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Beam-Column Base Plate Design LRFD Method

RICHARD M. DRAKE and SHARON J. ELKIN

INTRODUCTION It is common design practice to design a building or structure beam-column with a moment-resisting or xed base. Therefore the base plate and anchor rods must be capable of transferring shear loads, axial loads, and bending moments to the supporting foundation. Typically, these beam-column base plates have been designed and/or analyzed by using service loads1 or by approximating the stress relationship assuming the compression bearing location.2 The authors present another approach, using factored loads directly in a method consistent with the equations of static equilibrium and the LRFD Specication.3 The moment-resisting base plate must have design strengths in excess of the required strengths, exural (Mu ), axial ( Pu ), and shear (V u ) for all load combinations. A typical beam-column base plate geometry is shown in Figure 1, which is consistent with that shown on page 11-61 of the LRFD Manual.4

where: B N bf d f m base plate width perpendicular to moment direction, in. base plate length parallel to moment direction, in. column ange width, in. overall column depth, in. anchor rod distance from column and base plate centerline parallel to moment direction, in. base plate bearing interface cantilever direction parallel to moment direction, in. m n N 0.95d 2 (1)

base plate bearing interface cantilever perpendicular to moment direction, in. n B 0.80b f 2 (2)

base plate tension interface cantilever parallel to moment direction, in. x f d 2 tf 2 (3)

tf

column ange thickness, in.

Fig. 1. Base Plate Design Variables

Richard M. Drake is Principal Structural Engineer, Fluor Daniel, Irvine, CA. Sharon J. Elkin is Structural Engineer, Fluor Daniel, Irvine, CA.

The progression of beam-column loadings, in order of increasing moments, is presented in four load cases. Case A is a load case with axial compression and shear, without bending moment. This case results in a full length uniform pressure distribution between the base plate and the supporting concrete. This case is summarized in the LRFD Manual4 beginning on page 11-54 and is summarized herein for completeness. Case B evolves from Case A by the addition of a small bending moment. The moment changes the full length uniform pressure distribution to a partial length uniform pressure distribution, but is not large enough to cause separation between the base plate and the supporting concrete. Case C evolves from Case B by the addition of a specic bending moment such that the uniform pressure distribution is the smallest possible length without separation

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between the base plate and the supporting concrete. This corresponds to the common elastic limit where any additional moment would initiate separation between the base plate and the supporting concrete. Case D evolves from Case C by the addition of sufcient bending moment to require anchor rods to prevent separation between the base plate and the supporting concrete. This is a common situation for xed base plates in structural ofce practice. That is, a rigid frame with a xed base plate will usually attract enough bending moment to require anchor rods to prevent uplift of the base plate from the supporting concrete. CASE A: NO MOMENTNO UPLIFT If there is no bending moment or axial tension at the base of a beam-column, the anchor rods resist shear loads but are not required to prevent uplift or separation of the base plate from the foundation. Case A, a beam-column with no moment or uplift at the base plate elevation, is shown in Figure 2.

1. Assume that the resultant compressive bearing stress is directly under the column ange. 2. Assume a linear strain distribution such that the anchor rod strain is dependent on the bearing area strain. 3. Assume independent strain distribution. All three methods summarized by AISC5 assume a linear triangular distribution of the resultant compressive bearing stress. This implies that the beam-column base plate has no additional capacity after the extreme ber reaches the concrete bearing limit state. The authors propose that a uniform distribution of the resultant compressive bearing stress is more appropriate when utilizing LRFD. Case B, a beam-column with a small moment and no uplift at the base plate elevation, is shown in Figure 3. The moment Mu is expressed as Pu located at some eccentricity (e) from the beam-column neutral axis.

Fig. 2. No Moment - No Uplift Fig. 3. Small Moment Without Uplift

Mu Pu

0 0 0 0 Y e where: Y bearing length, in. e Mu e N N 2 Mu Pu Pu N 6 N 6 2e Y (5) (4)

CASE B: SMALL MOMENT WITHOUT UPLIFT If the magnitude of the bending moment is small relative to the magnitude of the axial load, the column anchor rods are not required to restrain uplift or separation of the base plate from the foundation. In service, they only resist shear. They are also necessary for the stability of the structure during construction. AISC5 addresses three different variations of the elastic method when using an ultimate strength approach for the design of beam-column base plates subjected to bending moment.

