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Undergraduate study in

Economics, Management, Finance and the Social Sciences 20122013

Academic direction by:

www.londoninternational.ac.uk/lse

Contents

Information
Using this prospectus
There is a colour-coded band down the side of each page in this prospectus. The colour of this band either refers to the different types of qualifications on offer or to a specific piece of information that you might need. The banding on this page refers to any general information related to the University or the suite of qualifications. A guide to the other colours used for different types of qualifications is listed below.

Undergraduate study in Economics, Management, Finance and the Social Sciences


Worldwide Access, Opportunity, International Reputation The University of London International Programmes Academic direction: The London School of Economics and Political Science Introduction to the awards Gaining a prestigious University of London qualification Am I ready to study? How you study Support for your studies The Online Student Portal Thinking ahead professional accreditation The route around our programmes Career and personal development study How much will my programme cost? BSc degrees 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 12 16 17 18 19 BSc International Relations BSc Management BSc Mathematics and Economics BSc Politics and International Relations BSc Sociology Joint Laws programme resources BSc Accounting with Law BSc Management with Law BSc Sociology with Law Diplomas for Graduates Diploma in Economics and Diploma in Social Sciences Additional educational support Access route 31 32 34 36 39 40 41 42 43 44 48 50 55

General information Standard Route Graduate Entry Route Individual courses Diploma for Graduates Diploma in Economics/ Diploma in Social Sciences Access route Accreditation of prior learning (APL) How to apply

10 key facts about your study with us

1.

You can gain a University of London degree through the University of London International Programmes, from anywhere in the world.

2. 3.

These degrees are internationally recognised, giving you an advantage in the job market, wherever your career takes you.

4. 5. 7.

You gain specialist expertise in businessrelevant subjects, with an international perspective.

A wide range of entry points include fast track routes, for those who already have diplomas or an undergraduate degree.

8.

Our degrees will help you to develop skills for the long term that employers value such as problem-solving, creative thinking, self-discipline and drive. You receive comprehensive study guides approved by LSE academics, as well as access to a wealth of online resources. You can study independently or choose additional study support from our network of 70-plus teaching institutions worldwide that meet our quality criteria.

Reference section

You can rely on the quality of the content of your degree. All of the programmes in this prospectus were developed by LSE, one of the worlds leading social science universities.

6.

9. 10.

Graduates from these programmes go on to study Masters degrees at top universities worldwide. The programmes allow you to spread payments over your study period.

Programmes

BSc Accounting and Finance BSc Banking and Finance BSc Business BSc Development and Economics BSc Economics BSc Economics and Finance BSc Economics and Management BSc Information Systems and Management BSc International Development

20 21 22 23 24 25 27 28 30

Transfer Selection groups Course descriptions Tests of proficiency in English Accreditation of prior learning (APL) Automatic and discretionary APL Application and registration process Documentary evidence Fees and contacts Inclusive Practice Policy Study programmes for 2012-2013

56 57 60 70 72 74 76 78 80 82 83

Key dates
Application deadline:
You can apply throughout the year, but we strongly advise you to apply as early as possible. < Applications must be received no later than: 1 October in the year before you intend to sit your first examinations. < Registration deadline: 30 November < Despatch of study materials: Soon after your registration form and fee are received. < Examinations: May/June

www.londoninternational.ac.uk/lse

Worldwide Access, Opportunity, International Reputation


The University of London International Programmes is unique in its global reach. < 50,000 students in more than 190 countries. < 100-plus degrees, diplomas and certificates. < Over 600 exam centres worldwide. < 70-plus institutions formally recognised to offer tuition for our programmes.

The University of London International Programmes


Professor Jonathan Kydd, Dean, University of London International Programmes
For more than 150 years, the University of London International Programmes has been offering degree programmes to students worldwide. Today, we have 50,000 students studying in over 190 countries, bringing the University of London to you through distance and flexible learning. As a family of world-class institutions, the University has a reputation for academic distinction in teaching and research, both in the UK and internationally. Ranging from education to management, and from law to philosophy, all of our programmes are developed by academics within the University of Londons constituent Colleges. This ensures that our awards are recognised worldwide for their quality and value, and that students benefit from the academic rigour and cutting-edge research undertaken within the Colleges. Studying with the University of London is one of the greatest investments you can make in yourself. We look forward to welcoming you into our global community of students and wish you every success.

Worldwide Access

Since 1858, the University of London International Programmes has enriched the lives of hundreds of thousands of students worldwide. < Our flexible and affordable study methods enable students to study wherever they live. < Our alumni include Nobel prize winners, politicians, designers, engineers, poets, teachers, lawyers and leaders of business and industry.

Opportunity

Our success is based on the University of Londons reputation for high academic standards, built by the outstanding teaching and research of its 18 Colleges. < All programmes offered by the University of London International Programmes are developed by Colleges of the University of London. These Colleges are also responsible for the assessment of the degrees. < Wherever our students live, they are examined to the same high standard as those studying in London at one of the Universitys Colleges.

International Reputation

I have been impressed by the way in which the programmes respond to the real challenges of delivering a UK university degree that produces graduates who are thinking, challenging, imaginative and analytical.
Professor Geoffrey Crossick, Vice-Chancellor, University of London

Undergraduate study in Economics, Management, Finance and the Social Sciences

www.londoninternational.ac.uk/lse

Academic direction: The London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE)
An introduction from Dr Keith Sharp, Director, University of London International Programmes at LSE
understand the causes of things. You can only find out the causes Studying on one of the programmes of things by asking questions listed in this prospectus could change our programmes will help you to your life in many ways. Not only can it think about why things are the improve your career prospects, it can way they are. Though extremely also encourage you to think critically rewarding, studying social science and creatively and increase your is very demanding and requires understanding of how a major commitment on your and why modern part. Many students achieve societies, outstanding results and we are institutions very proud of their success. and Our programmes provide an economic excellent foundation for a wide variety systems of careers ranging from accounting, function in the banking and information systems to way they do. the media, civil service and journalism. LSEs motto is All of the programmes can act as a rerum cognoscere stepping stone to further study at causas: to undergraduate and Masters level.

Introduction to the awards


Award Why consider this? Courses Cost Duration If you do not currently meet the entrance requirements for our degrees Access route If you have completed your schooling but do not meet the formal general entrance requirements of the University of London, this enables you to be accepted on to a Standard Route degree. Students who successfully complete the Access route may then complete a degree in a further three years and qualify for a reduced registration fee. If you can attend one of the Diploma-teaching institutions and you wish to: < Get on to the degree programme and may not meet the entrance requirements for the degree. < Gain a stand-alone qualification that will admit you into the second year of the BSc programmes listed in this prospectus and degrees at many universities in the UK, USA and Australia. 2 783 1-3 years

Welcome to a global programme

Ask yourself these questions: < Do I want to develop a questioning outlook and be critical of my own work?

How will you know if this is the right study programme for you?

< Do I want to link ideas from all the disciplines I study to create new ways of thinking about issues in the real world? < Do I want the challenge of developing more than one way of thinking about the social world? < Do I want to work co-operatively with others to share my ideas and learn how to develop this important skill for the world of work? If you can answer yes to all of the above then you are certainly someone who would enjoy studying one of these programmes. Whatever stage you have reached in your education you can use the table opposite to see which study path and qualification is the right one for you. We hope you enjoy looking through the programmes on offer and look forward to welcoming you.

Diploma in Economics and Diploma in Social Sciences

1,192

1-5 years

If you meet the entrance requirements for our degrees BSc Standard route < To gain a world-class degree through flexible study. < If you have previously studied similar material to a comparable level and depth you can apply for APL from up to four full 100 courses. If you wish to enhance your skills or professional knowledge, demonstrate your ability in a specific area (for example to a university or a professional body), or simply study certain subjects you have an interest in, you can apply to take individual courses. For more information on entrance requirements and fees, please see www.londoninternational.ac.uk/shortcourses/lse 12 3,678 3-8 years

Individual courses

1+

391 or 426

1-2 years

If you already have a first degree (Bachelors degree) BSc Graduate Entry Route If you hold a full first degree and want a flexible way to gain a second degree, you may be able to complete a shorter than usual study programme (a minimum of two years for most degrees). If you hold a full first degree in any discipline but, for professional or personal reasons, wish to secure a stand-alone qualification in a named discipline in the fields of Economics, Management, Finance and the Social Sciences. You may also use the diploma as a basis for progression into postgraduate study in a related area. 9 2,781 2-8 years

Diplomas for Graduates

1,341

1-5 years

The London School of Economics and Political Science


LSE is one of the Colleges of the University of London and a world-leading social science institution. Academics from LSE provide the academic direction for the programmes listed in this prospectus. Since its foundation in 1895, LSE has been regarded as an international centre of academic excellence and innovation in the social sciences. Its teaching and research is recognised worldwide as a benchmark of quality. The Schools academic profile spans the broad range of social sciences disciplines that reflect how we interact with one another and with society. LSE is an institution renowned for focusing on real world issues. Current areas of research and expertise include globalisation, human rights, risk and business management, new communications technologies, urban and regional policies, and new forms of governance. LSE alumni and former staff include 16 Nobel prize winners and 34 past or present heads of state. LSE academics come from all over the world and from many social, educational and ethnic backgrounds. They are in constant demand as commentators and analysts in the media, act as advisors to governments, and are seconded to national and international organisations.

Notes

Entrance requirements for: Access route see page 55 Diploma in Economics and Diploma in Social Sciences see page 48 BSc degrees (Standard and Graduate Entry Route) see page 19 Diplomas for Graduates see page 44 There are many other qualifications, from the UK and overseas, that the University accepts as satisfying the entrance requirements.

If completed in the minimum time period, based on University of London 2012-2013 fees (please note that fees are subject to annual review).

Diploma in Economics and Diploma in Social Sciences students will need to pay fees to a local institution. If you choose to attend an institution whilst studying for other awards you will need to pay their fees in addition to University of London fees. If you successfully complete one of these Diplomas you can transfer to, and complete, a BSc degree in a further two years paying continuing registration fees.

The BSc Development and Economics, BSc Economics and Finance, and BSc Information Systems and Management have a three-year minimum registration period. www.londoninternational.ac.uk/lse

Undergraduate study in Economics, Management, Finance and the Social Sciences

Am I ready to study?

Gaining a prestigious University of London qualification


As an International Programmes student you register with the University of London for one of its awards. The academic direction of your programme including the syllabus, assessment, learning resources and, where given, academic support is the responsibility of a particular College, or consortium of Colleges, of the University of London, known as the Lead College. LSE is the Lead College for the programmes in this prospectus. When you graduate with a degree, diploma or certificate from the University of London you will be sent two documents a final diploma (the parchment you receive on graduation) and a Diploma Supplement. The final diploma indicates that you were registered with the University of London and awarded a University of London degree or diploma, and give the name of the Lead College which conducted the examinations. The University of London logo and the ViceChancellors signature are incorporated. The Diploma Supplement describes the nature, level and content of the programme you successfully completed and includes a transcript of courses taken and marks achieved, as well as the overall classification. It also provides further information about the role of the Lead College and method of study.

A University of London qualification is sought after and highly regarded worldwide. Given the academic rigour of our programmes, to achieve good results requires a high degree of self-motivation and commitment. But your hard work will be worth it in the end, as you will join an expanding community of alumni with excellent career prospects.

three passes at GCSE/GCE O level at Grade C or above (including a mathematical subject), plus two further subjects at A level, and proof of your competence in English. If you are not eligible for the degree, you may be eligible for the Access route (please see page 55) or either the Diploma in Economics or Diploma in Social Sciences (please see page 48).

have not had enough time to allocate to your studies. As a guide, you should dedicate at least 35 hours per week for approximately 34 weeks of the year if you intend to complete the maximum of four courses in any one year.

Am I eligible?

You can take advantage of the wide range of entry points, including a fast track route for those who already hold a degree. For degree programmes you will need to have a minimum of the equivalent of

You can manage your studies to fit in with your own schedule and responsibilities. You do not have to enter for examinations every year if you

How can I fit my studies into my schedule?

You can either study independently at a pace that suits you, or enrol for additional classes at a local institution, either full time or part time, and benefit from the more formalised support this provides. Please note that only students taking the Diploma in Economics or Diploma in Social Sciences must attend a teaching institution.
www.londoninternational.ac.uk/lse

What support can I get?

Undergraduate study in Economics, Management, Finance and the Social Sciences

How you study


Our programmes provide an opportunity to obtain a prestigious degree or other qualification at a reasonable cost. You can choose to study independently or pay for additional educational support at a local institution, where available, to benefit from face-to-face tutorial support and interaction with fellow students. Please note that students taking the Diploma in Economics or Diploma in Social Sciences must attend a Diplomateaching institution (please see the list on pages 50-53). Although the University does not provide personal tuition to International Programmes students for the study programmes listed in this prospectus, LSE does offer a Study weekend and Summer School which may provide additional support for your studies (please see opposite page for details). University of London staff can help you with administrative queries. If you have any questions of an academic nature you will be able to contact the LSE office, but please remember (especially if you intend to study independently) that LSE staff cannot engage in active or regular contact or tuition.

Support for your studies


project/coursework also counts towards the assessment: < IS1060 Introduction to information systems < IS3139 Software engineering: theory and application < GY3157 Independent geographical study < IS3159 Research project in information systems

Flexible study

the best use of resources and preparing for examinations. < Subject guides for each course studied. These guides introduce you to topics and help you to use textbooks in a productive manner. < Past examination papers and Examiners commentaries. The commentaries provide an insight into how individual questions should have been tackled and outline common mistakes made by students in the past. Past papers enable you to practise for your examinations. These resources are updated annually and are available to download. < Regulations containing full details of important information such as syllabuses, programme structures and degree classification criteria. All of the above materials are available through the Online Student Portal (see page 10).

Courses from the University of London to support your studies


Each year in February, LSE arranges a Study weekend. The weekend consists of short courses designed to help you with examination preparation and technique. You will also have the opportunity to discuss your studies with subject specialists. Booking information is given in the Student handbook and on the LSE website.

LSE Study weekend

Access to a library with a quality selection of textbooks will be important for your study. You may be able to use other university or local libraries both in the United Kingdom and in your own country. We will provide a certificate of registration on request if the library requires it.
www.lse.ac.uk/library

Library support

LSE runs two three-week Summer The University also offers a oneSchools each year, usually from day Induction course held in early July to mid-August. You London in September and a series are welcome to join the schools, of Intensive weekend courses (in which offer a range of intellectually November, December, March and stimulating and academically April). These are aimed principally challenging courses designed at students studying for the to allow students, academics LLB, but may also be of interest and professional people to if you intend to study any law undertake a period of intensive courses as part of your degree study in areas of interest to them. or diploma. More information Attending the Summer School can be found on our website. does not count towards your final assessment but can be beneficial For more details: to your programme of study. LSE Study weekend and Summer School: www2.lse.ac.uk/study/
londoninternational.ac.uk/ current_student/laws

LSE Summer School

University law courses

LSE Library:

Law courses: www.

UOLIP/Events/home.aspx

Your study materials are specially written by academics appointed by LSE. The cost of your study pack is included in your initial and continuing registration fees. Study materials include: < A Student handbook containing advice and practical information such as: how to enter for examinations, contacts at the University, important dates in the year. < Strategies for success an academic and study skills handbook containing information about study techniques, planning your studies, making

Online study materials

You will need to provide your own books and we recommend that you budget up to 300 per year. We ensure all key books are widely available either from internet bookshops or by mail order. For more information see advice about books on our website at: www.
londoninternational.ac.uk/lse

Books

Registered International Programmes students may have access to the main LSE Library for reference only. Before you visit the Library we advise you to check the LSE website for opening hours and what ID you need to present when you arrive. Senate House Library, University of London: www.ull.ac.uk Registered International Programmes students are entitled to use Senate House Library. The Library charges for this service: Annual membership 130.72 Six-month membership 83.74 Day membership 6.28 You can also purchase a sevenday carnet (31.40) that allows you to make seven visits over the following 12 months. For more information contact Senate House Library, University of London, Malet Street, London WC1E 7HU. Tel: +44 (0)20 7862 8461/2 Fax: +44 (0)20 7862 8480 Email: enquiries@shl.lon.ac.uk

When you decide you are ready, you will enter for unseen written examinations. These are set and marked by our academics to ensure your work is assessed to the same standard as College-based students at LSE. Examinations are held once a year, in May/June, at local centres in over 180 different countries as well as in London. For most courses you will sit a three-hour paper (or a twohour paper for each half course). For the following courses a

Examinations

Scholarships for MSc study are awarded annually to students who have successfully completed one of the degrees in Economics, Management, Finance and the Social Sciences as International Programmes students, and who have also been accepted for postgraduate study at LSE. To qualify, students will normally have, or expect to have, a first class honours degree from the University of London International Programmes. These scholarships normally cover full fees and maintenance. 2012 scholarship recipients pictured with Rosie Gosling.

Scholarships for students to study at Masters level in London at LSE

Undergraduate study in Economics, Management, Finance and the Social Sciences

www.londoninternational.ac.uk/lse

The Online Student Portal


You are required to confirm on your application form that you have access to the internet so that you are able to make use of resources which are only available online.
< Recorded lectures: For a few subjects, where appropriate, the sessions from previous years Kick off days and Study weekends have been recorded and made available online via the VLE. < Audiovisual tutorials and solutions: For some of the first year courses such as Introduction to economics, Statistics and Mathematics, audiovisual tutorials are available to help you work through key concepts and to show the standard expected in examination. < Self-testing activities: Allowing you to test your own understanding of subject material. < Study skills: Expert advice on getting started with your studies, preparing for examinations and developing your digital literacy skills. < Students registered for Laws courses also receive access to the dedicated Laws VLE.
PREVIEW: You can preview some of the resources that are available at: www2.lse.ac.uk/study/
UOLIP/study_materials.aspx

For many students, using an Online Library and reading journal articles are new skills. We provide support and guidance on the best way to approach journal resources and a range of materials are available designed to improve your reading and information skills. A dedicated helpdesk is available if you have any difficulties in finding what you need.

As soon as you have registered we will send you a University of London username and password which will allow you to log in to the Student Portal. All of the online resources available to students can be found in the Portal:

By supporting your studies and helping you feel part of a community, the VLE forms an important part of your study experience with us. It provides: < Electronic study materials: All of the printed materials which you receive from the University of London are available to download, to give you flexibility in how and where you study. < Student discussion forums: An open space for you to discuss interests and seek support from your peers, working collaboratively to solve problems and discuss subject material. < Videos: Recorded academic introductions to many subjects; interviews and debates with academics who have designed the courses and teach similar ones at LSE.

The Virtual Learning Environment (VLE)

You receive a fully featured University of London email service. Once logged into the portal, you can carry out all standard email actions such as send, receive and forward emails, add attachments, and create folders for storing and organising your email.

Youve got mail

The great thing with the VLE is that its 24-hour access, wherever students are around the world. They can either stream video tutorials or download them to listen to offline if theyre commuting.
Dr James Abdey

Connect with us online


Follow us on Twitter Follow the LSE Office for the University of London International Programmes on Twitter for all the latest news and updates.
http://twitter.com/emfss

Computer requirements: So that you can make


the best use of the resources available, including the online student portal, you need regular access to the internet and a computer.

The Online Library holds thousands of journal articles which you will be able to access free of charge. Many of the courses on the EMFSS programmes make use of journal articles in the essential reading lists. The Online Library with its brand new search engine, Summon, is accessed via the Student Portal. Summon is a Google-like search engine that provides fast, relevancy ranked results through a single search box.

The Online Library

Like us on Facebook Visit our Facebook page tokeep up to date with the latest news and events. Get in touch with alumni of the programmes and current students.

Profile: Dr James Abdey | Department of Statistics, LSE


Statistics 1 is a core first-year course for many of the LSEled degrees. Although its compulsory, many students may not have had much previous statistical exposure. To support students, a range of learning resources relating to Statistics is available through the VLE. In the video tutorials you hear me explaining a concept in quite a dynamic way. Rather than just solving a question, I will also tailor the answer for an exam situation: Exactly how should this solution be structured? What are the Examiners looking for? You cant get that level of guidance straight from the subject guide. The great thing with the VLE is that its 24-hour access, wherever students are around the world. They can either stream video tutorials or download them to listen to offline if theyre commuting. Other online resources include a Q&A forum where students can post questions; self-test quizzes for each subject guide chapter, giving students an opportunity to see whether theyve grasped the key concepts; and recorded mini lectures which are particularly useful for independent learners. Having these different forms of resources, students can pick and choose which they use. They dont have to listen to every single video and try every single quiz. Rather it gives them the option to focus on specific areas where theyre having difficulty. For example, students may get onto the topic of hypothesis testing which might seem a bit alien to them so the VLE resources can provide support. Collectively, the archive of forum postings, practice exam questions, video tutorials and self-test quizzes should help them master the material.
www.londoninternational.ac.uk/lse

http://tinyurl.com/emfss-like

Blog Staff at the LSE Office for the University of London International Programmes regularly contribute to a blog, keeping you up-to-date with the latest news and to remind you of important dates. Alumni also offer study tips and advice on overcoming challenges.
http://externalstudy. wordpress.com/

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Undergraduate study in Economics, Management, Finance and the Social Sciences

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Thinking ahead professional accreditation


BSc Accounting and Finance graduates BSc Accounting and Finance graduates BSc Banking and Finance graduates Case by case application applies BSc Accounting and Finance graduates

Graduates of our BSc Accounting and Finance / BSc Banking and Finance degrees who wish to continue their studies towards professional accreditation in the accounting or financial professions can benefit from our fast track agreements with the professional bodies listed below. Subject to passing the required combination of courses on your degree, you will be exempt from certain modules required on

the route towards professional accreditation. We have provided a summary here, but advise you to visit the relevant website for further information. For all these qualifications you would study in a similar way to the International Programmes: modules are offered by self-study, supported by revision sessions and/or tuition offered by approved providers.

About The ICAEW

The Institute of Chartered Accountants in England and Wales (ICAEW) is the largest professional accountancy body in Europe, with over 130,000 members in over 160 countries. Their internationally recognised ACA qualification opens up a range of career opportunities from established multinationals to entrepreneurial local organisations. Competitive salaries, international travel and a choice of exciting careers, are just some of the rewards available to chartered accountants.

About ICPAS

Profile: Khadija Khan BSc Accounting and Finance, Pakistan


Societe Generale Corporate and Investment Banking is one of Europes top three investment banks when it comes to the league table rankings of Loan Syndication. I work in the Loan Sales and Trading team and am involved in both the primary and secondary market. I am quite thrilled about this role as not many graduates have had the opportunity to enter into investment banking straight after graduating. I can think of a hundred different ways of saying this, but lets just put it very simply: the University of London was, for me, a mirror - it first helped me recognise who I was, and then showed me the way ahead. I would not have been half the person I am today, had it not been for the degree I chose.
After graduating with a BSc Accounting and Finance, Khadija was awarded a scholarship to study a Masters at LSE. Watch her talk about her study experience on our YouTube channel: http://bit.ly/khadija-khan

The ICAEW differ from other accountancy bodies as students study for the ACA whilst in full time employment earning a competitive salary. Graduates study for the ACA whilst on a three year paid training contract with an authorised training employer. There are over 2,200 ICAEW training employers of all sizes throughout the UK and overseas. Training opportunities exist in countries including Cyprus, Malaysia and Russia to name but a few. There are fifteen exams which make up the ACA qualification: 12 Professional Stage modules and 3 Advanced Stage modules. The modules are linked to your work experience and personal skills development. Although graduates from any discipline can study the ACA, graduates of the BSc Accounting and Finance degree can claim credit for up to 6 Professional Stage modules depending upon the options chosen and grades achieved. < Further information and details of the credit for prior learning can be found on the ICAEW website www.icaew.com/careers

How to claim credit for up to 6 Professional Stage modules

The Institute of Certified Public Accountants of Singapore (ICPAS) is the national organisation of the accountancy profession in Singapore that accords the prestigious CPA Singapore designation. ICPASs network of members spans the globe and its international outlook and connections are reflected in its membership of professional organisations like the ASEAN Federation of Accountants (AFA), the Asia-Oceania Tax Consultants Association (AOTCA) and the International Federation of Accountants (IFAC). ICPAS also caters for the training and professional development of its members through regular courses conducted by its training arm, the Singapore Accountancy Academy (SAA).

About CPA Australia

CPA Australia is one of the worlds largest accounting bodies with a membership of more than 129,000 finance, accounting and business professionals across the globe. Its core services include education, training, technical support and advocacy, working with local and international bodies to represent the views and concerns of the profession to governments, regulators, industries, academia and the general public.

