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Twinning Project Fiche

1. Basic Information: 1.1. Programme: ENPI 2010 Annual Action Programme 1.2. Twinning number: GE12/ENP-PCA/EN/14 1.3. Title: Strengthening Management of Protected Areas of Georgia 1.4. Sector: Environment 1.5 Beneficiary country: Georgia (Ministry of Environment Protection of Georgia, Agency of Protected Areas).

2. Objectives:
2.1. Overall Objective

Support sustainable development of Georgias protected areas system through combining and balancing interests of nature conservation and protection as well as social-economic needs of local communities. 2.2. Project Purpose

The main purpose of the project is strengthening the effective nature conservation system of Georgia through improved management of protected areas of Georgia. The main approach of the project is building capacity of staff of the central apparatus of the Agency of Protected Areas and local park administrations to support implementation of EU acquis recommendations and requirements through practical application of protected area management methods-learning by doing. In this respect, the project will concentrate and cover four pilot sites: Lagodekhi PAs, Mtirala NP, Imereti Caves PAs, Ajameti Managed Reserve. Selection process of the areas is based on the international significance and special conservation value of the areas. Mtirala and Lagodekhi PAs are acknowledged potential Emerald Sites, Ajameti PA is a planned Emerald Site value. (See Annex II. Table B). Imereti Caves PAs have a special eco-tourism significance for locals as well as for international visitors who are attracted to nature-based tourism. Since 2010, Imereti Caves PAs are the member of the International Show Caves Association (ISCA). 2.3. Contribution to the Partnership and Cooperation Agreement and ENP Action Plan:

Article 57 of the EU-Georgia Partnership and Cooperation Agreement (PCA) adopted in April 1996 and entered into force in July 1999, promotes cooperation between the contracting parties in the field of environment. The Cooperation Agreement states that with regard to the environment, particular attention should be paid to supporting: the protection of forests, the conservation of biodiversity, protected areas and sustainable use and management of natural resources. This Twinning project will be particularly relevant for Chapter 4.6 Cooperation in specific sectors: including transport, energy, environment, telecommunications, research and innovation of the Action Plan developed within the European Neighbourhood Policy (ENP).
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Chapter 4.6 sets it as a priority to develop legislation and basic procedures to ensure planning for key environmental sectors, air quality, water quality, waste management, and nature protection. Specifically, the project is related to the following priorities (set out in the chapter 4.6.3 of the ENP AP): Enhance administrative capacities, including for the issuing of permits as well as for enforcement and inspection; This Twinning project will contribute to achievement of the above-mentioned Action Plans objectives through concrete and measurable results as elaborated below. The negotiations on the Association Agreement (AA), which will lay down a new legal foundation for EU-Georgia relations, started in July 2010. The Association Agreement will likely include a chapter on environment, including nature protection sub-sector. In this context the Twinning project anticipates and prepares the Agency of Protected Areas of Georgia for implementation of conclusions of the AAs chapter on environment. -

3. Description
3.1. Background and justification:

3.1.1. Background country information Caucasus is one of the WWF Global 200 Ecoregions, one of the 34 Conservation International Global Hotspots, and one of the Worlds 221 Endemic Bird Areas. The region has extremely high plant and animal diversity and a high level of endemism. Georgia holds the major part of the regions biodiversity with almost all Caucasus ecosystems and habitats represented and a high number of globally threatened species. Georgias biodiversity is threatened by unsustainable logging of forests, over-grazing of pastures, poaching of wildlife, the cultivation of wetlands, the inappropriate development, mining and quarrying, and mass tourism. These threats are compounded by the latent danger of climate change. Georgias main strategy for biodiversity conservation is the development and management of its network of protected areas. In the last 15 years,Georgia has undertaken an ambitious programme of expanding the network of protected areas. The system is composed of 64protected areas of different IUCN management categories. The present protected areas network includes14 (fourteen) strict nature reserves, 9 (nine) national parks, 21 (twenty-one) national monuments, 18 (eighteen) managed reserves and 2 (two) protected landscapes. Altogether, these coverabout 511274.3hectares of land, or 7,3 % of the countrys territory. Since 2002, the total number of protected areas more than doubled and their total territory increased by 75 %. According to the UN Environment Performance Review of 2010, the protected areas system adequately represents the full diversity of ecosystems with high conservation value protected sites. Introduction of IUCN categorization in Georgian law regulating the protected areas system has allowed turning of PAs into instruments for sustainable use of natural resources. Parks have been also serving local communities by bringing visitors, thus bringing income. The number of registered visitors to protected area increased from 5,669 in 2005 to 301032in 2011. The allocations to APA from the State budget has been increasing steadily during the last three years. One of the innovations brought by institutional reform in 2008was APAs increased
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capacity to generate income. Income generated directly by the national park administrations has increased from 42.600 GEL (approximately 17.7 EUR) in 2007 to 420, 866GEL (around 189, 439 EUR) in 2011. The resources of the State budget cover a part of the needs of the protected area system of Georgia, while the remaining is generated through income-generated activities in the parks, international organisations and private donors. Key important issue is absence of management plans as well as lack of skills and capacity at park administrations and APA in PA management planning. Management plans are considered as a main tool for integrated management of nature protected areas. In EU member states management plans constitute an effective means to fulfil the obligations provided for by the Habitats directive (92/43/EEC). Currently, only three out of the 64 protected areas have updated management plans (i.e. management plans that have been adopted in accordance with the procedures regulated by Georgian legislation and those that have not expired1). Thus, the vast majority of PAs are managed without documented comprehensive objectives and policies that can be communicated to PA staff, adjacent communities and others; they lack coherent and integrated strategies for protection, conservation, socio-economic development of adjacent communities, monitoring, and strengthening the administration. Because of absence of management plans, adjacent communities have few opportunities to participate in planning and management of PAs. One of the consequences is that opportunity costs, which fall on adjacent communities (e.g. loss of access to resources resulting from the establishment of the PA or restrictions imposed by the PA administration), usually are not taken into account in planning. Table A in Annex II presents list of all protected areas, their IUCN categories, areas, and management plan status. Table B presents the list and description of protected areas to be supported by the Twinning project, followed by a short description about each PA. 3.1.2 International Obligations in relevance to the management plan development:

Georgia has been party of the Convention of Biological Diversity (CBD) since 1994. CBD obligates its parties to rehabilitate and restore degraded ecosystems and promote the recovery of threatened species, inter alia, through the development and implementation of plans or other management strategies. An Action Guide to Implement the CBD Programme of Work on Protected Areas sets out substantial improvement of the site-based protected area planning and management as one of its goals. It indicates that: all protected are areas to have effective management in existence by 2012, using participatory and science-based site planning processes that incorporate clear biodiversity objectives, targets, management strategies and monitoring programmes, drawing upon existing methodologies and a long-term management plan with active stakeholder involvement. Key activity for the goal is to develop or update management plans for protected areas to achieve the objectives of the Convention better. In 2002, Georgia was invited by the Council of Europe to join the Emerald Network. Emerald Network is an ecological network to conserve wildfloraandfaunaand naturalhabitatsofEurope, which was launched in 1998 by the Council of Europeas part of its work under the Bern
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Management plans for Georgian protected areas typically have 5 years lifetime. Protected areas that do not have current management plans are managed by temporary regulatory document issued by the Minister of Environmental Protection and Natural Resources. 3

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In 2009, the Council of Europe re-launched the Emerald programme in Georgia. Currently, 20 existing and planned protected areas (e.g. Central Caucasus,) are acknowledged as potential Emerald sites. The Emerald Network was created by virtue of Recommendation No. 16 (1989) and Resolution No. 3 (1996) of the Standing Committee on Areas of Special Conservation Interest (ASCIs) that form the EMERALD Network. In the point four of the Recommendation No. 16, contracting parties are recommended to draw up and implement management plans which will identify both short and long-term objectives. 1. draw up and implement management plans which will identify both short- and longterm objectives (such management plans can relate to individual areas or to a collection of areas such as heathlands); 2. regularly review the terms of the management plans in the light of changing conditions or of increased scientific knowledge; 3. clearly mark the boundaries of ASCIs on maps and, as far as possible, on the ground; 4. advise the competent authorities and landowners of the extent of ASCIs and their characteristics; 5. provide for the monitoring of ASCIs and especially of the factors for which their conservation is important." 3.1.3. National obligations in relevance to the management plan development: According to the Georgian Law on the System of Protected Areas (1996), elaboration and adoption of management plans for individual PAs is obligatory. The Protected Areas Agency elaborates a management plan, which identifies the precise borders of the Protected Areas, their territorial organization, as well as the integral development programs of support (buffer) zone and protection, scientific research and monitoring, education, recreation, tourism, administration and other activities. After completion of the management plan, the Protected Areas Agency submits it to the Ministry of Environment Protection for approval. The guidelines for the elaboration of PAs management plan was adopted in August 22nd, 2011 (order #39 issued by the Minister of Environment Protection of Georgia). Management plans are being approved by the Minister of Environment Protection of Georgia. The renewed Management Plans are also being approved by the same rule. Besides legislation that directly stipulates development of management plans, several key policy documents in the field of environment further instruct to have such plans in place. For detailed description of relevant legislation and studies/assessments, please see the Annex III.