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CASE C: MAXIMUM MOMENT WITHOUT UPLIFT The maximum moment without base plate uplift is assumed to occur when the concrete bearing limit state is reached over a bearing area concentric with the applied load at its maximum eccentricity. If the eccentricity exN ceeds , the tendency for uplift of the plate is assumed to 6 occur. This assumes a linear pressure distribution in accordance with elastic theory and no tension capacity between the base plate and supporting concrete surfaces. Case C, a beam-column with the maximum moment without uplift at the base plate elevation, is shown in Figure 4.

shear. Case D, a beam-column with sufcient moment to cause uplift at the base plate elevation, is shown in Figure 5. This is the most common case in design practice, especially for rigid frames designed to resist lateral earthquake or wind loadings on the building or structure.

Fig. 5. Moment With Uplift

Mu Pu Mu e

(4)

Fig. 4. Maximum Moment Without Uplift

0 (4)

Pu N 6 N 6

e 0 Mu e Y N 2e Y

Mu Pu Pu N 6 N 6 N 2 N 3 2 N 6

(7)

CONCRETE BEARING LIMIT STATE To satisfy static equilibrium at the concrete bearing limit state, the centroid of the concrete bearing reaction ( Pp ) must be aligned with the line-of-action of the applied axial load. LRFD Specication Requirements (6) The LRFD Specication3 denes the concrete bearing limit state in Section J9. Pu
c Pp

CASE D: MOMENT WITH UPLIFT When the moment at the beam-column base plate exceeds N , anchor rods are designed to resist uplift as well as 6

(8)

On the full area of a concrete support: Pp 0.85 fc A1 (LRFD J9-1)

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On less than the full area of a concrete support: Pp 0.85 fc A1 A2 A1 where:


c

A2 A1

Case B: Small Moment Without Uplift A1 BY Y Pu (0.60)(0.85) fc BY Pu (N A2 A1 qY q( N 2 e) (12) 2 e) (0.60)(0.85) fc BY (2)

(LRFD J9-2)

fc A1 A2

compression resistance factor = 0.60 specied concrete compressive strength, ksi area of steel concentrically bearing on a concrete support, in.2 maximum area of the portion of the supporting surface that is geometrically similar to and concentric with the loaded area, in.2

Pu

Note that equation 12 is not a closed form solution because; q is a function of A1 , A1 is a function of y, y is a function of e, and e is a function of Pu . However, if e is dened as some xed distance or as some percentage of N , the corresponding maximum values of Pu and Mu can be determined directly. Case C: Maximum Moment Without Uplift As previously stated, Case C is the situation where uplift N is imminent and e . 6 A1 BY 2 N 3 A2 BY A2 2 B N 3 0.667qN P u ( e) Mu Pu N 6 (14) (6) (0.60)(0.85) fc BY (2) 1.02 fc B 2 N 3

Practical Design ProcedureRequired Area Select base plate dimensions such that: Pu And noting that: Mu Pu e (9)
c Pp

(8)

For convenience, dene a new variable, q, the concrete bearing strength per unit width (K/in). q q
c 0.85 fc B

A2 A1 A2 A1 A2 A1

c 0.85 fc B(2)

Y Pu Pu (0.60)(0.85) fc BY 0.51 fc B 2 N 3

(0.60)(0.85) fc B q 0.51 fc B

(0.60)(0.85) fc B(2) 1.02 fc B (10)

For most column base plates bearing directly on a concrete foundation, the concrete dimension is much greater than the base plate dimension, and it is reasonable to A2 assume that the ratio 2. For most column A1 base plates bearing on grout or a concrete pier, the concrete (grout) dimension is equal to the base plate dimension, and it is reasonable to conservatively take the ratio A2 1. A1 Case A: No Moment - No Uplift A1 Pu (0.60)(0.85) fc BN Pu BN A2 A1 qN

Pu Mu

(13)

0.111qN 2

Case D: Moment with Uplift Given the following: Pu , Mu , c , fc , B, f inches & kips
c Pp c 0.85 fc BY

(0.60)(0.85) fc BN (2) (11) e

A2 A1

qY

(15) (4)

Mu Pu

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Two equations will be needed to solve for the two unknowns, the required tensile strength of the anchor rods, T u , and bearing length, Y . To maintain static equilibrium, the summation of vertical force must equal zero: Fvertical Tu Pu Tu qY 0
c Pp

ANCHOR ROD SHEAR AND TENSION LIMIT STATES LRFD Specication Requirements The LRFD Specication3 denes the anchor rod (bolts) shear and tension limit states in Sections J3.6 and J3.7, and Tables J3.2 and J3.5. V ub Fv Ab Ft Ab 1.9 fv 45 (21) (22) (Table J3.5)

0 (16)

Pu

T ub For ASTM A307 bolts: Ft 59

To maintain static equilibrium, the summation of moments taken about the force T u must equal zero:
c Pp