Completing the ICPAS Professional Examination qualifies you for Associate Membership with the Institute. Upon satisfying the relevant work experience criteria and clearing the Pre Admission Course, you can apply for full membership and the designation CPA Singapore. To qualify for the ICPAS Professional Examination, you need to be awarded the BSc Accounting and Finance degree. If you have included all the subjects which ICPAS specify then you will be able to gain maximum credit and will only have to take a further 5 Professional Examination subjects required for provisional membership. If you have not taken all of the specified University of London courses you may be required to take bridging units. If you are studying a degree other than BSc Accounting and Finance, you can be considered for credit on an individual case basis. < Further information: www.icpas.com.sg

How to qualify as a Certified Public Accountant in Singapore

CPA Australia require students to have completed their degree as an entry point to the CPA (Aust) designation. Graduates that have successfully completed the BSc in Accounting and Finance programme are eligible to receive up to eight exemptions from the CPA Australia Programme. To ensure that you are studying courses which qualify for exemption, it is important that you check the exemptions page of the CPA Australia website when choosing your optional study courses. < Further information:
www.cpaaustralia.com.au

How to qualify as a Certified Public Accountant in Australia

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www.londoninternational.ac.uk/lse

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Thinking ahead professional accreditation


BSc Banking and Finance graduates BSc Accounting and Finance graduates BSc Banking and Finance graduates

We find University of London graduates a good fit for our firm, Grant Thornton. Coming from a diversity of cultural and national backgrounds, these graduates seamlessly blend into our culture. An added bonus is that some University of London graduates have chalked up invaluable work experience before pursuing their academic degrees. In a nutshell I would say they are every employers dream of an employee. They possess a certain level of maturity, willing to learn, independent and street smart. Professionals need a full range of skills apart from technical proficiency.
Mr Ong Soo Ann, Partner, Foo Kon Tan Grant Thornton LLP, Singapore

Association of Chartered Certified Accountants

The ifs is a world-class provider of financial education. Their programmes are the result of a constant dialogue with employers, students, teachers, tutors and examiners. They combine innovation and quality, and draw from over 130 years of educational experience, resulting in the ifs being the provider of choice to many of the worlds leading financial organisations.

About the ifs School of Finance

This pathway is an accelerated route whereby you can achieve Associateship of the ifs School of Finance, and subsequently go on to attain full Chartered Associateship status. Associateship of the ifs School of Finance (Aifs) is a prestigious award that confers professional standing within the financial services industry. Once you have completed the BSc Banking and Finance and included coverage of management issues (either course MN1107 Introduction to business and management taken within your degree, or by demonstrating equivalent learning via a different qualification) you need to complete four additional modules covering Strategic management in financial services and then choose from a range of specialised finance modules such as Applied credit analysis and Risk financing and management.

How to qualify for Associateship of the ifs School of Finance

ACCA (the Association of Chartered Certified Accountants) is the largest global professional accountancy body with 296,000 students and 115,000 members in 170 countries. They offer qualifications to people of application, ability and ambition around the world who seek a rewarding career in accountancy, finance and management. ACCAs reputation is grounded in over 100 years of providing accounting and finance qualifications.

About the Association of Chartered Certified Accountants (ACCA)

In order to qualify as an ACCA member, you need to complete 9 Fundamental level exams, and 5 professional level exams. You will also need to have relevant practical experience, with a minimum of three years and complete a Professional Ethics module. Graduates of our BSc Accounting and Finance are able to claim exemption from up to 8 of these 9 fundamental level examinations. The BSc Accounting and Finance compulsory courses cover these 8 courses but if you are a BSc Banking and Finance student, it is important that you choose your optional courses carefully by looking on the exemptions page of the ACCA website to make sure that you are studying ones which qualify for exemption:

How to qualify as an ACCA member

Having achieved Associateship, you will have positioned yourself to achieve, subject to certain criteria, full professional Chartered Associateship status. The Chartered designation (CAifs) recognises those Associates who are committed to the very highest standards of professional practice. < Further information: www.ifslearning.ac.uk

Onward progression

< Further information: www.accaglobal.com

www.accaglobal.com/join/acca/exemptions

About Grant Thornton International


Grant Thornton International is one of the worlds leading accounting and consulting firms, with more than 2,600 partners in over 100 countries. As the Singapore member firm of Grant Thornton International, Foo Kon Tan Grant Thornton LLP combines the knowledge and experience of the local marketplace with the technologies and specialist resources of a professional services organisation at the forefront of the global accounting profession. Foo Kon Tan Grant Thornton LLP currently employs 23 University of London graduates.
www.londoninternational.ac.uk/lse

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Undergraduate study in Economics, Management, Finance and the Social Sciences

15

The route around our programmes


In 2011-12, the suite of EMFSS programmes was substantially redeveloped to ensure all of our study programmes aligned with the Further and Higher Education Qualifications (FHEQ) framework.

Career and personal development study


< in your first year of study, you may only take 100 courses, unless you have received APL and are therefore permitted to take 200 or 300 courses < to be eligible for the award of a degree, you must attempt all 12 courses of the study programme and pass a minimum of 10 (although this would result in a drop in the class band of the degree award) < for the Graduate Entry Route degree programmes, you must successfully pass all nine courses to be eligible for the award of degree.
All of the programme structures given in this prospectus are subject to confirmation in the 2012-2013 Regulations. The Regulations also contain full details on the rules that govern the choice of any course. An individual course is a single course from one of the EMFSS programmes. As long as you satisfy the entry requirements and have the necessary background, you can take an individual course without registering for a degree or diploma programme. More than 90 individual courses are currently available. When you register you will receive a certificate of registration. If you pass the examination you will receive a Certificate of Achievement.

Introduction

Example AC1025 Principles of accounting


AC denotes the subject area (Accounting). 1 indicates that this is a 100 course (2 indicates a 200 course, 3 a 300 course). 025 is the unique course designator (based on the old course number 25 Principles of accounting).

What is an individual course?

You receive the same study materials, have access to the same online facilities, and take the same examinations as students taking the courses as part of an EMFSS degree or diploma programme.

What support will I receive? Flexible study at a reasonable cost

The UKs Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education (QAA) established the FHEQ as a framework for all further and higher education qualifications. Providing an important reference point, the FHEQ is based primarily on the concepts of levels and comparability. It helps providers of higher education to: maintain academic standards; inform international comparability of academic standards; ensure international competitiveness; and facilitate student/graduate mobility. Within the context of higher education awards, the FHEQ levels are: Level 4, Level 5 and Level 6. Levels 1-3 refer to pre-University education, while Level 7 is Masters-level. For ease of reference, we have adopted the following terminology: < 100 courses (equivalent to FHEQ Level 4). < 200 courses (equivalent to FHEQ Level 5). < 300 courses (equivalent to FHEQ Level 6). By assigning each course to the appropriate FHEQ level and presenting programme structures in terms of levels, comparisons can now be drawn more easily across the suite of BSc awards.

About the FHEQ framework

The new six-character course code is made up of three separate elements: the subject area, the course level and the unique course designator, respectively.

New course codes

Another key aim of the redevelopment is to make progression rules clearer. Courses are taken at three levels, representing the nominal three-year period of study. In your first year of study you must demonstrate the capacity to succeed at Level 4 (100) courses before advancing to Level 5 (200) or Level 6 (300) courses, unless you have received APL. In terms of your progression through the Standard Route degree programmes, the following rules apply: < you can take up to four full new courses in a year < in your final year of study, you may take five new courses in order to complete your 12 courses, provided you are not carrying a failed course < you may take a maximum of five courses at any examination period, in any combination of new courses and resits < you may take an individual course in your final year, provided you do not take more than four other courses

Rules of progression for BSc degrees

Programme structures

Are individual courses for me?

You can take individual courses to enhance your skills or professional knowledge, or to satisfy the accreditation requirements of a university or professional body, or simply to study certain subjects in which you are interested. If you are currently taking a degree or Diploma for Graduates which does not include all the courses you need for professional accreditation, you can apply to take the additional courses as individual courses.

If, after completing an individual course, you apply and are admitted to register for an EMFSS degree or Diploma for Graduates programme, you can obtain credit for the individual course(s) you have taken, provided you apply within three years of completing the individual course(s). Courses can only be credited if they are available on the relevant degree or Diploma for Graduates structure. The maximum number of courses for which credit may be given is: < eight full courses for degrees ac.uk/shortcourses/lse through the Standard Route < six full courses for degrees through the Graduate Entry Route < two full courses for the Diplomas for Graduates. Further information is given in the EMFSS Programme Regulations for individual courses.

Progression and credit

Assessment is by one written examination (four of the available courses also require coursework). Examinations are held once a year in May/June, so you can complete an individual course in one year if you wish. A composite fee of 356 for each full course (in 2012-2013) covers registration for two years and one examination. If you dont pass the exam the first time you can retake it the following year (you will need to pay an additional fee to do this). You can apply for up to eight full courses (or the equivalent) in one year. If your application is accepted, you will be able to register for up to four courses (or the equivalent) in one year. For more information please see www.londoninternational.

Profile: Shuchi Mehta | Access route and BSc Mathmatics and Economics, India
I was looking to pursue a BSc Mathematics and Economics degree offered by the University of London International Programmes. Since I was not looking to enrol at an institution, I pursued the BSc by way of the Access route and then three years of study for the degree. It was an interesting challenge at all times. There were times when it did get hard but at the end, the persuasion yielded a great sense of satisfaction. Economics was very valuable and practical. As for Mathematics, it has always been my passion so it was a thrill to explore and learn something new. The study pattern helped me become more independent and strong. It has made me stop looking for support and tackle things on my own. As for the study content and examination pattern, it has helped me develop my critical thinking and analytical skills. The process involved in accomplishing the BSc was a journey which has taught me many things. It has helped me develop as a person which is what is helping me to cope with things way better in the Masters course which is very intense compared to the BSc. Having done my Masters, I plan to return to India. I plan to work in the investment management side of the finance industry for the next couple of years, after which I see myself becoming an independent ace Options trader.
Shuchi took the Access route and then studied for the BSc in Mathematics and Economics. She gained Second Class Honours (upper division) and is now taking an MSc in Accounting and Finance at LSE.

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Undergraduate study in Economics, Management, Finance and the Social Sciences

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How much will my programme cost?


Standard Route
This example is for a degree student who completes in the minimum amount of time (three years) and without resits.

BSc degrees
Access route
This example is for an Access route student who then transfers to a degree, completing the Access route in the minimum amount of time (one year).

Graduate Entry Route


This example is for a Graduate Entry student who completes in the minimum amount of time (two years) and without resits.

First year

Application fee Initial registration fee Examination fee (four full courses)
Second year

70 650 776

First year

First year

Application fee Initial registration fee Examination fee (four full courses)
Second year

70 650 776

Application fee Initial registration fee Examination fee (two full courses)
Sub-total

70 325 388
783

Continuing registration fee 315 Examination fee 776 (four full courses)
Third year

Continuing registration fee 315 Examination fee 970 (five full courses)
Total 2,781

The student then transfers on to the Standard Route

Continuing registration fee 315 Examination fee 776 (four full courses)
Total 3,678

The BSc Development and Economics, BSc Economics and Finance, and BSc Information Systems and Management have a 3-year minimum registration period to allow time to complete the necessary prerequisites.

Standard Route
Second year

The BSc degree programmes provide an excellent foundation for a wide variety of careers ranging from accounting, banking and information systems to the media, civil service and journalism. All of the programmes can act as a stepping stone to further study at undergraduate and Masters level. You can gain a world-class degree through flexible study, while being encouraged to think critically and creatively. The programmes will also enable you to increase your understanding of how and why modern societies, institutions and economic systems function in the way they do.

Who are they for?

Standard Route
This example is for a degree student who completes in four years, with two resits in the second year.

Diploma for Graduates


This example is for a Diploma for Graduates student who completes in the minimum amount of time (one year) and without resits.

Access transfer fee Examination fee (three full courses)


Third year

640 582

First year

First year

Continuing registration fee 315 Examination fee 582 (three full courses) 70 495 776
Fourth year

BSc degrees consist of 12 courses when taken through the Standard Route and nine courses through the Graduate Entry Route. Courses are classified as either 100, 200 or 300.

Degree structures

For most degrees you have a certain amount of choice in the courses that you take. In the structures you will see that you can choose from a variety of Selection groups. You have control, within certain guidelines, over the number and choice of examinations you take each year. In any year that you enter an examination, you may attempt: < a minimum of one new half course and a maximum of four new full courses or < any number of courses that you have failed in a previous year (resits) plus a minimum of one new full course and a maximum of four new full courses or < any number of resits only or < five new full courses in your final year provided that you are not carrying any fails.

Choosing your courses

In your first year of study you must demonstrate the capacity to succeed at Level 4 (100) courses before advancing to Level 5 (200) or Level 6 (300) courses. All courses are full courses except where indicated otherwise in the selection groups on pages 57-59. You may complete your studies in a minimum of three years (or two years if you are given maximum APL or are studying through certain Graduate Entry Routes). You have up to eight years to complete your degree and you do not have to sit examinations every year.

Accreditation of prior learning (APL), Standard Route only:

Application fee Initial registration fee Examination fee (four full courses)
Second year

70 650 776

Application fee Initial registration fee Examination fee (four full courses)
Total

Continuing registration fee 315 Examination fee 776 (four full courses)
Sub-total Overall total 3,210 3,993

Some courses have prerequisites (i.e. courses which must first have been passed). The prerequisites are always represented by the code in brackets that comes after the title of the course.

Prerequisites

You may apply for APL from up to four full 100 courses. APL is awarded on an automatic or discretionary basis. See pages 72-74 for more information. You are advised to apply as early as possible if you want to claim APL from a course.

Degrees are awarded with the following classifications: First Class Honours, Second Class Honours (divided into Upper Division and Lower Division), Third Class Honours.

Classification

1,341

Continuing registration fee 315 Examination fee 776 (four courses incl. two resits)
Third year

Diploma in Economics/ Diploma in Social Sciences


Students should contact a local Diploma-teaching institution for full details of their fees. The fees payable to the University by a student in 2012-2013 who completes one of these Diplomas in one year are:

BSc degree entrance requirements


To be eligible for the Standard Route of one of the BSc degrees you must:

Continuing registration fee 315 Examination fee 582 (three full courses)
Fourth year

First year

Continuing registration fee 315 Examination fee 582 (three full courses)
Total 4,381

Initial registration Examination fee (four full courses)


Total

650 542
1,192

These examples are based on 2012-2013 fees and do not reflect year-on-year increases. In addition to the fees payable to the University, you should also budget for the cost of purchasing textbooks (this may well be in the region of 300 per year); the cost of any course or tuition you choose to take or (for the Diploma in Economics or Diploma in Social Sciences) are required to take; and the fee levied by your local examination centre to cover their costs. Please see page 80 for a full list of fees.

Graduate Entry Route

< normally be at least 17 years old and have either passes in: < two subjects at GCE A level, plus at least three further subjects at GCSE/ GCE O level at Grade C or above or < three subjects at GCE A level (with one A level at not less than grade D) or < three subjects at GCE A level and two further subjects at GCSE/GCE O level at Grade C or above or

< two subjects at GCE A level, plus two further subjects at GCE AS level and < demonstrate competence in Mathematics at least equivalent to GCSE/GCE O level at Grade C or above and < provide proof of competence in English which is acceptable to the University. A test of proficiency may be required (see page 70 for more information).

In addition to the qualifications listed here, you must hold a full first degree completed in a minimum of three years duration on a full time basis (or equivalent) from a university or other institution acceptable to the University of London.
Note: If you hold a professional and/ or postgraduate qualification without a full first degree, you cannot be considered for admission to the Graduate Entry Route.

Note: We accept many other qualifications, both from the UK and overseas, as satisfying our entrance requirements. Please visit: www.londoninternational.ac.uk/how_to_apply/application_process/entrance_quals.pdf

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Undergraduate study in Economics, Management, Finance and the Social Sciences

www.londoninternational.ac.uk/lse

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BSc Accounting and Finance


Programme overview
This degree gives you an understanding of accounting and finance that will be useful throughout your career. This means that we do not simply teach accounting techniques and focus on computational skills with the aim of immediate application, but to enable you to evaluate their usefulness in different contexts. We encourage you to adopt a critical and flexible viewpoint and to look at the subject from a variety of perspectives, including the international dimension.

BSc Banking and Finance


Programme overview
This degree provides you with an understanding of the way in which financial intermediaries and institutions operate and the structure and functioning of financial markets. You will learn about the pricing of financial assets and why and how corporations choose and issue various types of assets. The banking courses provide information on precisely how financial intermediaries operate, both on a domestic level and in the international arena.

Standard Route
100 courses 1 EC1002 Introduction to economics 2 ST104A Statistics 1 (half course) and
MT105A Mathematics 1 (half course)

Standard Route
100 courses 1 EC1002 Introduction to economics 2 ST104A Statistics 1 (half course) and
MT105A Mathematics 1 (half course)

3 FN1024 Principles of banking and finance Dr Libon Fung 4 AC1025 Principles of accounting 5 One course (or two half courses) from
Selection groups F(i), F(ii) or F(iii)

3 FN1024 Principles of banking and finance Dr Vicente Cuat 4 AC1025 Principles of accounting 5 One course (or two half courses) from
Selection groups F(i), F(ii) or F(iii)

200 and 300 courses 6 MN3028 Managerial economics (EC1002) +


(MT105A or MT1174) or EC2066 Microeconomics (EC1002) + (MT105A or MT1174)

200 and 300 courses 6 FN3092 Corporate finance (EC1002) +


(MT105A or MT105B or MT1174)

Programme specifics
Department of Accounting and Accounting professions Investment the Department of Finance. The banking Management consultancy Department of Finance enjoys a Financial management Investment pre-eminent reputation for the analysis and management excellence of its teaching and Further academic study research. The Department of Accounting enjoys a reputation Features of the degree as one of the leading groups < A thorough grounding in in the world for teaching and accounting and finance within a research in the economic, strong social science framework. institutional, and organisational < An international flavour, aspects of accounting and developed in consultation with financial management. < BSc Accounting and Finance academics and professionals throughout Southeast graduates can take advantage Asia as well as the UK. of fast track agreements with < The degree has been designed certain professional bodies by LSE academics in the (please see pages 12-14).

Programme specifics
Accountancy professions Consulting Commercial banking Investment Sales Banking Trading Risk management

Where can it lead?

7 AC3059 Financial management (AC1025)


or FN3092 Corporate finance (EC1002) + (MT105A or MT105B or MT1174)

Where can it lead?

8 AC3091 Financial reporting (AC1025) 9 AC3093 Auditing and assurance (AC1025) 10 AC3097 Management accounting (AC1025) 11 One course from Selection groups B, E or M 12 One 200 or 300 course (or two half
courses) from any Selection group

Graduate Entry Route


100 courses 1 EC1002 Introduction to economics 2 ST104A Statistics 1 (half course) and
MT105A Mathematics 1 (half course)

< You begin with a strong foundation in quantitative, economic, accounting and finance subjects. < You progress to a core of compulsory 200 and 300 courses in finance, banking and risk management.

Features of the degree

< You can choose optional courses in related areas which complement the core courses to give well-rounded coverage of the major issues and areas of modern financial theory and practice. < BSc Banking and Finance graduates can take advantage of fast track agreements with certain professional bodies (please see pages 12-14).

7 EC2020 Elements of econometrics (EC1002) +

(ST104A or ST104B) + (MT105A or MT105B or MT1174) or EC2065 Macroeconomics (EC1002) + (MT105A or MT1174) or EC2066 Microeconomics (EC1002) + (MT105A or MT1174)

8 FN2029 Financial intermediation (FN1024) 9 FN3023 Investment management* (FN1024) 10 One course from Selection groups A, B, E or M 11 One 300 course (or two half courses)
from any Selection group

12 One 200 or 300 course (or two half


courses) from any Selection group

Graduate Entry Route


100 courses 1 EC1002 Introduction to economics 2 ST104A Statistics 1 (half course) and
MT105A Mathematics 1 (half course)

3 AC1025 Principles of accounting 200 and 300 courses 4 MN3028 Managerial economics (EC1002) + (MT105A or MT1174) or

Profile: Ervan Lauw BSc Accounting and Finance, Indonesia


I chose to study for a University analyse. For the first time in my of London degree because life, I truly enjoyed the process of of its international reputation learning. The degree has opened for academic excellence. I was up so many opportunities for me. exposed to the University of My future career plan is to be a London syllabus, which I found researcher in the economics field. a totally different, and superior, experience Ervan took the Diploma than what I had known in Economics and a BSc in back in Indonesia. The Accounting and Finance. She was education emphasised awarded a British Chevening Scholarship to pursue an MSc in not just knowledge, International Strategy and but also the skills to think, Economics at the University to question, of St Andrews, where she is now studying for her PhD. and to

EC2066 Microeconomics (EC1002) + (MT105A or MT1174)

Profile: Jeetendar Chandnani BSc Banking and Finance, Hong Kong


Studying with the University of London through the Centre for International Degree Programmes at HKU SPACE has been a great journey for me. Over the course of the degree, the lecturers played a role of a support system, providing time and dedication to the students to make it an enriching environment to learn. The University of London is one of the most prestigious universities in the world, and studying this LSE-led degree was without doubt a tough challenge. Self-discipline is what I have learnt from studying the BSc Banking and Finance degree.
Jeetendar studied at HKU SPACE and passed his BSc Banking and Finance degree with First Class Honours. He now works as a Consultant in Global Markets for Huxley Associates.

3. FN1024 Principles of banking and finance 4. AC1025 Principles of accounting 200 and 300 courses 5. FN3092 Corporate finance (EC1002) +
(MT105A or MT105B or MT1174)

5 AC3059 Financial management (AC1025) or FN3092 Corporate finance (EC1002)


+ (MT105A or MT105B or MT1174)

6. One of the following courses: EC2020 Elements


of econometrics (EC1002) + (ST104A or ST104B) + (MT105A or MT105B or MT1174) or EC2065 Macroeconomics (EC1002) + (MT105A or MT1174) or EC2066 Microeconomics (EC1002) + (MT105A or MT1174)

6 AC3091 Financial reporting (AC1025) 7 AC3093 Auditing and assurance (AC1025) 8 AC3097 Management accounting (AC1025) 9 One full 200 or 300 course from
Selection groups E or M

7. FN2029 Financial intermediation (FN1024) 8. FN3023 Investment management* (FN1024) 9. One 300 course (or two half courses)
from any Selection group
*FN3023 Investment management must be taken with or after FN3092 Corporate finance.

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BSc Business
Programme overview
This degree programme prepares you for the demanding world of business. This requires a familiarity with the main management functions, with Marketing at the core. This degree allows you to study these management functions on the basis of a solid foundation in the social sciences. It will not only provide you with the required technical skills, but also give you a wider perspective on management that will enable you to view a business in its social, cultural and political context. Most importantly, you will acquire the ability to think independently about business decisions, and to assimilate new ideas throughout your career.

BSc Development and Economics


Standard Route
100 courses 1 EC1002 Introduction to economics 2 ST104A Statistics 1 (half course) and
MT105A Mathematics 1 (half course)

Programme overview
Do you want to know more about international development and the causes and solutions to global inequality? If so, this degree may be for you. Studying this degree will provide you with analytical and communication skills that are valued by employers and institutions. Perhaps more importantly, it gives you the chance to gain knowledge from a wide variety of sources that will demonstrate the importance of development, and give you the chance to understand more about what is happening in the world today.

Standard Route
100 courses 1 EC1002 Introduction to economics 2 ST104A Statistics 1 (half course) and
MT105A Mathematics 1 (half course) international development

3 SC1021 Principles of sociology Dr Jrn Rothe 4 AC1025 Principles of accounting 5 MN1107 Introduction to business
and management

3 DV1171 Introduction to Dr Tim Forsyth

4 SC1021 Principles of sociology 200 and 300 courses 5 EC2065 Macroeconomics (EC1002)
+ (MT105A or MT1174) + (MT105A or MT1174)

200 and 300 courses 6 MN3141 Principles of marketing


(EC1002 or SC1021 or MN2079)

Where can it lead?

Programme specifics
< A social science emphasis allows you to develop a thorough appreciation of business and management within a wider environment. < An opportunity to develop excellent analytical skills which are invaluable to the decisionmaking role of management and to further study.

7 One 300 course from Selection group M 8 One 300 course from Selection group M 9 One 300 course from Selection group M 10 One course from Selection group M 11 One 200 or 300 course from any Selection group 12 One 200 or 300 course from any Selection group

Business Banking General management Accountancy Management consulting Marketing Further academic study

< A solid understanding of the different functional areas of business and a good foundation for a career in management.