3.2.

Linked activities

In the recent years, a number of projects financed by different donors have been contributing for development and strengthening of the Georgian Protected Areas System. Several such interventions include development of management plans. However, these activities target individual protected areas and envisage development of management plans as parts of larger initiatives such as establishment of a protected area or ensuring income diversification mechanisms. In addition, they are performed by hired private consultants and do not focus on strengthening capacity of APA in management planning (with the exception of Borjomi-Kharagauli Management Plan and Vashlovani PA management plan development). Below is a summary of the current and planned interventions by other actors and that are relevant to the initiative presented in this Fiche. CaucasusNature Fund (CNF).It is currently contributing 80,000 EUR per year to the management costs of Borjomi-Kharagauli National Park and 80,000 EUR per year to the management costs of Lagodekhi PAs. Moreover, CNF aims to contribute similar amounts to the running costs of Tusheti and Vashlovani PAs from 2012. According to the framework agreement between CNF and MoEP, APA is obligated to develop a management plan for a PA to be funded by the CNF that partially contributes to the costs of the management plan development. However, APA by its own means or through donors support should contribute at least 50 % of the entire costs of the management plan development. UNDP/GEF Catalysing Financial Sustainability of Georgias Protected Areas Project. This project addresses the barriers in the legal framework that prevent income generation by PAs. It also develops and tests measures for generating income in Tusheti PAs. The project also develops a management plan for the pilot site: Tusheti Protected Areas. Projects entire budget is 875,420 USD (669,650EUR), 2009 2012. UNDP/GEF Ensuring Sufficiency and Predictability of Revenues for the Georgias Protected Areas System Project is establishing a sinking fund that will be used to finance CNF contributions to PAs management costs (see above). Providing PA managers with guidance and the tools needed to run protected areas at international standards, also to budget funds appropriately and effectively. UNDP/GEF funding is 1 million USD (765,480EUR), 2010 2016. EU supported project - Delivering protected area capacity and engaging traditional pastoral communities to conserve Georgias unique and internationally important biodiversity to develop and pilot strategies for managing human wildlife conflicts in Tusheti and Vashlovani PAs(EU funding 890,488 EUR, 2010 2012). For Vashlovani PAs elaboration of an anti-poaching strategy and communications strategy is on-going, which will be integrated into the updated management plan funded by the initiative below. GIZis co-financing the preparation of an updated management plan for Vashlovani PAs and elaboration of Gazelle reintroduction sub-plan. GIZ funding is approximately 90,000 Euro, 2010 2012). The CNF and WWF Caucasus PO have agreed to finance the preparation of a new management plan for Borjomi-Kharagauli National Park. CNF and WWF Caucasus PO grant is approximately 25,000 EUR, November 2010 2011(2012).
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The Minister of Environment Protection has agreed to propose the establishment of MachakhelaNational Park as the main investment under the 1.5 million USD (1,148,100 EUR) GEF 5 allocation to biodiversity protection in Georgia. The Ministry intends to submit its proposal to committeein December, 2011. In this case, Machakhela National Park will be established and the management plan developed. KFW (German Financial Cooperation) is financing the Eco-regional Nature Conservation Programme for the Southern Caucasus (ENCP), Phase III. The programme uses criteria such as gaps in management effectiveness to select the PAs it will support. According to the Feasibility study of the programme, four protected areas and planned protected areas were proposed for assistance: Algeti NP, Kazbegi NP, Kintrishi PAs, and Pshav-Khevsureti planned PAs. Development of management plans for this PAs is part of the programme. 8,250,000 EUR, 2012-2015(2016). 3.3. Results:

The Twinning project consists of two major components: (a) improved management of protected areas by developing and adopting actual management plans; and (b) strengthening capacity within the protected areas system. The following results are foreseen in the framework of the Twinning project: Result 1: Result 2: Result 3: 3.4. Strengthened APAs capacities of developing and implementing management plans as a main tool for nature conservation Enhanced understanding of EU legislative framework for nature protection Effective mechanism in place for involvement and consultation of local actors in preparation and implementation of management plans Activities

The Twinning will allow for the development of a close relationship with APA and a partner institution of an EU Member State. The listed activities are indicative and subject torevision in the framework of the preparation of the contract between the Twinning institutions. General Activities Activity 0.1: Method: Kick-off Workshop The first month of the project will allow the installation of the Resident Twinning Adviser (RTA) in Georgia. The RTA will have to be installed in his/her office at APA. S/he will be introduced to the BC stakeholders of the project and to his counterparts and staff. S/he will also hire an Assistant (RTA Assistant) through an appropriate selection procedure. A one-day kick-off workshop will be organised in the first month aiming at launching and presenting the project to the stakeholders, the media and the public at large. Stakeholders, media and public informed about the start and content of the project by start of the month. RTA, RTA Assistant, PL, STE, translation. Final Closing Conference During the last two months of the project, a closing conference will be organised at which the results of the project will be presented. The state of play in the areas of the projects interventions will be discussed with the
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beneficiary, the GoG, the civil society, donors, and other stakeholders. The conference will be concluded with some recommendations for possible follow-up and lessons learnt for similar projects. Closing Conference organised; Recommendations and Lessons learnt formulated and discussed Stakeholders, media and public informed about the results of the project at its end. RTA, RTA Assistant, PL, STE, translation.

Activity Group 1 Capacity Building for Development and Implementation of Management Plans This specific group of activities is expected to build upon practical training to the staff of the APA and administrations of the selected protected areas. This training will be provided by means of strong facilitation and guidance to the beneficiary staff through the process of management plan elaboration. Activity 1.1: Method: Collection of information on protected areas system in Georgia, as well as existing data on the selected 4 pilot sites RTA, in support of RTA counterpart and STE will collect information available about the protected areas system of Georgia as well as pilot PAs (description of key features, situation analysis and long-term objectives of selected PAs, old management plans, management plan development guidelines) Report on protected areas system in Georgia and existing data on the selected 4 pilot sites RTA, STE, RTA Assistant, RTA counterpart, APAs staff, BCPL, translation, printed materials. Introductory training to the core Working Group established under auspices of APA At the initial stage, RTA and RTA Counterpart support legal and technical establishment of the Working Group at the APA. The Working Group includes permanent as well as temporary members who will be involved in development of a particular management plan. (E.g., a botanist from APA central office will be involved in all management plans (MPs), while a botanist from Imereti Caves PAs will be involved only in Imereti Caves MP development). The Working Group will be as a core resource unit for development and implementation of PA management plans. To get prepared for the fieldwork, the Working Group will be supported by training in a form of workshops/working meetings. The scope of the discussions during the events will range from specific Terms of Reference (ToRs) of the unit and detailed working plan(s) for development of management plans in 4 pilot sites, to multidisciplinary and professional approach for nature conservation. At least 2 one-and-half-day workshops; ToRs and working plans for development of management plans in 4 pilot areas. RTA, STE, RTA Assistant, RTA counterpart, APAs staff, BCPL, translation, printed materials. Development methodologies for management plans and preparation of related training modules A pool of STEs will support the Working Groups activities in 4 pilot sites by
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providing advice on specific methodologies, facilitating related training workshops and seminars to the Working Group and relevant stakeholders onthe-field. As an output, the STEs will deliver: 1) conclusions and recommendations on guidelines for elaboration of the management plans; 2) training module on methodology for preparation of the specific section of the management plan which will be a tool for the APA trainers. A series of workshops to the Working Group and stakeholders on-the-field; Training modules covering aspects relevant to management plans (awareness raising, economic valuation, tourism and marketing, socio-economic assessment, law enforcement/patrolling potential, land use, hunting, geographic-geologic assessment, speleological survey, paleontological assessment, landscape, natural resources/forests, flora, fauna and legal assessment, etc.) RTA, STEs, RTA Assistant, RTA counterpart, APAs staff, BCPL, transportation, translation, printed materials. Consultation and expert advice on management plan development in 4 pilot sites A pool of STEs will support the Working Group activities in relation to development of management plans in 4 pilot areas. The STE will provide methodological and technical advice on development of specific sections of a management plan. STEs will provide facilitation and consultation on the fieldwork. STEs will work together with their counterparts of APA and the selected protected area administrations to draft specific parts of the management plans and coordinate consolidation process of different parts of management plan documents. Mission reports, including recommendations and contributions to management plans; management plan documents RTA, STEs, RTA Assistant, RTA counterpart, APAs staff, BCPL, transportation, translation, printed materials. Holding workshops/working meetings on the field STEs will support and facilitate the Working Group to handle consultation workshops/working meetings organised for discussion and finalisation of management plans in 4 pilot sites. By definition, such workshops will be held on the field so that involvement of relevant stakeholders is ensured. A series of workshops/working meetings on the field; Final drafts of 4 management plans RTA, STEs, RTA Assistant, RTA counterpart, APAs staff, BCPL, transportation, translation, printed materials. Discussions on lessons learned STE on management plan methodology and RTA conduct the overall workshop meeting on management plan development methodology for all involved APA staff. The workshop will serve as the wrap-up meeting of the entire process to discuss lessons learned and present the modules developed by STEs and presented as one deliverable. APA working group discusses the most essential aspects of the management plan development process. Modules developed by STE are presented. Brief report is developed on the lessons learnt during the entire process of the management plan development.
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RTA, RTA assistant, STE, APA, translation. Select participants and develop the training programme for training of trainers (ToT). RTA, 2 STEs and RTA counterpart identify and nominate up to 15 members of the working group whom they observe in the working process to be trained at the ToT. Training programme on the development of management plans for both central and local levels is developed and presented; the list of participants of ToT is presented. RTA, RTA Assistant, and/or STEs Conduct trainings of trainers (ToT) for APA members 2 STEs conduct training of trainers for 3-5 days on the methodology of MP development. Up to 15 members of APA are trained as trainers in MP development. RTA Assistant, STEs, translations, APAs staff