N 2

Y 2 Y 2 f

Pu ( e

f)

For ASTM A325 bolts, threads excluded from the shear plane: Ft 117 1.5 fv 90 (Table J3.5) (17) where: V ub required anchor rod shear strength, kips anchor rod resistance factor 0.75 nominal shear strength, ksi anchor rod nominal (gross) area, in.2 required anchor rod tensile strength, kips nominal tensile strength, ksi anchor rod shear stress, ksi fv For A307 bolts: Fv 24 ksi (Table J3.2) For A325 bolts when threads are excluded from the shear plane: V ub Ab (23)

N qY 2 qY N 2 q 2 Y 2

Pu ( e

f)

qY 2 2 q f

qY f N Y 2

Pu ( e Pu ( e

f) f)

0 0 (18)

Fv Ab T ub Ft fv

This is in the form of a classic quadratic equation, with unknown Y . aY Y


2

bY b

c b2 2a
2 N 2

0 4ac

(19)

q f Y

N 2

q f 2

q 2

[ Pu ( f

e)]

Fv

60 ksi

(Table J3.2)

q 2 2

Required Strength The shear stress ( fv ) is calculated considering the required shear strength of the column base. 2 Pu ( f q e) (20) where:
v

N 2

N 2

fv

V ub v Ab

(24)

To determine the other unknown, T u , substitute the value for Y into the equation: Tu qY Pu (16)

number of rods sharing shear load, unitless

Note that all the base plate anchor rods are considered effective in sharing the shear load. Practical Design Procedure Rod Sizes V ub Vu
v

As a check, back substitute the value for Y into the equation: qY N 2 Y 2 f Pu ( e f) 0 (17)

0.75Fv Ab

(25)

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Ft

59

1.9 Tu
t

V ub Ab

On section parallel to column anges: 45 (26) M pl (27) fp m2 2 (29)

T ub where:
t

0.75Ft Ab

On section parallel to column web: M pl where: fp concrete bearing stress, ksi fp n2 2 (30)

number of rods sharing tension load, unitless

Note that all of the base plate anchor rods are not considered effective in sharing the tension load. For most base plate designs, only half of the anchor rods are required to resist tension for a given load combination. The embedment, edge distances, and overlapping shear cones of the anchor rods into the concrete must be checked to assure that the design tensile strength also exceeds the required tensile strength. This check should be in accordance with the appropriate concrete design specication, and is beyond the scope of this paper.3,6 It should be noted that base plate holes are often oversized with respect to the anchor rods. In this case, some slippage may be necessary before the anchor rod shear limit state is reached. For large shear loads, the designer may choose to investigate alternate shear transfer limit states involving pretensioned bolts,7 friction and/or shear lugs. BASE PLATE FLEXURAL YIELDING LIMIT STATE The entire base plate cross-section can reach the specied yield stress (F y ). LRFD Specication Requirements The LRFD Specication3 denes the exural yielding limit state in Section F1. M pl Mn where: M pl
b b Mn

The bearing pressure may cause bending in the base plate in the area between the anges, especially for lightly loaded columns. Yield line theory8,9 is used to analyze this consideration. n M pl Let c db f 4 fp ( n )2 2 (31) (32)

the larger of m, n, and n : M pl fp c2 2 (33)

where: n c yield line theory cantilever distance from column web or column ange, in. largest base plate cantilever, in.

(28) (LRFD F1-1)

Note that for most base plate geometries, the cantilever dimension ( n) is very small and corner bending of the base plate is neglected. When the dimension is large to accommodate more anchor rods or more bearing surface, corner bending plate moments should be considered and used in the base plate thickness calculations. Required StrengthTension Interface The tension on the anchor rods will cause bending in the base plate for the cantilever distance x. For a unit width of base plate: M pl Nominal Strength For a unit width of base plate: Mn Mp t2 p Fy 4 (35) Tu x B (34)

Mp

Mn Mp

required base plate exural strength, in-K exural resistance factor = 0.90 nominal exural strength, in-K plastic bending moment, in-K

Required StrengthBearing Interface The bearing pressure between the concrete and the base plate will cause bending in the base plate for the cantilever distances m and n. The bearing stress, f p (ksi), is calculated considering the required axial and exural strength of the column base, Pu and Mu respectively.