Features of the degree

Graduate Entry Route


100 courses 1 EC1002 Introduction to economics 2 ST104A Statistics 1 (half course) and
MT105A Mathematics 1 (half course)

You may already be working for a development agency in a developing country and want to take a qualification. Or you may hope to start a career in international development with an NGO or government development agency.

Where can it lead?

Programme specifics
< A thorough grounding in the fundamentals of economics, sociology and human geography subjects whose literature demonstrates keys links with the process of development. Key mathematical and statistical skills are acquired in the early stages of the degree. < Case study material is drawn widely from South East Asia, Latin America and Africa. However you can also use your own knowledge of the development process wherever you live.

6 EC2066 Microeconomics (EC1002) 7 GY2109 Geographies of development 8 DV3044 Economics of development


(EC2065 + MN3028) or (EC2065 + EC2066)

9 One 300 course from Selection groups D or E 10 One 300 course from Selection group D 11 One 300 course from Selection group D 12 One 100, 200 or 300 course (or two half
course) from any Selection group

3 AC1025 Principles of accounting 4 MN1107 Introduction to business


and management

< An opportunity to study aspects of development such as urbanisation, housing and infrastructure, poverty and social exclusion, environmental concerns and issues of gender.

Features of the degree

Graduate Entry Route


100 courses 1 EC1002 Introduction to economics 2 ST104A Statistics 1 (half course) and 3 DV1171 Introduction to
MT105A Mathematics 1 (half course) international development

Profile: Ken Chong | BSc Business, Hong Kong


My degree in business helped hone my business acumen and I now plan to take a Masters to give me the knowledge to develop my business further by raising my own animals and crops. I am committed to using my career to contribute to the development of my countrys agricultural systems.
Ken started studying for his degree in New York, but in the aftermath of the terrorist attacks in 2001, felt safer returning home to Hong Kong. He completed his business degree with the University of London International Programmes while attending classes at HKU SPACE, and working in his fathers business. Inspired by his fathers success as an entrepreneur, and motivated by the desire to make a difference to Chinas rural economy, Ken has set up his own business making high nutrient animal feeds and soil fertilizers using superworms.

200 or 300 courses 5 MN3141 Principles of marketing


(EC1002 or SC1021 or MN2079)

4 SC1021 Principles of sociology

6 One 300 course from Selection group M 7 One 300 course from Selection group M 8 One course from Selection group M 9 One course from Selection groups A, B, E or M

Profile: Robert Tew | BSc Development and Economics, United Kingdom


I decided to study this programme because of my interest in international development, especially the economic aspects. I chose the International Programmes because of its reputation for excellence. In order to do well at this programme you need an inquiring mind, a willingness to challenge your existing thinking about the world and self discipline. After not studying for more than 20 years this has got my brain working again!
Robert studied independently in the UK for the BSc Development and Economics degree and was awarded First Class Honours. He is now working in a school in the Sudan.

200 and 300 courses 5 EC2065 Macroeconomics (EC1002)


+ (MT105A or MT1174) + (MT105A or MT1174)

6 EC2066 Microeconomics (EC1002) 7 GY2109 Geographies of development 8 DV3044 Economics of development


(EC2065 + MN3028) or (EC2065 + EC2066)

9 One 300 course from Selection groups D or E


Through the Graduate Entry Route the degree takes a minimum of three years to complete.

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BSc Economics
Programme overview
This degree builds on a foundation of economic theory and the necessary mathematics and statistics in the 100 courses. It deepens that intellectual platform in the 200 and 300 courses that are available: a wide choice of more specialised options including economic policy, and the application of economic theory to particular topics. Depending on your choice of courses, the study of economics will give you greater understanding both of particular areas such as public economics, international trade or economic development, and of the broader behaviour of economies. While much of the subject is settled territory one of the excitements of economics is that it remains work in progress, as the recent international economic crisis makes clear.

BSc Economics and Finance


Standard Route
100 courses 1 EC1002 Introduction to economics 2. ST104A Statistics 1 (half course) and
ST104B Statistics 2* (half course)

Standard Route
100 courses 1 EC1002 Introduction to economics 2 ST104A Statistics 1 (half course) and
ST104B Statistics 2 (half course)

Programme overview
This degree has been designed to provide the economic reasoning, quantitative skills and institutional knowledge required by financial economists to solve practical problems arising in finance. These skills should make graduates highly suited for further studies as well as for a career in investment banking or in financial markets. This degree offers you the opportunity to combine in-depth studies in economics and finance. It provides you with the analytical tools from the fields of mathematics, statistics, economics and econometrics together with the institutional knowledge required to work as a financial economist.

3 MT105A Mathematics 1 (half course) and


MT105B Mathematics 2 (half course)

4 FN1024 Principles of banking and finance 200 and 300 courses Professor David Webb 5 EC2065 Macroeconomics (EC1002)
+ (MT105A or MT1174) + (MT105A or MT1174)

3. MT105A Mathematics 1 (half course) and


MT105B Mathematics 2** (half course)

Dr Donald Verry

4. One course (or two half courses) from


Selection groups F(i), F(ii) or F(iii).

6 EC2066 Microeconomics (EC1002) 7 EC2020 Elements of econometrics


(EC1002) + (ST104A or ST104B) + (MT105A or MT105B or MT1174) (MT105A or MT105B or MT1174)

200 and 300 courses 5. EC2020 Elements of econometrics


(EC1002) + (ST104A or ST104B) + (MT105A or MT105B or MT1174)

6. EC2065 Macroeconomics (EC1002)


+ (MT105A or MT1174) + (MT105A or MT1174)

8 FN3092 Corporate finance (EC1002) + 9 EC3115 Monetary economics (EC2065) or


EC3099 Industrial economics (EC2066)

7. EC2066 Microeconomics (EC1002) 8. One 300 course from Selection group E

Programme specifics
A career as a financial economist, whether in government or finance (investment or commercial banking, risk management, research, fund management or securities trading). The combination of economic reasoning and mathematical and other quantitative skills acquired should suit those interested in a career in consultancy, general management or accountancy. It also provides a sound basis for further academic study.

Where can it lead?

Programme specifics
< You will study questions ranging from how much of its income a household chooses to save and what goods it chooses to buy, to how all the households and businesses in the country interact to determine national output, the balance of payments, inflation and unemployment. < You will learn an approach to a logical analysis of social and individual decision making and overall the approach for analysing a whole range of problems, often outside what is thought of as the conventional domain of economics.

Where can it lead?

9. One 300 course from Selection group E 10. One 300 course from Selection group E 11. One 200 or 300 course from Selection group E 12. One 100, 200 or 300 course (or two half
courses) from any Selection group

Because of its combination of verbal reasoning, and mathematical and quantitative analysis, the degree is an excellent foundation for employment as an economist in industry, finance, government or international organisations, among others.

Graduate Entry Route


100 courses 1 EC1002 Introduction to economics 2. ST104A Statistics 1 (half course) and
ST104B Statistics 2* (half course)

< You will benefit from the wide knowledge and experience of the LSE Department of Economics, frequently ranked number one outside the USA for its published research.

Features of the degree

< A thorough programme grounded on quantitative, economics and finance subjects. < Those pursuing the standard route can choose optional courses in economics and finance as well as in related areas such as accounting. < More generally, the degree is designed to develop excellent analytical skills which should be useful in the context of further studies or work as an economist.

Features of the degree

10 FN3142 Quantitative finance* (EC2020 + EC2066) 11 One 300 course (or two half courses)
from any Selection group

12 One 100, 200 or 300 course (or two half


courses) from any Selection group

Graduate Entry Route


100 courses 1 EC1002 Introduction to economics 2 ST104A Statistics 1 (half course) and
ST104B Statistics 2 (half course)

3 MT105A Mathematics 1 (half course) and


MT105B Mathematics 2 (half course)

3. MT105A Mathematics 1 (half course) and


MT105B Mathematics 2** (half course)

Profile: Alexander Petrov BSc Economics and Finance, Russia


The course content stimulated critical thinking and presented certain facts I might have known before in a more scientific way. On top of that, more advanced subjects were also very valuable in practice and genuinely contributed to my understanding of how the world economy works. Taking the BSc Economics and Finance degree made me intellectually braver: I learnt to doubt unverified claims, challenge stereotypes and distrust people who are too sure about something too complicated to be too sure about. I think that I considerably improved my time-management, both on a macro level like distributing plans between different weekdays, and on a micro level, which was particularly helpful during exams. In addition to this, I developed a variety of other study skills.

4 FN1024 Principles of banking and finance 200 and 300 courses 5 EC2065 Macroeconomics (EC1002)
+ (MT105A or MT1174) + (MT105A or MT1174)

200 and 300 courses 4. EC2020 Elements of econometrics


(EC1002) + (ST104A or ST104B) + (MT105A or MT105B or MT1174)

6 EC2066 Microeconomics (EC1002) 7 EC2020 Elements of econometrics


(EC1002) + (ST104A or ST104B) + (MT105A or MT105B or MT1174) (MT105A or MT105B or MT1174)

Profile: Chung Chun Kit BSc Economics, Hong Kong


I am proud that I am a graduate of the International Programmes. Studying for a degree is always difficult but it develops students who are independent, hard working and critical. This is a solid background for further studies.
Chun Kits studies began with the Diploma in Economics. He then went on to achieve First Class Honours in the BSc Economics. He is now studying for a PhD in Economics at the Chinese University of Hong Kong and teaches at HKU SPACE.

5. EC2065 Macroeconomics (EC1002)


+ (MT105A or MT1174) + (MT105A or MT1174)

6. EC2066 Microeconomics (EC1002) 7. One 300 course from Selection group E 8. One 300 course from Selection group E 9. One 200 or 300 course from Selection group E
*ST104B Statistics 2 must be taken with or after ST104A Statistics 1 **MT105B Mathematics 2 must be taken with or after MT105A Mathematics 1

8 FN3092 Corporate finance (EC1002) + 9 FN3142 Quantitative finance* (EC2020 + EC2066)


Through the Graduate Entry Route the degree takes a minimum of three years to complete. *FN3142 Quantitative finance must be taken with or after FN3092 Corporate finance.

Alexander studied at the International College of Economics and Finance in Moscow. He received a First Class Honours degree and is now studying for an MSc in Economics at LSE.

24

www.londoninternational.ac.uk/lse

25

The University of London International Programmes is globally recognised, and being a part of it has opened up opportunities for me to continue my studies in one of the worlds best universities, which is LSE.

BSc Economics and Management


Programme overview
What makes management such an interesting subject is that it is a combination of so many fields, and economics is central among them. This degree provides you with the concepts and methods from economics that are relevant for management and shows you how to apply them. It also gives you the opportunity to acquire the foundations of complementary disciplines like finance, accounting, sociology, as well as the necessary quantitative methods. Together with your optional course choices these subjects cover all relevant aspects of management from many different perspectives. As a result you will be able to understand how organisations work and how they interact. Analysing the structure and strategies of firms will allow you to understand the evolution of industries and the functioning of markets. This ability to apply economic reasoning and to think independently about management is critical for managers and entrepreneurs. This degree provides the foundation for careers in management, consulting, or further study.

Standard Route
100 courses 1 EC1002 Introduction to economics 2 ST104A Statistics 1 (half course) and
MT105A Mathematics 1 (half course)

3 SC1021 Principles of sociology Dr Jrn Rothe 4 AC1025 Principles of accounting 5 MN1107 Introduction to business
and management

200 and 300 courses 6 MN3028 Managerial economics (EC1002) + (MT105A or MT1174) or EC2066 7 EC2065 Macroeconomics (EC1002)
+ (MT105A or MT1174)

Microeconomics (EC1002) + (MT105A or MT1174)

8 MN3127 Organisation theory: an interdisciplinary


approach (EC1002 or SC1021 or MN2079)

9 One 300 course from Selection group E 10 One 300 course from Selection group M 11 One 300 course from Selection groups E or M 12 One course (or two half courses)
from Selection groups E, M or S

Ursula Wiriadinata

Programme specifics
Where can it lead?
Graduates of this programme go on to work in a great variety of areas, including management consultancy, banking and accountancy; some choose to pursue postgraduate studies.

Profile: Ursula Wiriadinata Diploma in Economics, BSc in Economics and Finance, Indonesia
The Diploma in Economics gave the big picture of accounting and economics, as well as substantial knowledge about finance. Therefore, by the end of the programme, I was fully prepared for a wide range of disciplines. I decided to pursue a BSc in Economics and Finance because it was very useful in preparing myself for a job in the financial sector. The University of London International Programmes is globally recognised, and being a part of it has opened up opportunities for me to continue my studies in one of the worlds best universities, which is LSE. I applied to several very good universities and all of them gave me offers. So you see how powerful the degree is I love this programme!
Ursula passed her BSc in Economics and Finance with First Class Honours. She was awarded a scholarship to study an MSc in Finance and Economics at LSE. Watch Ursula talk about her study experience on our YouTube channel: http://bit.ly/ursula-wiriadinata

< A strong emphasis on social science theory and practice.

Features of the degree

< Knowledge and understanding of a range of issues in international management and economics. < A degree which will be valued by employers who are looking for people who can demonstrate logical and quantitative reasoning. < This degree contains a substantial amount of Economics, so that students can pursue careers in Management and Economics.

Graduate Entry Route


100 courses 1 EC1002 Introduction to economics 2 ST104A Statistics 1 (half course) and
MT105A Mathematics 1 (half course)

3 AC1025 Principles of accounting 4 MN1107 Introduction to business


and management

200 and 300 courses 5 MN3028 Managerial economics (EC1002) + (MT105A or MT1174) or EC2066 6 EC2065 Macroeconomics (EC1002)
+ (MT105A or MT1174)

Profile: Ethan Yu BSc Economics and Management, Malaysia


While studying I was able to develop career-related skills such as problem solving, communication, report writing, computer literacy and many others which have been valuable assets. I would highly recommend this degree as the skill sets that you acquire are highly transferable in the modern business environment.
Ethan is now working for the largest executive search firm in Malaysia, MRI Network, as a Regional Consultant in the Banking and Financial Services division.

Microeconomics (EC1002) + (MT105A or MT1174)

7 MN3127 Organisation theory: an interdisciplinary


approach (EC1002 or SC1021 or MN2079)

8 One 300 course from Selection groups E or M 9 One 200 or 300 course from
Selection groups E or M

26

Undergraduate study in Economics, Management, Finance and the Social Sciences

www.londoninternational.ac.uk/lse

27

Standard Route
100 courses

BSc Information Systems and Management


Programme overview
Information and communications technology (ICT) has had a huge effect on our world. It has enabled new forms of communication and automation; opened new markets and opportunities across the globe; and created new types of business and government. It is not technology which has achieved this, but the way its used by people in social settings. This degree studies information systems as technical and social phenomena. It provides the skills needed by managers to solve organisational and business problems using ICT, as well as providing an understanding of the wider social impact of the technology.

1 IS1060 Introduction to information systems 2 MN1107 Introduction to business


and management

3 IS1168 Introduction to computer systems


architecture and programming

4 < < < <

EC1002 Introduction to economics or GY1009 Human geography or IR1011 Introduction to international relations or SC1021 Principles of sociology

One of the following 100 courses:

200 and 300 courses 5 One of the following courses: < MN3127 Organisation theory: an interdisciplinary approach (EC1002 or SC1021 or MN2079) or < MN3075 Human resource management or < MN2079 Elements of social and applied
psychology

The degree includes a new course on Management and innovation of e-business. The course is at the cutting edge of knowledge on the subject.
Dr Steve Smithson

Dr Steve Smithson

6 IS2062 Information systems development


and management (IS1060)

7 IS2138 Information and communication


technologies: principles and perspectives (IS1060 + IS1168)

Programme specifics
This degree would suit you if you are hoping to pursue a career in information systems management, in a software house or in management consultancy specialising in ICT and Information Systems. It would also give you a distinct advantage in other careers in public and private organisations.

8 IS3139 Software engineering: theory


and application (IS2062 + IS2138)

Where can it lead?

< A focus on how computers are used within business and

Features of the degree

administrative organisations. It is natural therefore to combine the study of information systems with the study of management. < An opportunity to demonstrate your practical skills by submitting coursework, including computer-based work. You will need access to a standard computer with standard database, spreadsheet, programming language and word processing software.

9 IS3159 Research project in information


systems (IS2062 + IS2138)

10 IS3167 Management and innovation of e-business 11 One 300 course from Selection group M 12 One 100, 200 or 300 course (or two half
courses) from any Selection group

Graduate Entry Route


100 courses 1 IS1060 Introduction to information systems 2 MN1107 Introduction to business
and management

3 IS1168 Introduction to computer systems


architecture and programming

Profile: Dr Steve Smithson | Department of Management, LSE Subject guide author: Research project in information systems
For the final dissertation students are encouraged to go out and do some real research in business or in society concerning the application of business systems. There have been some excellent projects over the past few years, including one in a hospital in the Caribbean where the student had looked in depth at the information problems and the technological solutions available, and tried to match them. But also match them according to the different views of the stakeholders: patients, nurses, doctors and administrators. Hence, when they complete the many previous information degree, graduates are in technologies. However, a position to contribute relatively few businesses are positively, from day one, to actually making much money whichever organisation they out of it or are able to harness join within their own locality. web 2.0 to make changes The degree also includes a in the bottom line. Its only new course on Management recently that enough research and innovation of e-business. material has been gathered E-business has changed together to put together a peoples lives so much solid, academic course on the changed their social lives subject. The Management through social networking and innovation of e-business sites (like Facebook), contentcourse is at the cutting edge sharing sites (like YouTube) of knowledge on the subject. and blogs, and changed their working lives through the use Watch Steve talk about of web-based systems. Theres The Importance of E-Business on our YouTube channel: a tremendous hype thats grown up around web 2.0, like http://bit.ly/steve-smithson
www.londoninternational.ac.uk/lse

Through the Graduate Entry Route the degree takes a minimum of three years to complete.

Profile: Adeolu-Ayodeji Adelodun BSc Information Systems and Management, Nigeria


The flexibility of the University of With the knowledge I now have, London International Programmes I want to explore the use of allowed me to combine travels, information systems to bridge the work and family with my studies gap between business enterprise very easily. Studying the BSc and the manufacturing process. Information Systems Im very proud to be a graduate and Management of the University of London. has improved my knowledge and Adeolu works as an Operator awareness of the use of for oil and gas company Chevron Nigeria in Escravos in information data in my the Niger Delta. Watch Adeolu environment, my talk about his study experience company and on our YouTube channel: the oil and http://bit.ly/adeolu-ayodeji gas industry.

4 < < < <

One of the following 100 courses: EC1002 Introduction to economics or GY1009 Human geography or IR1011 Introduction to international relations or SC1021 Principles of sociology 200 and 300 courses

5 One of the following courses: < MN3127 Organisation theory: an interdisciplinary approach (EC1002 or SC1021 or MN2079) or < MN3075 Human resource management or < MN2079 Elements of social and applied
psychology

6 IS2062 Information systems development


and management (IS1060)

7 IS2138 Information and communication


technologies: principles and perspectives (IS1060 + IS1168)

8 IS3139 Software engineering: theory and application (IS2062 + IS2138) or


IS3159 Research project in information systems (IS2062 + IS2138)

9 IS3167 Management and innovation of e-business

28

29

BSc International Development


Programme overview
The field of International Development
is the attempt to understand and to shape processes of social and economic change in order to reduce poverty and to create a better life for poorer people, and the countries where they live.

Standard Route
100 courses 1 DV1171 Introduction to international development 2, 3, 4 three courses chosen from: < EC1002 Introduction to economics < GY1009 Human geography < IR1011 Introduction to international relations < SC1021 Principles of sociology < ST104A Statistics 1 (half course) and < MT105A Mathematics 1 (half course) 200 or 300 courses 5 DV3165 Development management 6 GY2109 Geographies of development 7, 8 two courses chosen from: < DV2169 Economic policy analysis in international < < < < <

BSc International Relations


Programme overview
International Relations started out as the study of an international system composed first and foremost by nation-states. Today, the discipline considers the role not only of states but also of a wide range of international actors, from international organisations to multinational corporations, and from civil society groups to terrorist networks. At its heart are questions Dr Robert Falkner concerning war and peace, international order and stability, and the forces that produce change in the international system. In an era of economic globalisation, International Relations is also concerned with the close links between international politics and the global economy, and whether globalisation is producing a more integrated or more fragmented world. The study of International Relations is characterised by a sense of pluralism; it is an arena of debate between competing theoretical perspectives. The discipline encourages critical engagement with global policy challenges and seeks answers to pressing issues in international politics today.

Standard Route
100 courses 1 IR1011 Introduction to international relations 2 PS1130 Introduction to modern political thought or PS1172 Introduction to political science 3 One 100 course (or two half courses)
from Selection group F(i)

It combines social-science approaches from disciplines such as economics, politics, sociology and demography. It also requires an understanding of global processes of economics and politics as well as more local, national, and sub-national processes. Typical themes of International Development include poverty alleviation, economic growth; aid and assistance; the management of local and global environmental problems and the political economy of social change.

Dr Tim Forsyth

4 One 100 course (or two half courses) 200 and 300 courses

from Selection groups F(i), F(ii) or F(iii)

development (DV1171) EC2065 Macroeconomics (EC1002) + (MT105A or MT1174) EC2066 Microeconomics (EC1002) + (MT105A or MT1174) GY2164 Economic geography IR3026 International political economy (EC1002 or IR1011) SC3160 Population and society

5 IR3026 International political economy


(EC1002 or IR1011)

6 IR3083 International political theory (IR1011) 7 IR2085 International institutions (IR1011) 8 IR2137 Foreign policy analysis (IR1011) 9 IR3140 Security and international relations
(IR1011)

9, 10 two courses chosen from: < DV3044 Economics of development (EC2065

Where can it lead?

Programme specifics

+ MN3028) or (EC2065 + EC2066) < DV3162 Complex emergencies and humanitarian responses < DV3166 Global environmental problems and politics (GY1009 or IR1011 or SC1021 or PS1172)

10 One 300 course from Selection groups IR or P 11 One course (or two half courses) from
Selection groups E, IR, P or S

International Development is a growing field of public policy and private investment. Graduates can work for governments, international organizations such as the United Nations, aid agencies and non-governmental organizations, and for the private sector. The discipline offers the chance to gain experience in various elements of politics, economics and social policy with practical problem-solving skills. Careers can include economic planning, rural development, humanitarianism, poverty reduction, and working to provide public services and environmental protection.

< A wide-ranging training in

Features of the degree:

11 One 300 course from Selection groups D, E, G, IR or S 12 One course (or two half courses) from any Selection group

Programme specifics
< Postgraduate study < Government < International organisations < Business and the media Also, many other careers which require articulate, clear thinking individuals with a grasp of contemporary international issues. < A programme for those who wish to engage critically with the range of materials about contemporary international relations, perhaps those from other subject areas, such as economics or law, who need to be equipped with sufficient knowledge of international relations to enable them to understand the international dimensions of their own chosen fields.

12 One 100, 200 or 300 course (or two half


courses) from any Selection group

diverse social science skills, and in the subject matter of International Development. < You will gain experience in themes of economic, political and social analysis, with options to take related fields through optional courses. < The degree is designed to connect different approaches to Development, and addresses realworld problems relating to economic growth, politics, humanitarianism, poverty, environment and governance in poorer countries.

Graduate Entry Route


100 courses 1 DV1171 Introduction to international development 2, 3, 4 three courses chosen from: < EC1002 Introduction to economics < GY1009 Human geography < IR1011 Introduction to international relations < SC1021 Principles of sociology < ST104A Statistics 1 (half course) and < MT105A Mathematics 1 (half course) 200 or 300 courses 5 DV3165 Development management 6 GY2109 Geographies of development 7, 8 two courses chosen from: < DV2169 Economic policy analysis in international < < < < <

Where can it lead?

Features of the degree

development (DV1171) EC2065 Macroeconomics (EC1002) + (MT105A or MT1174 EC2066 Microeconomics (EC1002) + (MT105A or MT1174) GY2164 Economic geography IR3026 International political economy (EC1002 or IR1011) SC3160 Population and society

< You will have the opportunity to gain a basic knowledge of at least one other social science discipline and will study the same compulsory 200 and 300 courses as students at LSE in International political theory, International institutions, Foreign policy analysis and International political economy. < These courses are designed to provide a detailed and critical understanding of the core literature and main theoretical debates in the field of International Relations. < A programme for concerned citizens who seek a framework for understanding the international aspects of problems such as environmental degradation, the globalising of economy, development and human rights, which are recognised to be of increasing importance in the 21st century.

