photograph. A funeral home representative can call the obituary desk at (570) 829-7224, send a fax to (570) 829-5537 or e-mail to tlo- bits@timesleader.com. If you fax or e-mail, please call to confirm. Obituaries must be submitted by 9 p.m. Sunday through Thursday and 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday. Obituaries must be sent by a funeral home or crematory, or must name who is hand- ling arrangements, with address and phone number. We discourage handwritten notices; they incur a $15 typing fee.

SSTT MMAARRYYSS

MMOONNUUMMEENNTTCCOO

M onum ents -M arkers -Lettering

975 S. M A IN ST.H AN O V ER TW P.

829-8138

N EXT TO SO LO M O N ’S C REEK

Marcella Jacobs

May 31, 2012

M arcella Jacobs, of Wilmington, Del., passed away on Thurs-

day, May 31, 2012, at age 89. Marcella was a longtime resi- dent of Wilmington, Del. She re- tired as Coordinator of Hazardous Materials at the DuPont Company after more than 30 years of service there. Born the eldest of two children to Mary Healy and John Irving in Wilkes-Barre, Marcella began studying dance at age 7. After years of entertaining throughout Northeastern Pennsyl- vania and New Jersey as a tap danc- er, she eventually started her own dance school. Marcella was a grad- uate of Hanover High School in Lee Park, Pa., and attended Col- lege Misericordia in Dallas. In 1951, Marcella married Maur- ice “Jake” Jacobs, and they moved to Wilmington, where their two sons were born. She has been a member of St. Helena’s Catholic Church ever since. She was also a dedicated vol- unteer for the Tobin Foundation for the Visually Impaired. She was predeceased by her brother, James Irving, San Francis- co, Calif. Marcella is survived by her hus- band, Jake, Wilmington, Del.; her son Kevin, Wilmington, Del.; son Lawrence; and daughter-in-law, Katherine, New York City, N.Y.; grandsons, Nicholas and Samuel “Lock” Jacobs, Wilmington, Del.; sisters-in-law, Thelma and Esther Jacobs; and cousin, Sally Ann Hea- ly, Wilkes-Barre. There will be a memorial Mass held at 11 a.m., Tuesday, June 5, at St. Helena’s Church, 602 Philadel- phia Pike, Wilmington, DE 19801. Friends and family may call from 10 to 11 a.m. at the church. Burial will be private. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, 501 St. Jude Place, Memphis, TN 38105. www.mealeyfuneralhomes.com.

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Elizabeth Winnicki

June 1, 2012

E lizabeth Radovich “Betty” Win- nicki, 91, formerly of Miller

Street, Luzerne, has gone gallivant- ing. Betty will be on the lookout for the best of bargains for all her family and friends. Born March 11, 1921 in Luzerne, she was a daughter of the late Dush- an and Verinica Smida Radovich. Twin sister Genevie Kinger; sis- ters, Vera Kuzma and Ann Alaimo; brothers, Steve, Nickolaus, George and Joseph Radovich preceded her in death. Betty was Louis Paul Winnicki’s better half and co-proprietor of Louie’s Bar, Hunlock Creek, where no one went home thirsty, hungry or broke. The only rule was good laughs and good times were here again. Betty was also a nurse’s aide in the baby ward at the Nesbitt Memo- rial Hospital during the war. She al- ways worked at jobs where she served her fellow man, whether it was waitressing at the Boston Store, making pastries at the Percy Brown bakery or as a CNA for the Leader Nursing Home in Kingston before Agnes, and afterward for the Home Health Care Wilkes-Barre, before re- tiring in 1980. She was a loving and guiding mother of Frank, Rita, Zigmond and Joseph Winnicki; supportive moth- er-in-law to Wanda and Nancy Win- nicki; a beaming grandmother of Ray and Robert Hunter, Debra Shu- ga, Lisa Neuendorf, Matthew, Jen- nifer and Katrina Winnicki. Amazed that she would be blessed with 13 great-grandchil- dren, flabbergasted that she would ever live long enough to become a great-great-grandmother.

ever live long enough to become a great-great-grandmother. stant bingo player. My brother and I have

stant bingo player. My brother and I have lost our fa- vorite foods on our birthdays, un- limited hugs and kisses and new socks every Christmas. Her smile will always be in our heart. She watches over us with her love as she walks with the Lord. Betty made sure her children al- ways wore socks and shoes because they were not to be country bump- kins. She made sure that her sons got a college education so that they would not have to dig ditches or work in the coal mines for a living. She made sure her sons stood tall and straight and walked like men who would be kings. Betty Winnicki loved to laugh with abandon, dance as if no one was looking, cook as if she was feed- ing an army, and love, yes, always love unconditionally. The family will have a Memorial Service for their matriarch at a fu- ture date. Condolences may be sent to Rita Winnicki, P.O. BOX 145, Hunlock Creek, PA 18621, or Joseph Winnicki, 6 Hunter Lane, Barring-

The lady in the hat and wheel ton, NH 03825.

chair says thanks for the unlimited desserts and coffee at the Old Coun- try Buffet, and to Boscov’s for door buster sales every day. “Wheel of Fortune” has lost an ardent fan and the PA lottery has lost a devoted in-

by

McLaughlin’s - The Family Funeral Service. Permanent messages and memories can be shared with Be- tty’s family at www.celebrateherlife- .com.

Arrangements

made

Sanai Michelle

May 30, 2012

S anai Michelle, precious angel of Samiyah Carden, died early

We dnesday morning, May 30, 2012 , at home. Born in Geisinger Wyoming Val- ley Medical Center, Plains Town- ship, on February 25, 2012, Sanai brought a smile to everyone’s face who looked at her. She was what is beautiful in life. Sanai is survived, in addition to her mother, Samiyah, by her grand- mother, Kiesha; brothers, Samir, Sa- mad; aunts, Aaliyyan and Nia; un- cle, Allen; and cousins. God blessed us with this sweet lit- tle bundle of love for just a short time, but she will be missed forever. Funeral service for Sanai was held yesterday for the family, at the Lehman Family Funeral Service

for the family, at the Lehman Family Funeral Service Inc., 689 Hazle Ave., Wilkes-Barre. To send

Inc., 689 Hazle Ave., Wilkes-Barre. To send condolences to the fam- ily or to view Sanai’s video tribute, visit the funeral home website at www.lehmanfuneralhome.com.

FUNERALS

BARBER – Cora, funeral Monday at 11a.m. at the Bowman’s Creek Free Methodist Church, corner of routes 29 and 309. Friends may call 9 to 11 a.m. before the service. BURNS – Justin, Mass of Christian Burial Tuesday at 10 a.m. at Queen of the Apostles Church, 715 Hawthorne St., Avoca. Family and friends are asked to go directly to church for Mass. Friends may call Monday 4 until 8 p.m. at Queen of the Apostles Church, Hawthorne Street, Avoca. CARLIN – John, funeral 10 a.m. Tuesday from McLaughlin’s, 142 S. Washington St., Wilkes-Barre. Traditional Latin Requiem Mass (Tridentine Rite) at 11 a.m. in St. Michael the Archangel Church, 1703 Jackson St., W. Scranton. Friends may call Monday 5 to 8 p.m. COONS – Marjorie, memorial ser- vice 11 a.m. Monday in the Shel- don-Kukuchka Funeral Home Inc., 73 W. Tioga St., Tunkhannock. CROOP – Jessica, funeral 7 p.m. today from Williams-Hagen Funeral Home Inc., 114 W. Main St., Plymouth. Friends may call today 4 p.m. until the time of service. DONNORA – Julia, funeral Monday at 9 a.m. from the Gubbiotti Funeral Home, 1030 Wyoming Ave., Exeter. Mass of Christian burial at 9:30 a.m. at St. John the Evangelist Church, William St., Pittston. Visitation today 6 until 8 p.m. at the funeral home. ELLARD – Edward Jr., blessing service today at 8 p.m. in the Victor M. Ferri Funeral Home, 522 Fallon St., Old Forge. Friends may call today 6 to 8 p.m. GROSEK – Anthony Jr., Mass of Christian Burial 10 a.m. Monday in St. Therese’s Church, Pioneer Ave. and Davis St., Shavertown. Friends may call today 2 to 5 p.m. in the Harold C. Snowdon Funeral Home Inc., 140 N. Main St., Sha- vertown. GUDMAN – Genevieve, celebration of life Mass 11 a.m. Saturday in St. Frances X. Cabrini Church, 585