Activity Group 2: Enhancing Understanding of EU Nature Legislation The group of activities is designed in anticipation of EU-Georgia negotiations on the Association Agreement (specific chapter on environment). Activity 2.1: Method: Seminars and workshops on EU Nature legislation Twinning partners will hold training seminars and workshops to the APA staff and representatives from park administrations on the EU Nature legislation. The training will familiarise the target group with the key EU legislation on nature protection in the context of EU-Georgia AA negotiations and legal approximation. 2 workshops organised Training material RTA, STE, RTA Assistant, BC PL, RTA counterpart, APAs staff, translation. 3 Study Tours in Protected Areas of partner country/countries to observe the management plan implementation and enforcement RTA and STEs will recommend 3 protected areas from partner country/countries that are relevant to Georgia and selected sites. APA will nominate 3 groups each consisting of 3 relevant employees (9 people in total). The study tours will last for maximum 5 days. The main objective of the tours will be to exchange knowledge and skills on effective PA management tools and practices. Three priority topics are identified from APAs side: sustainable cave management, sustainable hunting farm development/management and nature-based tourism development/marketing. The staff from the central apparatus of the APA as well as representatives of park administration will participate in the tours. 3 study tours in relevant protected areas to observe management plans in action. Results and observations are formally shared with APA through presentation or report. RTA, RTA Assistant, STEs, APAs staff, transportation. Raising Public Awareness of EU Nature Protection Principles
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Complementary to raising understanding of the EU nature protection legislation by the APA staff and staff of protected area administrations, the activity will target key stakeholders of APA: other line ministries and authorities, regional and local authorities, local communities, non-state actors and business society. Through broad conferences and specific publications, the Twinning partners will give to the key stakeholders an overview of the main EU nature protection principles, implications to social and economic development of local communities, as well as business development. As regards the other line ministries and institutions, it is expected to demonstrate a role and examples of inter-institutional coordination and cooperation. 2 days conference is organised. 4 STE from MS will share their experience on EU nature protection principles during the conference. RTA, 4 STE, RTA Assistant, BCPL, RTA counterpart, APA staff, conference venue, interpretation, translation, printed materials.

Activity Group 3: Development of Consultation Process with Local Partners in Pilot Protected Areas Consultation with local actors and involvement of stakeholders in development and implementation of a management plan is an essential part of the process. The group of activities is to focus on both general issues on how to address key stakeholders and specific application of methods in 4 pilot sites. Activity 3.1: Method: Holding Inception Workshops in 4 Pilot Areas (Ajameti, Lagodekhi, Mtirala, Imereti Caves) At the beginning of each management plan development process, the Working Group supported by the Twinning partners and a director of the relevant protected area arrange inception workshop for stakeholders. Planned activities will be introduced to local communities, governments, NGOs, private sector and media. 4 Inception Workshops are organised; relevant local stakeholders, media and public are informed about the planned activities. RTA, STE, RTA Assistant, RTA counterpart, APAs staff, BCPL, transportation, translation, printed materials. Developing communication strategy Due to limited knowledge about nature protection, it is usually seen by the public as a main barrier to economic development. Therefore, a good communication between nature conservation administration and its stakeholders, especially people living and working in or close to protected areas is crucial for successful nature protection in the long term. By workshops and expert advice, the Twinning partners will work out a draft of Communication strategy and accompanying action plan for its implementation. This will be a tool that the APA will employ (potentially attracting other donors as well) to reach out to important stakeholder groups with a clear and targeted messages. At least 2 workshops organised. Draft Communication strategy and accompanying action plan elaborated. RTA, STE, RTA Assistant, RTA counterpart, APAs staff, BCPL, translation, printed materials. Final workshops for each of 4 protected areas (Ajameti, Lagodekhi,
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Mtirala, ImeretiCaves) At the end of each management plan development process RTA, RTA Assistant, together with APAs working group leader and a director of relevant protected area arrange final workshop for stakeholders aiming at presentation of results to local communities, governments, NGOs, businesses and media. 4 final workshops are organised with participation of local stakeholders, media and public to inform them about the result of the planned activities. RTA, STE, RTA Assistant, PL, RTA counterpart, APAs staff, field trip, transportation, translation.

3.5.

Means/Input from the MS Partner Administration 3.5.1. Profile and tasks of the Project Leader (PL)

The PL will be expected to devote a minimum of 3 days per month to the project in his/her home administration. In addition, s/he will coordinate, from the Member state side, the Project Steering Committee (PSC), which will meet in Georgia every three months. Profile: At least 10years of experience in the field of protected areas management. During the project period, he/she must be in an active senior management position in the MemberState institution for at least 3years; Have experience in the field of project management, institutional issues and organisation of protected areas system. Tasks: Overall coordination, guidance and monitoring of the project; Preparation of project progress reports with support of RTA; Timely achievement of the project results; Co-Chairing of project steering committee; Provision of legal and technical advice and analysis whenever needed. 3.5.2. Profile and tasks of the Resident Twinning Adviser (RTA) One Resident Twinning Adviser (RTA) over a period of 24 months as well as medium/short term experts will implement the above-listed components. The RTA has the responsibility to guide the work of the team and provide support in elaboration of management plans and capacity building. The RTA is expected to fill the following profile: Masters Degree in Biological Sciences, Protected Areas Management, or related discipline; 7 years of general working experience in protected areas or relevant field; 5 years practical and proven experience in project management related to protected areas and development of policy level documents including management plans; Familiarity with CIS and especially with Georgian protected areas system would be an asset;
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Knowledge of European protected areas system and its implementation mechanisms; Sound comparative knowledge of relevant EU legislative and institutional requirements related to the various components of this project; Good training, public speaking, diplomatic and written communication skills; Excellent computer literacy (Word, Excel, Power Point); Excellent command of spoken and written English; Language skills kills in Georgian or Russian would be an asset.