Graduate Entry Route


100 courses 1 IR1011 Introduction to international relations 2 PS1130 Introduction to modern political thought or PS1172 Introduction to political science 3 One 100 course (or two half courses)
from Selection group F(i)

4 One 100 course (or two half courses) 200 and 300 courses

from Selection groups F(i), F(ii) or F(iii)

5 IR3026 International political economy


(EC1002 or IR1011)

6 IR3083 International political theory (IR1011) 7 IR2085 International institutions (IR1011) 8 IR2137 Foreign policy analysis (IR1011) 9 IR3140 Security in international relations (IR1011)

9 DV3044 Economics of development (EC2065 + MN3028) or (EC2065 + EC2066) or DV3166


Global environmental problems and politics (GY1009 or IR1011 or SC1021 or PS1172)

30

Undergraduate study in Economics, Management, Finance and the Social Sciences

www.londoninternational.ac.uk/lse

31

BSc Management
Programme overview
This degree offers you the opportunity to study the activity of management and the environment in which the manager operates. It has an emphasis on social science theory and practice which reflects different areas of expertise. Management at LSE is strongly based on economics and students require a strong mathematical base, though other areas such as industrial relations, strategy, and organisation theory also occupy a central position. This degree reflects this approach and will suit you if you are interested in a career in management or management consultancy, and many other areas where the skills that you learn will be valued.

Standard Route
100 courses 1 EC1002 Introduction to economics 2 ST104A Statistics 1 (half course) and
MT105A Mathematics 1 (half course)

3 SC1021 Principles of sociology Professor Saul Estrin 4 AC1025 Principles of accounting 5 MN1107 Introduction to business and management 200 and 300 courses 6 MN3028 Managerial economics (EC1002) + (MT105A or MT1174) 7 MN3127 Organisation theory: an interdisciplinary
approach (EC1002 or SC1021 or MN2079)

Six years after graduating, and having worked in both the corporate world and in academia, I can testify to the fact that the University of London degree opened doors for me I did not know existed. My undergraduate preparation as a University of London student rendered me credibility and prestige.
Abhisekh Ghosh Moulick

8 MN3119 Strategy (EC1002) + (MT105A or MT1174) 9 One course from the following: < MN2079 Elements of social and applied psychology or < MN3032 Management science methods (ST104A) + (MT105A or MT1174) or < MN3075 Human resource management or < MT2076 Management mathematics
(ST104A) + (MT105A or MT1174)

Programme specifics
< Management consulting < Banking < General management careers where a critical perspective is required. < An opportunity for critical and theoretical study. < An intellectually demanding, broad preparation for

Where can it lead?

Features of the degree

management that draws on a wide range of social science disciplines. < A degree relevant to your own experiences and local environment but which will also give you an understanding of a range of issues in international management.

10 One 300 course from Selection group M 11 One course (or two half courses) from Selection groups E, M or S 12 One 200 or 300 course (or two half courses)
from any Selection group

Graduate Entry Route


100 courses 1 EC1002 Introduction to economics 2 ST104A Statistics 1 (half course) and 3 AC1025 Principles of accounting
MT105A Mathematics 1 (half course)

Profile: Abhisekh Ghosh Moulick | Diploma in Economics and BSc Management, India
Before I joined the programme, the very name University of London conjured images of academic excellence and a world of possibilities. Now, six years after graduating, and having worked in both the corporate world and in academia, I can testify to the fact that the University of London degree opened doors for me I did not know existed! Wherever I have travelled around the world, my undergraduate preparation as a University of London student rendered me credibility and prestige. The primary challenge that I faced was to gather the resources required, such as books and journals, to prepare for the rigorous courses. Also, students entering the University of London programme after high school are asked and encouraged maybe for the very first time in their lives to think for themselves, instead of learning by rote. This can be both a liberating as well as an intimidating intellectual experience, as it was for me. The University of London programme helped me acquire advanced analytical and quantitative skills and afforded me a holistic exposure to social sciences, while allowing me to specialize in an area London student I would of interest to me. These not only think about how opportunities prepared me an issue would impact just for Doctoral studies and gave me, or my neighbourhood, me the confidence to make or my country, but the informed academic choices world at large. Certainly it as a budding social scientist. is a challenging intellectual The world we are in today enterprise, but one that is very different from the one not only makes me good we were in, say, a decade ago. at my job, but also allows While scientific innovations me to make a difference bring human society closer, to the world around me. at the same time the chasms that divide us are increasing Abhisekh studied for his Diploma in Economics and at an alarming pace. The BSc in Management in University of London degree Calcutta, India. He began his prepared me to face this Doctoral studies in autumn time of conflict, turmoil, 2011 at the Department and change by making me of Political Science, Texas think and act as a global A&M University. citizen. As a University of
www.londoninternational.ac.uk/lse

Profile: Akvan Gajanyake BSc Management, Sri Lanka


The University of London International Programmes allowed me to earn a worldclass degree by staying in my home country. This gave me the opportunity to work during the period I was studying, which has given me a distinct advantage, specially because the degree was very much academic in content. The knowledge that I gained from this course has helped me immensely at my work place, giving me the skill to look at situations more analytically. The economics and accounting background gives me an edge over my colleagues who are mostly science graduates.
Akvan works as a programme assistant in Sri Lanka.

4 MN1107 Introduction to business and management 200 and 300 courses 5 MN3028 Managerial economics (EC1002) + (MT105A or MT1174) 6 MN3127 Organisation theory: an interdisciplinary
approach (EC1002 or SC1021 or MN2079)

7 MN3119 Strategy (EC1002) + (MT105A or MT1174) 8 One course from the following: < MN2079 Elements of social and applied psychology or < MN3032 Management science methods < MN3075 Human resource management or < MT2076 Management mathematics
(ST104A) + (MT105A or MT1174) (ST104A) + (MT105A or MT1174) or

9 One course from Selection groups A, B, E or M

32

33

BSc Mathematics and Economics


Programme overview
This degree focuses on how mathematics and economics connect and interact. You will not only acquire technical skills, but also powers of analysis. The ability to think analytically will enable you to adapt to new developments in your chosen career. We believe that the combination of mathematics and economics instils such ability. You will be able to understand how rigorous proofs can be given in mathematics, and see how the theories developed can be used in an economics context. The general skills you will gain will enable you to proceed to a successful career in many fields. In this course, you will learn how formal mathematics is done: why it is important to have precise definitions, and how results can be proved and techniques justified.

Standard Route
100 courses 1 EC1002 Introduction to economics 2 ST104A Statistics 1 (half course) and
ST104B Statistics 2 (half course)

3 MT1173 Algebra Professor Martin Anthony 4 MT1174 Calculus 200 and 300 courses 5 EC2065 Macroeconomics (EC1002 + (MT105A or MT1174) 6 EC2066 Microeconomics (EC1002) + (MT105A or MT1174) 7 MT2116 Abstract mathematics (MT1174)
or (MT105A + MT105B)

The reason a degree like this is attractive to employers is because what you learn when you study maths is a way of thinking, a way of modelling problems.
Professor Martin Anthony

8 MT2176 Further calculus (half course) (MT1174) and 9 One course from the following: < DV3044 Economics of development

MT2175 Further linear algebra (half course) (MT1173)

< EC2020 Elements of econometrics (EC1002) +

(EC2065 + MN3028) or (EC2065 + EC2066)

Programme specifics
Where can it lead?
Finance Business Management Accounting Education Professional or managerial careers, particularly in areas requiring the application of quantitative skills (e.g. forecasting and risk) Further academic study topics fit well with the economics topics. < The 100 courses which you take first have slightly more mathematical and statistical topics because these have to be studied before their application in the economics courses. < There is some flexibility in the choice of papers you take as 200 and 300 courses, but generally, about half of your papers will be related to economics, and half to mathematics.

< EC3015 Economics of labour (EC2066 or MN3028) < EC3016 International economics (EC2065 + EC2066) < < < <

(ST104A or ST104B) + (MT105A or MT105B or MT1174)

or (EC2065 + MN3028) EC3022 Public economics (EC2066 or MN3028) EC3099 Industrial economics (EC2066 or MN3028) EC3115 Monetary economics (EC2065) EC3120 Mathematical economics (EC2066 + MT105A + MT105B) or (EC2066 + MT1174) < IR3026 International political economy (EC1002 or IR1011)

10 One 300 course (or two half courses)


from Selection group N

11 One 300 course from Selection group E 12 One 300 course (or two half courses)
from Selection groups E or N

< A thorough programme providing an understanding in advanced areas of mathematics, carefully structured so that these

Features of the degree

Profile: Professor Martin Anthony | Department of Mathematics, LSE


Algebra and calculus are new courses. By taking these two courses, along with Statistics and Economics, students are getting up to exactly the right level by the end of year one, which we hope will make it easier for them to transition into the second year. These arent just generic first-year maths courses, theyre definitely aimed at students who want to do the sort of maths thats relevant to economic theory, rather than, say, engineering. Given this is a combined programme in Maths and Economics, there are obvious career opportunities in finance and related areas. Its also a good preparation for Masters programmes. Its still the case, I think, that most graduate jobs arent too specific about what degree they want. Employers want bright people, people who can solve problems. What matters, for many jobs, is that you have a quantitative degree from a good university, and that its a good class of degree. The reason a degree like this is attractive to employers is because what you learn when you study maths is a way of thinking, a way of modelling problems. And thats particularly true in a combined degree like this where youre not just doing pure maths but youre doing some economic modelling. You can learn how to model a situation and work out what are the important bits and what is just extraneous detail. You can get down to the core of the problem and solve it. The ability to think doesnt go out of date, thats the important thing.
www.londoninternational.ac.uk/lse

Profile: Tommy Khoo | BSc Mathematics and Economics, Singapore


For those who are unable to do a degree course on campus at a university, and want to pursue mathematics or mathematical economics, this is an excellent choice. In particular, from personal experience, I think this is an excellent second chance for someone who might have done poorly in their exams in the past but still wants to do mathematics or mathematical economics formally. This degree has been proven to be well recognised by top universities in the UK. If it didnt exist, I probably would never have had the opportunity to gain admission into a top UK university like Oxford.
Tommy studied at Singapore Institute of Management and gained his BSc degree with First Class Honours. Having completed his Masters degree at the University of Oxford, he is now applying to do a PhD.

34

Undergraduate study in Economics, Management, Finance and the Social Sciences

35

BSc Politics and International Relations


Programme overview
This degree enables you to combine a study of both politics and international relations. How political power is distributed and organised within the state and between states is central to this specialism. International relations is concerned with the behaviour of states and their relations with each other. It considers some of the great issues of international society, such as the causes of war and the conditions of peace. But it also concerns international economic relations and such questions as globalisation: its advantages and disadvantages. I have been involved in the International Programmes for many years and my particular interests are international organisations, especially the UN system and the European Union.

Standard Route
100 courses 1 IR1011 Introduction to international relations 2 PS1130 Introduction to modern political thought or PS1172 Introduction to political science 3 One course (or two half courses)
from Selection group F(i) from Selection group F(i)

Professor Paul Kelly

4 One course (or two half courses) 200 and 300 courses 5 PS2082 Comparative politics (PS1172 or PS1130) 6 IR3083 International political theory (IR1011) 7 IR2084 Nationalism and international
relations (IR1011)

8 PS3086 Democracy and democratisation


(PS1172 or PS1130)

Careers in the business world Journalism and media Civil service Public sector International organisations

Where can it lead?

Programme specifics
< You will analyse political relationships in the economic and social context and take into account historical influences on contemporary politics. < You will focus on the changing nature of international society and the principles of international order and justice in the post cold war period. < You will learn to analyse detailed social and political data and to form balanced judgements.

9 One 300 course from Selection groups IR or P 10 One course (or two half courses) from
Selection groups E, IR, P or S Selection groups E, IR, P or S

Different courses on our programmes will give you different kinds of skills. In a course like mine, which is about reading texts, its the ability to critically analyse arguments. Thats a very general thing, but its a hugely valuable skill in almost any advanced career.
Professor Paul Kelly

11 One course (or two half courses) from 12 One 100, 200 or 300 course (or two half
courses) from any Selection group

< You will study various types of regime, the institutions of representative and responsible government, the process of politics and the forming and implementation of public policy.

Features of the degree

Graduate Entry Route


100 courses 1 IR1011 Introduction to international relations 2 PS1130 Introduction to modern political thought or PS1172 Introduction to political science 3 One course (or two half courses)
from Selection group F(i)

Profile: Professor Paul Kelly | Head of Department of Government, LSE


I wrote the study guide for Introduction to modern political thought, which is one of the required first year courses on the Politics and International Relations programme. It gives students a broad and general theoretical framework within which a lot of more recent real world politics fits. In structuring the study guide, you try and give a clear indication to the student how they should deal with the material, what is the process of note-taking, revision, how do they read. With a course like Introduction to modern political thought a lot of it is engagement with texts, setting out your ideas, trying to critically engage with the text. And that can be done remotely just as much as in a classroom. As part of a general intellectual training, a good social science education is applicable to a variety of careers. We find that our students go into all manner of jobs including the civil service, public affairs, NGOs, teaching, political lobbying and journalism. The range is quite extraordinary. Our experience, both from internal students and International Programmes students, is that employers like the high quality of education they get: intelligent, articulate, open-minded and critical students who generally do well in whatever they apply themselves to. Different courses on our programmes will give you different kinds of skills. In a course like mine, which is about reading texts, its the ability to critically analyse arguments. Thats a very general thing, but its a hugely valuable skill in almost any advanced career. Its perhaps the most important transferable skill you get out of any quality higher education.
www.londoninternational.ac.uk/lse

Profile: Major Will Strickland | BSc Politics and International Relations, United Kingdom
I managed to complete the degree in five years. I found it extremely difficult, and I often look back with amazement that I managed to complete it. I had to remain flexible and be persistent. The degree has helped me in my formal career progression, but more importantly has helped me conduct operations better. Having a sound analytical framework to what you do has helped me immeasurably. This was given to me by both the degree content but also the exam-based method.
Will took his degree while serving as a member of the British Army in Kosovo, Iraq and Afghanistan. He hopes, in the future, to take an MSc at LSE.

200 and 300 courses 4 PS2082 Comparative politics (PS1172 or PS1130) 5 IR3083 International political theory (IR1011) 6 IR2084 Nationalism and international
relations (IR1011)

7 PS3086 Democracy and democratisation


(PS1172 or PS1130)

8 One 300 course from Selection groups IR or P 9 One 100, 200 or 300 course (or two half
courses) from Selection groups E, F(i), IR, P or S

36

37

The study guides were like someones helping hand, leading me through a forest of material, helping to make sense of things, connect concepts and ideas.

BSc Sociology
Programme overview
Sociology at LSE is a world class department offering a degree in one of the most consistently innovative and challenging of the social science subjects. LSE has a long and distinguished history in this field. This recently revised degree structure contains a broad range of courses across the curriculum which provide more opportunity for students to engage with this stimulating and highly relevant subject. We have worked in close collaboration with the Department of Sociology at LSE to bring you the best that contemporary sociology has to offer. Sociology graduates go on to work in a wide variety of areas and we confidently expect that many of them will also go on to develop their academic work by undertaking postgraduate study. We trust that you will find studying for the degree a rewarding experience.

Standard Route
100 courses 1 SC1021 Principles of sociology 2 SC1158 Reading social science (half course) and ST104A Statistics 1 (half course) 3 One course (or two half courses)
from Selection group F(i)

Mila in front of a poster advertising her 2010 documentary film, Cinema Komunisto.

Dr Nigel Dodd

4 One course (or two half courses) from


Selection groups F(i), F(ii) or F(iii)

200 and 300 courses 5 SC3144 Historical sociology (SC1021) 6 SC2145 Social research methods (SC1021) 7 SC2163 Sociological theory and analysis (SC1021) 8 One 300 course (or two half courses)
from Selection group S from Selection group S from Selection group S

9 One 300 course (or two half courses) 10 One 300 course (or two half courses) 11 One 200 or 300 course (or two half
courses) from any Selection group courses) from any Selection group

Programme specifics
< Theoretical: a general Politics Public administration introduction to the social Social and health services Media, sciences; an exploration of marketing and advertising Nonthe classical traditions of the governmental organisations. Several discipline and an introduction to students each year decide to enhance contemporary ideas and to new their career prospects by continuing directions in sociological thinking. < Diversity: a wide range of their academic studies in this field. courses which allow you to Features of the degree: explore how and why societies < Practical: an opportunity to have developed in the ways develop skills in the close reading that they have, key aspects of of key texts that have shaped the contemporary social institutions discipline; an introduction to the and processes, as well as ideas key methods that sociologists use about social action and social to research all aspects of social life. development and change.

Where can it lead?

12 One 100, 200 or 300 course (or two half

Profile: Mila Turajlic | BSc Politics and International Relations graduate, Serbia
The BSc Politics and International Relations degree was my chance to read everything I had always been interested in, but in a structured way. The study guides were like someones helping hand, leading me through a forest of material, helping to make sense of things, connect concepts and ideas. I got a real kick out of it. The other thing I really appreciated was that critical thinking was really encouraged I remember in that first year, one exam question was whether the NATO intervention in Serbia was justified on humanitarian grounds and I wrote a pretty scathing but well-argued essay that definitely went against the widespread opinion, and got very high marks. The questions were all topical. I was reading current affairs magazines and incorporating events of the day into my exam essays, and it was just so much fun to use the theory I was learning to analyse political events happening before my eyes.
An award-winning producer and documentary filmmaker based in Serbia, Mila was awarded the Michael Peacock Scholarship which enabled her to come to LSE to do an MSc in Media and Communications.

Graduate Entry Route


100 courses 1 SC1021 Principles of sociology 2 SC1158 Reading social science (half course) and ST104A Statistics 1 (half course) 3 One course (or two half courses)
from Selection group F(i)

200 and 300 courses 4 SC3144 Historical sociology (SC1021) 5 SC2145 Social research methods (SC1021) 6 SC2163 Sociological theory and analysis (SC1021) 7 One 300 course (or two half courses)
from Selection group S from Selection group S

Profile: Rachel Chan | BSc Sociology, Malaysia


At HELP University College, where I studied, there was a newsletter for University of London students. As editor of this pamphlet, this greatly improved my otherwise chick-lit tendency for writing, integrating highbrow theoretical analysis into my observations of socialism in Bolivia. Currently, as a student Postgraduate Research Fellow at the local premier research university, University of Malaya, I am researching the equivalent of chav culture in Malaysia. This is known as the Ah Beng subculture, situating itself in shopping malls in Kuala Lumpur.
Rachels degree honed her writing abilities and gave her the skills needed to undertake postgraduate research.

8 One 300 course (or two half courses) 9 One 100, 200 or 300 course (or two half
courses) from any Selection group

38

Undergraduate study in Economics, Management, Finance and the Social Sciences

www.londoninternational.ac.uk/lse

39

Joint Laws programme resources


Additional resources for Law courses only
If you register for a law course, in addition to subject guides and past examination papers you also receive < Studying English law with the University of London (an introductory guide to the basics of common law legal systems). < One copy of the core textbook if you study any of the four Intermediate Law subjects. < Study packs containing key readings for all the core subjects and selected options. < Learning skills for law containing advice on study skills, developing English language and legal English skills, reading cases and statutes and guidance on exam technique. < Recent developments in law booklets, to make sure you are up to date with developments in each subject as of February of the current year and give details of any new editions of textbooks.

< full text versions of subject Pre-course exercises These exercises offer a taster so that guides and other study guides you can try out the type of skills you < facilities for you to set up will be expected to develop as you your own profile pages < links from the VLE take you to go through the Laws programme. the Online Library, programme Student portal resources and key external sites. The student portal allows you to access the Virtual Learning The Laws VLE covers all Environment (VLE) for laws compulsory subjects and EU students, which provides a Law. Laws students can also centralised location for accessing access online legal research many resources and hosts: exercises. These exercises are < Law subject pages with news designed to build on and enhance and updates, provided by your ability to find primary and legal academics associated secondary legal materials using with the Laws Programme electronic sources, as well as < discussion forums where hard copy/paper sources in you can debate the finer libraries, and to conduct legal points of your subjects research more generally.

BSc Accounting with Law


Programme overview
This degree combines elements of the BSc Accounting and Finance degree with the LLB (Law) programme offered through the University of London International Programmes.

Standard Route
100 courses 1 AC1025 Principles of accounting 2 LA1040 Elements of the law of contract 3 LA1031 Common law reasoning and institutions 4 One course (or two half courses)

This degree is for you if you: < wish to pursue a career in accounting. < would like to work in areas of commerce such as insurance, banking, sales and marketing. < are considering working as a Company Secretary.

Where can it lead?

Programme specifics
< It takes a broad approach to the subjects rather than focusing on narrow technicalities. < You will need to undertake further study if you wish to qualify as an accountant. < During the course of your law studies you will undertake research exercises online and make extensive use of online and physical library resources. < It will provide you with a good background in both accounting and law.

from Selection groups F(i) or F(ii)

200 and 300 courses 5 LA3017 Commercial law 6 LA3021 Company law 7 AC3059 Financial management (AC1025) or
FN3092 Corporate finance (EC1002) + (MT105A or MT105B or MT1174)

8 AC3091 Financial reporting (AC1025) 9 AC3093 Auditing and assurance (AC1025) 10 AC3097 Management accounting (AC1025) 11 One 200 or 300 course (or two half
courses) from any Selection group

< This degree will help you to develop the skills needed to think critically.

Features of the degree

12 One course (or two half courses) from

Selection groups A, B, F(i), F(ii), F(iii), L or M

Graduate Entry Route


100 courses 1 AC1025 Principles of accounting 2 LA1040 Elements of the law of contract 200 and 300 courses 3 LA3017 Commercial law
Laws VLE homepage Laws Online Library

4 LA3021 Company law 5 AC3059 Financial management (AC1025) 6 AC3091 Financial reporting (AC1025) 7 AC3093 Auditing and assurance (AC1025) 8 AC3097 Management accounting (AC1025) 9 One course (or two half courses) from

Further informaation
For intending solicitors in the UK: For intending barristers in the UK:
< www.legaleducation.org.uk This website is provided by the Bar Council but covers both professions.

Useful addresses

Selection groups A, B, F(i), F(ii), F(iii), L or M

Solicitors Regulation Authority, Regulations and Information Services, Ipsley Court, Redditch Worcestershire B98 0TD < Tel: +44 (0)870 606 2555 (enquiries) < Fax: +44 (0)20 7320 5964 < Email: info.services@sra.org.uk < www.sra.org.uk < 24-hour information pack order service: +44 (0)1527 504455

Bar Standards Board, Education Training and Records Department 289-293 High Holborn London WC1V 7HZ < Tel: +44 (0)20 7242 0082 < Fax: +44 (0)20 7831 9217 < www.barstandardsboard.org.uk

Additional information

< You may be able to gain some APL from professional accounting examinations. Please see pages 12-14 for details. < An additional fee is payable for law courses. Please see page 80 for details.
www.londoninternational.ac.uk/lse

40

Undergraduate study in Economics, Management, Finance and the Social Sciences

41

BSc Management with Law


Programme overview
This degree combines essential elements from both the BSc Management and the LLB (Law) programmes, giving students an opportunity for both critical and theoretical study.

BSc Sociology with Law


Programme overview
The Sociology Department at LSE which developed this programme is world class and offers one of the most consistently innovative and challenging degrees in social science. This degree provides you with an opportunity to investigate and analyse specific examples of law, social theories, aspects of social action, social processes and institutions. It will enable you to understand these in the context of your own society and to compare different types of social life and societies. It will give you an opportunity to examine theories about the nature of social existence and change and to study these in relation to the State and the legal framework. The approach will be broadly theoretical but you will develop your analytical skills in both law and sociology. This degree aims to provide for the diverse interests of students, whether that is pursuing a career in sociology or law-related fields, or pursuing the study of law or sociology for intellectual interest. We have selected law courses which complement those studied in sociology on this programme with the hope that you will develop a criticalreflective understanding of sociological thinking and legal values and how law and sociology fit together and with a wide range of topics.

Standard Route
100 courses 1 AC1025 Principles of accounting 2 LA1040 Elements of the law of contract 3 LA1031 Common law reasoning and institutions 4 MN1107 Introduction to business
and management

Standard Route
100 courses 1 LA1031 Common law reasoning and institutions 2 SC1021 Principles of sociology 3 SC1158 Reading social science (half course) and ST104A Statistics 1 (half course) 4 One course (or two half courses) from
Selection groups F(i), F(ii) or F(iii)

and practice, which should be < Students who wish to pursue relevant to your experiences a career in management. and local environment. < The combination of management < Both the law and management and law will equip you to work in subjects will provide you with a both public and private sectors knowledge and understanding where a demonstrated ability of a wide range of issues in for logical reasoning is required. international management. < It is particularly useful if you < It is an intellectually demanding want to pursue a career in the degree as there are two management of a legal practice. disparate disciplines involved. < During the course of your law Features of the degree studies you will undertake < The management courses have research exercises online and been designed with a strong make extensive use of online emphasis on social science theory and physical library resources.