Mt. Olivet Road,(Kingston Town- ship) Carverton. LEMMOND – Charles, funeral 11 a.m. Wednesday at the Dallas United Methodist Church, 4 Parsonage

St., Dallas. Friends may call Tues- day 4 to 7 p.m. at the Harold C. Snowdon Funeral Home Inc., 140

N. Main St., Shavertown.

LEVA NDOWS KI – Ad am, funeral 9:30 a.m. Monday from Kiesinger Funeral Services Inc., 255 McAl- pine St., Duryea. Mass of Chris- tian Burial at 10 a.m. at Queen of the Apostles Church, Hawthorne Street, Avoca. Friends may call today 5 to 7 p.m. MLECZYNSKI – Christina, viewing 2 to 5 p.m. today at the Earl W. Lohman Funeral Home Inc., 14 W. Green St., Nanticoke. MOSS – Sharon, Mass of Divine Liturgy at 9 a.m. Monday at the Holy Transfiguration Ukrainian Church, Center St., Nanticoke.

Friends may call today 4 to 7 p.m. at the George A. Strish Inc. Fu- neral Home, 105 N. Main St.,

Ashley.

PRINCIC – Suzanne, blessing ser-

vice 7 p.m. Tuesday in the Victor

M. Ferri Funeral Home, 522 Fallon

St., Old Forge. Visitation Tuesday from 3 to 7 p.m. in the funeral

home.

SHULTZ – Robert, military funeral service 11 a.m. Tuesday from the Harold C. Snowdon Funeral Home Inc., 140 N. Main St., Shavertown. Friends may call Monday 4 until 7 p.m. at the funeral home.

VA NFLEET – Ca rl, memorial se rvice June 20 at 6:30 p.m. in the Eatonville United Methodist

Church.

WICKKISER – James, funeral 10 a.m. Monday from the Charles V. Sherbin Funeral Home, Main Road, Hanover Green, Hanover Township. Friends may call 5 to 8 p.m. today at the funeral home. ZATCOFF – Florence, graveside

service 10 a.m. today in the B’nai Jacob Cemetery, 91 Darling St.,

Wilkes-Barre.

The family of the late MICHAEL (MICKEY) YAKALAVICH would like to thank friends, family and
The family of the late
MICHAEL
(MICKEY)
YAKALAVICH
would like to thank friends, family
and neighbors who sent monetary
gifts, flowers, food and Mass cards
during our recent time of sorrow.

George Swan

June 1, 2012

G eorge Andrew Swan (Swannie), 62, of Hanover Township,

passed away Friday, June 1, 2012, at the Wilkes-Barre General Hospital. Recently diagnosed, he was fighting

a brave battle with cancer. He was born in Wilkes-Barre on

January 24, 1950, a son of the late Henry and Dorothy Kuhl Swan, and

a grandson of the late Anna and An-

drew Kuhl. Swannie’s greatest joys and proudest accomplishments in life were his family and his service to his country. Swannie loved the life he created with his family. He is survived by his high school sweetheart and wife of 42 years, Je- nys Casterline Swan; daughters, Amy (Russell) Wren, Shavertown; Allison (Mike) Dagen, Pittsburgh, and Hillary (Mike) Gasper, Hanover Township. Throughout his life, Swannie’s wife and daughters always knew he could be counted on to do anything for his family. Swannie was a devoted and lov- ing “Pop” to his six grandchildren, Michael and Mackenzie Gasper, Ri- ley Wren, and Bode, Cali and Kai Dagen. Much to his delight, most of his days were spent creating memo- ries with his grandchildren. This not only brought great joy to his life, but theirs as well. He was his fam- ily ’s hero. Swannie attended GAR High School, leaving at age 17 to volun- tarily enlist for military service. He proudly served his country from 1967 to 1969 in the Marine Corps, 1st Division Infantry. He was a ma- chine gunner stationed in Da Nang, Vietnam. While he was in Vietnam, he was awarded both a Presidential Citation and a Purple Heart. He was his country ’s hero. Swannie received an associate de- gree from Luzerne County Commu- nity College and attended King ’s College. He was employed by the City of Wilkes-Barre for 23 years and the U.S. Postal Service before his re-

for 23 years and the U.S. Postal Service before his re- tirement. He is also survived

tirement. He is also survived by his sisters, Nancy (Alan) Davis, Mary (Tom) Kerpovich and Judy Marasky; sis- ters-in-law, Nancy Gittens, Sharon (Fra nk) Ya nulevius, Holly (Luke) Colleran, Cindy (Angelo) DeSanto; aunts, Eleanor Loftus and Ruthie Gavin; and several cousins, nieces and nephews. His family would like to extend their sincere appreciation to every- one who aided in his care, and espe- cially to Dr. Patrick Kilduff, whom Swannie considered not only as a physician, but also as a caring friend. A private family memorial and deserving military service will be held at the Lehman Family Funeral Service Inc., Wilkes-Barre, on Tuesday, June 5. Memorial contributions may be made to Vietnam Veterans Memo- rial Fund, http://www.vvmf.org. One of his favorite Elvis songs was “Walk a Mile in My Shoes.” It began, “You never stood in that man’s shoes, or saw things through his eyes, or stood and watched with helpless hands while the heart in- side you dies. So help your brother along the way no matter where he starts, for the same God that made you, made him too, these men with broken hearts.” Semper Fi, George “Swannie” Swan. You will be sadly missed and live forever in our hearts and memo- ries.

sadly missed and live forever in our hearts and memo- ries. Stephen Goch June 1, 2012

Stephen Goch

June 1, 2012

S tephen E. Goch, 40, of Charles St., Ashley, passed away Friday

evening, June 1, 2012, at Celtic Health Care, Geisinger South Wilkes-Barre. He was a son of the former Elea- nor (Lyons), of Ashley, and the late James J. Goch Sr. Stephen was a graduate of Hanov- er Area High School, class of 1989. He had been employed as a machi- nist for Penn Cigar Machines in Nanticoke for approximately 20 years. Stephen had a passion for the out- doors. He was an avid hunter and fisherman and enjoyed working on cars. He loved his family and friends and his dog, Shadow. Surviving along with his mother, Eleanor Goch, is a brother, James J. Goch Jr., Ashley; aunt, Gloria Kieff- er and her husband, Donald, Clarks Summit; uncles, Marlin Lyons and his wife, Sue, Orangeville, Pa., John C. Goch and Joseph L. Goch, both of Ashley; numerous loving relatives and friends, and his dog, Shadow.

Funeral services for Stephen

will be held on Wednesday at 9 a.m. from the George A. Strish Inc. Fu-

on Wednesday at 9 a.m. from the George A. Strish Inc. Fu- neral Home, 105 N.

neral Home, 105 N. Main St., Ash- ley, with a Mass of Christian Burial at 9:30 a.m. in St. Leo’s/ Holy Ros- ary Church, Manhattan Street, Ash- ley. Interment will be held in St. Ma- ry ’s Cemetery, Hanover Township. Family and friends may call on Tues- day from 5 to 8 p.m. In lieu of flowers, donations in his memory may be made to Celtic Health Care, 601 Wyoming Ave., Kingston, PA 18704.