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Practical Design ProcedureBearing Interface Base Plate Thickness Setting the design strength equal to the nominal strength and solving for the required plate thickness (t p ): M pl Mn fp c2 2
b Mn

Case D: Moment with Uplift fp For all cases: t p(req) If Y m: t p(req) 1.49c Pu BYF y (46) 2.11 Tu x BF y (45) Pu BY (44)

(28) (LRFD F1-1)

Mp 0.90 t2 p Fy 4 fp Fy

t p(req)

1.49c

(36)

If Y

m: Pu m t p(req) 2.11 BF y
Y 2

Practical Design ProcedureTension Interface Base Plate Thickness Setting the design strength equal to the nominal strength and solving for the required plate thickness: M pl Tu x B t p(req)
bMp

(47)

DESIGN EXAMPLE 1

(28)

0.90

t2 p Fy 4 Tu x BF y (37)

2.11

Case A: No MomentNo Uplift fp t p(req) Pu BN 1.49c Pu BNF y (38) (39)

Case B: Small Moment Without Uplift fp Pu BY 1.49c Pu B( N 2 e) Pu B ( N 2 e )F y (40)


Required:
Fig. 6. Design Example 1

t p(req)

(41)

a) Design anchor rods b) Determine base plate thickness


Solution:

Case C: Maximum Moment Without Uplift fp Pu BY Pu B


2 3N

1.5 Pu BN 1.5 Pu BNF y

(42)

1. Dimensions: m 22.0 in. 16.0 in. 2 0.95(12.12 in.) 2 12.12 in. 2 5.24 in. (1)

t p(req)

1.49c

(43)

0.605 in. 2

2.24 in. (3)

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2. Eccentricity: e N 6 120 ft-K(12 in./ft) 130K 22.0 in. 6 3.67 in. 11.08 in. 11.08 in. (4) e, Case D(7) q

Select: Base Plate 2

20

1-10

6. Check bearing on concrete below grout layer The grout is 2 in. thick. Assume that the concrete extends at least 2 in. beyond grout in each direction. (0.51)(4 ksi)(20.0 in.) 76.6 K/in. (24 in.)(6.67 in.) (10) (20 in.)(2.27 in.)

3. Concrete bearing: Assume the bearing on grout area will govern. q f f (0.51)(6 ksi)(20.0 in.) 1 N 2 e 16.0 in. 2 16.0 in. 2 19.0 19.0 Tu 22.0 in. 2 11.08 in. 61.2 K/in. (10)

61.2 K/in. used in design o.k.

DESIGN EXAMPLE 2 19.0 in. 19.08 in.

(19.0)2 16.73

2(130)(19.08) 61.2 2.27 in. 130 K

(20)

61.2 K/in.(2.27 in.)

8.92 K (16)

4. Anchor rod shear and tension: Check 4 3 in. dia. anchor rods 4 V ub Fv Ab 30.0 K 4 7.50 K (25)

0.75(24 ksi)(0.4418 in.2 ) 7.96 K 7.50 K V ub o.k. (26) (27)

Ft

59 T ub Ft Ab

1.9

7.50 K 0.4418 in.2 8.92 K 2

26.7 ksi

Fig. 7. Design Example 2

4.46 K

Required:

0.75(26.7 ksi)(0.4418 in.2 ) 8.85 4.46 K T ub o.k.

a) Determine required tensile strength b) Determine base plate thickness


Solution:

Select: 4 - 3/4 in. Diameter Anchor Rods 5. Base plate exural yielding: Y 2.27 in. t p(req) 5.24 in. 2.11 m, n and n not applicable 0.35 in. (45)

Note that this problem is Example 16 from the AISC Column Base Plate Steel Design Guide Series.5 1. Required strength: (LRFD A4-2) Pu Mu 1.2(21K) 1.6(39K) 87.6K 700 in.-K

(8.92 K)(2.24 in.) (20.0 in.)(36 ksi)

1.2(171 in.-K)

1.6(309 in.-K)

(130 K) 5.24 in. t p(req) 2.11

2.27 in. 2

2. Dimensions: 14.0 in. m (47) x 11.0 in. 2

0.95(7.995 in.) 2 7.995 in. 2

3.20 in. 1.72

(1) (3)

(20.0 in.)(36 ksi)