Tasks: Overall supervision of the project implementation and coordination of all activities, as well as management of the project administration; Coordination of the activities of the team members in line with the agreed work programmes to enable timely completion of project outputs; Provide technical input to the project whenever needed and provision of advice in his field of expertise; Liaise with MS and BC Project Leaders and daily contacts with BC RTA counterpart; Co-preparation of project progress reports with Project Leader; Liaison with EU Project Manager; Liaison with other relevant projects and Georgian institutions; Together with the PL and/or RTA Counterpart lead the working group at APA and provides supervision on tasks assigned to the group; Elaborate ToRs of the STEs of the project. 3.5.3. Profile and tasks of the medium/ short-term experts Tasks of Short Term Experts: Terms of Reference for short-term adviser(s) will be elaborated by Project Leader/RTA at the work plan preparation stage. The exact number of STEs per activity should be agreed during the contract negotiation process. Profile of short-term expertise: There should be a pool of short term experts to ensure smooth implementation of the project during the overall implementation period. STEs should be identified by the Project Leader/RTA and have to be agreed with the beneficiary administration in the course of designing and delivery of the project. The STE's shall have: a university degree in a relevant subject; a minimum of 5 (five) years of experience in their respective field; sound experience in contributing to or developing management plans knowledge of EU Nature legislation and its practical application an excellent command of written and spoken English; Georgian and/or Russian language knowledge would be an asset; Experience in Phare/ENP-East countries or in other international projects relating to management of protected areas will be an asset.

Based on a brief comparison between the available expertise at APA and needs of the protected areas of the project, STEs in the following fields will be necessary: 1. Speleology
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2. Palaeontology 3. Land Use Planning 4. Tourism/Marketing 5. Awareness Raising 6. Socio-economic assessment 7. Economic valuation of PAs 8. Hunting 9. Geology-geography 10. Law Enforcement/patrolling 11. Communication In order to achieve the results pertaining to the training of APA staff, STEs should also have the following skills: training and facilitation skills; good writing, training and presentation skills; experience in coaching/mentoring.

In addition to their missions in Georgia, the short-term experts are expected to contribute actively to elaborating the programmes of the foreseen study visits and internships.

4. Legal and Institutional Framework


The establishment and management of PAs is governed by the Law On the System of Protected Areas (1996) as amended (the Protected Areas Law) and subsidiary regulations. The Protected Areas Law lays down the categories of PA which may be established in Georgia and procedures for establishing, changing boundaries of, and dissolving PAs, and assigns powers and responsibilities. Responsibility for planning the system of PAs is vested in the Ministry of Environment Protection (MoEP) and APA. Responsibility for approving new PAs, extensions to existing PAs, re-categorisation of PAs and cancellation of PAs rests with the Parliament. Decisions to establish new PAs are based on proposals prepared by the APA and submitted to the Government by the MoEP. The Protected Areas Law assigns responsibility for managing PAs to the APA.Until 2008, protected areas were managed by the Department of Protected Areas. The latter was replaced by the semi-governmental structure referred in Georgian Law as the Legal Entity of Public Law and was renamed as the Agency of Protected Areas. The Agency remains under the Ministrys structure but has more financial flexibility. Before the transition, some protected areas were under the Ministrys direct subordination and other under the Departments. Following the changes in 2008, all protected areas became under the subordination of one Agency. According to the Implementation Completion and Results Report of the GEF/World Bank project of Protected Areas Development, at this time, APA is a dynamic organization with a vision to expand on the Projects achievements. It has secured Government resources and is working hard to broaden revenue sources for the PAs, from visitors, international donors, and the private sector. APA has 458 employees, 36 employees work in the central apparatus and the rest work in regional offices across Georgia. APAs annual average state budget is 3.2 million Georgian Lari and annual average donor support is 2.5 million EUR(years 2008-2011).
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The following list represents several stakeholder organizations in the field of protected areas with whom APA should consult during the management planning: State bodies that have important formal powers related to the PAs and that are consulted during the management plan development; Various ministries such as the Ministry of Economy and Sustainable Development in relation to economic activities in and around protected areas, Ministry of Energy and Natural Resources in relation to hydro power developments and other projects around protected areas; State Representatives of the Regions, who carry the authority of the President, can facilitate communication between projects and local self-governing bodies; The municipalities - representative of local government; Local Communities living in or around protected areas; Regional and national NGOs and branch offices of international NGOs with knowledge, skills and experience relevant to the PA sector; The Georgian Orthodox Church that owns or manages under agreement with the State a large number of sites of religious, cultural and historical significance in or around protected areas; Seasonal livestock herders who use pastures in or around protected areas; Private businesses with an interest to benefit from protected areas such as hospitality businesses, tour operators, and various other service providers; Educational institutions interested in scientific research on protected areas and offering education and knowledge in the field.

All stakeholders should be involved in the process and consulted during the project implementation to ensure the participatory approach to the management plan development. For more detailed description of relevant institutions, please see Annex VI.

5. Budget
The maximum total budget available of the action is 1.1 million. The beneficiary will provide in kind contribution in the form foreseen in the Common Twinning Manual.

6. Implementation Arrangements
6.1.1. Implementing Agency The European Union Delegation in Tbilisi will be responsible for tendering, contracting, payments and financial reporting, and will work in close cooperation with the beneficiary. The person in charge of this project is: Mr. Michel Jambou Project Manager Delegation of the European Union to Georgia 38 Nino Chkheidze Str.,0102 Tbilisi, Georgia Tel.: (995) 32 2943 763; Fax: (995) 32 943 768 E-mail: michel.jambou@eeas.europa.eu

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PAO will support the TWG Project implementation process together with the EU Delegation. The person in charge of this project is: Mr. Roman Kakulia PAO Director Project Administration Office (PAO) in Georgia Office of the State Minister of Georgia on European and Euro-Atlantic Integration #7, Ingorokva Street, Tbilisi 0134, Georgia Office tel./fax: (995 32) 299 89 14 / 292 26 09 E-mail:pao@eu-nato.gov.ge

6.1.2.

Main counterpart in the Beneficiary Country:

Project Leader (PL) Ms. Tamar Pataridze Deputy Head Agency of Protected Areas 6, Gulua Street Tbilisi, Georgia Phone: + 995 32 275 23 56 Fax: + 995 32 75 23 53 Email: tamar.pataridze@gmail.com http://apa.gov.ge RTA Counterpart: Ms.Rusudan Chochua Landscape Planning Specialist Agency of Protected Areas 6, Gulua StreetTbilisi, Georgia Phone: + 995 32 275 38 89 Fax: + 995 32 75 23 53 Email: tatachochua@yahoo.com http://apa.gov.ge 6.1.3. Contracts: The project will be implemented through one Twinning contract. 6.1.4. Project Steering Committee: A Project Steering Committee (PSC) will be established for the control and supervision of the project activities and the mandatory results. The Steering Committee will meet at regular intervals and will submit by the end of the meeting (as recorded in the minutes of meeting) an approval/not approval of the project reports. Official minutes of the PSC meetings will be kept in English. To facilitate communication, the project can foresee the translation to Georgian and distributed to all parties within 15 days after the PSC meeting.

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In addition, monthly progress monitoring meetings should be held. As a gathering of RTA, RTA counterpart, PAO and EU Delegation representative the meetings are to monitor progress and solve any emerging operational problems on a monthly base. As the outcome, it is recommended to record proceedings of the meetings in one-page minutes. 7. Implementation schedule (indicative) 7.1. Launching of the call for proposals: February 2012 7.2. Start of the project activities: October 2012 7.3. Project completion: January 2015 7.4. Duration of the execution period (number of months): 24months (+ 3 months for the startup and closure of the project).

8. Sustainability:
The capacity building of the staff of the APA and park administrations within the Twinning project is constructed as a learning process through practical development of the management plan for the selected pilot protected areas. The sustainability of the project will be achieved through active participation of local staff throughout the project and more importantly, through training of trainers of APA and park administrations members. As a result, skilled and knowledgeable team (including future trainers) will create sound basis and structure enabling knowledge transfer among the administrations of protected areas in Georgia and between the protected areas and the APA. The core team that is expected as an outcome of the Twinning project will be a great contributor to the development of management plans for other PAs: Batsara-Babaneuri SNR and Ilto MR; Gardabani MR; Mariamjvari SNR, Korugi and Iori MRs; Tbilisi NP, Kobuleti PAs; Chachuna MR. (For more information see chapter 3.2 Linked activities).Inclusion of other PAs staff in the trainings will improve management planning skills on the entire system level. Moreover, involvement of other stakeholders in the process of management plan development is foreseen as another important element for sustainability of the Twinning project. It is foreseen that involvement of representatives of local community, government, NGOs and business sector, including their invitation and participation in the inception and final workshops to discuss proposed measures for management of a protected area, will raise a level of ownership in relation to the management plan of the protected area. Such ownership will also be helpful during the implementation phase of measures foreseen and agreed in the management plan.