More Obituaries, Page 2A

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PAGE 8A SUNDAY, JUNE 3, 2012

NEWS

THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

so that we can begin the process of bringing our communities to- gether – the Hispanic community and the existing Caucasian com- munity,” said HIP board presi- dent Bob Curry. The video is a step in that di- rection, Curry said. The HIP and community cen- ter project came about through the efforts of Hazleton native Joe Maddon, manager of the Ta mpa Bay Rays Major League Baseball team and American League Man- ager of the Year in 2007 and 2011. The HIP launched an aware- ness campaign in December with

communication,” Curry said. And with that, Curry showed a five-minute video Maddon re- corded at Tropicana Field espe- cially for the group, with the Rays practicing in the background. “When I was back home, I was really a little bit upset by what I was seeing regarding the city in general … seeing fear and trepida- tion between the Hispanic com- munity and our own,” Maddon said. “I thought it was really im- portant to try to do something at that point, to do something to bring everybody together.” “I believe that if you don’t em- brace our Hispanic brothers and sisters … our city is really going to go away. These people want to be here, they want to be part of our community” and work for a better life, Maddon said, not un- like his own grandparents many years ago. “I believe that embracing our Latin brothers and sisters in Ha- zleton and working together as one city, we really, truly have a

which the Hispanics who moved only united will we be able to ities at the parks and playgrounds didn’t get that sense of communi- chance to get back on our feet

and make it into something spec- tacular again,” he said.

translator with the group, that ribio said.

and the video soon will be posted on the site.

and other big names such as base- ball legends Yogi Berra and Don

big names such as base- ball legends Yogi Berra and Don AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER Left

AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER

Left to right in the back row, Latino’s Media group members Edilio Ulerio, Maximo A. Toribio, Jorge Garcia and Jose Galan created the video ‘Hazleton: Land of Dreams of the Immigrant’ for the Hazle- ton Integration Project. In the front row, Donna Palmero, president of the Greater Hazleton Chamber of Commerce; Amilcar Arroyo, HIP vice president; Bob Curry, HIP president; and Melissa Galan, translator for the media group, participated in a recent screening of the video.

work together, pretty much like it was a century ago when it was the Polish, the Italians were in Hazle- ton and the way it’s changed now and how the Hispanics now have had just as much of an impact as (immigrants) did back then,” To-

do it,” he said. George Garcia, producer, said the Hazleton-based Latino Media

ished. He recalled he hired Maddon to coach one of those programs

group was formed in June 2011 when he worked for the city of

and started working on the video soon after. It was completed early this year. A website – www.hazle-

Hazleton, and the two became friends. He called Maddon “a cheer-

film.com – is under construction leader for the city” when he

In introducing the video to the chamber group, editor/producer Jose Galan said Hazleton can continue economic and cultural

Sense of tension detected After a showing of the video, Curry recalled life in Hazleton decades ago, when college stu- dents oversaw children’s activ-

every weekday in the summers and youth sports programs flour-

spoke of growing up in the Hazle- ton area “and how wonderful it was and how for him this place just signified something really special.” “And for the first time, about 18 months ago, when Joe was here, he didn’t get that same sense. He

ty. He was feeling some tension and he was feeling some lack of

BY THE NUMBERS

According to the U.S. Census Bureau:

In 1990, 249 Hispanics com-

prised 1 percent of Hazleton’s total population of 24,730.

In 2000, 1,132 Hispanics made up

about 5 percent of Hazleton’s total population of 23,329.

In 2010, 9,454 Hispanics com-

prised 37 percent of Hazleton’s total population of 25,340. Hispanic community leaders have said that historically, Hispanics have been undercounted.

DREAMS

Continued from Page 1A

ropean immigrants had in the city ’s growth in the days of coal mining, the city ’s economic wane after coal’s decline and the uptick in population and new business- es in the past decade that accom- panied a major influx of Latinos into the city. “It talks about the immigrants that first came here in the past and how they had to adjust to the

lifestyle in the area, and now a fundraiser attended by Maddon

we’re seeing that with our new immigrants. I think it portrays

the community very well. It Zimmer and professional wres-

shows what a great quality of life we have here and, more specifi- cally, that this is what our Latino friends want for their families,” Palermo said. More important, Palermo said,

the video addresses communica- and we also have an absolutely

tion and other obstacles that still exist. “We’re making progress, but we still have barriers up. People … are afraid to associate because they’re of a different nationality or ethnicity, so this is a good op- portunity for people in an infor- mal setting to talk to each other and get to know each other for the betterment of the communi- ty,” Palermo said.

beautiful, powerful film, which was written directed, produced and edited by the Latino Media Group.”

tling stars Sgt. Slaughter and “Nasty.I.Am” Brian Knobbs. “Now, we are taking those next steps,” Curry said. “We joined the chamber, we wanted to increase awareness by having this mixer,

Seeking acceptance, unity Maximo Toribio, photogra- pher with Latino Media Group, said through Melissa Galan, a

the members of the company “wanted to be a part of something that would support the commu- nity, integrate us, bring us closer

Push on for center

The mixer was sponsored by together. All they needed was growth if all of its citizens are

the Hazleton Integration Project – an organization with the major goal of opening the Hazleton One Community Center. The center would be “a place primarily, but not solely, for kids

one simple idea. From there, the video was launched.” “The video shows the way in

to Hazleton have become part of the community – the way we

willing to work together. “Only united will we grow, on- ly united will we progress, and

make of our community a better place to live and to wo rk . We can

Deal to privatize liquor sales elusive

service, prices, convenience that they demand and that they see in other states.” Under the latest proposal, ac- cording to people familiar with it, the state would issue 1,600 licens- es for the retail sale of liquor and wine. Beer distributors would be given the right of first refusal and licenses that are not sold to them would be auctioned off to other

By PETER JACKSON Associated Press

HARRISBURG — Amid the crush of wrangling and debate that annually precede passage of

Pennsylvania’s state budget, ad- private companies.

vocates of getting the state out of the business of selling liquor and wine are hoping to advance their

cause before lawmakers break for ly licensed to sell takeout beer

could not be licensed to sell li- quor and wine for 10 years. Turzai, whose efforts are backed by Gov. Tom Corbett, said many Pennsylvanians want priv-

Among other things, it would atization.

give the state’s 1,200 beer distrib- utors the first shot at buying li- censes to sell beverages currently

available only at state-owned lawa re , Ohio and We st Vi rg inia

can seem to do it in a responsible

stores.

On Friday, Turzai announced manner and Pennsylvania is so

plans for a House GOP caucus antiquated,” he said.

meeting on privatization next week in preparation for a still-to-

be-scheduled vote on his plan. volved in the sale of alcoholic Lawmakers are slated to recon- beverages and relentless opposi- vene Monday for a busy June tion from the union that repre-

sents about 2,500 state-store em- ployees. Jay Wiederhold, president of the Pennsylvania Beer Alliance,

stantially since he unveiled his which represents beer wholesal-

ers that supply retail distributors and restaurants, said many retail

by an outside consultant and a distributors would be squeezed

by the price of the licenses. Prices would be set by county, ranging from $60,000 in rural Juniata County to more than $800,000 in the Philadelphia suburb of Mont- gomery County, he said. “Here’s the best advice I have:

lican said this week. “The final ‘Slow down,”’ Wiederhold said.

product has to be geared toward

the citizens of Pennsylvania

provide consumers with the best

“This is a huge change. We’ve been doing this since coming out of Prohibition in 1933.”

original bill nearly a year ago — through public hearings, a study

But the plan has drawn a tepid response from trade groups in-

“They travel to other states. They don’t understand why New York, New Jersey, Maryland, De-

Also, the 600-plus state stores would be closed over five years, and supermarket chains current-

House majority leader is trying to line up votes for his latest plan.

the summer. House Majority Leader Mike Turzai, the Legislature’s leading privatization champion, is trying to line up votes for his latest plan.

schedule whose main task is to pass a budget for the fiscal year that starts July 1. Turzai’s plan has evolved sub-

watershed committee vote — and he warned that the latest pro- posal is likely to undergo more re- visions before it hits the House floor. “It’s merely a draft, that’s all it is,” the Allegheny County Repub-

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steps to protect their anonymity, but the judge has yet to rule. The AP doesn’t identify people who say they have been sexually as-

had not — and still have not — been determined by investiga- tors, boys witnesses said were subjected to sexual acts by Sand-

usky inside football team show- the case. But their prior state- saulted without their consent.