Where can it lead?

Programme specifics

200 and 300 courses 5 LA3017 Commercial law 6 LA3021 Company law 7 One 300 course from Selection group M 8 One 300 course from Selection group M 9 One 300 course from Selection group M 10 One course from Selection group M 11 One 200 or 300 course (or two half
courses) from any Selection group courses) from any Selection group

200 and 300 courses 5 LA3005 Jurisprudence and legal theory 6 LA3025 Criminology 7 SC2145 Social research methods (SC1021) 8 SC2163 Sociological theory and analysis (SC1021) 9 SC3144 Historical sociology (SC1021) 10 One 300 course from Selection group L 11 One 200 or 300 course (or two half
courses) from Selection group S from any Selection group

12 One 100, 200 or 300 course (or two half

Graduate Entry Route


100 courses 1 AC1025 Principles of accounting 2 LA1040 Elements of the law of contract 3 MN1107 Introduction to business
and management

200 and 300 courses

Profile: Saroj Maistry | BSc Management with Law, Mauritius


I chose the University of London not only for the prestige but also for the high quality of its courses. Its very practical formula of distance learning enabled me to study at my own pace and in my own time. The challenge I faced was to keep going simultaneously on three fronts: work, caring for my two teenage sons, and studying. The degree has helped me acquire management skills and the fact that I studied law as well as management enabled me to gain a lead position in a specialized institution which investigates corruption and money laundering. I then moved onto a role in compliance in a bank. I am now considering setting up my own business and my management and law background will provide tremendous help.
Saroj works for the Banque des Mascareignes in Mauritius.

4 LA3017 Commercial law 5 LA3021 Company law 6 One 300 course from Selection group M 7 One 300 course from Selection group M 8 One 300 course from Selection group M 9 One course from Selection group M

This degree is particularly suited to those who wish to work in areas such as teaching, media, journalism, development, social work and government departments especially those in the criminal justice system. It also provides a good basis for further academic study.

Where can it lead?

Programme specifics
< A wide range of courses which allow you to explore how and why societies have developed in the ways that they have, important questions about the nature of sociological research, as well as ideas about social action and social development and change. < An opportunity to develop an understanding of the principal features of law and to understand the operation of the law in a wide social context. < During the course of your law studies you will undertake research exercises online and make extensive use of online and physical library resources.

12 One 100, 200 or 300 course

Graduate Entry Route


100 courses 1 LA1031 Common law reasoning and institutions 2 SC1021 Principles of sociology 200 and 300 courses 3 LA3005 Jurisprudence and legal theory 4 LA3025 Criminology 5 SC2145 Social research methods (SC1021) 6 SC2163 Sociological theory and analysis (SC1021) 7 SC3144 Historical sociology (SC1021) 8 One 300 course from Selection group L 9 One 200 or 300 course from Selection group S

< An opportunity to develop skills in the close reading of key texts that have shaped the discipline of sociology; an introduction to the key methods that sociologists use to research all aspects of social life.

Features of the degree

Additional information

< An additional fee is payable for law courses. Please see page 80 for details.

Additional information

< An additional fee is payable for law courses. Please see page 80 for details.
www.londoninternational.ac.uk/lse

42

43

Diplomas for Graduates


Who are they for?
The Diplomas for Graduates enable you to extend either the depth or range of your previous undergraduate study. They are comprised largely of honours-level courses drawn from the undergraduate Economics, Management, Finance and Social Sciences syllabus. Specifically, they are aimed at graduates who wish to: < acquire and demonstrate vocational skills in a particular field in the workplace and beyond or < use the Diploma as a basis for progression into postgraduate study and whose first degree is in an unrelated field or < gain a stronger basis for entry to postgraduate study at a university and whose first degree may not be readily acceptable as equivalent to a good UK honours degree. Entry to Masters programmes is competitive, and at the discretion of each admitting university., so you should confirm with the relevant university whether the Diploma for Graduates is acceptable for entry and, if so, what mark is needed. When honours-level courses are taken as part of a bachelors degree, you will normally be familiar with the subject matter through having taken prerequisite courses earlier in the degree. While graduates are permitted to register for these awards without taking the prerequisites, you should be prepared for the difficulty of the courses. For example, you are advised to have a firm grasp, at undergraduate level, of mathematics or economics before embarking on honourslevel courses in these subjects.

Without being taught at the level I was, with the University of London International Programmes, I would not have driven myself to choose the career path Im following today.
Notes:
< If you hold a professional qualification and/or postgraduate qualification without a full first degree, you cannot be considered for admission to a Diploma for Graduates. < If you apply for the Diploma for Graduates (Mathematics) you are advised that, although not a formal entrance requirement, it is your responsibility to ensure that before you start this programme your mathematics is already at least at the standard of a first year undergraduate degree in mathematics and includes multivariate calculus. < If you apply for the Diploma

Apeksha Vora

Profile: Apekska Vora Various distance learning awards | India


From the start, the quality of the University of London International Programmes was higher than I had ever studied before. I found it challenging and, more importantly, it made me question the world around me. The inter-disciplinary nature of the programmes I studied meant that I was able to discover other subjects, which sparked my interest in Development Economics, and subsequently, International Development. Through my studies, I finally decided that I wanted to engage with development research. Without being taught at the level I was, with the University of London International Programmes, I would not have driven myself to choose the career path Im following today. Not only does the International Programmes open avenues because of its reputation, but it has also opened up real opportunities for me by changing my perception of the world.
Apeksha completed three awards through the University of London International Programmes a Diploma in Economics, BSc in Economics and Management, and a Diploma for Graduates in International Development with teaching support from Russell Square International College in Mumbai. Awarded a 20,000 scholarship by the Sir Ratan Tata Trust, she is now studying for a Masters in International Development at the Institute of Development Studies, University of Sussex.
www.londoninternational.ac.uk/lse

Features

As well as developing subjectspecific skills, Diplomas for Graduates enable you to question and analyse information, develop arguments, and bolster your analytical and communicative competence.

Structures

Each Diploma for Graduates is made up of four courses, which can be taken in any order (there are no prerequisites). You have between one to five years years to complete the programme. A full list of courses is given on pages 46-47.

the requirement to demonstrate competence in Mathematics. If you wish to transfer from this programme to another Diploma for Graduates at a later stage, however, you will be required to demonstrate competence in Mathematics as described.

for Graduates (International Relations) you are exempt from

Further information
Entrance requirements at least equivalent to a pass To be eligible to register for a at GCSE/GCE O level in a Diploma for Graduates as an Mathematical subject at International Programmes Grade C or above and < provide proof of student, an applicant must: < hold a full first degree competence in English completed in a minimum which is acceptable to of three years duration on a the University and full-time basis (or equivalent) < internet access is also a from a university or other requirement for registration. institution acceptable to the University of London Classification (but see notes below) and Students must pass four full < demonstrate that they courses to be awarded the have reached a level of Diploma for Graduates. One competence in Mathematics resit may be attempted for
any course failed. Diplomas for Graduates will be classified as Distinction, Merit or Pass. A student who has failed a course twice or two courses once is eligible for a Pass grade only. Students will not be permitted to transfer from the Diploma for Graduates to the related BSc or other degrees or to other qualifications offered through the International Programmes. Students may transfer between the different Diplomas for Graduates. A student who fails a course twice may change to another course, within the five-year registration period, provided that the failed course is not compulsory on the Diploma for Graduates to which they wish to transfer.

Transfer

There is no accreditation of prior learning offered for any course on the Diploma for Graduates programmes.

Please note

44

Undergraduate study in Economics, Management, Finance and the Social Sciences

45

Diplomas for Graduates


Accounting
One compulsory course AC1025 Principles of accounting Two courses chosen from: AC3059 Financial management or FN3092 Corporate finance AC3091 Financial reporting AC3093 Auditing and assurance AC3097 Management accounting
Plus

One compulsory course FN3092 Corporate finance Two courses chosen from: AC3091 Financial reporting AC3093 Auditing and assurance AC3143 Valuation and securities analysis FN2029 Financial intermediation FN3023 Investment management FN3142 Quantitative finance
Plus

Finance

Three compulsory courses Is2062 Information systems


development and management

Information Systems

Three courses chosen from: Ir1011 Introduction to

International Relations

(At least one of which must be a 300 course)

One compulsory course and two compulsory half courses Mt2116 Abstract mathematics Mt2175 Further linear algebra
(half course)

Mathematics*

Four full courses (or equivalent) chosen from any of the Selection groups
(At least one of which must be a 300 course)

Social Sciences

international relations international relations

Is2138 Information and

communication technologies: principles and perspectives information systems

Ir2084 Nationalism and

Note

Is3159 Research project in One course chosen from: Is1060 Introduction to

Ir2085 International institutions Ir2137 Foreign policy analysis Ir3026 International political economy Ir3140 Security and international
relations
Plus

Mt2176 Further calculus (half course) Four half courses chosen from: Mt3040 Game theory (half course) Mt3041 Advanced mathematical
analysis (half course)
Note

You may not choose more than one 100 course (or two half courses) from Selection groups F(i), F(ii) or F(iii) You may take no more than two courses from Selection group L.

One 200 or 300 course (or two half courses) chosen from any Selection group, including any course not selected above.

One compulsory course FN1024 Principles of banking


and finance

Banking

One course (or two half courses) chosen from any Selection group, including any course not selected above.

information systems or and organisations

Is2136 Information systems Is3139 Software engineering:

One compulsory course from: GY1009 Human geography or GY1147 Physical geography: Two courses chosen from:
(At least one of which must be a 300 course)

Geography and Environment

theory and application systems architecture and programming

One 300 course (or two half courses) chosen from any Selection group, including any course not selected above.

Mt3042 Optimisation theory


(half course)

Mt3043 Mathematics of finance and


valuation (half course) theory (half course)

Two compulsory courses: sC2145 Social research methods sC2163 Sociological theory and analysis
Plus

Sociology

Is1168 Introduction to computer

st3133 Advanced statistics: distribution One compulsory course MN1107 Introduction to business
and management

Management

st3134 Advanced statistics: statistical


inference (half course)
*Although this is not a formal entrance requirement, it is your responsibility to ensure that before you start this programme your Mathematics is already at least at the standard of a first year undergraduate degree in Mathematics and includes multivariate calculus.

Two courses chosen from: AC3059 Financial management or FN3092 Corporate finance AC3093 Auditing and assurance AC3143 Valuation and securities analysis FN2029 Financial intermediation FN3023 Investment management FN3142 Quantitative finance
Plus

One 300 course with the prefix SC chosen from Selection group S One course (or two half courses) chosen from any Selection group.

fundamentals of the physical environment

One compulsory course DV1171 Introduction to international


development

International Development

Plus

Two courses chosen from:


(At least one of which must be a 300 course)

AC3059 Financial management or FN3092 Corporate finance AC3097 Management accounting Is2136 Information systems
and organisations

GY2109 Geographies of development GY2149 Biogeography GY2150 Geomorphological processes GY2151 Environmental change GY2152 Hydrology GY2164 Economic geography GY3068 Society and the environment GY3153 Space and culture GY3154 Geomorphological applications GY3155 Biodiversity GY3156 Tropical land management
Plus

Two courses chosen from:


(At least one of which must be a 300 course with the prefix DV)

Three courses chosen from: Ps1130 Introduction to modern political thought or Ps1172 Introduction to political science Ps2082 Comparative politics Ps3086 Democracy and
democratisation the European Union

Politics

One 200 or 300 course (or two half courses) chosen from any Selection group including any course not selected above.

DV3044 Economics of development DV3162 Complex emergencies and


humanitarian responses

MN2079 Elements of social and


applied psychology

DV3165 Development management DV3166 Global environmental


problems and politics

MN3027 The law of business organisations MN3028 Managerial economics MN3032 Management science methods MN3075 Human resource management MN3077 Management: international MN3119 Strategy MN3127 Organisation theory: an MN3141 Principles of marketing Mt2076 Management mathematics
Plus

Economics
Three compulsory courses eC2020 Elements of econometrics eC2065 Macroeconomics eC2066 Microeconomics
Plus

Ps3088 Politics and policies of Ps3108 Political analysis and


public choice
Plus

GY2109 Geographies of development GY2164 Economic geography GY3068 Society and the environment sC3057 Social policy sC3160 Population and society
Plus

and comparative perspectives

One 300 course with the prefix EC chosen from Selection group E.

One 300 course (or two half courses) chosen from any Selection group, including any course not selected above.

One 300 course (or two half courses) chosen from any Selection group, including any course not selected above.

interdisciplinary approach

One 200 or 300 course (or two half courses) chosen from any Selection group, including any course not selected above.

Notes
< All of the above structures are subject to confirmation in the 2012-2013 Regulations. The Regulations also contain full details on the rules that govern the choice of any course. < Selection groups are listed on pages 57-59. < You are advised to have a firm grasp, at undergraduate level, of mathematics or economics before embarking on honours-level courses in these subjects.

One 300 course (or two half courses) chosen from any Selection group, including any course not selected above.

46

Undergraduate study in Economics, Management, Finance and the Social Sciences

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47

Diploma in Economics and Diploma in Social Sciences


The Diploma in Economics and Diploma in Social Sciences are qualifications in their own right that must be studied at a recognised Diploma-teaching institution. Please see Additional educational support on pages 50-53 for further information. These qualifications are for you if: < you have the ability, motivation and maturity to study at degree level, but do not have the qualifications usually required to enter a degree programme. < you have the necessary qualifications to embark on a degree, but would prefer a course with more teaching support. < you intend to take a degree programme, but would like to gain a recognised qualification after one year. Finance and the Social Sciences listed in this prospectus. If you intend to go on to a degree programme listed in this prospectus, choose your courses carefully and make sure that the courses you choose are available on the degree that interests you. This will ensure that you receive credit for the courses you have passed. You can transfer to one of the degrees listed in this prospectus after attempting four courses and passing two full courses (provided one is a quantitative subject) of the Diploma in Economics or Diploma in Social Sciences.

< You sit your examinations in May/June. < You must pass all four courses in order to be awarded the Diploma in Economics or Diploma in Social Sciences.

one and a half compulsory courses: eC1002 Introduction to economics and st104A Statistics 1 (half course)

Diploma in Economics structure

Four courses in total chosen from: AC1025 Principles of accounting*

Diploma in Social Sciences structure

Notes
(1) MT105B Mathematics 2 must be taken after or at the same time as MT105A Mathematics 1. (2) MT1173 Algebra may not be taken with MT105A Mathematics 1 or MT105B Mathematics 2. (3) MT1174 Calculus may not be taken with MT105A Mathematics 1 or MT105B Mathematics 2. (4) ST104B Statistics 2 must be taken after or at the same time as ST104A Statistics 1. Diploma in Social Sciences students must take a minimum of two courses marked () and a maximum of two courses marked (*). Students registered for the Diploma in Economics or Diploma in Social Sciences cannot transfer their registration to the corresponding Diploma after 31 October in the first year of their registration.

DV1171 Introduction to international development eC1002 Introduction to economics FN1024 Principles of banking and finance* GY1009 Human geography GY1147 Physical geography: fundamentals
of the physical environment

Plus one of the following half courses: GY1148 Methods of geographical analysis (half course) Mt105A Mathematics 1 (half course) sC1158 Reading social science (half course) st104B Statistics 2 (half course)(4) Plus two courses (or the equivalent) chosen from: AC1025 Principles of accounting DV1171 Introduction to international development FN1024 Principles of banking and finance GY1009 Human geography GY1147 Physical geography: fundamentals
of the physical environment

Are you eligible?

To be eligible for the Diploma you must: < normally be 18 years or older before 31 December in the year you first register with the University < be admitted to a course of instruction at a Diplomateaching institution. In addition to the above, many institutions recognised for teaching the Diploma have their own admission criteria. You should contact the institutions directly for this information.

GY1148 Methods of geographical analysis (half course) Ir1011 Introduction to international relations Ir1034 World history since 1917 Is1060 Introduction to information systems* Is1168 Introduction to computer systems
architecture and programming

< You take the same 100 courses as those offered to degree students. < You must be registered An entry route to degree study with a Diploma-teaching If you do not have traditional institution. You cannot A levels or their equivalent, the study independently Diploma in Economics and Diploma for these Diplomas. < You can complete these in Social Sciences provide an entry route to all of the degrees in the Diplomas in a minimum of one fields of Economics, Management, year and a maximum of five.

Features of the Diplomas

lA1031 Common law reasoning and institutions* MN1107 Introduction to business and management* Mt105A Mathematics 1 (half course) Mt105B Mathematics 2 (half course)(1) Mt1173 Algebra(2) Mt1174 Calculus(3) Ps1130 Introduction to modern political thought Ps1172 Introduction to political science sC1021 Principles of sociology sC1158 Reading social science (half course) st104A Statistics 1 (half course) st104B Statistics 2 (half course)(4)

Ir1011 Introduction to international relations Ir1034 World history since 1917 Is1060 Introduction to information systems Is1168 Introduction to computer systems
architecture and programming

Further details

For further details (fees, entrance requirements and application deadlines) or to apply please contact your local Diplomateaching institution.

lA1031 Common law reasoning and institutions MN1107 Introduction to business and management Mt105A Mathematics 1 (half course) and Mt105B Mathematics 2 (half course)(1) Mt1173 Algebra
(2) (3)

Dr Phil Stephenson from SIM teaching Mathematics

More
< There are currently over 15 universities in the UK, including LSE, that will consider you for entry into the second year of a degree if you pass the Diploma with very high marks and have taken the appropriate courses (see page 56). To be considered for a place, you will need to apply through UCAS, stating that you are applying for second-year entry. < The Diploma is awarded with a grading of Distinction, Merit, Credit or Pass. < You should expect your studies to take 35-40 hours per week. < You must attend lectures and tutorials regularly and are expected to write assignments, and while these do not count towards your final assessment you are required to complete them before you can enter for the examinations.

Mt1174 Calculus

Ps1130 Introduction to modern political thought Ps1172 Introduction to political science sC1021 Principles of sociology

Profile: Dr Chew Seen Meng | Diploma in Economics, Malaysia


The Diploma is a respected program that will suit students wishing to gain a competitive edge in their professional careers. With the Diploma credential, I was able to win scholarships to top universities in the UK and US for postgraduate studies in Economics, which subsequently gave me the necessary qualifications and confidence to pursue career opportunities at established companies. I currently work as an Economic Consultant at NERA Economic Consulting in its Chicago office, focusing in the area of global transfer pricing, where I provide economic, pricing and tax advice to multinational companies. One of the most important things that I took away from the Diploma was the cultivation of independence and self-reliance, especially under challenging circumstances.
Dr Chew Seen Meng studied for his Diploma in Economics at HELP, Malaysia, and was awarded his PhD from the University of Chicago.

48

Undergraduate study in Economics, Management, Finance and the Social Sciences

49

Additional educational support


We aim to give our students as much choice as possible about how, when and where they study. Some prefer the flexibility of being able to study independently, at their own pace, using our study materials. Others prefer the benefits of faceto-face teaching and classroom support, and choose to pay for additional educational support at a local independent institution. We currently work with a growing network of 70-plus independent teaching institutions worldwide that provide tuition support for our students. We refer to these institutions as recognised centres and there are two categories: Affiliate Centres have demonstrated a sustained commitment to the quality of teaching, support and administration; Registered Centres have demonstrated acceptable standards for the purpose of supporting International Programmes students in preparing for examinations. The Diploma in Economics/ Diploma in Social Sciences may be studied either full time or part time. Students must have registered through, and be studying at, a teaching institution that has been recognised for teaching these Diplomas by the University of London. In the following list, institutions that are recognised for teaching the Diplomas are marked:
DiPlomA-tEAching inStitution

Affiliate Centres
HOng KOng SAR KAzAKHSTAn

Affiliate Centres
MAlTA PAKISTAn (continued) SIngAPORE

HKU School of Professional and Continuing Education (HKU SPACE)


DiPlomA-tEAching inStitution

< Admissions Unit Room 313, 3/F, Admiralty Centre 18 Harcourt Road Hong Kong < Tel: +852 3761 1122 < Fax: +852 2527 0489 < Email: londonu@ < www.hkuspace.hku.hk
IndIA hkuspace.hku.hk

< 59 Tole Bi Street Office 402 Almaty 050000 Kazakhstan < Tel: +7 727 272 39 72 < Fax: 007 3272 72 0489 < www.kbtu.kz; www.ise.edu.kz
MAlAySIA

Kazakh British Technical University (KBTU)/ International School of Economics and Social Sciences (ISE)

St Martins Institute of Information Technology


DiPlomA-tEAching inStitution

University College Lahore


DiPlomA-tEAching inStitution

Singapore Institute of Management Pte Ltd


DiPlomA-tEAching inStitution

< Schembri Street Hamrun HMR 08 Malta < Tel: 00356 21 235 451/ 21 222 691/ 21 222 702 < Fax: 00356 21 232 630 < Email: infodesk@stmartins.edu < www.stmartins.edu
PAKISTAn

< 1.5 km from Niazbeg Thokar Raiwind Road Lahore 53700 < Pakistan < Tel: +92 42 7515851-53 < Fax: +92 42 7515854 < Email: uclhr@ucl.edu.pk; < www.ucl.edu.pk
admissions@ucl.edu.pk

< SIM Headquarters 461 Clementi Road 599491 Singapore < Tel: 0065 6248 9746 < Fax: 0065 6463 8317 < Email: study@sim.edu.sg < www.sim.edu.sg/ge
SRI lAnKA

Indian School of Business and Finance


DiPlomA-tEAching inStitution

< B 26, Okhla Phase - I New Delhi 110020 India < Tel: +91 11 405 777 33 < Fax: +91 11 405 777 30 < Email: uol@isbf.edu.in < www.isbf.edu.in

< Level 3 Block E, Kompleks Pejabat Damansara (KPD) Jalan Dungun Damansara Heights Kuala Lumpur 50490 Malaysia < Tel: 00603 2095 8791 < Fax: 00603 2095 7100 < Email: chinkh@help.edu.my < www.help.edu.my

HELP Academy SDN BHD

Roots College International


DiPlomA-tEAching inStitution

University College Lahore Business School Multan


DiPlomA-tEAching inStitution

Royal Institute of Colombo


DiPlomA-tEAching inStitution

< DHA-Campus Phase-1, Sector-A Islamabad Pakistan < Tel: 00925 1578 8380-3 < Fax: 00925 1511 0680 < Email: rci@rootsschool.edu.pk < www.rootsschool.edu.pk

< 11/9 Qaswar Gerdezi Road Near Canal Officers Colony Multan, Pakistan < Tel: 00926 1458 6642-43 < Email: uclmultan@gmail.com < www.ucl.edu.pk
RuSSIA

< 189 Havelock Road Colombo 05 Sri Lanka < Tel: +94 11 255 6329 < Fax: +94 11 255 6329 < Email: royaldgr@sltnet.lk; < www.ric.lk
niroshi@ric.lk

Russell Square International College


DiPlomA-tEAching inStitution

For further information about recognised centres, including brief profiles and the programmes for which they are recognised to teach, please visit: www. The Directory also provides details of those teaching institutions that have formally commenced the process for becoming recognised.
londoninternational.ac.uk/ onlinesearch/institutions

< Gulmohar Cross Road No. 9 Juhu Vileparle Development Scheme Vileparle (East), Juhu Mumbai 400 049 India < Tel: 0091 22 26715816, 2624 1670/ 26254297/98 < Fax: 0091 22 2623 7263 < Email: enquiry@rsicollege. < www.rsicollege.org

< Level 5, Klang Parade 2112 Jalan Meru Klang 41050 Malaysia < Tel: +603 3346 7131 < Fax: +603 3343 0240 < Email: enquiry@hict.edu.my; < www.hict.edu.my
lilian.chan@hict.edu.my

HELP College of Arts and Technology

org; registrar@rsicollege.org

< Millennium Campus of Economics and 308, Street no 3, Sector I-9/3 Finance (ICEF) < University Higher School of Islamabad Pakistan Economics < Tel: 0092 51 4859024 Pokrovsky bulvar, 11 < Email: rootscollegeinternational@ Moscow 109028 rootsschool.edu.pk Russia < www.rootsschool.edu.pk < Tel: 007 495 771 3245 < Fax: 095 925 7933 Roots College International < Email: icef@hse.ru < Metropolitan campus < icef.hse.ru Building # 12-K G-8 Markaz Islamabad Pakistan < Tel: 0092 51 8439001-7 < Email: rci.isb@ < www.rootsschool.edu.pk
rootsschool.edu.pk

Roots College International

International College

TRInIdAd And TObAgO

< #53-54 Sagan Drive Champs Fleurs Trinidad and Tobago < Tel: 1 868 663 7227 < Fax: 1 888 622 9666 < Email: sbcs@sbcstnt.com < www.sbcs.edu.tt

School of Business and Computer Science

50

Undergraduate study in Economics, Management, Finance and the Social Sciences

www.londoninternational.ac.uk/lse

51

Additional educational support


Affiliate Centres
TuRKEy

Registered Centres
bAnglAdESH MAlAySIA

Registered Centres
nIgERIA PAKISTAn (continued) TRInIdAd And TObAgO

Istanbul Bilgi Universitesi


DiPlomA-tEAching inStitution

< Kurtulus Deresi Caddesi No 47 Dolapdere Istanbul 80370 Turkey < Tel: 0090 212 3115000 < Fax: 0090 212 2970878 < Email: undergraduate@bilgi.
edu.tr; gasan@bilgi.edu.tr < www.bilgi.edu.tr

< House No. 30, Road No. 14-A Dhanmondi R/A 1209 Bangladesh < Tel: 8802-9134177/ 9111628 < Fax: 00880 2 8121000 < Email: dclebd@yahoo.com < www.dclebd.org
gREEcE

Dhaka Centre for Law and Economics (DCLE)

< 26 Jalan Wong Ah Fook 1st to 6th Floor Johor Bahru Johor 80000 Malaysia < Tel: 00 607 222 0998 < Fax: 00 607 221 2998 < Email: admin@
crescendo.edu.my

Crescendo International College

unITEd ARAb EMIRATES

DEI Bachelor and Master Degrees (College)


DiPlomA-tEAching inStitution

< www.crescendo.edu.my

< CLB Hall, 9B Abagbon Close off Ologunagbeje Street Victoria Island Lagos, Nigeria < Tel: 00234 1 7757719/ 7757720/ 2704404/ 7317601 < Fax: 00234 1 7317602 < Email: info@clb.com.ng < www.clb.com.ng
PAKISTAn

Centre for Law and Business

University College of Islamabad


DiPlomA-tEAching inStitution

< Street 21, House 8 Shalimar F-8/2 Islamabad 44000, Pakistan < Tel: 0092 51 228 1461; 0092 51 285 3178 < Fax: 0092 51 226 0690 < Email: ucipk1@yahoo.com < www.uci.edu.pk
SIngAPORE

< 34 Southern Main Road Curepe Trinidad and Tobago < Tel: +1 868 663 9495/ +1 868 662 7807 < Fax: 868 663 9831 < Email: queries@atstnt.com < www.atstnt.com < 4-6 Chancery Lane San Fernando Trinidad and Tobago < Tel: 001 868 653 3945/ 001 868 652 6938 < Fax: 001 868 653 3945 < Email: queries@itt123.com < www.itt123.com
unITEd KIngdOM

Academy of Tertiary Studies (ATS)

Institute of Tertiary Tutors

Western International College


DiPlomA-tEAching inStitution

< Next to RAK Free Trade Zone Nakheel P.O.Box: 16038 Ras Al Khaimah U.A.E < Tel: +971 7228 1725 < Fax: +971 7 228 1726 < Email: info.iitmedu@gmail.com < www.iitmedu.ae
Note: Western International College was formerly known as International Institute for Technology and Management FZ LLC (IITM).