9. Cross cutting issues


9.1. Equal Opportunity

The principle of equal opportunity will be integrated into all stages of the project implementation. At the level of the training and development activities, conducted as part of the Twinning project, the trainers and trainees will be engaged according to the definition of the required skills or current position, so the practical influence of this principle is likely to be small. 9.2. Environment
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No negative environmental impact of the project is expected. As a matter of fact, goals of the Twinning project are centred onbestenvironmental practices and sustainable development principles. Key elements and deliverables of the Twinning project improved capacity of the APA and administrations of protected areas constitute important measures and tools for management of protected areas in Georgia.

10.Conditionality and sequencing


There is no precondition set for this Twinning project.

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Abbreviations and Acronyms:


AP Action Plan APA -Agency of Protected Areas ASCI - Areas of Special Conservation Interest within the Emerald Network BC - Beneficiary country CBD - Convention on Biological Diversity CNF - Caucasus Nature Fund ECPC - Eco-regional Conservation Plan for the Caucasus ENP - European Neighbourhood Policy GEF - Global Environmental Facility GoG - Government of Georgia IUCN International Union for Conservation of Nature KfW - German Bank of Reconstruction (Bankengruppe) MoEP - Ministry of Environment Protection of Georgia MP Management Plan NBSAP National Biodiversity Strategy and Action Plan NEAP National Environmental Action Plan NPASAP - National Protected Area Strategy and Action Plan PA - Protected Area NP National Park SNR Strict Nature Reserve MR Managed Reserved PCA - Partnership and Co-operation Agreement PASCDAP - Protected Areas System Capacity Development Action Plan for Georgia PL Project Leader RAPPAM - Rapid Assessment and Prioritization of Protected Areas Management RTA Resident Twinning Adviser STE Short-term expert UNDP - United Nations Development Programme WWF - World Wide Fund for Nature

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Annexes to the Project Fiche - Annex I


ANNEX I - LOGFRAME PLANNING MATRIX for TWINNING FICHE:
Strengthening Management of Protected Areas of Georgia
Overall objective Support sustainable development of Georgias protected areas system through combining and balancing interests of nature conservation and protection as well as social-economic needs of local communities Objectively verifiable indicators Increase in sustainable financing sources of Georgias protected areas system Positive trends of key sustainable development indicators, in particular, in the regions related to the protected areas Positive opinion of relevant international organisations on management of Georgias protected areas system Objectively verifiable indicators Method for management planning is applied: management plans for other Georgias protected areas are additionally developed and accepted after completion of the Twinning project Working group established at APA for management planning (core staff) is functional and providing services to Georgias protected areas after completion of the Twinning project. Management plans are developed with strong involvement of local communities after completion of the Twinning project Programme name and number: Total budget: Sources of Verification Governmental Parliamentary reports APA Annual Reports Analytical reports/ assessment reports by international organisations and EUR 1.100.000 Assumptions

Project purpose Strengthening the nature conservation Georgia through management of areas of Georgia effective system of improved protected

Sources of Verification Analytical reports/ assessment reports by local and international NGO and/or international organisation Governmental Parliamentary Reports APA Annual Reports EC Assessment Monitoring Reports Reports/ and

Assumptions Policies supporting sustainable development, i.e. combining and balancing economic activity with nature protection, will be pursued by the Government of Georgia APA management remains committed to and continues strengthening APAs professional and institutional standing. Institutional and legislative framework is maintained so that APA remains in full capacity to accomplish its regulatory duties in harmony with EU acquis and best practices. Financing of the APA is adequate to enable it to take necessary steps for professional development and deliver its regulatory duties effectively Local and business communities remain cooperative and constructive, and contribute to sustainable development of Georgias protected areas system Assumptions APA, as a part of Georgian public administration, remains committed to adopting EU best practice in management planning methodology Trained staff of APA is retained in the institution. A system of further development of staff

Twinning project assessment mission report Twinning Project Final Report Minutes of the Project Steering Committee (PSC)

Results Result 1: Strengthened APAs capacities of developing and implementing management plans as a main tool for nature conservation Result 2: Enhanced understanding of legislative framework nature protection EU for

Objectively verifiable indicators 4 (four) Protected Areas have management plans elaborated and accepted by the end of project duration: Management plan for Ajameti Managed Reserve (MR); Management plan for Lagodekhi PAs Management plan for Mtirala NP;

Sources of Verification Decision/letter of the Head of Agency for Protected Areas Twinning Project Interim Quarterly and Final Reports Minutes of consultation meetings/ protocols with stakeholders in the protected areas Draft methodologies/ guideline

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Management plan for ImeretiCaves(Sataplia) PAs; Draft methodologies/ guideline on management planning made available for APA staff by the end of the project Training modules made available for APA staff/ trainers by the end of the project A group of APA staff on the central level at the Agency working on management plan development established by the end of the project At least 20 staff members from APA and core PAs administrations trained in the process and capable of leading management plan development by the end of the project Up to 15 staff members from APA and selected members of the working group area are trained to be trainers in management plan development by the end of the project. on management planning Decision/ order of the Head of APA on establishment of the Working Group Decision/ order of the Head of APA on a list of APA trainerstaff Twinning Project Interim Quarterly and Final Reports Minutes of Twinning Project Steering Committee meetings Reports on APA staff skill assessment and APA SWOT analysis between the periods of the start (baseline), the middle (12th month) and the end (24st month) of the Project STE(s) Training reports competencies and capacities is functioning at APA, and maintains staff motivation as well as knowledge. Adequate human and financial resources are ensured for the system of Georgias protected areas Overall legislative and regulatory framework related to management of the protected areas is maintained or further enhanced in favour of the system of Georgias protected areas Communication with local communities, NGOs and businesses community is maintained in a constructive and cooperative spirit The tools and guidelines developed within the Twinning project are updated and revisited accordingly in response to new lessons-learnt and legislative changes Staff turnover in APA is minimal so that the core competencies and knowledge is retained in the institution Assumptions APA management remains committed to developing and strengthening use of management planning methodologies APAs staff able to participate in the workshops and field missions Time management and resources mobilisation are properly done so that relevant APA staff actively participate in the work of WG, and the tool is continued Cooperation with local communities, NGOs and business communities is ensured and maintained.

Result 3: Effective mechanism in place for involvement and consultation of local actors in preparation and implementation of management plans.

Activities/Components or input 0.1 Kick-off workshop 0.2 Final conference for project closure

1.1. Collection of information on protected areas system in Georgia, as well as existing data on the selected 4 pilot sites 1.2. Introductory training to the core Working Group established under auspices of APA 1.3. Development methodologies for management plans and preparation of related training modules 1.4. Consultation and expert advice on management plan development in 4 pilot sites 1.5. Holding workshops/working meetings on the field

Means (indicative) PL, RTA, RTA Assistant, STEs, translation RTA, RTA Assistant, RTA counterpart, APAs staff, BC PL, transportation, translation, printed materials STE (4 x 5 m d), translation, transportation, APAs working group, 4 working meetings STE (3 x 5 md), translation, APA working group, 3 workshops STE (5 x 5 md), translation, transportation, APA working group STE (21x 5 m d), translation, transportation, APA working group, 16 workshops STE (18x 5 m d), translation, transportation, APA working group, 16 workshops STE (3x5 md), translation, APA working group, 3 workshops. STE (2x8 m d), translation, APA working group, STE (3x10 m d), translation, transportation, APA working group, 3 workshops

1.6. Discussions on lessons learned. 1.7. Select


participants and develop the training programme for training of trainers (ToT).

1.8. Conduct trainings of trainers (ToT) for APA members.

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RTA, RTA Assistant, BC PL, RTA counterpart, APAs staff, field trip, transportation, translation STE (4x8 m d), translation, APA working group, 4 workshops APAs staff, 9flights, 54per diem STE (4x5md),2 day conference, translation, interpretation, conference venue, printed materials STE (4x5m d), translation, transportation, APA working group, 4 workshops, printed materials STE (4x5m d), translation, APA working group, 2 workshops STE (4x5m d), translation, transportation, APA working group, 4 workshops, printed materials Preconditions none

2.1. 2.2.

