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STREET LIGHTING

TECHNOLOGY SUPPLEMENT

2008/09

CosmoPolis

STREET LIGHTING TECHNOLOGY SUPPLEMENT 2008/09 CosmoPolis Old technology Stealth LED A NEW ZEALAND LOCAL GOVERNMENT
Old technology
Old technology

Stealth LED

SUPPLEMENT 2008/09 CosmoPolis Old technology Stealth LED A NEW ZEALAND LOCAL GOVERNMENT MAGAZINE SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT
SUPPLEMENT 2008/09 CosmoPolis Old technology Stealth LED A NEW ZEALAND LOCAL GOVERNMENT MAGAZINE SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT
SUPPLEMENT 2008/09 CosmoPolis Old technology Stealth LED A NEW ZEALAND LOCAL GOVERNMENT MAGAZINE SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT

A NEW ZEALAND LOCAL GOVERNMENT MAGAZINE SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT

NEW ZEALAND LOCAL GOVERNMENT PUBLISHER/MANAGING DIRECTOR: Chauncy Stark GENERAL MANAGER: Joy Hall ASSISTANT GENERAL
NEW ZEALAND LOCAL GOVERNMENT PUBLISHER/MANAGING DIRECTOR: Chauncy Stark GENERAL MANAGER: Joy Hall ASSISTANT GENERAL
NEW ZEALAND LOCAL GOVERNMENT
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Waitakere leads the charge to advance new street lighting technologies in New Zealand

By MICHELLE DAWSON

By MICHELLE DAWSON

A national leader in

researching and trialling

new sustainability initiatives,

Waitakere City has turned its

attention to new streetlighting

technologies in its search for energy saving opportunities. Known nationally and internationally as New Zealand’s Eco City, Waitakere has made some good energy efficiency gains in recent years, winning the EECA EnergyWise Public Sector Award in 2007 in recognition of its $1.26 million and 8.6 million kWh savings since 2001. The council acknowledges that it has a real challenge ahead if it is to reach its goal of reducing greenhouse gas emissions by 50 per cent by 2021 – a daunting task when streetlighting comprises 26 per cent of its total emissions. However, by identifying energy saving opportunities, Waitakere has already begun to stabilise its emissions ahead of target. Waitakere began looking at energy efficient opportunities for streetlighting in June 2007 after hearing about a CosmoPolis street lighting project in a Whangamata subdivision. A business case was developed and Waitakere installed 203 of the CosmoPolis new metal halide lights in the city over last financial year. The council was also introduced to light emitting diode (LED) streetlighting last year when an Auckland company approached it to install and trial its first production of the LED lights in Waitakere – the results of which continue to be evaluated. However, the most significant opportunity for Waitakere to understand the possibilities for reducing energy usage (and therefore greenhouse gas emissions) came from discussions with Modus Lighting around smart technologies, such as streetlighting control and dimming systems. Waitakere’s corporate sustainability manager, Michelle Dawson, says energy

efficiency for streetlighting systems poses

a significant challenge for councils, who

inherit most of their new streetlighting from developers and only replace a small percentage each year through capital upgrade programmes. “As standard lighting infrastructure equipment, energy-efficient streetlighting bulbs and luminaires (light fittings) can

provide an energy efficiency gain of 25 to 50 per cent. Around another 35 per cent

of energy reduction can come from smart control of the streetlighting system itself,

if the technology is installed during a

council’s capital upgrade programme or as part of new developments,” she says. “Councils cannot develop the solution for energy-efficient streetlighting by themselves. We need to work with the industry to get some of the technological solutions into New Zealand and installed. We also need to look at new opportunities for funding their installation to reduce the burden on ratepayers.” In its search for energy-efficient solutions to streetlighting, Waitakere realised that much more information-sharing needed to take place within the streetlighting industry if councils are able to take action to improve the efficiency of their streetlighting infrastructure. Waitakere and Modus Lighting felt others could benefit from their experiences with some of the new technologies and were keen to learn about what others were doing as well.

technologies and were keen to learn about what others were doing as well. 2 NEW ZEALAND

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NEW ZEALAND LOCAL GOVERNMENT - SUPPLEMENT

The result was the hugely successful Advancing New Zealand’s Streetlighting Technologies Forum and Night Tour, held in Waitakere on September 24. While there was an initial expectation of only 30 to 40 participants, the event attracted more than 120 participants from all over New Zealand, including government officials, local government managers, lighting engineers, urban designers, developers and lighting suppliers. The forum began with an informal trade expo from technology suppliers exhibiting a range of streetlighting lamps, control gear and luminaires, including high-pressure sodium lights, metal halide lights, solar streetlights and the new CosmoPolis and LED white light luminaires. The new generation luminaires showed the advantages of precise light-control optics to minimise spill light and glare and also displayed much improved weather protection ratings. Guest presenters at the forum covered a diverse range of topics, including CosmoPolis’ new metal halide, LED lighting, centralised dimming control systems, electricity metering for streetlighting, lighting education, innovative capital financing techniques and design consultant viewpoints on sustainable streetlighting. The discussion at the end of the forum considered some of the issues the industry is facing as it begins to consider innovative solutions for energy efficient streetlighting. Some of the issues raised included opportunities for capital financing, balancing the timing of investment outflows with cost reductions, problematic electricity tariff structures with high fixed/variable cost ratios and the current un-metered electricity supply regime not encouraging an “invest to save” culture. The nature of organisational and financial management within councils was also cited as a problem, with many dealing with differing priorities over short-term cost control and the lifecycle cost/benefit of new technologies and the need to identify alternative funding sources to reduce the cost to the ratepayer of installing the new technology. Forum participants were then taken on a night tour of Te Atatu Peninsula to view Waitakere’s installations of