< 131 Tsimiski & 9 Ethnikis Amynis Thessaloniki 54621 Greece < Tel: +30 2310 251 888/239 543/251 999 < Fax: +30 2310 251 291 < Email: studies@dei.edu.gr < www.dei.edu.gr

< Lot 7A Jalan 223 Section 14 Petaling Jaya 46100 Malaysia < Tel: 00603 7956 3188/ 7968 5532/ 7968 8073/ 7968 1188 < Fax: 00603 7958 4705 < Email: law@stamford.edu.my < www.stamford.edu.my

Stamford College (PJ) Sdn Bhd

Alta Vista College


DiPlomA-tEAching inStitution

< 36 Nazimuddin Road F-8/4 Islamabad 44000 Pakistan < Tel: 0092 51 285 4601 / 4243 < Fax: 0092 51 285 2449 < Email: admin@avc.edu.pk < www.avc.edu.pk < 8 Flench Street < Civil Lines off Fatima Jinnah Bridge Behind old British Council Library Karachi, Pakistan < Tel: +9221 5662657/5223743 < Fax: +9221 5223744 < Email: bayviewcollege@ < www.bayviewhigh.com
gmail.com

< 355 Jalan Bukit Ho Swee Singapore 169567 Singapore < Tel: 0065 6885 1000 < Fax: 0065 6276 3103 < Email: admissions@psbcorp.com < www.psb-academy.edu.sg

PSB Academy

Bay View College

SAA Global Education Centre


DiPlomA-tEAching inStitution

City of London College


DiPlomA-tEAching inStitution

< TripleOne Somerset 111 Somerset Road Unit #06-01/02 Singapore 238164 < Tel: +65 6532 5312 < Fax: +65 6532 3095 < Email: uol@saa.org.sg < www.saa.org.sg

< 80 Backchurch Lane London E1 1LX United Kingdom < Tel: 020 7553 0430 < Fax: 020 7247 1226 < Email: info@clc-london.ac.uk < www.clc-london.ac.uk

Profile: Shalini Mittal | Diploma in Economics, India


I have always been fascinated by economics from my high school days. The Diploma course offered by the University of London was the only course which offered a good balance between the theory and application of economics. The course content was very in line with what I was looking for in a diploma course. I was provided with enough online material and the study guides were very useful. As an individual, I have become even more analytical in my perspective and I have improved my style of studying. I try to find the causes of things instead of accepting them as they are. I also developed my reading skills when it comes to searching relevant information in the many journals which I have to read on a daily basis.
Shalini studied at the Indian School of Business and Finance, New Delhi. She is currently studying for a BSc in Economics at LSE.

< 211 Khayaban-e-Shaheen, Phase VIII, Defence House Authority, Karachi, Pakistan < Tel: 0092 21 5848791 / 5848796 < Fax: 0092 21 5848798 / 5848799 < Email: lecolekarachi@
lecole.edu.pk; lecole. undergrad@gmail.com < www.lecole.edu.pk

LEcole for Advanced Studies

Stansfield College
DiPlomA-tEAching inStitution

< 3 Anson Road Springleaf Tower, Level 6 Singapore 079909 < Tel: 0065 6348 0000 < Fax: 0065 6338 0400 < Email: enquiry@ < www.stansfieldcollege.com
stansfield.edu.sg

52

www.londoninternational.ac.uk/lse

53

Access route
The Access route has been designed to provide you with an entry route to the degrees in the fields of Economics, Management, Finance and the Social Sciences if you do not meet our entrance requirements and are unable to study at an institution. You must take two courses and pass both in order to successfully complete the Access route. The minimum period of registration for the Access route is one year, the maximum is three years, and you will be examined to the same standard as the 100 courses of the degrees. If you are applying for the Access route with the intention of proceeding to one of the degrees in Economics, Management, Finance and the Social Sciences, you should choose your courses with care. Consider the 100 courses that are available on the degree that interests you and choose courses that are common to both that degree and the Access route. This will help to ensure that, when you successfully complete the Access route, you will receive credit for the courses you have passed.

Access route structure


two full courses (or equivalent) Chose from: DV1171 Introduction to international development GY1009 Human geography GY1147 Physical geography: fundamentals
of the physical environment

On successful completion you can transfer your registration to the degree of your choice with credit for the courses you have passed. This transfer should be completed by 30 November in the year you complete the Access route in order to benefit from the reduced registration fee for the degree (i.e. the Access transfer fee given on page 80). When you transfer we will give you a new period of registration and you will be able to complete the degree within a further three to eight years.

Degree transfer

Ir1011 Introduction to international relations Ir1034 World history since 1917 Is1168 Introduction to computer systems
architecture and programming

lA1031 Common law reasoning and institutions Mt105A Mathematics 1 (half course) and Mt105B Mathematics 2 (half course)1, 2 Mt1174 Calculus Ps1130 Introduction to modern political thought or Ps1172 Introduction to political science sC1021 Principles of sociology st104A Statistics 1 (half course) and Mt105A Mathematics 1 (half course)3 or st104A Statistics 1 (half course) and GY1148 Methods of geographical analysis (half course)4 or st104A Statistics 1 (half course) and sC1158 Reading social science (half course) or st104A Statistics 1 (half course) and st104B Statistics 2 (half course)5

To be eligible for the Access route you must:


< normally be 18 years or < provide proof of competence older before 31 December in English acceptable to the in the year you first register University. (It may be necessary with the University and for you to have passed a < have obtained passes in a recognised test of proficiency, at minimum of at least five separate the appropriate level, within the subjects at GCSE/GCE O level, last three years see page 70 for or the equivalent, with the a list of acceptable tests) and < have access to the internet and following grades: < either have completed a at least three subjects at Grade C or above and minimum of 12 years schooling at least two further subjects or completed 11 years of at Grade B or above, one schooling with at least two years of which must be in a of relevant work experience Mathematical subject. since leaving school.

Notes
This structure is subject to confirmation in the 2012-2013 Regulations. The Regulations also contain full details on the rules that govern the choice of any course. 1 MT105B Mathematics 2 must be taken with or after MT105A Mathematics 1.

2 Students who choose this option will not be permitted to also take ST104A Statistics 1 and MT105 Mathematics 1. 3 Students who choose this option will not be permitted to also take MT105A Mathematics 1 and MT105B Mathematics 2. 4 GY1148 Methods of geographical analysis must be taken with or after ST104A Statistics 1. 5 ST104B Statistics 2 must be taken with or after ST104A Statistics 1.

54

Undergraduate study in Economics, Management, Finance and the Social Sciences

www.londoninternational.ac.uk/lse

55

Transfer
Registering as an International Programmes student with the University of London does not mean that you can automatically transfer at a later date and complete your studies at one of the Colleges of the University. LSE, Queen Mary and Royal Holloway are three Colleges of the University that will consider you for entry into the second year of certain degree programmes. If you are taking the Diploma in Economics, Diploma in Social Sciences, or four 100 courses of one of the degrees, you can be considered for second year entry. You cannot be considered for transfer into the final year. To be considered you will need to be taking courses whose syllabuses are similar to those taken at the Colleges concerned. You will need to have been predicted to achieve very high marks in these courses and to have done well at school. You will be competing with many other applicants to all these Colleges for a limited number of places.

Selection groups
If you are thinking of transferring to another university in the UK, Australia, the USA, Canada or New Zealand we advise you to find out by October (a year before you hope to transfer) what the procedures are for making an application. Within the UK there are a number of universities who have departments that will consider you for entry to the second year of their degrees if you are taking the Diploma in Economics, Diploma in Social Sciences or four 100 courses of one of the degrees. Other universities in the UK may consider applications from International Programmes students. You should contact the admissions officers of the university concerned in the first instance and direct them to the University of London website which lists all the necessary information about the programme.

Level 200 and 300 courses


AC3059 Financial management (AC1025) or FN3092 Corporate finance (EC1002) + AC3091 Financial reporting (AC1025) AC3093 Auditing and assurance (AC1025) AC3097 Management accounting
(AC1025) (MT105A or MT105B or MT1174)

Selection group A

1) to another College within the University of London

2) to another university in the UK or elsewhere

Some of the universities who will consider applications include: < University of Bath < University of Bristol < University of East Anglia < University of Essex < University of Exeter < Lancaster University < University of Newcastle Upon Tyne < University of Nottingham < Queen Mary, University of London < University of Queensland, Australia < University of Reading < Royal Holloway, University of London < University of Sheffield < University of Southampton < University of Wales, Aberystwyth < University of Westminster
Please note: some departments do not accept transfer students.

List of courses available in selection groups

Example 1 AC3059 Financial management (AC1025)


(this course may not be taken with FN3092) Course number Exclusion Prerequisite

Prerequisites for courses are given in the text within brackets. The prerequisites must be passed before the course can be taken. Certain courses cannot be taken with each other, such exclusions are shown in red text. Completion within the minimum registration period can only occur if students choose courses carefully, keeping in mind prerequisites. Prerequisites do not apply to the Diplomas for Graduates.

AC3143 Valuation and securities


Example 2 eC3016 International economics (EC2065
+ EC2066) or (EC2065 + MN3028)

analysis (FN1024 + AC1025)

FN3142 Quantitative finance*


(EC2020 + EC2066)
*FN3142 Quantitative finance must be taken with or after FN3092 Corporate finance.

Course number

Prerequisites

AC3091 Financial reporting (AC1025)

Selection group B

Level 100 courses


DV1171 Introduction to international
development

AC3093 Auditing and assurance (AC1025)

Selection group F(i)

AC1025 Principles of accounting FN1024 Principles of banking and finance


information systems

Selection group F(ii)

AC3143 Valuation and securities

analysis (FN1024 + AC1025)

FN2029 Financial intermediation (FN1024) FN3092 Corporate finance (EC1002) + FN3023 Investment management*
(FN1024) (MT105A or MT105B or MT1174)

eC1002 Introduction to economics GY1009 Human geography GY1147 Physical geography: fundamentals
of the physical environment analysis (half course)

Is1060 Introduction to Is1168 Introduction to computer systems MN1107 Introduction to

To be considered for a place in any of the University of London Colleges listed above and for other Universities in the UK you will need to apply through UCAS, stating that you are applying for second year entry. Your local British Council office can advise you further. It is advisable to apply before the closing date in January and preferably well before this. If you study at a teaching institution your academic tutor will be able to advise you.

architecture and programming (NEW) business and management

FN3142 Quantitative finance**


(EC2020 + EC2066)
* FN3023 Investment management must be taken with or after FN3092 Corporate finance. ** FN3142 Quantitative finance must be taken with or after FN3092 Corporate finance.

GY1148 Methods of geographical Ir1011 Introduction to

international relations

Ir1034 World history since 1917 Mt105A Mathematics 1 (half course) Mt105B Mathematics 2** (half course) Mt1173 Algebra Mt1174 Calculus Ps1130 Introduction to modern
political thought

lA1010 Criminal law lA1020 Public law

Selection group F(iii)

3a) between programmes listed in this prospectus

The programmes listed in this prospectus have been designed to make it easy for you to transfer between them should you wish to. If you are registered for one programme and realise that another would be better suited to you, then you may be able to transfer to that programme. Please note that in some cases you will need to satisfy additional entrance requirements for the programme to which

you wish to transfer (e.g. when transferring from the Diploma for Graduates (International Relations) to any other Diploma for Graduates). Full information and instructions on how to transfer between programmes are given in the Regulations. Information on progressing from the Diploma in Economics, Diploma in Social Sciences or the Access route to one of the degrees in Economics, Management, Finance and the Social Sciences is given on pages 48 and 55 respectively.

3b) to another programme we offer

DV2169 Economic policy

Selection group D
analysis in international development (DV1171)

It may also be possible to transfer to another programme within the International Programmes. This is not automatic, and you will need to satisfy any entrance requirements (both general and course specific) for the programme for which you wish to transfer (for example, when transferring from BSc Information Systems and Management to BSc Computing and Information Systems). You should also note that if you transfer to another programme (either listed in this prospectus or not) any outstanding fees will be payable.

lA1031 Common law reasoning and institutions lA1040 Elements of the law of contract

DV3044 Economics of development


(EC2065 + MN3028) or (EC2065 + EC2066)

Ps1172 Introduction to political science sC1021 Principles of sociology sC1158 Reading social science
(half course)

DV3162 Complex emergencies and


humanitarian responses

DV3165 Development management DV3166 Global environmental problems


and politics (PS1009 or IR1011 or SC1021 or PS1172)

st104A Statistics 1 (half course) st104B Statistics 2* (half course)


* ST104B Statistics 2 must be taken with or after ST104A Statistics 1. ** MT105B Mathematics 2 must be taken with or after MT105A Mathematics 1.

GY2109 Geographies of development GY3068 Society and the environment sC3057 Social policy sC3160 Population and society
www.londoninternational.ac.uk/lse

56

Undergraduate study in Economics, Management, Finance and the Social Sciences

57

Selection groups
LEVEL 200 and 300 COURSES (continued)
DV3044 Economics of development
(MN3028 + EC2065) or (EC2065 + EC2066)

LEVEL 200 and 300 COURSES (continued)


Is2062 Information systems development Is2136 Information systems
and organisations

Selection group E

DV3162 Complex emergencies and


humanitarian responses

Selection group G

Selection group IS

and management (IS1060 or IS2136)

AC3059 Financial management (AC1025) or FN3092 Corporate finance (EC1002) + AC3097 Management accounting
(AC1025) (MT105A or MT105B or MT1174)

Selection group M

eC3120 Mathematical economics

Selection group N

eC2020 Elements of econometrics

DV3165 Development management GY2109 Geographies of development GY2149 Biogeography (GY1147) GY2150 Geomorphological
processes (GY1147)

(EC2066 + MT105A + MT105B) or (EC2066 + MT1174) or (MT105A + MT105B)

GY3068 Society and the environment lA3005 Jurisprudence and legal theory lA3025 Criminology MN2079 Elements of social and
applied psychology

Selection group S

(EC1002) + (ST104A or ST104B) + (MT105A or MT105B or MT1174)

Mt2116 Abstract mathematics (MT1174) Mt2175 Further linear algebra


(half course) (MT1173)

Is2138 Information and communication


technologies: principles and perspectives (IS1060 + IS1168)

eC2065 Macroeconomics (EC1002) +


(MT105A or MT1174)

eC2066 Microeconomics (EC1002) +


(MT105A or MT1174) the 20th century

Is3139 Software engineering: theory

DV3165 Development management Is2136 Information systems


and organisations

MN3127 Organisation theory: an

GY2151 Environmental change (GY1147) GY2152 Hydrology (GY1147) GY2164 Economic geography GY3068 Society and the environment GY3153 Space and culture (GY1009) GY3154 Geomorphological
applications (GY2150)

and application (IS2062 + IS2138) systems (IS2062 + IS2138)

Mt2176 Further calculus

(half course) (MT1173)

interdisciplinary approach (EC1002 or SC1021 or MN2079)

eC2096 Economic history in eC3015 Economics of labour


(MN3028 or EC2066)

Is3159 Research project in information Is3167 Management and

Is3167 Management and

Mt3040 Game theory (half course) Mt3041 Advanced mathematical

sC2145 Social research methods (SC1021) sC2163 Sociological theory and


analysis (SC1021)

innovation of e-business applied psychology

(MT1174) or (MT105A + MT105B) analysis (half course) (MT2116) course) (MT2116)

innovation of e-business

MN2079 Elements of social and MN3027 The law of business organisations MN3028 Managerial economics (EC1002)
+ (MT105A or MT1174)

sC3057 Social policy sC3144 Historical sociology (SC1021) sC3160 Population and society

eC3016 International economics (EC2065)


+ (EC2066 or MN3028) (MN3028 or EC2066)

Mt3042 Optimisation theory (half Mt3043 Mathematics of finance and Mt3170 Discrete mathematics
and algebra (MT2116)

eC3022 Public economics

GY3155 Biodiversity (GY2149) GY3156 Tropical land management


(GY2149 or GY2150 or GY2152)

lA3001 Law of tort lA3003 Land law

Selection group L

valuation (half course) (MT2116)

lA3002 Law of trusts lA3004 Civil and criminal procedure lA3005 Jurisprudence and legal theory lA3007 Evidence lA3008 Administrative law lA3012 History of English law lA3013 Public international law lA3014 Conflict of laws lA3016 Succession (LA3002) lA3017 Commercial law lA3018 Labour law (LA1031) lA3019 Family law lA3021 Company law lA3024 EU law lA3025 Criminology lA3026 Intellectual
property (LA1031)

MN3032 Management science methods


(ST104A) + (MT105A or MT1174)

eC3099 Industrial economics


(MN3028 or EC2066)

eC3115 Monetary economics (EC2065) eC3120 Mathematical economics


(EC2066 + MT105A + MT105B) or (EC2066 + MT1174)

GY3157 Independent geographical


study (GY1148)

MN3075 Human resource management MN3077 Management: international


and comparative perspectives (EC1002 or IR1011 or MN1107)

st3133 Advanced statistics:

distribution theory (half course) (ST104A + ST104B) inference (half course) (ST104A + ST104B)

sC3160 Population and society

st3134 Advanced statistics: statistical

MN3119 Strategy (EC1002) +

FN3092 Corporate finance (EC1002) + GY2164 Economic geography Ir3026 International political
economy (EC1002 or IR1011)

(MT105A or MT105B or MT1174)

DV3162 Complex emergencies and


humanitarian responses

Selection group IR

(MT105A or MT1174)

MN3127 Organisation theory: an

interdisciplinary approach (EC1002 or SC1021 or MN2079) or SC1021 or MN2079)

DV3165 Development management DV3166 Global environmental problems


and politics (GY1009 or IR1011 or SC1021 or PS1172) relations (IR1011)

MN3141 Principles of marketing (EC1002 Mt2076 Management mathematics

DV3162 Complex emergencies and


humanitarian responses

Selection group P

MN3028 Managerial economics (EC1002)


+ (MT105A or MT1174)

DV3165 Development management DV3166 Global environmental problems


and politics (GY1009 or IR1011 or SC1021 or PS1172) (PS1172 or PS1130)

Mt3095 Further mathematics for


economists (MT105A + MT105B) or (MT1174)

(ST104A) + (MT105A or MT1174)

Ir2084 Nationalism and international Ir2085 International institutions (IR1011) Ir2137 Foreign policy analysis (IR1011) Ir3026 International political Ir3083 International political
theory (IR1011) economy (EC1002 or IR1011)

Ps2082 Comparative politics Ps3086 Democracy and democratisation


(PS1172 or PS1130)

Ps3088 Politics and policies of the


European Union (PS1172)

lA3028 Introduction to Islamic law lA3029 International protection


of Human Rights

Ir3140 Security in international


relations (IR1011)

Ps3108 Political analysis and public


choice (EC1002 or PS1172)

58

Undergraduate study in Economics, Management, Finance and the Social Sciences

www.londoninternational.ac.uk/lse

59

Course descriptions
The following pages give the aims, objectives and learning outcomes of the more popular courses available. Further details regarding prerequisites, assessment, essential reading and topics to be examined are provided on the course information sheets, available on the programme pages of our website.
This course provides you with a broad understanding of the theory and practice of financial and management accounting, both for non-specialist students and as a foundation for further study in the area. Learning outcomes You should be able to distinguish between different uses of accounting information and relate these uses to the needs of different groups of users. You will learn to explain and apply financial accounting concepts and conventions. You will be able to: < Prepare basic financial statements from both structured and unstructured data. < Analyse, interpret and communicate the information contained in basic financial statements, and explain the limitations of such statements and their analysis. < Categorise cost behaviour, and prepare and contrast stock valuations under different costing methods. < Describe the budgeting process and discuss the use of budgets in planning and control. < Explain, discuss and apply relevant techniques to aid internal users in decision-making.

Accounting, Banking and Finance


Aims and objectives To introduce you to the institutional features of financial systems and to identify key issues and problems arising in banking and finance. It introduces you to, and illustrates how, the key economic concepts required to analyse these key issues and problems. This course is the foundation banking and finance course on which subsequent and more specialised finance courses are based. Learning outcomes You should be able to understand the role of financial systems in the economy and the imperfections associated with bank-based and market-based financing. You should be prepared for studying the intermediate and advanced courses in banking and finance. You will gain knowledge and insight which help to make sense of many of the developments affecting banking and financial markets.

FN1024 Principles of banking and finance

Learning outcomes You should be able to discuss and evaluate key theories relating to the role of banks as financial intermediaries and the risks which banks face and explain how these risks are managed, with particular focus on techniques of asset and liability management, and credit risk measurement and management. You will be able to discuss the importance of capital in bank management and the role of securitisation, and explain the importance of capital adequacy within banking regulation. You will learn to describe and analyse the various means of analysing bank performance and explain the principles and techniques involved in the use of derivative instruments for hedging credit, interest rate and exchange rate risk.

will be able to discuss and give examples of the wider aspects of financial management including international considerations and the need to communicate decisions made to other members of a management team.

Aims and objectives To introduce you to the principles underlying accounting, and to enable you to explain and apply key accounting techniques.

AC1025 Principles of accounting

Aims and objectives To develop your understanding of the theories of financial intermediation and of concepts and practices relating to the risk management process and techniques applied within major financial intermediaries. To develop your understanding of recent developments in financial risk management and regulation, including credit risk models, securitisation, derivative instruments and capital adequacy.