Their testimony will be all the more critical to prosecutors, be- cause unlike sexual abuse cases, the Sandusky investigation likely did not produce forensic evi- dence. But the scope and nature

some of the 52 counts against ferred to Victims 11 through 17, of the prosecution’s evidence,

and its witness list, haven’t been disclosed. One closely watched witness

not been charged. Whether those will be Mike McQueary, an as-

sistant coach who was a graduate assistant in 2001 when he said he saw Sandusky naked in the team showers with a boy of about 10 described in the grand jury re- port as Victim 2.

suggesting investigators might have identified seven additional accusers for whom Sandusky has

ments and court filings suggest the trial will hinge on testimony by the accusers, and Sandusky’s lawyers are determined to attack their credibility. Recently, a defense filing re-

more interviews, and Cleland lat- er issued a gag order that has ef- fectively stopped his lawyers and prosecutors from talking about

ers. The second arrest came about a month later, when state prose- cutors added charges related to two more boys. Sandusky’s law- yers are still seeking to have all or

delay requests, it now appears the case will get under way Tuesday with the selection of jurors from among his neigh- bors in the central Pennsylva- nia county that is home to Penn State, an area that before November could be called Happy Valley without a hint of irony or bitterness. The scandal toppled football coach Joe Paterno, forced ma- jor changes at the highest lev- els of Pennsylvania’s largest and most prominent universi- ty, and raised still-unanswered questions about the response by various people to the warn- ing signs that had periodically

arisen over more than a dec- Pennsylvania, to preside.

ade. After months of planning, court officials say they are pre- pared for what could be several weeks of trial, building on ex- periences in other states with high-profile proceedings. About 250 reporters have reg- istered to attend, and 29 televi- sion trucks are expected in tiny Bellefonte. “I think we’re ready to go. A few loose ends between now

and Monday night, maybe what types of electronic trans-

missions will be permitted from the courtroom during trial. Sandusky’s wife, Dottie, has stood by him, posting his bail and issuing a statement in early De-

The Nittany Lions’ former cember that said the accusers

had concocted lies that left her “shocked and dismayed.” Sand- usky appeared on NBC to deny he was a pedophile and ramble on when asked if he was sexually

Jerry Sandusky is the truth: attracted to boys.

defensive coordinator has con- sistently maintained his inno- cence, so jurors will have to sort out which of the two dra- matically opposed versions of

even Tuesday morning, but we’re pretty confident we’re ready,” said Jim Koval, spokes- man for the Administrative Of- fice of Pennsylvania Courts.

him dismissed on various grounds, more than enough counts to send the 68-year-old de- fendant to prison for the rest of his life. The case has followed a twist- ed path to trial, starting with the decision by all the judges in Cen- tre County to recuse themselves, so the state Supreme Court brought Judge John Cleland, a veteran jurist from northwestern

people exist, and if they will testi- fy — or if Sandusky will take the stand — are among the ques- tions the trial should answer. Lawyers for five of the young men have asked Cleland to take

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CEO of Raymond James Finan-
cial Services said, “We are very
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serve Northeastern Pennsylva-
nia. Capin brings over 26 years
Capin and his staff offer a
comprehensive range of finan-
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About Raymond James Financial, Inc.
Raymond James Financial (NYSE-RJF) is a Florida-based diversified holding company providing financial
services to individuals, corporations and municipalities through its subsidiary companies. Its three principal
wholly owned broker/dealers Raymond James & Associates, Raymond James Financial Services and
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More recently, his lawyers sought several times to delay the trial, but a state appeals court turned them down after Cleland ruled against them and kept the case on track to begin this week. Defense attorneys have appealed to the Pennsylvania Supreme Court, which could rule some- time Monday. On Friday, a group of news or- ganizations that includes The As- sociated Press sought clarity on

the avuncular ex-coach devot- ing his life to help needy chil- dren, or the predator who used his access to boys to commit vile and criminal sexual at- tacks? He was arrested twice, the first time in early November, when prosecutors charged him

with abusing eight boys, in- said.

cluding two whose identities

He later revisited the topic, telling The New York Times the question took him aback. “I was sitting there saying, ‘What in the world is this ques-

tion?’ You know, if I say, no, I’m not attracted to boys, that’s not the truth, because I’m attracted

” he

to young people, boys, girls

Sandusky hasn’t given any

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PAGE 10A SUNDAY, JUNE 3, 2012

NEWS

THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

Jobs report weakens Obama’s re-election campaign

President forced onto the defensive by three months of lackluster to dismal growth.

By JIM KUHNHENN Associated Press

CHICAGO — The suddenly

dismal news on American jobs is

a blow to President Barack Oba-

ma’s re-election argument that he has been a steward of recovery. It’s heightened White House anx- iety over global threats to U.S. ec- onomic growth — and the presi- dent’s political prospects, too. The economy, Obama conced- ed Friday, “is not growing as fast as we want it to.” Ta king a harsher tone, presum- ed Republican rival Mitt Romney declared that the country ap- peared to be “moving backward.” He sought to drive home a politi- cal point from the nation’s first in- crease in joblessness in almost a year. After a winter when the job trends were in his favor, Obama has been forced onto the defen- sive by three months of lacklus- ter to dismal growth. Confronted by Friday’s report of a feeble 69,000 new jobs and an uptick in unemployment to 8.2 percent in May, Obama vigorously renewed his demand that Congress step up and enact some of his jobs pro- posals. Calling the Eurozone’s debt cri- sis a “shadow” hanging over the U.S. economy, Obama made his most urgent plea yet for mea-

sures that he said would “serve as

a buffer in case the situation in

Europe gets any worse.” Later Friday, speaking to do- nors at a fundraiser, Obama said:

“Europe is having a significant crisis in part because they haven’t taken as many of the decisive steps as were needed to deal with the challenge, and that’s weak- ened Asia and that means it’s har- der for our exports. All this stuff

makes a difference in the global economy.” The jobs numbers, issued early every month, have become the year’s dominant economic ba- rometer, a baseline from which to gauge Obama’s and Romney ’s po-

litical fortunes in an election that rides on the pace of a post-reces- sion recovery.

Romney, responding to the

since he effectively

clinched the GOP presidential

nomination, called the figures “devastating news.”

with

CNBC, Romney said that Oba- ma’s policies and his handling of the economy had “been dealt a harsh indictment.” Obama was in Minnesota to push his proposal to expand job opportunities for veterans and to raise money for his campaign. He also raised money Friday evening in Chicago, where he was to spend a rare night in his family home. He said private business has created more than 4 million jobs over the past 27 months, but, he added, “as we learned in today’s jobs report, we’re still not creat- ing them as fast as we want.” Still, he said, “we will come back stronger; we do have better days ahead.” The economy, struggling to re-

first report

In an interview Friday

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cover from the worst recession

since the Great Depression, has created per month in the Janu-

had to fend off a number of exter- nal pressures, from high oil pric- es to natural disasters and, now, economic troubles in Europe and

a weakening economy in China. into the job force, but that was a

for the past three years, only to bounce back. Last year, from May to August, job growth averaged 80,000 a month and from June through September of 2010, the average was 76,000. Hiring, housing, consumer spending and manufacturing all appear to be improving, yet they remain less than healthy. Econo- mists surveyed by The Associat- ed Press expect growth to pick up this year, though not enough to lower unemployment much. Eager to draw attention to his challenger, Obama has mounted

candidate’s argument — Obama ing more damage to Obama’s a step-by-step assault on Rom-

ney ’s economic record, from his

have lost when the rate was on

as that, and past incumbents General Motors.