Seminars and workshops on EU Nature legislation 3 Study Tours in Protected Areas of partner country/countries to observe the management plan implementation and enforcement Raising Public Awareness on EU Nature Protection Principles

2.3.

3.1.

Holding Inception Workshops in 4 Pilot Areas (Ajameti, Lagodekhi, Mtirala, Imereti Caves) Developing communication strategy Final workshops for each of 4 protected areas (Ajameti, Lagodekhi, Mtirala, Imereti Caves)

3.2. 3.3.

Annex II. Protected Areas of Georgia and their management plan status Table A) The following table lists All of Georgias Protected Areas according to IUCN Categories and their Administrations Protected Area Strict Nature Reserves (IUCN Category I) Babaneuri Strict Nature Reserve Batsara Strict Nature Reserve Borjomi Strict Nature Reserve Kintrishi Strict Nature Reserve Area (hectares) 862 2,986 14,820 10,703 Administration

Batsara-Babaneuri PAs Administration Batsara-Babaneuri PAs Administration Borjomi-Kharagauli NPs Administration Kintrishi PAs Administration 21

Strengthening Management of Protected Areas of Georgia ENPI GE11/ENP-PCA/EN/14 project

Kobuleti Strict Nature Reserve Lagodekhi Strict Nature Reserve Mariamjvari Strict Nature Reserve Sataplia Strict Nature Reserve Tusheti Strict Nature Reserve Vashlovani Strict Nature Reserve Liakhvi Strict Nature Reserve(1) Pskhu - Gumista Strict Nature Reserve(2) Bichvinta - Miusera Strict Nature Reserve(2) National Parks (IUCN Category II) Algeti National Park Borjomi-Kharagauli National Park Kazbegi National Park Kolkheti National Park Mtirala National Park Tbilisi National Park Tusheti National Park Vashlovani National Park Javakheti National Park Natural Monuments (IUCN Category III) Alazani Flood Plain Forest Natural Monument Artsivi Gorge Natural Monument Jason's Cave Natural Monument Khomulo Cave Natural Monument Kumistavi Cave Natural Monument Nagarevi Cave Natural Monument Navenakhevi Cave Natural Monument Okatse Canyon Natural Monument Okatse Waterfall Natural Monument Sakazhia Cave Natural Monument Takhti-Tepha Natural Monument Tskaltsitela Gorge Natural Monument Tsutskhvati Cave Complex Natural Monument White Cave Natural Monument Managed Reserves (IUCN Category IV) Ajameti Managed Reserve Chachuna Managed Reserve Gardabani Managed Reserve Ilto Managed Reserve

331 22,295 1,040 354 10,852 10,143 6,388 40,819 3,645 6,822 61,235 8,707 45,447 15,806 22,425 71,482 24,610 14 206,83

Kobuleti PAs Administration Lagodekhi PAs Administration Mariamjvari PAs Administration Sataplia SNR Administration Tusheti PAs Administration Vashlovani PAs Administration

Algeti NP Administration Borjomi-Kharagauli NPs Administration Kazbegi NP Administration Kolkheti NP Administration Mtirala NP Administration Tbilisi NP Administration Tusheti PAs Administration Vashlovani PAs Administration N/A

204 Vashlovani PAs Administration 100 9 Vashlovani PAs Administration Sataplia SNR Administration Sataplia SNR Administration Sataplia SNR Administration Sataplia SNR Administration Sataplia SNR Administration Sataplia SNR Administration Sataplia SNR Administration Sataplia SNR Administration Vashlovani PAs Administration Sataplia SNR Administration Sataplia SNR Administration

- Sataplia SNR Administration 5,117 5,200 3,484 6,971 Ajameti MR Administration Chachuna MR Administration Gardabani MR Administration Batsara-Babaneuri PAs Administration 22

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Iori Managed Reserve Katsoburi Managed Reserve Kobuleti Managed Reserve Korugi Managed Reserve Lagodekhi Managed Reserve Nedzvi Managed Reserve Kartsakhi Managed Reserve Sulda Managed Reserve Khanchali Managed Reserve Bughdasheni Managed Reserve Madatafa Managed Reserve Protected Landscape (IUCN Category V) Kintrishi Protected Landscape Tusheti Protected Landscape Table B:

1,336 295 439 2,068 2,156 8,992 158 320 839 126 1484

Mariamjvari PAs Administration Katsoburi MR Administration Kobuleti PAs Administration Mariamjvari PAs Administration Lagodekhi PAs Administration Borjomi-Kharagauli NPs Administration N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A

3,190 Kintrishi PAs Administration 31,320 Akhmeta Municipality

The following table demonstrates priority protected areas for APA and their management plan status. Those that do not have management plans are marked as Absent, those that are going to have management plans through various ongoing initiatives are marked as Planned, and those that have valid management plans are marked as In Place. According to the table, eight priority PAs will be without management plans by 2012. Out of eight PAs three are Emerald Sites ASCI. Another three are planned to be Emerald Sites and will be nominated for the inclusion in the list by APA in 2011. Protected Area Vashlovani Pas (Emerald Site - ASCI) Lagodekhi Pas (Emerald Site - ASCI) Tusheti Pas (Emerald Site - ASCI) Management Plan Status Planned Funded through GIZ project: Update of MP of Vashlovani PAs through the project Biodiversity conservation program for South Caucasus; 2011. Absent (out of date since 2009)

Batsara-Babaneuri, PAs (Emerald Site - ASCI) Tbilisi PA Borjomi-Kharagauli PAs (Emerald Site - ASCI) Kazbegi PA (Emerald Site - ASCI)

Planned Funded through GEF/UNDP Catalyzing Georgias Protected Areas Financial Sustainability; 2011. Ilto In Place Absent Planned Funded through CNF, WWF Caucasus PO, Preparation of MP of Borjomi-Kharagauli PAs; 2011. Planned Funded through BMZ/KFW Eco-regional Conservation Programme III/Thematic Approach, Development of Kazbegi PA and 23

Strengthening Management of Protected Areas of Georgia ENPI GE11/ENP-PCA/EN/14 project

Mtirala PA (Emerald Site - ASCI) Machakhela Planned PAs

preparation of MP; 2012-15. In Place but will expire in 2011 Funded through WWF Development of Mtirala National Park Project supported by Norwegian Government. Planned Funded through GEF5- Project Creation of new Protected Areas and development of Management. Establishment of Machakhela PAs and preparation of MP, 2012-13.

Javakheti PA(Emerald Planned Site - ASCI) Funded through BMZ/KFW, Eco-regional Conservation Programme II, Establishment of Javakheti PAs and preparation of MP, 2011-12. Kolkheti PA In Place (will expire in 2012) (Emerald Site - ASCI) Planned through Kolkheti Fund by SOCCAR Kobuleti PA In Place (will expire in 2012) Planned through Kolkheti Fund by SOCCAR Imereti Caves PAs ABSENT Kintrishi PA Planned (Emerald Site - ASCI) Funded through KFW. Eco-regional Conservation Program III, Thematic Approach. Development of Kintrishi PA and preparation of MP; 2012-14. Algeti PA Planned (Emerald Site - ASCI) Funded through KFW. Eco-regional Conservation Program III, Thematic Approach. Development of Algeti PA and preparation of MP; 2012-14. Gardabani PA ABSENT (Planned Emerald Site ASCI) Chachuna PA ABSENT (Emerald Site-ASCI) Korugi, Mariamjvari, ABSENT Iori PAs (Planned Emerald Site ASCI) Ajameti PA ABSENT (Planned Emerald Site ASCI) Ktsia-Tabackuri PA Planned BTC &C/IUCN Development of Ktsia Tabatskuri Protected Areas. Brief Information on Protected Areas that the project will work on (see the map of Georgias PAs below ): Ajameti Managed Reserve Ajameti Managed Reserve (MR) was established in 2007 by the Georgian Law on the Status of Protected Areas on the basis of Ajameti Strict Nature Reserve (established in 1946). The main goal of 24