FN2029 Financial intermediation

Aims and objectives To place financial management as a clear part of the decision making, planning and control subsystems of an enterprise. To provide you with an overview of the problems facing a financial merger in the commercial world. To introduce you to the concepts and theories of corporate finance that underlie the techniques which are offered as aids for the understanding, evaluation and resolution of financial managers problems. Learning outcomes You should be able to discuss the theoretical models underpinning the practices in financial management. You should be able to apply the techniques derived from the models and theories in financial management, explain the long and short-term financial needs of a business and describe the techniques used for the selection and management of long and short-term assets. You

AC3059 Financial management

Aims and objectives To develop your understanding of asset pricing and corporate finance. To provide a theoretical framework used to address issues in project appraisal and financing, the pricing of risk, securities valuation, market efficiency, capital structure, and mergers and acquisitions. To provide the tools required for further studies in financial intermediation and investments. Learning outcomes At the end of this course, and having completed the essential reading and activities, you should be able to: < clearly describe fundamental aspects of project valuation < confidently apply key capital budgeting techniques (NPV and IRR) in the context of investment appraisal < keenly express the mathematical principles of portfolio theory and demonstrate how risk affects the value of assets in equilibrium under wellestablished asset pricing paradigms (CAPM and APT) < describe the fundamental characteristics of derivative instruments (forwards, futures and options) < accurately apply wellestablished derivatives pricing methodologies (portfolio replicating and risk-neutral) < knowledgeably discuss the theoretical framework of informational efficiency in the financial markets context and competently review the related empirical evidence

FN3092 Corporate finance

< adequately explain wellestablished concepts in capital structure theory and critically analyse the ways by which the notion of information asymmetry affect it < cogently explain the relevance, facts and role of the dividend policy < broadly illustrate how corporate governance can contribute to firm value < critically analyse why merger and acquisition activities exist, and calculate the related gains and losses with minimum support.

decision making and strategic thinking to the managerial role and functions < discuss and compare different models and approaches to understanding the firm, evaluating these in the context of the business environment < explore the impact of key environmental factors on decision making and organisational behaviour < evaluate the significance of contemporary issues in business and management.

Business and Management


Aims and objectives To provide a comprehensive introduction to the key elements of the business organisation, and to competing theories and models of the firm and its environment, and to provide a critical perspective on the main functional areas of management. To build a foundation of knowledge of the different theoretical approaches to management and decision making. To develop your analytical skills so that you can identify the links between the functional areas in management, organisations, management practices and the business environment. Learning outcomes On completion of this course, you should be able to: < understand the evolution of the business organisation and management thought, identifying the interconnections between developments in these areas < evaluate alternative theories of management critically, recognising the centrality of

MN1107 Introduction to business and management

Aims and objectives To approach managerial decision problems using economic reasoning. You will be able to present business practice topics using an analytical approach, using equations and numerical insight. Topics covered include: Basic microeconomics, alternative theories of the firm, internal organisation of the firm, market structure, efficiency wages, incentive structures, human resource management etc. as well as some industrial organisation theories of commonly used pricing practices. Individual (one person) decision making under uncertainty, attitudes to risk and the value of information. Theory of games i.e. strategic decision making, with applications to oligopoly, collusion, product differentiation, entry deterrence etc. The effects of asymmetric information in areas such as bargaining, bidding and auctions. Situations of moral hazard and adverse selection. Learning outcomes < Be prepared for Marketing and Strategy courses by being able to analyse consumer behaviour and markets in general.
www.londoninternational.ac.uk/lse

MN3028 Managerial economics

60

Undergraduate study in Economics, Management, Finance and the Social Sciences

61

Course descriptions
psychology and its major methodological approaches. < To identify the key ideas and processes people use in understanding their social world. < To assess the impact of group membership and social influence MN3075 Human on peoples behaviour. < To evaluate the role of social resource management Aims and objectives relations in our societies. < To illustrate how social To demonstrate how the social sciences can assist in understanding psychological knowledge the management of human and principles can be applied resources and to examine and to real-world issues. evaluate human resource policies Learning outcomes and practices of organisations. You should be able to describe The course adopts the view that key concepts, theories and research and theory about managing methodological approaches people at work has progressed to used in social psychology. the point where analytic coherence You will be able to outline can be achieved, and that this in turn the processes used in can guide policy development and understanding our social world, human resource practice. The course assess how people behave in presents and then examines the groups and the role of social principal theories upon which modern influence and analyse the human resource practices are based. processes and phenomena Learning outcomes involved in social relations. At the end of this course and having You will learn to critically evaluate completed the essential reading and how social psychology can be activities you should be able to: applied to social issues and can < describe the relationship aid our understanding of human between HRM and organisational behaviour in real-world settings. performance and be able to critically evaluate the MN3141 Principles empirical evidence of marketing < critically evaluate alternative Aims and objectives perspectives on HR practices To introduce you to the < analyse the relationship fundamental principles of between HR practices and marketing and marketing their outcomes for the management. Marketing can individual and organisation only be properly understood < evaluate the effectiveness through the various disciplines of different HR practices that support it (i.e., economics, < comment upon the limitations psychology, sociology and of the theories covered. strategy) and this course explores the relevance of these academic MN2079 Elements of social subjects to marketing. Topics covered in the course include and applied psychology Aims and objectives origins of marketing theory This course has five major aims. and practice, consumer theory, < To provide you with an product development, promotion overview of the scope of social strategy, pricing strategy,

< Analyse business practices with respect to pricing and competition. < Define and be able to apply key concepts in decision analysis and game theory.

placement and distribution strategy, marketing ethics and corporate social responsibility. The strategic approach taken will enable you to gain a broad understanding of consumers and the marketing behaviour of firms, especially those operating in an international environment. You will be encouraged to question the limitations of marketing management and to suggest ways of overcoming its many problems. Through the use of short articles and case studies, you will also develop your practical skills by applying learned theories to realworld organisational problems. Learning outcomes The course is ideally suited to those who wish to develop a sophisticated and critical understanding of marketing theory. At the end of this course and having completed the essential reading and activities you will be expected to: 1. Describe the behaviour of consumers from both an economic and psychological perspective. 2. Discuss the function and effect of advertising/promotion from both an organisational and market-wide perspective. 3. Describe the pricing behaviour of firms in an uncertain environment where information may be limited or wrong. 4. Describe and analyse the marketing behaviour of firms and consumers and make predictions regarding such events as the success or failure of a new product or advertising campaign. These four themes will run throughout the course. You will be expected to acquire a knowledge and critical understanding of these four themes as well as the sub-topics which form a part of each theme.

< reasons for expecting violations of these assumptions in certain eC1002 Introduction circumstances, tests for violations < potential remedial measures, to economics Aims and objectives including, where appropriate, the To introduce you to an use of instrumental variables. understanding of the domain You will recognise and apply the of economics as a social theory. advantages of logit, probit and You will learn the main analytical similar models over regression tools used in, and be introduced analysis when fitting binary choice to the main conclusions derived models. You will be competent to use from, economic analysis. As you regression, logit and probit analysis develop your understanding of to quantify economic relationships their organisational and policy using standard regression implications this will enable programmes in simple applications. you to participate in debates You will describe and explain the on economic matters. principles underlying the use of Learning outcomes maximum likelihood estimation. You You should be able to demonstrate an will apply regression analysis to fit understanding of the main economic time-series models using stationary models used in economic analysis, time series, with awareness of be able to assess their potential and some of the econometric problems limitation. You will learn to translate specific to time series applications problems which are described in (for example, autocorrelation) daily language to the language of and remedial measures. economic modelling and apply the You will recognise the difficulties models to solve these problems. that arise in the application of regression analysis to nonstationary eC2020 Elements time series, know how to test for unit roots, and know what of econometrics Aims and objectives is meant by cointegration. To develop your understanding of the use of regression analysis and eC2065 Macroeconomics related techniques for quantifying Aims and objectives economic relationships and testing To show how our understanding economic theories. You become of how economic systems equipped to read and evaluate operate has evolved substantially, empirical papers in professional explain why the growth rate of journals. It will provide you with aggregate output varies from year practical experience of using to year, explain what determines mainstream regression programmes unemployment and inflation in to fit economic models. the short run and in the long run Learning outcomes and discuss how macroeconomic You should be able to describe policy might influence business and apply the classical regression cycles or long run growth. model and its application to Learning outcomes cross-section data. You will be You should be able to apply a able to describe and apply the: wide range of economic models < Gauss-Markov conditions and to analyse contemporary and other assumptions required historical macroeconomic events. in the application of the In particular, you should be able classical regression model to analyse the causes of business

Economics

cycles, long-run economic growth, unemployment and inflation and be able to suggest appropriate macroeconomic policies to deal with each of these issues.

Aims and objectives To examine how economic decisions are made by households and firms, and how they interact to determine the quantities and prices of goods and factors of production and the allocation of resources. It also investigates the principles of microeconomic policy and the role of government in allocating resources. It prepares you for 200 and 300 courses which require a knowledge of microeconomics. Learning outcomes You should be able to define and describe: the determinants of consumer choices, including intertemporal choices and those involving risk, firms behaviour, how firms behaviour differs in different market structures and may help to determine those structures, how firms and households determine factor prices. You should analyse and assess efficiency and welfare optimality of perfectly and imperfectly competitive markets, the effects of externalities and public goods on efficiency, government policies aimed at improving welfare.

eC2066 Microeconomics

Geography
Aims and objectives To introduce you to key current debates in geography and positions these debates within the history of geographical ideas. You will obtain a broad knowledge of a range of contemporary geographical issues and to understand how these have developed over time. It provides a basic understanding of economic, social, cultural and political concerns from a global and local perspective.
www.londoninternational.ac.uk/lse

GY1009 Human geography

62

Undergraduate study in Economics, Management, Finance and the Social Sciences

63

Course descriptions
Learning outcomes impact of information and At the end of this course and having communication technologies completed the essential reading and on the economy and society < discuss the history of the activities you should be able to: < outline the theoretical development of information and contribution and development of communication technologies and geography to the social sciences describe some of the emerging < critically analyse processes of consequences for organisations < express a basic logical contemporary economic, social, cultural and political change from understanding of how a a geographical perspective computer system works, < describe and discuss the and its principal structures importance of understanding and components including both diversity and contemporary technologies homogeneity to the process for data input, data of geographical enquiry output, data storage < discuss alternative < describe the principal understandings of how the technologies used in data global and the local human transmission (networks), environment are connected. including the basic functions and architecture of the Internet < explain the various functions Information Systems of systems software (operating Is1060 Introduction to systems), language translators and various classes of taskinformation systems Aims and objectives oriented application packages < explain the main tasks that need To provide a broad introductory understanding of information to be undertaken in preparing systems, seen within organisational for the establishment of a new and societal contexts. To provide information system in terms of you with an appropriate balance the systems development life of technical and organisational cycle and with an appreciation of perspectives to serve as the basis alternative system development for further study in the field. methodologies and tools < describe and justify a range of Learning outcomes At the end of this course and having professional roles in information completed the essential reading and systems development activity < demonstrate, through a project, activities you should be able to: < explain the fundamental experience in the analysis and principles and assumptions design of small projects using of studying the application of database and spreadsheet information and communications programs, and the ability to technologies in terms of write brief but informative information systems (rather than reports on such work. as simply technical apparatus) < apply these principles to study Is1168 Introduction to a number of practical business computer systems architecture and administrative information and programming systems within real organisations Aims and objectives < discuss the social, organisational To develop an understanding of the fundamentals of hardware and and economic context of software technologies that underlie computer use and debate the
contemporary computer-based information systems. To develop an understanding of the underlying structure and theories of computers and programming. To provide the skills needed to develop algorithms for programming solutions. To provide the skills needed to write simple programs in Java. At the end of the course and having completed the essential reading and activities you should be able to:

Learning outcomes

< identify the basic elements of hardware and explain their functions and how they fit together to form an architecture < explain how data is represented, manipulated and stored within a computer system < identify and explain the functions of operating systems < explain how computers interact through local and wide area networks < identify various different types of programming languages and appreciate how they have evolved since the early days of computer programming < design algorithms to solve basic programming problems < explain common data types and structures < explain basic programming structures < explain the underlying concepts of object-oriented programming < write simple but effective programs in Java.

critical ideas in management thinking related to the use and implementation of information technology in organisations. The first part of the course identifies three models of information system design focusing on data processing, decision making and transaction costs and explores their organisational implications. The second part of the course deals with a critical revision of the key concepts of strategy, technology infrastructure and implementation issues. Learning outcomes At the end of this course and having completed the essential reading and activities you should be able to: < discuss the organisational implications of ICT deployment < critically appraise the validity of concerns expressed in particular cases of ICT choices, their merits, shortcomings and feasibility of implementation < identify and discuss the merits and shortcomings of the major theoretical perspectives that inform the design and deployment of ICT in organisations < comment upon technical innovation as a process involving both technology development and organisational change < describe the actions and interventions that are associated with ICT strategies.

Aims and objectives To provide you with the fundamental concepts needed for understanding information technology in organisations from information systems theory, organisation theory and economics perspectives. To introduce you to some new,

Is3136 Information systems and organisations

International Development
DV1171 Introduction to international development (NEW)

it should be understood as a global phenomenon < describe and evaluate the main intellectual traditions out of which ideas about international development have emerged < show how development can only be fully understood if its historical and political dimensions are given as much attention as its economic and social dimensions < illustrate how development policy and practice has evolved over time and why some options are seen as possible by governments, International Financial Institutions and civil society organisations while others are not < do this by looking in depth at the following key themes: late development (i.e. industrialisation now) and industrial policy; agrarian change and rural development; governance and public policy; the international order. Learning outcomes At the end of this course, and having completed the essential reading and activities, you should be able to: < show why development should be understood as global phenomenon < discuss and critically evaluate the main intellectual traditions shaping international development today < use a range of historical, political, economic and social concepts and facts in their analysis of development issues < demonstrate a good understanding of how policy debates and practical interventions have evolved over time in the context of a number of key themes.

policies in developing countries. To demonstrate how the underlying theories that inform development policies are evolving in light of continuous empirical testing. To provide a comprehensive introduction to evidence-based policy analysis, including a non-technical but operational ability to read and comprehend regression analyses used in quantitative policy evaluation. Learning outcomes At the end of the course, and having completed the essential reading and activities, you should be able to: < describe the main theories, debates and concepts in development economics < demonstrate a clear understanding of the major economic policy issues in developing countries < be able to read, understand and critique empirical analysis in the context of development policy evaluations at a non-technical level < demonstrate an understanding of how theories of development economics have evolved and shaped policy over the past 50 years.

Law
(Please note: an additional fee is payable for these law courses).

lA1010 Criminal law


This course examines general principles of criminal liability, a range of fatal and non-fatal offences against the person and selected offences against property. Inchoate offences, secondary liability and defences also form part of the University of London criminal law curriculum. Criminal law consists of a highly developed body of precisely formulated legal rules but as criminal conduct is subject to
www.londoninternational.ac.uk/lse

Aims and objectives The specific objectives of the course are to: < demonstrate that development is not just about the South or the Third World but that

Aims and objectives To provide an overview of current growth and welfare

DV2169 Economic policy analysis in international development (NEW)

64

Undergraduate study in Economics, Management, Finance and the Social Sciences

65

Course descriptions
punishment it thus engages with broad issues of morality and policy. Understanding the tension between certainty in the law and social adaptation affects the development of criminal law will take students beyond the basic stage of understanding the substantive rules of criminal law.

lA1031 Common law reasoning and institutions


This comprehensive introduction to the English legal system seeks to convey what is distinctive about the common law approach as a legal methodology and as it reflects the history and politics of England & Wales. It examines the sources of law, the civil and criminal court structure, and the role of judges and judicial reasoning. Special attention is paid to the laws claims to fairness, examining the rules protecting accused persons in the criminal system and access to legal remedies in the civil system, as well as courts of appeal. The course seeks to familiarise students not only with how the system operates but why.

lA1020 Public law


The UK constitution is famously unwritten and thus contrasts with other constitutional models. Analysing key issues of sovereignty and the division of powers between legislature, executive and administration, one key question is how far the UK lives up to classic doctrine. Equally, membership of the European Union, and the Human Rights Act 1998, affect the overall picture of the relation between citizen and the state. To fully engage with this subject, students need to take an interest in current affairs and debates about what is involved in constitutional issues and reforms.

Mathematics and statistics


Aims and objectives To enable you to acquire skills in the methods of calculus (including multivariate calculus) and linear algebra, as required for their use in economics-based subjects and to prepare you for 200 and 300 courses in mathematics and/or related disciplines. Learning outcomes At the end of this half course and having completed the essential reading and activities you should have: < used the concepts, terminology, methods and conventions covered in the half course to solve mathematical problems in this subject < the ability to solve unseen mathematical problems involving understanding of these concepts and application of these methods < seen how mathematical techniques can be used to solve problems in economics and related subjects.

Mt105A Mathematics 1 (half course)

Aims and objectives To enable you to acquire further skills in the methods of calculus and linear algebra (in addition to those in 05a Mathematics 1), as required for their use in economicsbased subjects and to prepare you for courses in mathematics and/or related disciplines. Learning outcomes At the end of this half course and having completed the essential reading and activities you should have: < used the concepts, terminology, methods and conventions covered in the half course to solve mathematical problems in this subject < the ability to solve unseen mathematical problems involving understanding of these concepts and application of these methods < seen how mathematical techniques can be used to solve problems in economics and related subjects. Aims and objectives To enable you to acquire skills in the methods of algebra, as required for their use in further mathematics subjects and economics-based subjects. To prepare students for further courses in mathematics and/or related disciplines. Learning outcomes At the end of the course, and having completed the essential reading and activities, you should be able to: < use the concepts, terminology, methods and conventions covered in the course to solve mathematical problems in this subject < solve unseen mathematical problems involving understanding of these concepts and application of these methods

Mt105B Mathematics 2 (half course)

lA1040 Elements of the law of contract


Contracts are the legal basis of all commercial transactions. Covering the core topics including formation of contracts, capacity to contract and privity, performance and breach of contract and remedies for breach of contract the emphasis is on understanding the key underlying principles of English law. This is very much a case law subject, with judicial precedents stretching back nearly 400 years in some instances (but more usually of 19th and 20thcentury origin) and a small number of statutory provisions, as well as the impact of EU law. An understanding of what factors judges may, or must, take into account when exercising their discretion is crucial.

Mt1173 Algebra

to a student with a moderate mathematical competence < be able to routinely apply a variety of methods for explaining, summarising and presenting data and interpreting results clearly using appropriate diagrams, Mt1174 Calculus titles and labels when required < be able to summarise the ideas Aims and objectives To enable you to acquire skills in of randomness and variability, the methods of calculus (including and the way in which these multivariate calculus), as required link to probability theory to for their use in further mathematics allow the systematic and logical subjects and economics-based collection of statistical techniques subjects. To prepare you for of great practical importance further courses in mathematics in many applied areas < have a grounding in probability and/or related disciplines. Learning outcomes theory and some grasp After successfully completing of the most common this half course, you should: statistical methods < use the concepts, terminology, < be able to perform inference methods and conventions covered to test the significance of in the course to solve mathematical common measures such as problems in this subject means and proportions and < solve unseen mathematical conduct chi-squared tests problems involving of contingency tables understanding of these concepts < be able to use simple linear and application of these methods regression and correlation < see how calculus can be used analysis and know when it to solve problems in economics is appropriate to do so. and related subjects < demonstrate knowledge and st104B Statistics 2 understanding of the underlying (half course) principles of calculus. Aims and objectives To develop your knowledge of st104A Statistics 1 elementary statistical theory. The emphasis is on topics that are (half course) Aims and objectives of importance in applications to To introduce some of the basic econometrics, finance and the ideas of theoretical statistics while social sciences. Concepts emphasising the applications of the and methods that provide methods in the disciplines covered the foundation for more by the economics, management, specialised courses in statistics finance and social science degrees. are also introduced. There is an emphasis on the Learning outcomes interpretation of tables and results. After successfully completing Learning outcomes this half course, you should: < be a competent user of standard At the end of the course, and having completed the essential statistical operators and be reading and activities, you should: able to recall a variety of < be familiar with the key ideas well-known distributions and of statistics that are accessible their respective moments

< see how algebra can be used to solve problems in economics and related subjects < demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the underlying principles of algebra.

< be able to explain the fundamentals of statistical inference and be able to apply these principles to justify the use of an appropriate model and perform tests in a number of different settings < appreciate that statistical techniques are based on assumptions and in any analysis of real problems the plausibility of such assumptions must be thoroughly investigated.

Politics and International Relations


Aims and objectives To explore the nature of the anarchical international society of legally-autonomous, territoriallybased, political units called states. To consider a range of principles of organisation of the international system such as imperialism, and the major adaptations of international society in the modern period. To identify the international aspects of the emerging problems of the current era, such as those of the environment, those of promoting economic development, and those concerning the protection of human rights. To evaluate the character and achievements of newer forms of international arrangements, such as the United Nations system and non-governmental organisations. To consider why wars happen between states and how peace can be sustained over time. Learning outcomes At the end of this course and having completed the essential reading and activities you should be able to: < discuss and evaluate competing approaches to the study of international relations, with their associated concepts and perspectives
www.londoninternational.ac.uk/lse

Ir1011 Introduction to international relations

66

Undergraduate study in Economics, Management, Finance and the Social Sciences

67

the meaning and justification of those concepts and their continuing relevance to the nature of modern politics. You will explore rival theoretical frameworks such as natural law, utilitarianism, Ir1034 World history egalitarianism, communitarianism and Marxism and develop the since 1917 Aims and objectives critical skills necessary to examine To develop your ability to think and assess complex theoretical logically and critically, to develop arguments and to assess their your knowledge of political and strengths and weaknesses. social systems and of the various Learning outcomes cultural influences on policy-makers You should be able to in different parts of the world. demonstrate a familiarity with Learning outcomes the great texts of modern At the end of this course and having political theory. You will be able completed the essential reading and to identify and explain different activities you should be able to: concepts and how they vary < analyse important aspects of the between thinkers, assess the twentieth century international strengths and weaknesses of system, especially the nature and different theories and write significance of the Cold War analytical essays that explain and < explain how international crises paraphrase complex arguments were perceived and responded in clear and concise prose. to by the great powers < relate local and regional Ps1172 Introduction aspects of particular conflicts to political science to the broader international Aims and objectives aspects of the Cold War To introduce you to the main which influenced them differences between democratic < analyse what motivated and non-democratic regimes, states and their rulers as they and between different models of sought to expand their power democratic government, and how and influence and deal with political preferences are formed, threats to their interests in the how voters behave, how parties twentieth century world. compete, how interest groups form, and how electoral systems Ps1130 Introduction to shape behaviour. To explain how political institutions work, such modern political thought Aims and objectives as presidential and parliamentary To provide you with an introduction systems, single-party and coalition to the great texts of modern governments, federalism, and political theory and to examine courts and central banks. the meaning and justification To explain how political of important concepts such as behaviour and institutions freedom, sovereignty, equality shape policy outcomes, such as and rights. The study of politics is economic performance, public shaped by concepts and methods spending, and immigration that have developed over the and environmental policies, last three centuries. The study of and to prepare you for further political theory is concerned with courses in political science.

< display this engagement by developing a capacity to write clearly about the issues involved, and to present arguments about international relations coherently.

Learning outcomes At the end of this course and having completed the essential reading and activities you should be able to: < explain patterns of voting behaviour and party competition in different countries, and how electoral systems influence voters and parties < explain how different institutional designs of democracy work < understand how political science explains policy outcomes < critically evaluate rational choice and institutional theories in political science < explain the pros and cons of quantitative and qualitative methods in political science.

Sociology
Aims and objectives Section A, Theory and method, introduces you to the subject matter and focus of sociology and provides you with the tools to enable you to read critically and to gather information creatively and carefully. It describes and provides you with knowledge of and critical evaluation of the major sociological theories of society. It introduces you to the major techniques and the methods used in sociological research and provides you with an understanding of the relationship of theory to the formation, collection and analysis of data. It introduces you to the analyses of the changing nature of modern/ contemporary societies and their relevance for social theory. Section B, Globalisation and social change, introduces you to the range of theoretical perspectives that aim to explain the phenomenon of globalisation and social change and the importance of critical evaluation of these. It will

sC1021 Principles of sociology

introduce you to the contribution that studies of globalisation make to the sociological discussions of contemporary society. In Section C you choose one topic area in sociology where you will use the theories studied in Sections A and B to ensure that you have understood how these theories have influenced the approach of the key sociologists to the subject matter, with particular reference to epistemological concerns. You will choose one topic from religion and society, gender, social inequality and social injustice, race and ethnicity, the sociology of organisations and power in society. Learning outcomes At the end of the course and having completed the essential reading and activities you should be able to: < Describe the nature of the sociological perspective and the major theories of society. < Apply the major sociological perspectives to at least two aspects of social life. < Read the set texts critically and creatively and select relevant material cited by the authors selectively in your examination answers. < Explain and evaluate the scope of the research process and the approach of different methods of social inquiry and be able to criticise these. < Explain the relationship between theory and method in sociology. < Outline debates surrounding sociology as a science and the major theories of knowledge. < Evaluate the sociological debates surrounding the processes of modernisation and globalisation and be able to compare and criticise these. < Apply the skills and knowledge learnt in sections A and B to a specialist topic in section C.