Friday’s report seriously damp- ens Obama’s message, though the May numbers may end up do-

matic drop from the 226,000 jobs

policies. Obama is counting on an un- employment trajectory that has fallen from a high of 10 percent in October 2009. The president likes to point to the 3.8 million jobs created since he became president, though 12.5 million people remain unemployed. He highlights the resurgence of the auto industry following govern- ment bailouts of Chrysler and

thin silver-lining to an otherwise

ary-March quarter. May’s 8.2 percent jobless rate, the first increase in 11 months, re- flected more people coming back

No president since the Great Depression has sought re-elec- tion with unemployment as high

The economy is central to each

wants it to be a choice between his and Romney ’s economic vi- sions; Romney wants it to be ref- erendum on Obama’s economic

The unemployment numbers,

while imprecise and typically a discouraging report.

lagging indicator of economic performance, are nevertheless an undeniable marker of the human cost of a weak economy. May’s 69,000 new jobs and

downward adjustments for the rise.

March and April mean the econo-

my has averaged just 73,000 jobs a month over the past two

months. That’s half of what’s

needed simply to keep up with population growth and is a dra-

short-term political standing

than to the economy long-term. days as a venture capitalist to his

The United States has experi- enced periods of jobs slowdown

tenure as Massachusetts gover- nor from 2003-2007.

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C M Y K SUNDAY, JUNE 3, 2012 PAGE 11A ●
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SUNDAY, JUNE 3, 2012 PAGE 11A ●
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PAGE 12A SUNDAY, JUNE 3, 2012

NEWS

THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

TALK

Continued from Page 3A

surface most often. “I’m a recovering politician,” Madeira said, though he’s quick to point out that while he ran in those circles he never made it to the inner ring. “I’m just a regular guy who has an insider’s knowledge of the game,” said Madeira who ran unsuccessfully as a Repub- lican for a state Senate seat in 2006 and Congress in 2010. He lost in the party ’s primar- ies to Lis a Ba ke r and To m Mari- no, who would both go on to win the respective seats in the general election. “I’m not guarding what I say on the air like a politician does. Most politicians have that filter between their brain and their mouth,” he said. Because he has no plans to seek office again, he is free to say what he thinks without worrying about future repercussions. His “recovering politician” line finds its way into the fabric of most of his shows, which he refers to as “therapy” on the air.

waves in 2010 as a weekend

to as “therapy” on the air. waves in 2010 as a weekend NIKO J. KALLIANIOTIS/FOR THE

NIKO J. KALLIANIOTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

Dave Madeira of 94.3 The Talker goes over notes during a commercial break. He has begun a local radio talk show weekdays from 6 to 9 a.m. At right, Tom Jenkins works the control board.

the station. Brian Spinelli, the station’s

seemed like a good fit with the

Madeira brings much to the table as a host, including his in-

business worlds. But something Spinelli said is apparent is Madeira’s “ability to articulate political issues,” and his ability to stand behind those feelings.

against Imus, but they wanted a local talk show to lead off the lineup. “Imus was a good show, but he’s not talking to Scranton or Wilkes-Barre. He’s not from our backyard,” Spinelli said. While the feedback the sta- tion’s received has included both positive comments about Madeira and negatives about taking Imus off, Spinelli and Madeira both said they’re pleased with the decision and look forward to building the show into “must-hear radio.” “I want to be the somewhere people go in Northeast Pennsyl- vania for the real truth,” Madei- ra said. He said as a listener of talk radio he sometimes tires of hearing the same experts and insiders pop in to say the same things. So he lines up guests who can give valuable insight but might not be household names. One such guest, David Rubin, was a client with Infinity Con- cepts and lives in Israel. So when a story related to Israel makes headlines, Madeira has Rubin come on to discuss the is- sues “as our on-the-ground cor-

“He definitely takes a stand respondent.”

and defends his position. I re-

er said. Imus had been the day’s first show since 94.3 switched for- mats from soft rock to all talk in 2009. Spinelli said the decision to drop his show wasn’t a slight

His goal is to have “major

First lured to the 94.3 air- general manager, said Madeira volvement in the political and spect that,” the general manag- league radio at the local level.”

But he doesn’t want to do a run-of-the-mill talk show. “People don’t want to tune in and just have me lecture,” Ma- deira said. “They want to be en- tertained.”

morning host of a live call-in station’s weekday lineup that

show, he found the show both rewarding and fun and started talking to station management

consists of fellow conservative talkers Sean Hannity, Glenn Beck, Laura Ingraham and

about expanding his role with Mark Levine.

Wallaby caught in Crawford County

The Associated Press

CAMBRIDGE SPRINGS — If you’re missing a wallaby, the Pennsylvania Game Commission wants to talk to you. Commission officials say a wal- laby — an animal resembling a small kangaroo — was captured Wednesday in Craw fo rd County in northeastern Pennsylvania. The 25-pound male was tran- quilized near Cambridge Springs and taken to the Pymatuning Deer Park in Jamestown, where it will remain until the owner is found. Officials said a former commis- sion biologist aide reported that her landlord had seen the animal. Eugene Morton, senior scien- tist emeritus at the Smithsonian Institution, told the Erie Times- News that he “broke up in laugh- ter” when heard the student’s sto- ry. He and others who use the Hemlock Hill Biological Re- search Area in Rockdale Town- ship are more accustomed to see- ing birds than marsupials native to Australia and surrounding is- lands. In Pennsylvania, wallaby own- ers are required to have a license to keep exotic animals, but offi- cials said no one has reported such an animal missing.

TRAIL

Continued from Page 3A

was built along side of it,” said Dale Freudenberger, anthracite regional coordinator for the Her- itage Corridor. Much of the trail from Bristol, Bucks County to White Haven has been cut back, cleaned up and repurposed as a hiking and biking trail. Its closest complete segment, the Lehigh Gorge State Park Trail, terminates at the op- posite end of Main Street from the trailhead where the new cor-

MURAL

Continued from Page 3A

Barnes & Noble. "The river doesn’t start in New York state," said Lokuta, "the river starts in our own backyards." Maday said the committee is looking forward Riverfest 2012 as an opportunity for environmental awareness, food, friends and fun. He especially looks forward to the "river paddles" which will provide opportunity for residents to spend time on the water. This year’s Riverfest will take place on June 22, 23, and 24. Infor- mation on Riverfest can be ac- cessed atwww.rivercommons.org or by telephoning Penn State Ex- tension at 825-1701.

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and into Wilkes-Barre. “The plan is, eventually, our trail will link with all the other trail systems in the region; the Susquehanna Warrior Trail, the

ridor picks up. This summer workers from the Heritage Corridor will level its now passable but rough and overgrown surface and lay down

a compressed stone compound Back Mountain Trail and the

Black Diamond Trail. Susan Eckert, president of the White Haven Chamber of Com- merce, said during the tour Sat- urday that the trail could im- prove White Haven’s status as a

eral grants, Freudenberger said. hub for outdoor recreation.

Eventually, Freudenberger said the group would like to ex- tend the trail through Mountain Top, down past the Seven Tubs

Natural Area, through Ashley omy,” Eckert said.