1.82 in. controls

0.435 in. 2

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3. Eccentricity: e 700 in.-K 87.6 K 7.99 in. 7.99 in. (4) e, Case D (7)

for the design of the anchor rods is slightly smaller because the centroid of the compression reaction is a greater distance from the anchor rods. SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS A methodology has been presented that summarizes the design of beam-column base plates and anchor rods using factored loads directly in a manner consistent with the equations of static equilibrium and the LRFD Specication.3 Two design examples have been presented. A direct comparison was made with a problem solved by another AISC method. The step-by-step methodology presented will be benecial in a structural design ofce, allowing the design practitioner to use the same factored loads for the design of the steel structure, base plate, and anchor rods. In addition the uniform rectangular pressure distribution will be easier to design and program than the linear triangular pressure distribution utilized in allowable stress design and other published LRFD formulations.5 REFERENCES 1. Blodgett, Omer W., Design Of Welded Structures, 1966. 2. Smith, J. C., Structural Steel Design, LRFD Approach, 2nd Edition, 1996. 3. American Institute of Steel Construction (AISC), Load and Resistance Factor Design Specication for Structural Steel Buildings, December 1, 1993. 4. American Institute of Steel Construction (AISC), Manual Of Steel Construction, Load & Resistance Factor Design, 2nd Edition, Volume 2, 1994. 5. American Institute of Steel Construction (AISC), Column Base Plates, Steel Design Guide Series, 1990. 6. Shipp, J.G., and Haninger, E.R., Design Of Headed Anchor Bolts, Engineering Journal, Vol 20, No. 2, (2nd Qtr.), pp 58-69, AISC, 1983. 7. American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE), Design Of Anchor Bolts In Petrochemical Facilities, pp 4-3 to 4-8, 1997. 8. Thornton, W. A., Design of Small Base plates for Wide-Flange Columns, Engineering Journal, Vol 27, No. 3, (3rd Qtr.), pp 108-110, AISC, 1990a. 9. Thornton, W. A., Design of Small Base plates for Wide-Flange Columns - A Concatenation of Methods, Engineering Journal, Vol 27, No. 4, (4th Qtr.), pp 108110, AISC, 1990b. NOMENCLATURE A1 area of steel concentrically bearing on a concrete support, in.2

N 14.0 in. 2.33 in. 6 6 4. Concrete bearing: q f f Y 12.5 12.5 Tu

(0.51)(3 ksi)(14 in.) 4 N 2 e

42.8 K/in.

(10)

11.0 in. 14.0 in. 12.5 in. 2 2 11.0 in. 7.99 in. 13.49 in. 2 ( 12.5)2 10.05 2(87.6)(13.49) 42.8 (20)

2.45 in. 87.6 K 17.3 K (16) 17.3 K

42.8 K/in.(2.45 in.)

Required Tensile Strength 5. Base plate exural yielding: Y t p(req) 2.45 in. 2.11 3.20 in.

m, n and n not applicable 0.51 in.


2.45 in. 2

(17.3 K)(1.72 in.) (14.0 in.)(36 ksi) (87.6 K) 3.20 in.

(45)

t p(req)

2.11

(14.0 in.)(36 ksi)

(47)

1.24 in. controls Select: Base Plate 1 1/4 14 1 -2 6. Comparison: AISC5 solution for this problem: Required Anchor Rod Tensile Strength Select: Base Plate 1 1/4 14 1 -2 5.1 in. 21.2 K

Length of triangular compression block Authors solution for this problem: Required Anchor Rod Tensile Strength Select: Base Plate 1 1/4 14 1 -2

17.3 K

Length of rectangular compression block 2.45 in. Remarks: The authors solution yields the identical base plate size and thickness. Required tensile strength

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A2 Ab B Ft Fv Fy Mn Mp M pl Mu N Pp Pu Tu T ub Vu V ub Y bf c

maximum area of the portion of the supporting surface that is geometrically similar to and concentric with the loaded area, in.2 anchor rod nominal (gross) area, in.2 base plate width perpendicular to moment direction, in. nominal tensile strength, ksi nominal shear strength, ksi specied minimum yield stress, ksi nominal exural strength, in.-K plastic bending moment, in.-K required base plate exural strength, in.-K required exural strength, in.-K base plate length parallel to moment direction, in. nominal bearing load on concrete, kips required axial strength, kips required tensile strength, kips required anchor rod tensile strength, kips required shear strength, kips required anchor rod shear strength, kips bearing length, in. column ange width, in. largest base plate cantilever, in.

d e f fc fp fv m n n q tf tp x

b c t v

column overall depth, in. axial eccentricity, in. anchor rod distance from column and base plate centerline parallel to moment direction, in. specied concrete compressive strength, ksi concrete bearing stress, ksi anchor rod shear stress, ksi base plate bearing interface cantilever parallel to moment direction, in. base plate bearing interface cantilever perpendicular to moment direction, in. yield line theory cantilever distance from column web or column ange, in. concrete (or grout) bearing strength per unit width, kips/in. column ange thickness, in. base plate thickness, in. base plate tension interface cantilever parallel to moment direction, in. anchor rod resistance factor = 0.75 exural resistance factor = 0.90 compression resistance factor = 0.60 number of rods sharing tension load, unitless number of rods sharing shear load, unitless

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