< Describe the key sociological debates surrounding the subject matter of the area chosen, especially in relation to the development of key concepts, epistemological concerns and social research.

Aims and objectives To introduce you to the practical skills of close reading and comprehension of original material. It gives you a sound introduction to some of the key ideas, in their original form, that have shaped social scientific, specifically sociological, thought. Learning outcomes At the end of this half course and having completed the essential reading and activities you should be able to: < discuss texts using a critical approach < recognise, understand and explain an argument or idea < identify and discuss arguments and ideas across a range of thinkers and writers, and be able to identify the broader context of these arguments < read and analyse texts with the aim of formulating sustained arguments of your own.

sC1158 Reading social science (half course)

68

Undergraduate study in Economics, Management, Finance and the Social Sciences

www.londoninternational.ac.uk/lse

69

Tests of proficiency in English


The following qualifications are equated with GCSE/GCE O Level English Language grade C for the purposes of satisfying the entrance requirements.
< Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English < Cambridge English Language 1119 (at grade 6 or better) conducted overseas by the University of Cambridge Local Examinations Syndicate. < Hong Kong Examination Authority Advanced level Use of English (grade C or better). < Hong Kong Certificate of Education English Language (Syllabus B) (at grade C or better). < Hong Kong Certificate of Education Examination (HKCEE)
English Language section from 2007 performance levels 5*, 5, 4 or 3. < International General Certificate of Education (IGCSE): English as a Second Language, passed at grade B or above. < NEAB (formerly JMB) University Entrance Test in English for Speakers of Other Languages. < School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS) Diploma in English for Academic Purposes (passed at grade A or B).

The qualifications below are not acceptable as equivalent to GCSE/GCE O Level (grade C) English Language but they are considered acceptable evidence of proficiency in English provided they have been awarded within the past three years.
< Advanced Placement International English Language Examination (APIEL), when a score of 4 or 5 is achieved. < Associated Examining Board (AEB) Test in English for Educational Purposes (TEEP) (when Proficiency level (4) is achieved in each of the listening, reading and writing components). < Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English. < City & Guilds International ESOL 8984 Mastery award. < Hong Kong Examinations Authority AS Use of English. < International English Language Testing System (IELTS) when an overall score of at least 6 is achieved with a minimum of 5.5 in each sub-test.

< International General Certificate of Secondary Education (IGCSE): English as a Second Language passed at grade C or above. < Malaysian Certificate of Education/Sijil Pelajaran Malaysia English Language Communicational (122 or 322) grade 6 or better. < Oxford Delegacys Higher Level Examination in English as a Foreign Language when taken with the ARELS examination in spoken English (a pass with credit or above must be achieved in the Oxford examination and a Good Pass or better in the ARELS test). < School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS) Diploma in English for Academic Purposes (passed at grade C). < A diploma awarded by any of the polytechnics in Singapore. (This satisfies the English language requirement for the degrees in Economics, Management, Finance and the Social Sciences and the Access route to these degrees only). < Test in English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) with a score of 580 (or 237 on the

computerised test) plus the Test of Written English (TWE) with a score of 4.5 (or a Writing Rating of 4.5 in the computerised test). < iBT Test of English as a Foreign Language (iBT TOEFL) score of 92 in total with at least 22 in both Reading and Writing Skills sub-tests and at least 20 in both Speaking and Listening sub-tests. < University of Cambridge Local Examinations Syndicate (UCLES) Business English Certificate Level 3 only (BEC 3 award). < HELP, Malaysia Foundation programme Advanced English module (this satisfies the English language requirement for the degrees in Economics, Management, Finance and the Social Sciences and the Access route only). < A degree or associate degree awarded within the past three years by a university in Hong Kong that is acceptable to the University of London (this satisfies the English language requirement for the degrees in Economics, Management, Finance and Social Sciences and the Access route only).

Other acceptable qualifications


There are many qualifications, both from the UK and overseas, that we accept as satisfying our entrance requirements. Further details are available on our website:

www.londoninternational.ac.uk/how_to_ apply/application_process/entrance_quals.pdf
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Am I eligible to apply for APL?


1. You are eligible to be registered for the degree of your choice. 2. You are suitably qualified.

You can be considered for APL if you satisfy all of the following criteria:
3. If you are applying for automatic APL, you must 4. You have already received the final award for that qualification/s.

Accreditation of prior learning (APL)


Other institutions may use the terms credit transfer or advanced standing; we use the term accreditation of prior learning (APL). If we award you APL you are not required to take a particular course or courses as part of your degree. We only award APL on the Standard Routes of the BSc degrees.
that equate in level, content and standard to the 100 course(s) that form part of your degree. Some APL we award is automatic; all other APL is considered on a discretionary basis. Further details and a full list of qualifications which may be considered for APL are given on our website at: progress through your degree. They also count towards the total number of courses you have to take to complete the degree. In this respect, it is as if you have taken these subjects as part of your degree studies. (In certain circumstances APL may be considered for courses not listed on the degree structure. This applies to all degrees except BSc Economics and Management.) < APL is only valid for a limited period. If you are granted APL, this period is given on your decision letter. If you do not attempt an examination during this period, the APL will expire. If this happens, and you still want the APL to count towards your degree, you will need to make a further application.

< You must have passed examinations which compare in level, content and standard to the examinations for the courses from which you want APL. < APL is normally only considered on a subject-for-subject basis. For example, you should only apply for APL from the course EC1002 Introduction to economics if, in your opinion, you have previously studied a similar subject in the same depth, at degree level (or the equivalent), and you have achieved good marks in the corresponding examination. < We do not give APL on the basis of GCSE/GCE O levels or GCE A levels, or other similar school-leaving examinations.

have passed the whole of the qualification(s) on which your application is based, within the five years preceding the application. < If you are applying for discretionary APL, consideration will also be given if you have completed part of a degree-level qualification that has been examined. < Except for some accounting and legal bodies, we do not normally grant APL from Economics, Management, Finance and Social Science subjects on the basis of examinations from professional bodies. For details please visit: www.

< If you have not yet received the award, your APL application will be considered under the APL regulations that apply at the time that the award is finally made. These regulations may be different to those that applied at the time you submitted your application. < Your qualification must have been awarded before the application deadline for you to receive APL from an examination in the following year. For example, to receive APL from an examination in 2012, your qualification must have been awarded before 1 October 2011.

londoninternational.ac.uk/ current_students/lse

Formal application must be made for all APL, both discretionary and automatic.

How do I apply for APL?

You can gain APL up to the value www.londoninternational. ac.uk/current_students/ of four full 100 courses (please see programme_resources/lse Selection groups F(i) and F(ii) on page 57). You may be able to apply for APL if you have already covered a A formal application must similar syllabus in the same breadth be made for all APL < The classification of degree you and depth as part of a previous qualification, within the past five receive will not be adversely years preceding your application. affected by the APL you receive. < You will be able to use APL from To be eligible to apply for APL, you must satisfy us that you have named courses, as appropriate, already passed examinations for prerequisite purposes as you

Complete the APL section of the application form given in the centre of this prospectus when you apply for admission. If you cannot do this, you should send a written application as soon as possible to the Admissions Office, addressed to the APL Officer.

On receipt of your initial APL application, the Admissions Office will send you one of the following: < a decision letter advising you that certain automatic APL has been awarded or < a letter requesting further before a decision regarding automatic APL can be taken or < a decision letter informing you that your APL request has been unsuccessful. This will usually be because you do not satisfy the criteria given in the section Am I eligible to apply for APL? If you are applying for discretionary APL, we will then send you an APL request pack.
documentary evidence

We must receive your initial application for APL no later than:


1 October

Deadline date

Please complete and return the request form and fee following the instructions given in the accompanying letter. You must also submit all the documentary evidence requested in that letter and the fee indicated. Once we have received this we will then take a decision on your application for discretionary APL as soon as possible. Please note that it is not possible for us to refund the APL application fee, even if we are unable to award you any APL.

Notes:

< Applications for APL cannot be considered after a student has made entry to the examination for the course concerned. Students who have failed an examination may not, at a later stage, apply for APL from that examination. < APL is valid only for a limited time and as indicated in the offer of APL. < APL is valid only for the particular programme of study and subject for which they have been awarded.

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Automatic and discretionary APL

Automatic APL

< Subject to the conditions given, and the correct subjects having been passed, APL from up to four full courses of those specified is normally awarded automatically, on application, for the qualifications listed in the table provided in the Regulations and on the International Programmes website at:
www.londoninternational. ac.uk/current_students/ programme_resources/lse/ exemptions/automatic.shtml

< We will consider past qualifications for up a maximum of four individual full courses (MT105A, MT105B, ST104A and ST104B count as half courses). < The APL application fee is payable for the consideration of all discretionary APL (see How do I apply for APL? on page 73).

Discretionary APL

< Applicants will be awarded all the APL possible for the qualifications they have. < There is no application fee for the consideration of automatic APL (see How do I apply for APL? on page 73).

Full information about APL can be found online and in the Regulations. This information is not binding and is subject to confirmation in the current Regulations for the degree concerned. The University reserves the right to review annually the APL policy and APL awarded for each degree. Please note: all applicants must also satisfy the criteria listed under Am I eligible to apply for APL? on page 73. For further information about Accreditation of prior learning please visit our website:
www.londoninternational. ac.uk/current_students/ programme_resources/lse/ exemptions/apply.shtml

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Application and registration process


How to apply and register Getting started
< For the Diploma in Economics and Diploma in Social Sciences please apply through the Diplomateaching institution that you will attend (see pages 50-53). < For all other programmes you apply online: www.

Stage 1
Complete the online application form, listing all your qualifications. There is also an application fee which you pay when you submit the form. Submit your documentary evidence (listing your full name and your qualifications) to: Admissions Office University of London International Programmes Ground floor Stewart House 32 Russell Square London WC1B 5DN United Kingdom Please submit documentary evidence in support of your application as early as possible but no later than 1 October. Applications received after the deadline date will be kept on file and processed when the new Admissions year opens in February. Applicants resident in Hong Kong and Singapore should return their application form directly to:

Stage 2
When you submit your online application form we send you a student number. The allocation of a student number at this stage does not constitute acceptance onto the programme.

Stage 3
We check your application and give you a decision once we have received all the necessary documentation. We email you with one of the following responses: eIther You are qualified, we will email you: < a letter offering you registration for your chosen programme (called the Offer letter). or It appears that you are qualified and we are provisionally accepting you, but in order to receive a final Offer letter you will need to submit further information and/or documentary evidence (as specified in our letter) that confirms the qualifications on your application form. or We require more information and/or documentary evidence before we can make a decision on your application. It may also be necessary to then refer your application to the Special Admissions Panel for a final decision to be made (see Special admissions on page 78).

Stage 4
or We are currently unable to accept you
onto the programme. We will then make some suggestions as to what you might do to become qualified. If you take our advice and obtain the qualification(s) we specify within the validity of the application form (five years from the date it is submitted), you should submit evidence of the qualification(s) to the Admissions office. If it is then confirmed that the conditions have been met and the qualification is still available, the offer of registration will be issued. You will not need to submit a second application or pay a second application handling fee. Shortly after you receive the offer letter, we email you details of how to register online. You should register as early as possible but no later than 30 November.

Stage 5
Once you register, we send you your study materials.

< Students who intend to study at an institution are advised to contact the institution for advice about submitting their application. < Please read the Guidance notes for applications (Undergraduate) before you complete your application: www.
londoninternational. ac.uk/forms/online_ application_forms/ ug_guidance_ notes.pdf

londoninternational. ac.uk/onlineapps/

Hong Kong: The University of Hong Kong School of Professional and Continuing Education (HKU SPACE) University of London International Programmes Admissions Unit 3/F, Admiralty Centre 18 Harcourt Road Hong Kong Singapore: RELC Examinations Bureau, 30 Orange Grove Road, Level 3 RELC Building, Singapore 258352

Useful information for applicants


Note: If you apply for admission to a degree but we are unable to accept you, we will automatically consider you for a lower entry point where applicable. If you are eligible, we will send you an offer letter for that route.

There are many qualifications, both from the UK and overseas, that we accept as satisfying our entrance requirements. Further details are available on our website: www.londoninternational.ac.uk/how_to_
apply/application_process/entrance_quals.pdf

Other acceptable qualifications

< Submit your application even if it is incomplete (for example: if you are waiting to sit an examination or to receive examination results). Do not delay we can often begin to consider your application without all the evidence. < We cannot tell you whether you are eligible until your form, application handling fee and all the required documentation have been received.

< We will process your application as soon as we receive your fee. You are also asked to note that this fee cannot be refunded. < Once your application is received, it is kept on file for five years. During this time we will give you any advice and information you need about your application at no extra cost.

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77

Documentary evidence
All applicants
the appropriate awarding < We strongly advise or examining authority you to send all original to ask them to write to us documents by Special direct giving further details Delivery or International of your qualification/s. < You can send us your original result Recorded Delivery < If any evidence you submit slip/s of any A level examinations is either incomplete or for which the final certificate has unacceptable to the University yet to be issued. However, result for admission purposes or if slips from previous years cannot we need further information be accepted you will need to about a particular qualification submit the original certificate. (e.g. a transcript and/or syllabus), < You should endeavour to we may ask you to contact submit any documentation within one month of submitting your application. < The University reserves the right to ask for further evidence of your qualification/s if required. < It is your responsibility to arrange for all the necessary documentation to be obtained in support of your application. The University cannot undertake to do this on your behalf. (This also applies to any translation(s) of documents submitted by the applicant that may be required.)

Applicants living in the UK

< Enclose, where available, the original certificate(s) showing the final award(s) for each qualification. Photocopies cannot be accepted for admission purposes. < If you prefer not to send your original certificates by post, you may bring them into the Admissions Office personally. < We will photocopy the certificates and return them to you. Your application will then be processed in the usual way and the decision sent to you by email.

< If an original certificate is unavailable for any reason, you may either submit any other evidence that you have relating to the qualification(s) or await our initial response to your application. We will then advise you exactly what evidence you need to submit. < If the evidence you submit is incomplete or unacceptable for any reason, we will ask you to contact the appropriate awarding or examining authority to arrange for them to send us direct a certified statement of your results.

Applicants living outside the UK should enclose:

eIther the original certificate/s showing the final award/s for each qualification or photocopies of these originals verified by a British Council official. If the British Council is unable to provide this service for any reason, it will be necessary for you to either send the original certificates with your application or you should contact the appropriate awarding/ examining authority and arrange for them to send us direct a certified statement of results.
other than a degree from an acceptable institution, or < you have a professional qualification/s (gained by examination) that admits you to membership of an acceptable professional body, or < if you do not meet the normal minimum age requirement for registration.

Special admissions

The University has a Special Admissions Panel that will consider an application from you if either; < you have passed examinations that would give you admission to an acceptable university outside the UK, or < you have obtained an appropriate qualification/s

Note: The Special Admissions Panel considers every aspect of the application including all qualifications, relevant work experience and reasons for study. You are asked to note, however, that applications are rarely accepted on the basis of extensive/relevant work experience alone. Evidence of a qualification obtained since leaving secondary/high school is also invariably required. Having considered your application, the Panel may decide that you must obtain an additional qualification/s before an offer of registration for the International Programmes can be made.

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79

Fees and contacts


Fees payable to the University
AcAdEMIc yEAR 2012/3

Application handling fee


(non-refundable)

70 70 35 650 325 495 315 194 97 640 42

No financial assistance is available from the University. Some employers in both the public and private sector may be willing to consider offering financial assistance to their employees.
Students who are resident in the UK may be able to apply for a

Financial assistance

eligible Service personnel who wish to enhance their educational or vocational achievements. The ELC Administration Service website can be found at: www.
enhancedlearningcredits.co.uk Students who are in prison in the UK may be able to obtain

APL application fee


(per course)

APL application fee


(per half course)

Initial registration fee


(BSc and Graduate Entry Route)

Initial registration fee


(Access route)

Initial registration fee


(Diplomas for Graduates)

Continuing registration fee Examination fee per course Examination fee per half course Access transfer fee Additional registration fee for students taking law courses
(per course)

Part-time Student Grant or a Career Development Loan. Information can be obtained from the Department of Education and Skills (DIUS) Information Line on 0800 731 9133 or from their website: www. dfes.gov.uk/studentsupport (for Part-time Student Grants), and the CDL Information Line on 0800 585 505 or from their website: www.
direct.gov.uk/adultlearning

Prisoners Education Trust


a grant to assist with funding. For information please write to: The Prisoners Education Trust, Wandle House, Riverside Drive, Mitcham, Surrey CR4 4BU.

Students with disabilities

dATES FOR 2012/13 AcAdEMIc SESSIOn

The application handling fee is valid until the application closing date, 1 October 2012. The registration fee is valid until the registration closing date, 30 November 2012. The continuing registration fee is valid and payable between 1 August 2012 and 30 November 2012. The examination fees apply to students entering the 2013 examinations and are payable between 30 November 2012 and the examination entry deadline date, 1 February 2013.
Please note: fees are subject to annual review. The University reserves the right to amend previously announced fees, if necessary. Please see page 18 for fee examples. All fees must be paid in pounds sterling, which may be paid either by Western Union Quick Pay, a credit/ debit card (Visa, MasterCard, Maestro, Electron, JCB), bankers draft/cheque or international money/postal order, made payable to The University of London.

for a Disabled Student Allowance (DSA). For a copy of the information leaflet (which answers most of the questions commonly asked about DSAs) please contact the Skill Information Line on 0800 328 5050, textphone 18001 0800 328 5050 or email info@skill.org.uk The guide is also available on the Skill website: www.skill.org.uk/

Disabled students who are resident in the UK may also be able to apply

If you are in London at any time you would be most welcome to visit our offices. Most of our offices are open between 9.00am and 5.30pm, Monday to Friday, but you are advised to telephone first to make an appointment to ensure that the person you want to see is available.

Personal callers

If you have any questions that are not answered by this prospectus or you would like information about any of the other qualifications listed on page 83, please contact:
The Information Centre University of London Stewart House 32 Russell Square London WC1B 5DN United Kingdom

page.aspx?c=15&p=148#funding Students who are members of the UK Armed Forces should note

Glossary of terms
claim APL from up to four < Accreditation of prior full 100 courses. This may learning (APL) If the allow you to complete the University of London degree within two years. recognises that you have Further information on APL already covered a syllabus is given on pages 72-74. in the same depth and < Awards qualifications. breadth as part of a previous qualification in the < Federal university The University of London is a last five years you will be federal university made granted an APL, whereby up of 19 Colleges (e.g. LSE, you will not be required to Kings College London take a particular subject as and UCL) and a number of part of your degree. APL central academic Institutes. is available on degrees < Graduate Entry Route through the Standard If you already have an Route only. These consist acceptable and full first of 12 courses and you may degree i.e. a Bachelors degree, you may opt for this study route, where 9 courses are studied instead of 12. You may be able to complete within two years. < International Programmes student A student registered for a programme of study via the University of London International Programmes. < Prerequisites For the BSc degrees some courses have prerequisites, i.e. courses which you must have passed first.

Armed forces

that the University of London has been approved by the Ministry of Defence in support of the Enhanced Learning Credits (ELC) Scheme (ELC Provider Reference Number 1284). The Scheme provides financial support to

Tel: +44 (0)20 7862 8360 Web: enquiries.

londoninternational.ac.uk

Please give your full postal address when contacting the Information Centre.

< Individual courses You can apply to study one or more of the courses from the programme as an individual course. Individual courses are not covered in detail by this prospectus, but you can find full details at: www. < University of London International Programmes The framework by which students all over the world can earn a University of London award without having to come to London.
londoninternational. ac.uk/shortcourses/lse

Other costs In addition to the fees payable to the

University, you should also budget for the cost of: < purchasing textbooks (this may well be in the region of 300 per year) < the cost of any course or tuition you choose to take or (for the Diploma in Economics or Diploma in Social Sciences) are required to take < the fee levied by your local examination centre to cover their costs.

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81

Inclusive Practice Policy


The University has a panel that considers applications from students for special examination arrangements.
The aim of the panel is to ensure that disabled and other students with specific access requirements are neither advantaged nor disadvantaged when compared with other students. If you have specific access requirements (such as extra time or special aids), you should complete the relevant section of the application form or write to the Inclusive Practice Manager at the address below, enclosing medical and/ or other supporting evidence: Inclusive Practice Manager University of London International Programmes Stewart House 32 Russell Square London WC1B 5DN United Kingdom Fax: +44 (0)20 7862 8290 Email: special.arrangements@london.ac.uk You can request a copy of the University of Londons full Inclusive Practice Policy statement. Please refer to the Admissions contact details on page 76, or download it from our website: www.londoninternational.ac.uk/dissn

Study programmes for 2012-2013


We offer a wide range of programmes for study by distance and flexible learning, from full degree programmes to certificates and individual courses/modules. For further information please visit: www.londoninternational.ac.uk/prospective_students

Undergraduate
< Accounting < Accounting and Finance < Accounting with Law < Banking < Banking and Finance < Business < Business Administration < Computing and Information Systems < Common Law < Creative Computing < Development and Economics < Divinity < Economics < Economics and Finance < Economics and Management < English < Finance < Geography and Environment < History < Information Systems < Information Systems and Management < International Development < International Relations < Law < Management < Management with Law < Mathematics < Mathematics and Economics < Philosophy < Philosophy, Religion and Ethics < Politics < Politics and International Relations < Psychology < Social Sciences < Sociology < Sociology with Law < Theology

Postgraduate
< Agricultural Economics < Applied Educational Leadership and Management < Applied Environmental Economics < Banking < Clinical Trials < Economic Policy < Educational and Social Research < Environmental Management < Epidemiology < Finance < Finance and Financial Law < Financial Sector Management < Global Health Policy < Human Resource Management < Infectious Diseases < Information Security < International Business < International
Management < International Management (China) < Law < Livestock Health and Production < Managing Rural Development < Organizational Psychology < Petroleum Geoscience < Policy Studies < Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice < Public Financial Management < Public Health < Public Management < Public Policy and Management < Quantitative Finance < Sustainable Development < Veterinary Epidemiology and Public Health

While every effort has been made to ensure that the information contained in this prospectus is accurate at the date of publication (March 2012), all matters that it covers may be subject to change from time to time, both before and after a student has registered. In particular, information about the structure and content of programmes is subject to confirmation in the Regulations and registered students should refer to these. All fees are subject to annual review. The University does not intend by publication or distribution of this prospectus to create any contractual or other legal relation with applicants, registered students, their advisers or any other persons. You are strongly advised to check our website (www.londoninternational.ac.uk) for any revisions to this prospectus. We advise you to check local recognition criteria in your own country before applying for any qualification listed in this prospectus. This prospectus is issued free by the University of London. Published by: University of London International Programmes (Design, Editorial and Production). Copyright University of London, 2012.

Important note:

We aim to provide the highest quality service to our students. We endeavour to solve any problems you experience quickly and fairly. If, however, you wish to make a complaint our complaints procedure is published on our website and in our Student Handbooks.
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All programmes offered through the University of London International Programmes are developed by academics at the University of Londons constituent Colleges. Assessment is the responsibility of academics at these Colleges. Currently these include: Birkbeck, goldsmiths, heythrop college, institute of Education, Kings college london, the london School of Economics and Political Science (lSE), london School of hygiene & tropical medicine, Queen mary, Royal holloway, Royal Veterinary college, School of oriental and African Studies, and ucl (university college london).

For further information on the range of programmes we offer, please visit our website or contact us at: The Information Centre, University of London, Stewart House, 32 Russell Square, London WC1B 5DN United Kingdom Tel: +44 (0)20 7862 8360 Web: enquiries.londoninternational.ac.uk

www.londoninternational.ac.uk

Follow us on: www.londoninternational.ac.uk/youtube www.londoninternational.ac.uk/facebook www.londoninternational.ac.uk/twitter www.londoninternational.ac.uk/linkedin www.londoninternational.ac.uk/blog

(student blog)