“I think it’s going to bring a lot more people through our won- derful town, and I really hope it’s going to improve our local econ-

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INTERNATIONAL FESTIVAL AT ST. JUDE’S

INTERNATIONAL FESTIVAL AT ST. JUDE’S AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER Juliet, 6, Sophia, 3, Melissa and Tommy,

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Juliet, 6, Sophia, 3, Melissa and Tommy, 5, Biscotti

LEADER Juliet, 6, Sophia, 3, Melissa and Tommy, 5, Biscotti AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER Mike Caponigro

AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER

Mike Caponigro and Dan Fraschella

DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER Mike Caponigro and Dan Fraschella AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER Linda Brown and Marilyn

AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER

Linda Brown and Marilyn McCormick

DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER Linda Brown and Marilyn McCormick Avery, 5, and Bobbi Cloutier AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES

Avery, 5, and Bobbi Cloutier

AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER

Avery, 5, and Bobbi Cloutier AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER Ashlen Kuhar and

AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER

Ashlen Kuhar and Stephen Phillips

TYLER WINSTEAD FAMILY BENEFIT

Kuhar and Stephen Phillips TYLER WINSTEAD FAMILY BENEFIT AMANDA HRYCYNA/FOR THE TIMES LEADER Mollie Evans,

AMANDA HRYCYNA/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

Mollie Evans, Hughestown, Susan Mason, Wilkes-Barre, and Denise Thomas, Wilkes-Barre

Susan Mason, Wilkes-Barre, and Denise Thomas, Wilkes-Barre AMANDA HRYCYNA/FOR THE TIMES LEADER Danielle Kishbaugh of

AMANDA HRYCYNA/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

Danielle Kishbaugh of Kingston and Gail Kishbaugh of Wilkes-Barre

Kishbaugh of Kingston and Gail Kishbaugh of Wilkes-Barre AMANDA HRYCYNA/FOR THE TIMES LEADER Kim Royce, Wilkes-Barre,

AMANDA HRYCYNA/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

Kim Royce, Wilkes-Barre, and Heather Lavelle, Wilkes-Barre

Kim Royce, Wilkes-Barre, and Heather Lavelle, Wilkes-Barre AMANDA HRYCYNA/FOR THE TIMES LEADER Kierra Brogdon, Judah

AMANDA HRYCYNA/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

Kierra Brogdon, Judah Springer and Safeer Brogdon

LEADER Kierra Brogdon, Judah Springer and Safeer Brogdon AMANDA HRYCYNA/FOR THE TIMES LEADER Jenny Chi of

AMANDA HRYCYNA/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

Jenny Chi of Wilkes-Barre and Edovkovaka Ezoun of Wilkes-Barre

KIDS MURAL FOR RIVERFEST

Edovkovaka Ezoun of Wilkes-Barre KIDS MURAL FOR RIVERFEST FED ADAMS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER Ethan Kozden and

FED ADAMS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

Ethan Kozden and Michael Tkach

ADAMS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER Ethan Kozden and Michael Tkach FRED ADAMS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER Alana Hughes

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Alana Hughes and Crystal Gigliotta-Hughes

THE TIMES LEADER Alana Hughes and Crystal Gigliotta-Hughes FRED ADAMS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER Judy Tkach and

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Judy Tkach and Sydney Kozden

FRED ADAMS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER Judy Tkach and Sydney Kozden Jan Lokuta and John Maday FRED

Jan Lokuta and John Maday

FRED ADAMS/ FOR THE TIMES LEADER

Jan Lokuta and John Maday FRED ADAMS/ FO R THE TIMES LEADER FRED ADAMS/FOR THE TIMES

FRED ADAMS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

Pete Schmidt, Kallysta Jayne and Brooke Hartman

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PAGE 14A SUNDAY, JUNE 3, 2012

NEWS

THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

GUNS

Continued from Page 1A

guns hidden inside clothing, in bags and vehicle glove compart- ments and trunks when they leave home, though concealed guns are prohibited in schools, many government properties and some other places.

Safety-driven concerns For many, such as Nanticoke resident Dave Evans, the moti- vation to arm himself was per- sonal safety. He said his job at the time required him to deliver pizza in areas that seemed un- safe. “It’s peace of mind. The gun is

a tool – one more thing I can use

if everything else fails,” Evans

said. About a dozen county resi- dents recently applying for per- mits at the county courthouse gave the same reason: safety. Hazleton area resident Eric Osborne, who obtained a permit last month, said he’s a new fa- ther and sees an increase in local violence, gangs and drugs.

with the U.S. Marine Corps, said he hopes he never has a reason

to use the gun for protection.

Brian Geiswite obtained a permit in February because he

perceived an increase in crime.

A stranger who appeared to be

under the influence of drugs pushed him into a light pole without provocation and threat- ened to kill him in South Wilkes- Barre, he said. “I got mine as a means to pro- tect myself,” said Geiswite, who

lived in Plains Township until recently moving to the Altoona area for a new job. Daniel Polerecki, Pittston, ob- tained a permit decades ago to help secure his business and re- cently went to the county for a renewal. “I kept up with it for self pro- tection. We have problems in the area,” he said, noting a re- cent theft of copper in a vacant rental in his neighborhood.

cent theft of copper in a vacant rental in his neighborhood. CLARK VA N ORDEN/THE TIMES

CLARK VAN ORDEN/THE TIMES LEADER

Dave Fleury, owner of Back Mountain Gun Spor ts in Dallas, shows a few of the handguns that he sells most often to people who have a permit to carry a concealed weapon.

ing about five handguns per day, six days a week, but that number

are spending their extra money on vacations at this time but ex- pects the volume to resume in the fall. High-profile crimes also im-

pact sales, he said. “We haven’t had too many vio- lent crimes in the paper. Once there’s two or three home inva- sions, another influx of people looking for guns will be here,” Lasecki said, noting sales of pep- per spray and Ta sers also are up. Dave Fleury, owner of Back Mountain Gun Sports in Dallas, also believes a search for securi- ty is driving many sales. “There’s a lot of people com- ing in and stating they are buy- ing their first handgun for home protection,” Fleury said.

Elderly gun buyers are a large part of the increase, he said. “They’ve never had a gun be- fore, now they are arming them- selves for defense,” he said.

Carrying responsibly People carrying guns must consider the safety of others – not just themselves, Evans said. “The weapon you carry is a re- sponsibility and a liability as well. You’re responsible for what that tool does,” Evans said. He knows how to handle and maintain his gun and practices target shooting. Evans said he

would attempt to get away or be comfortable handling guns.

physically stop a threat before He’s fiercely protective of the

Constitutional right to bear arms and plans to be an NRA member for life. Harowicz said he obtained his permit a decade or so ago and believes local crime is driving

extensively practices with her the permit increase. His son

lives in Philadelphia, but the men said crime seems as much of a concern here. Gun injuries and deaths often

removing his gun from the hol-

Training should be mandated,

Parrent said she wouldn’t con- sider carrying her gun until she

husband and a family friend who worked for the FBI. Responsible gun handling is the key, said Max Nacheman, ex-

ecutive director of CeaseFirePA, are committed by people who

don’t register and permit their weapons, they noted. “If you can’t protect yourself,

derstand they’ve introduced a your home and family, that’s

something to worry about,” the younger Harowicz said between rounds of target shooting.

new, serious risk,” Nacheman said. Indoor/outdoor shooting and

which promotes gun safety is- sues. “New gun owners have to un-

archery ranges were added to a master plan for county-owned

Osborne, who recently served recently dropped off. He be- Moon Lake Park in Plymouth

lieves prospective customers Township because the sheriff ’s

office identified gun training as a local need, though the plans may never materialize due to a lack of funding. Some permit holders practice shooting through gun clubs or at state gameland ranges. Wilkes-Barre resident Wil- liam Hossage keeps his shooting skills sharp by regularly target shooting at a gameland range off state Route 118 in Ross Town- ship. He has had a permit for decades and considers it a hob- by, as opposed to protection. “The fun of shooting is hitting what you’re shooting at,” he re- cently said before aiming at a ti- ny target he placed at the range. Hossage enjoys sharing his shooting experience with others

“There’s a big increase in that.” on the range, though he avoids

the place on more crowded weekends. He’s a stickler for rules and safety and shook his head at bul- let holes in off-limit sections. The state added a $30 annual fee last year for range users who don’t have hunting or fur-taker licenses, which will generate revenue for maintenance and upkeep. Plains Township resident Joe Harowicz recently shot targets at the state range with his son, Joe Jr. He taught his two daughters and son to shoot so they would

Women arming themselves The permit increase is notice- able at Piestrak’s Gun Shop in Nanticoke, where about 50 cus- tomers have been shopping for handguns weekly, said owner Ken Piestrak. “People feel threatened in their own home,” Piestrak said. “Men and women are fearful, and they feel a need (to have a gun).” Piestrak said the rise in gun purchases by women is the most significant. He recommends a

trainer if they seem unsure ster.

about shooting and loading and

unloading their new weapons. he said.