Strengthening Management of Protected Areas of Georgia ENPI GE11/ENP-PCA/EN/14 project

establishment of MR was to protect unique Iberian Oak forests. Nowadays the area covers 5,117 hectares and is managed by Ajameti MR Administration. The territorial unit consists of 20 persons including 17 rangers and 3 administrative members. Ajameti MR is surrounded by 16 villages. The pipe-line of state importance and a road of local use cross the MR. In addition, Georgian Army Acting Division is located inside the Reserve. Imereti Caves (Sataplia) Protected Areas Imereti Caves Protected Areas were created on the basis of Sataplia Strict Nature Reserve in 2007 by the Georgian Law on Establishment and Management of Protected Areas of Imereti Caves. Protected Areas are of the complex character and include geological, palaeonthological, speleological, and botanical rarities. A Strict Nature Reserve, a Managed Natural Reserve and 11 Natural Monuments are included in Imereti PAs: Prometheus Cave, Tetri Cave, Khomuli Cave, Tsutskhvati Cavity, Navenakhevi Cave, Nagarevi Cave, Jason's Cave, Sakazhia Cave, Tskaltsitela Gorge, Okatse Canyon, and Okatse Waterfall. Imereti Caves Protected Areas are managed by the Administration of Sataplia Strict Nature Reserve, which consists of 22 employees including 9 rangers and 13 administrative members. Natural Monuments are surrounded by villages and settlements. Lagodekhi Protected Areas Lagodekhi protected areas were the first protected areas established in Georgia in 1912. Since 2003 it has been established in the categories of reserve and managed reserve with total area 24 451 ha. Lagodekhi protected areas are located in northeast of Georgia, in the Lagodekhi region. The distance from Tbilisi to Lagodekhi is 170 km. The protected areas are located on the southern slopes of the Greater Caucasus. Lagodekhi protected areas are distinguished by their unique value not only for Georgia but also for the whole Caucasus region. The areas are represented by rare and endemic species of flora and fauna. Lagodekhi protected areas is a priority protected area in the Caucasus Ecoregional Conservation Plan 2006. The territorial unit consists of 27 employees: 19 rangers and 8 administrative members. Mtirala National Park Mtirala National Park was established in 2006. The park covers 15,806 ha and includes well preserved ecosystems of forests and shrubs. It is located 320 km away from Tbilisi in historical Achara. Protected Areas are created with the aim of preservation of Colkhic relict forests. Mtirala National Park is located between the Black Sea and Achara mountain Range, 1381 m above sea level. The name of the mountain describes its nature very well, because the annual precipitation amount is 4 520 mm. Mtirala National Park is distinguished with its biodiversity. There are spread Colchic forests represented by unique woody plants. Some of them are rare, endangered, endemic and relict. 25

Strengthening Management of Protected Areas of Georgia ENPI GE11/ENP-PCA/EN/14 project

Territorial unit consists of 24 employees: 8 administrative members and 16 rangers.

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ANNEX III. Relevant Studies and Legislation According to Georgian Law, management plans are being adopted based on the order of a Minister of Environment Protection of Georgia (Law of Georgia about the System of Protected Areas, March 7, 1996; paragraph 15, section 4). According to Georgian legal hierarchy, Ministerial order represents a normative act and part of the legislative base of the country (Law of Georgia on Normative Acts, November 19, 1996; Article 4, section 1). The Government of Georgias policies regarding PA development and management are set out in the National Biodiversity Strategy and Action Plan (NBSAP) adopted in 2005. The actions set out in the NBSAP have been overtaken for all practical purposes by the National Protected Areas System Development Strategy and Action Plan (NPASDSAP), though it has no formal status. Strategic Goal 3 of NPASDSAP and actions for achievement of the goal improvement of management of protected areas stipulate the development and adoption of management plans for all individual PAs. The GoG with the support of the Ministry of Housing, Special Planning and the Environment of Netherlands is currently at the completion phase of the National Environmental Action Plan (NEAP 2) that is expected to be adopted in January 2011. Draft of the NEAP 2, chapter 6 stipulates an action to develop management plans on all protected areas by 2015. In addition to its own goals and determination to develop management plans and build capacity in management planning, the Agency of Protected Areas has received numerous recommendations in this regard from its international partners. These recommendations stem from various studies conducted within international projects alerting GoG, the donor community, and other stakeholders to develop the management plans on all PAs. Some of these recommendations are presented below: Management Effectiveness Assessment of Protected Areas of Georgia (WWF, IUCN, 2008): The Assessment used RAPPAM method and revealed absence of management plans and capacity to develop management plans as significant weaknesses within the protected areas system. Assessing overall planning, the following key challenges were identified: low number of management plans and inconsistency of management policies and plans with the PAs. The assessment concluded that the PA network was under-performing on habitat restoration, wildlife management, provision of infrastructure, management planning, surveys and tourism management. The Assessment further recommended to develop management plans for all protected areas and to conduct staff training in management planning (Section 3.2.1.1). Protected Areas System Capacity Development Action Plan for Georgia - PASCDAP (WWF, 2008): PASCDAP highlights the importance to have current management plans that can provide direction for all PAs. In its critical strategic direction 3 - Management Planning It sets out the following specific objective and actions: Objective: All Protected areas have current management plans that reflect stakeholder involvement and provide direction for current operations. 28

Strengthening Management of Protected Areas of Georgia ENPI GE11/ENP-PCA/EN/14 project

Actions: Develop a protected areas management planning guidelines; Determine status of PA management planning for all PAs; Seek funding for management planning activities; Partner with international organizations to train PA staff in Conservation Action Planning; Develop new management plans; Establish detailed management policy statements that focus on fulfilment of legal mandates; Update existing plans; Develop revision schedule as required. Progress Assessment towards Targets of the Programme of Work on Protected Areas in Georgia (WWF, 2009): The Assessment alerts Georgia about its obligation to elaborate management plans for all PAs and recommends to develop management plans and to implement them. Assessment of the capacity of the APA within the Feasibility Study for the Caucasus Eco-regional Conservation Programme, Phase III (KFW, BMZ, 2010): Study team of the Programme carried out an assessment of the APAs capacity against 35 criteria. The assessment revealed several strengths and some weaknesses that significantly affect the APAs capability. According to the assessment, significant weaknesses exist in relation to: skills of managers in key positions and basic management systems which manifest themselves in various ways including: only 3 out of the 50 PAs have current management plans; the vast majority are being managed without documented long term objectives and policies. Training Needs Analysis through the GEF/UNDP project Catalysing Financial Sustainability of Protected Areas of states that Many PAs still do not have management plans or those are out-dated. Even if they do, these plans have been developed by external experts and PA staff has little ownership for them... Training priorities related to management planning are: development of PA management plans, implementation of PA management plans and participation of local communities and other stakeholders in PA management planning.

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Annex IV: Structure of Agency of Protected Areas of Georgia Org chart of the Central Apparatus of APA Typical org chart of the territorial unit, an individual protected area

For more information about the protected areas of Georgia, please visit: http://apa.gov.ge

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ANNEX V: List of relevant institutions and organizations with short descriptions


Nota bene: this list is by no means exhaustive and represents only a brief overview of partners and stakeholders of protected areas of Georgia. State organisations Parliament of Georgia The Parliament of Georgia decides on the establishment of new PAs and changes to the boundaries, or cancellation, of existing PAs upon a proposal from the Government. Ministry of Finance The Ministry of Finance controls the allocation of state budget funds to government organisations. The Ministry represents the Government in international financing agreements. Ministry of Environment Protection (MoEP) The MoEP is responsible for the development and implementation of environmental policy and legislation in Georgia including biodiversity conservation. The MoEPs agreement is needed to any proposal to establish a new PA or to change the boundaries or cancel an existing PA before the proposal is sent to other ministries. Units of the Ministrys central apparatus that are especially relevant to the programme are the following: The Biodiversity Protection Division is responsible for the development and implementation of policy and legislation for biodiversity conservation inside and outside protected areas. The Department of Environmental Policy and International Relations is responsible for environmental policy development and long-term planning of the MoEP, as well as liaison with international partners and donors. Agency of Protected Areas (APA) under the MoEP The APA is a legal entity of public law under the supervision of the MoEP. The Agencys core functions are: (a) to manage protected areas of IUCN Categories I-IV, and other PAs in cooperation with other institutions; (b) maintaining and supervising PAs; (c) PA system and capacity development planning, and (d) the development of plans, draft laws and guidelines related to PAs. There are some additional functions, such as the monitoring of rules established by the law, the planning and development of new protected areas, their popularization and the development of ecotourism, as well as the planning and arrangement of protected area infrastructure. The mandate of the APA is laid down in the Regulation of the Agency of Protected Areas (2008).
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Strengthening Management of Protected Areas of Georgia ENPI XXX project