Female customers typically purchase smaller caliber guns, such as a .22 or .38 special, while large calibers such as a 9mm are popular among men, he said. He recommends permits, even if people plan to take their guns outside the home only for target shooting. “For the few dollars it costs, it’s worth it to be legal,” Piestrak said. Joe Lasecki, owner of the Nimrod Haven Gun Shop in Ha- nover Township, had been sell-

Gun toters can carry openly

By SHEENA DELAZIO sdelazio@timesleader.com

Four years ago a Lebanon County mother was on the side- lines at her child’s soccer game with a handgun holstered in plain view. Aghast parents and fans thought Meleanie Hain was breaking the law in the widely publicized incident, but in real- ity she was exercising her right to openly carry a loaded firearm in Pennsylvania. The issue has emerged closer to home. In 2008, Hazle Town- ship came under verbal attack from gun advocates when it banned firearms from its Com- munity Park. Right-to-bear-arms advocates contended it was a violation of the Uniform Fire- arms Act. The following year, Scranton City Council discussed an ordi- nance to ban firearms from meetings after members noticed some audience members were armed. They backed off after gun advocates told them a ban would be illegal. In Pennsylvania, people 18 and older who are not prohib- ited by law from owning fire- arms may openly carry a loaded handgun in plain sight. They do not need to have a license to carry. The exceptions to the law include in vehicles and any- where in Philadelphia, which has a first-class state charter. Those instances require a citi- zen to have a license to carry a concealed firearm. Guns also may not be carried, open or concealed, in places such as court and federal facil- ities, state parks, detention facilities, airport terminals and schools. According to PAOpenCar- ry.org and state law, cities, towns and municipalities are prohibited from enacting laws prohibiting concealed or open carry of firearms. In Pennsylvania, a citizen does not need to be a resident to open carry. PAOpenCarry.org says there is no “brandishing” or “dis- turbing the peace” law in Penn- sylvania if one is carrying a gun openly. If a person intimidates or intends to intimidate another person with a firearm, they are subject to charges. Long guns (rifles and shot- guns) must be unloaded and in separate containers if being transported inside a vehicle. Handguns may be loaded while in a vehicle only if the person in possession of the gun has a valid license to carry. Without a license to carry in Pennsylvania, unloaded hand- guns may only be transported to and from specific activities and locations. For example, a gun owner can transport his or her weapon from the store of pur- chase to home or take the fire- arm to a shooting range or hunt- ing location.

Weighing in on self-defense laws

said. “But we

felt that as long as they were going to push

bill

through, we needed to have substantial in- put into the legislation.” Long said his association, along with oth- er law enforce- ment agencies, lobbied for in- clusion of sev- eral vital com- ponents in the Pennsylvania law that set it apart from those recently enacted in oth- er states. Under the current mea- sure, a person using deadly force must have a legal right to pos- sess the fire- arm, deadly force cannot be used against a law enforce- ment officer in

Concerns raised “Everyone keeps telling me, ‘Hey, Charlotte, I’m getting a gun,’ ” Charlotte Raup, president of the Wilkes-Barre Crime Watch Coalition, said, recalling com- ments she’s heard since “stand your ground” became law. “It’s actually frightening. With- out the proper training for our ci- tizens, many times the bad guys end up with the gun in self-de- fense situations,” she said. Raup said it’s the official policy of the national Crime Watch Coa- lition that members are to be un- armed at all times when volun- teering in their neighborhoods and are only to observe and re- port suspicious activity. “It’s common sense,” said Raup, who supports Second Amendment rights. “I mean, we train and license people to drive cars but don’t require any training to carry a gun in public.” But there are other voices on the issue. “I believe everyone should be allowed to carry a gun and pro- tect themselves,” said Hazleton resident Lucy Mikula, who refer- enced the recent uptick in home invasions and purse snatchings in her area. “But they should receive the proper training in the use of firearms and self-defense.” Richard Long, spokesman for the Pennsylvania District Attor- neys Association, which lobbied heavily to alter the provisions of the initial legislation, called the bill “a solution in search of a prob- lem.” He said a concern is the law

could make it more difficult to Washington-based lobbying

prosecute criminals. “The old law adequately dealt with the issue of self-defense, as far as we were concerned,” Long

group. Pashinski voted for the re- vised version of the bill after the District Attorneys Association added some amendments.

Supported by NRA Proponents of the legislation, led by the National Rifle Associ- ation, say it enhances public safe- ty by exempting gun owners act- ing in self-defense from prosecu- tion. However, the NRA does not support the inclusion of govern- ment-mandated gun training un- der expanded self-defense laws. Luzerne County District Attor- ney Stefanie Salavantis said she is aware of the provisions of the cur- rent law and plans to stay in con- tact with the District Attorneys Association to remain updated on the Castle Doctrine issue and will thoroughly investigate every fatal shooting to “determine the facts of the case and see if indeed the new Castle Doctrine legisla- tion applies.” One problem Salavantis had with the bill’s passage last year is there was “no public outcry for a change” in the law. That theme was echoed by state Rep. Eddie Day Pashinski. He said the bill was pushed by ALEC, the American Legislative Exchange Council, a well-funded

the commis- sion of his duty and the use of deadly force is pro- hibited if the person is engaging in illegal activity at the time of the self-defense incident. “Our major concern is that the law will be misused by criminals and misapplied by defense attor- neys,” Long said.

The recent Trayvon Martin shooting in Florida and the ensu- ing controversy over gun control has raised concerns about the new wave of “stand your ground” laws across the country. In Pennsylvania, as in most states, a resident has had the right to defend themselves in their home under the Castle Doc- trine. The right was expanded last year when the state House and Senate approved a new gun-con- trol law that outlines the rights of people to use deadly force against attackers in places outside their homes. The new legislation also eliminates a requirement that people attempt to retreat before using deadly force in those situa- tions. Gov. Tom Corbett signed the controversial bill into law in Au- gust 2011. Former Gov. Ed Ren- dell had vetoed a similar bill in 2010 before leaving office.

By STEVEN FONDO Times Leader Correspondent

Pa.’s Castle Doctrine and other states’ ‘stand your ground’ laws debated.

and other states’ ‘stand your ground’ laws debated. “It’s ac- tually frighten- ing. With- out the

“It’s ac-

tually

frighten-

ing. With-

out the

proper

training for our citi- zens, many times the bad guys end up with the gun in self- defense

situa-

tions.”

Charlotte Raup President of the Wilkes-Barre Crime Watch Coalition

this

SCHOOLS

Continued from Page 1A

nary budget with a 2.4 percent in- crease and opted to drain more money from reserves.

• At least 45 positions will be

million to $17.5 million in a five- year period,” Antonelli said. Hanover Area Business Man- ager Tom Cipriano said some dis- tricts – including his – could take a big hit in state subsidies in com- ing years thanks to Corbett’s deci- sion to bundle what had been var-

ing from the new Family and Barre Area debated the district’s ious separate subsidies into one

Community Enrichment Servic-

some of that money ends up com-

grade sports programs,

ing, but it’s rare. Wilkes-Barre Ar- ea’s preliminary plan calls for re- instating seventh- and eighth-

detritus of the budget butcher- cluding those aligned with the

be a bit less severe than Corbett’s proposed plan, as legislators – in-

inate a planned tax hike. Good news can be found in the

SCHOOL DISTRICT PRELIMINARY BUDGETS

2011-12 budget total 2012-13 preliminary budget total Crestwood $32.5 $33$33.2.2 Dallas $3 2 $32.9 $32.9
2011-12 budget total
2012-13 preliminary budget total
Crestwood
$32.5
$33$33.2.2
Dallas
$3
2
$32.9 $32.9
Greater
$24.3 $24.3
(both (both years) years)
Nanticoke
Hanover
$2$24.4.88
$2$25.5.11
Area
Hazleton
$117.1
$12$1200
Area
Lake-
$2$26.6.11
$2$27.7.55
Lehman
Northwest
$17$17.4.4
$17$17.9.9
Area
Pittston
$40.8
$42$42
Area
Wilkes-Barre
$97.6
$100$100.1.1
Area
Wyoming
Valley West
$5
9.6
$6$63.3.33
Wyoming
$2$28.8.99 $2$299
Area
$0
$40
$80
$120
(millions)

Source: District preliminary budgets Mark Guydish/The Times Leader

PRELIMINARY BUDGET PROPERTY TAX CHANGES

Proposed increases may change before final budget approval later this month. *Hazleton Area 2011-12 rate adjusted to reflect change in tax levy

earmarked for library

 

2011-12 property tax mills 2012-13 preliminary budget mills

 

percent change

 

Crestwood

   

9.16

         

0.0%

 

Dallas

       

11.5824

11.80511.80522

 

1.9%

Greater

Nanticoke

   

9.929

 

5

10.1807

10.1807

2.5%

Hanover

       

16.4783

0.0%

Area

Hazleton

     

8.8567*

 

9.102

9.102

7 7

2.8%

 

Area

Lake-

   

8.8531

 

9.9.2728

4.7%

Lehman

Northwest

Area

     

9.1986

 

9.4193

9.4193

2.4%

 

Pittston

Area

       

13.1

23

13.424

13.424

2.3%

Wilkes-Barre

         

Area

       

15.3684

 

0.0%

 

Wyoming

Area

       

13.5

 

13.824

13.824

2.4%

 

Wyoming

Valley West

       

13.079

9

13 13

.55 .55 3.6%

         

Source: District preliminary budgets Mark Guydish/The Times Leader

kind of lost in this whole thing,”

Republican governor – are talk- ing about adding to the educa- tion budget, thanks to better- than-expected state revenue in recent months. When Wilkes-

preliminary plan, Superintend-

there was a very good chance of “increased revenue” from the state. But that could be cold comfort,

pension system. Districts must contribute a percentage of teach-

and that percentage is soaring.

their fair share of contributing to that system for approximately 10 years, and now it’s all bouncing back on local districts,” Antonelli

creasing exponentially.” The state sets the district’s contribution rate, and under cur- rent proposals “our annual pay- ments could increase from $2.8

though

block grant for districts. In partic-

cut, either by attrition – not re-

placing positions opened by re- es, or F.A.C.E.S. program. ent Jeff Namey told the board ular, Corbett has lumped state

subsidies of Social Security taxes in with basic education funding and transportation subsidies. All three had previously been

near retirement age. The biggest trators stress their budgets were as there also are increased de- calculated separately based on cut – 24 positions – will take drawn up without firm numbers mands from the state. Antonelli actual numbers from districts –

on what the state is providing. pointed to proposals for handling enrollment or bus miles traveled, Gov. Tom Corbett has dramat- a big shortfall in the state-run for example. Now, Cipriano

place through a mix of attrition and furlough at Hazleton Area.

noted, it looks like districts will receive one lump sum based on

not been officially eliminated in

the preliminary budget, cuts may terity last year when he trimmed er pay into the fund each year, what this year’s subsidies were.

The problem: Hanover Area had

ea Superintendent Tony Perrone year ’s spending. Corbett insisted “The state basically did not do implemented major staff reduc-

said no cuts are detailed in the district’s proposed spending

plan, but up to eight support staff

– aids and hall monitors, for ex-

ample – could be pared from the payroll. Wyoming Valley West Business Manager Joe Rodriquez said the district may opt to elim- inate some support staff posi-

tions in order to reduce or elim-

still come. Greater Nanticoke Ar-

tirements or other reasons – or by furloughing employees, as Crestwood had to do thanks to a cadre of younger teachers, none

• Even where positions have

Launched with $25,000 this year, the outreach effort would be lim- ited to $10,000 in 2012-13. Board members and adminis-

ically shaken up the state budget system, launching this age of aus-

nearly $1 billion from the prior

When they make their budgets, they are still staring at less mon- ey coming from Harrisburg. Still, some administrators ex- pect the state’s final budget will

the cuts resulted because federal stimulus money used to plug holes the last two years was gone,

based on this year ’s cost , the dis-

tinction without a difference: said. “Those costs are just in- the lowest salary expense this trict will be penalized because

salaries will rise, increasing So- cial Security tax payments, with no comparable increase in state subsidies.

but local educators note it is a dis-

tions this school year, along with a pay freeze, dramatically reduc- ing payroll. “This current year is probably

district will ever have,” Cipriano said, “which means we’re getting the lowest reimbursement for So- cial Security.” If future reimbursements are

“That’s something that’s just Cipriano said.

PEOPLE

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THE TIMES LEADER

timesleader.com

SUNDAY, JUNE 3, 2012

One woman’s story of challenge, chaos and progress By ANNA GORMAN Los Angeles Times A
One woman’s story of challenge, chaos and progress
By ANNA GORMAN
Los Angeles Times
A fter months searching for work and feeling increasingly discouraged, Na-
talie Cole caught a break — an offer of a part-time position at a Little
Caesars Pizza shop in Compton, Calif. The manager scheduled her orien-
tation and told her she had to pass a food safety test. • She took the test — and
failed. But rather than study and take it again, she shrugged it off. • “I guess I am
not working for a reason,” she said.
Cole isn’t a victim of the struggling econo-
my. She was poor before and is poor now. Hers
is a story of entrenched poverty — a whirl of
choices, challenges and chaos that keeps un-
dermining her spurts of personal progress.
Tracking Cole’s life over six months offers a
messy and at times disheartening insight into
vexing social policy questions: How do you
break the cycle of generational poverty? Can
or should society do more to change the trajec-
tory of the young and poor?
Cole, 27, and her four children have moved
nearly a dozen times in the last year while liv-
ing on about $1,000 a month in public cash as-
sistance and food stamps. She wants to pro-
vide a better life for her children but seems not
to know how.
“I just know what I know,” she said. “All I
MCT PHOTOS
can do is raise
They are going to make
their own path in life.”
But if Cole doesn’t find a better way, chances
are her children won’t finish school, hold stea-
dy jobs or stay healthy.
“Poverty is bad for kids,” said Harvard Ken-
ABOVE: In relief and joy, Cole embraces
her boyfriend Juan Sena after learning
that they had gotten the one-bedroom
apartment in Compton, Calif. TOP: Strug-
gling with diabetes, Natalie Cole receives a
checkup. INSET: Natalie Cole’s youngest
son, Jaylyn, 2, receives treatment for a
severe asthma attack.
See STRUGGLE, Page 2B
MEET TOM HESS T om Hess is the president of two Servpro franchises he owns
MEET TOM HESS
T om Hess is the president of two Servpro franchises he owns with his wife
Dorothy. Hess, 55, attended Benton Area High School and received an asso-
CLARK VAN ORDEN
/THE TIMES LEADER
ciate’s degree in business at Luzerne County Community College. He and Do-
rothy have three children: Jennifer, Jessica an