As a legal entity of public law, the APA is entitled to conduct certain economic activities and to collect the revenue of these activities for re-investment in PA system development. One of the sources of such revenues has been ecotourism, and the APA has been actively promoting ecotourism in Georgian PAs. Ministry of Economy and Sustainable Development (MoESD) The mission of the Ministry of Economy and Sustainable Development is to provide stable and high temps of economic growth with working up and implementation an effective economic policy. The government of the country is implementing structural and institutional reforms with aim to provide the most favourable business environment. Consequently, the current economic reforms are targeted at: Liberalization of entrepreneurship activity, creation of favourable, transparent and stable legislation for private entrepreneurship and attractive business and investment climate. Realization of active privatization process and support to strengthening of private sector. Liberalization of the sphere of licenses and permits and reform of the system of technical regulation. Economic deregulation and providing and protection of terms of competition on local market. Development of tourist, transport and communication infrastructure and support to growth of the countrys transit potential. Liberalization of tariffs on import and support to growth of export potential. Rehabilitation and economic development of the regions of Georgia and post conflict territories. National Tourism Agency The National Tourism Agency (the successor to the Department of Tourism and Resorts) under the MoESD is the government organisation responsible for the development and promotion of tourism in Georgia. Ministry of Regional Development and Infrastructure (MoRDI) The Mission of the MoRDI is the development and implementation of policy, legislation and planning instruments for the coordinated development of Georgias regions including their infrastructure. The Ministry also has a key role as a coordination agency for infrastructure development projects. It was formed in early 2009 only, incorporating some Departments that were earlier under the Ministry for Economic Development. Ministry of Agriculture: Department of Regional Management Mission: Within the general mission of the Ministry of Agriculture, the mission of the Department of Regional Management is the implementation of agricultural policy and the development of agriculture in Georgias regions. Ministry of Justice
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Strengthening Management of Protected Areas of Georgia ENPI XXX project

The functions of the Ministry of Justice include scrutiny of draft laws before they are submitted to the Parliament including laws establishing, cancelling and changing the boundaries of protected areas. The Ministry supervises the National Agency of Public Registry which is responsible for establishing and administering a registration system for ensuring recognition and protection of immovable property rights by the state. Ministry of Energy and Natural Resources (MoENR) The Mission of the Ministry of Energy and Natural Resources is to exploit existing energy and natural resources, to diversify imported energy supply, to ensure energy safety, to develop alternative energy sources as well as assessment of natural resources and ensuring sustainable use of natural resources. It also pursues the long-term goal of meeting the entire demand on electricity by local hydropower resources. The MoENR is promoting the establishment of small hydropower stations in Georgia, to be financed by investors. This interest extends to some protected area buffer zones and planned protected areas. The Ministry of Energy and Natural Resources could play an important role for the promotion of the establishment of small hydropower stations in these areas. Beyond this, the Ministry could become a partner in piloting new innovative schemes of energy trade for the benefit of local communities. Offices of the State Representatives - Governors State Representatives-Governors have the mission to represent the State at the level of the region (the highest level of regional subdivision in Georgia) and to coordinate policy implementation at the regional and sub-regional level. They are also consulted by municipalities regarding local budget allocations. Currently the regions are not legally established because the Georgian Constitution foresees establishment of the necessary legislation only once the Georgian State has full jurisdiction over the entire country. Hence, the State Representatives at the regional level are also not legally established, although fulfilling their de-facto role. The Offices of the State Representative Governors have Departments of Relations with Local Government and Public Organs, which are mainly responsible for the collaboration with Municipalities. The Offices take part in the decision-making regarding the allocation of state funds and coordination of donor projects throughout the Region, and support initiatives and activities aimed at the development of the region. The Offices of the State Representatives Governors can play a strong role as a communication facilitator and advisor to the programme. They should be represented in consultation and cooperation mechanisms established in the framework of the socio-economic development sub-programmes. Municipalities The municipalities are the only tier of representative local government. The elected body is the Sakrebulo; the executive body is the Gamgeoba and is appointed by the Sakrebulo. The election system is such that all villages/settlements of a municipality are represented in its Sakrebulo. The mandate of Sakrebulos is defined by the Organic Law of Georgia on Local Self-governance (2005). The Sakrebulos natural interest is safeguarding local participation in the decision making on all issues of relevance to the municipalities, including any changes to the PA boundaries and the establishment of
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Strengthening Management of Protected Areas of Georgia ENPI XXX project

new PAs, the setup of PA support zones, and the natural resource use regime in the municipalities. At the same time, the Sakrebulo promotes the interests of the local population. Municipalities suffer from low funding and are able to provide only minimal services to their residents. In many instances the Sakrebulos have less political influence than the Gamgebelis (the Gamgebeli is the chief executive of the Gamgeoba). Nevertheless the Sakrebulos of the municipalities in the selected programme areas will be important partners for the programme. Non-governmental organizations: Transboundary Joint Secretariat (TJS) Not a legal entity but operates as form of regional NGO. Financed by German Financial Cooperation. Second phase started in March 2011. Scope of work includes conceptual support and capacity building in the PA sector. Capacity is low at the present time due to the winding down of the first phase. Second phase will bring substantial funding. Influence in the PA sector will by increased by the local implementation partners (REC Caucasus) connections to the ministries of environment. REC Caucasus Regional NGO founded by the EU and the ministries of environment of Armenia, Azerbaijan and Georgia. Active in integrated water resources management, community forestry, climate change adaptation, sustainable land management, waste management. Will become active in the PA sector as a partner in the consortium which will implement Phase II of the TJS. Suffered for years from poor management. Changes to structure and staff and injection of new project funding are helping to turn the organization around but longer term core finding is not assured. Close connections to the ministries of environment give the organization significant influence. WWF Caucasus Implements projects in the PA sector including creation of new PAs (Borjimi-Kharagauli PA, Mtirala PA). Coordinated the elaboration of the ECPC. Acts as the secretariat of the Caucasus Biodiversity Council (see below) WWF has used its influence to bring substantial funds from donor organizations into the PA sector. Caucasus Biodiversity Council An informal coordination mechanism that brings together representatives of the governments, NGOs and science and research bodies from the Caucasus countries to promote and update the ECPC. IUCN Programme Office for the Southern Caucasus
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Strengthening Management of Protected Areas of Georgia ENPI XXX project

Contributes to improving PA management effectiveness through trainings, PA system planning, development of formats for local stakeholder participation in PAs. NACRES (Noahs Ark Centre for the Rescue of Endangered Species) Carries out research and implements projects in the PA sector. Currently implementing the EU-funded human wildlife conflicts project in Tusheti and Vashlovani PAs in association with Fauna and Flora International and a component of the UNDP/GEF Catalysing Financial Sustainability project in the Tusheti PAs pilot area, also in association with Fauna and Flora International. CENN Georgian sustainable development NGO/consultancy with a diverse project portfolio, including communication, participation in small hydropower development, advocacy, sustainable land management, EIA. CUNA Georgica/CWC Promotion of sustainable natural resource use in Georgia, certification (FairWild) and market chains for wild products. Elkana Promotes, implements projects and provides extension services in the fields of sustainable rural development, organic agriculture, rural tourism. Local NGOs Smaller NGOs are active in many parts of Georgia and some have the capacity to act as local implementation partners. Teaching, Science and Research The main teaching, science and research organisations with an interest in the subject matter of the programme are Ilia State University, Faculty of Life Sciences. Research into the ecology and conservation of Georgian fauna. Field station in Stepantsminda, various research activities in Kazbegi. Georgian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Botany. Botanical Research, regional coordination of Caucasus Plant Red List Assessment, to be finalized in 2010. Communities adjacent to PAs
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Strengthening Management of Protected Areas of Georgia ENPI XXX project

Generally communities have few opportunities to participate in the management of PAs and they are not organised and capacitated to exploit whatever opportunities are given to them to influence PA management. Seasonal livestock herders Seasonal livestock herders use pastures in PAs for grazing. The impacts of their natural resource use and the impacts of PA establishment and management on their livelihoods will need to be taken into account during programme implementation. Private Sector Private tourism service providers include companies who sell package and custom tours, providers of outdoor activities (e.g. horse riding, rafting, mountain biking, hotels and family run guest houses. The Georgian Tourism Association (GTA) is an umbrella organization of Georgian tourism operators. GTA has a 28 business membership and is active in the fields of destination promotion, capacity building and training. The association initiated cooperation with the APA regarding the development of sustainable tourism in 2008, and has since been involved in marketing, trail marking and education activities in various PAs of Georgia, in collaboration with APA and local stakeholders

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