STREET LIGHTING

TECHNOLOGY SUPPLEMENT

2008/09

of STREET LIGHTING TECHNOLOGY SUPPLEMENT 2008/09 CosmoPolis and LED streetlighting. This allowed

CosmoPolis and LED streetlighting. This allowed participants to see the emergent technologies first hand and compare the nuances of light, colour and performance. Previously, many had only seen the technology within their office environment. The evening closed with a night demonstration by Modus Lighting of an internet-based central streetlight control and monitoring system. This demonstration involved using a laptop computer with mobile internet link to communicate with a web server (located in France) to control and measure light levels and energy usage on a test streetlight luminaire. This was a mini- demo of the now-popular European technique of energy-saving streetlight dimming during quiet off-peak hours. The forum participants agreed that some very basic issues need to be worked through to enable New Zealand to get the most out of the new technologies. This has been heard by the Electricity Commission and the New Zealand Lighting Council, who are now developing plans to support the industry to begin working through some of the issues. In the meantime, Ms Dawson is encouraging other councils to take up the challenge of looking for opportunities to improve the energy efficiency of their streetlighting infrastructure. “Not only can we work together to leverage funding and improve economies

of scale for street lighting products but we can make significant energy usage and cost reductions for streetlighting nationally over the next 10 to 15 years,” she says. “In the short-term, there are many areas councils can begin to work on to improve the energy efficiency of their street lighting through capital replacement programmes and by working with developers to ensure that they inherit streetlighting infrastructure that will meet the needs of the future. “These technologies will not continue to develop if we don’t show interest in their application. For councils, looking at the capital and operational costs within the 10-year timeframe of our next Long Term Council Community Plans is a good starting point.” The Electricity Commission has sponsored the production of a DVD recording of the Advancing New Zealand’s Street Lighting Technologies Forum to deliver the message of street lighting efficiency and performance improvement to councils and the street lighting industry. The DVD will be distributed by Waitakere City Council and Modus Lighting and is expected to be released at the end of this month. Michelle Dawson – Waitakere District Council. For more information, phone Michelle Dawson at Waitakere City Council on 836 8000, ext 8539 or email michelle.dawson@ waitakere.govt.nz.

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Dark patches emerge in lighting technology Beca’s Greg Williams discusses the market readiness of new

Dark patches emerge in lighting technology

Beca’s Greg Williams discusses the market readiness of new lighting technology in the wake of the recent Waitakere Street Lighting Conference.

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T he conference offered up pretty much what attendees had expected to see on arrival. There were representatives from some selected luminaire

manufacturers, technology providers and a large number of attendees from local councils. After going through the exhibits and catching up with the exhibitors, we settled in for an afternoon of edification and enlightenment (excuse the pun). The seminars and trade show in the main promoted two emerging lamp technologies –the use of LED technology, and the new Cosmopolis lamp produced by Philips. Also discussed was the use of photovoltaic cells to provide alternative energy sources (energy neutral) for road lighting, using the national grid as the energy store, the use of technology to control, meter and monitor the condition of the road lighting assets and the need for an alternative funding model to provide incentive to councils and road lighting asset owners to use the new technology. Despite the almost overpowering swathe of advertising during these seminars, a number of issues were brought to light that were further discussed in an open forum after the seminars were presented.

New technology and electrical network utilities

The most challenging issues for the industry did not appear to be the cost of electricity, or a lack of desire to adopt new technology. The road block to the adoption of the newer technologies appears to be linked directly to the cost of line charges charged by electrical network utilities, as well as their apparent lack of flexibility to cope with un-metered loads that will change their characteristics (e.g. dimming systems)

throughout their operating period. When considering this, it is clear that there is very little financial incentive to attempt to save power, as, even if one manages to save up to 50 per cent of the electricity cost, this only influences around 5 per cent of ones “power bill”. This is despite the enthusiastic encouragement of the various council energy managers. This issue will need to be addressed before large scale energy savings are likely to be entertained by councils. It is fortunate that a representative from EECA attended the conference, and heard these concerns first hand; and it is hoped that this issue will be brought before the politicians and be addressed. While representatives from the Utilities were also in attendance, there remains little incentive for them to address this issue. Government and the utilities must be involved to open a dialogue with local councils and consultants on this matter, and the conference attendees urged them to do so.

New LED lamp technology shows promise

The new lamp technology presented was very interesting, with LED’s an exciting hope for the future. The Philips Cosmopolis lamp also shows promise as a technology that could be adopted by many in the near future. As always, the information that wasn’t presented was as interesting as that presented:

lumen depreciation and lifetime figures for LED’s are still notoriously difficult to obtain. A number of reputable manufacturers still comment that LED technology is changing rapidly, and that the technology is not suitable for wholesale introduction and replacement of the existing lighting stock. What we felt was equally significant was the lack of representation of other more

NEW ZEALAND LOCAL GOVERNMENT - SUPPLEMENT

of other more NEW ZEALAND LOCAL GOVERNMENT - SUPPLEMENT “mature” lamp technologies in the mix. The
of other more NEW ZEALAND LOCAL GOVERNMENT - SUPPLEMENT “mature” lamp technologies in the mix. The
of other more NEW ZEALAND LOCAL GOVERNMENT - SUPPLEMENT “mature” lamp technologies in the mix. The
of other more NEW ZEALAND LOCAL GOVERNMENT - SUPPLEMENT “mature” lamp technologies in the mix. The

“mature” lamp technologies in the mix. The CDM-T (and other types of metal halide lamp) is the poor cousin to the Cosmopolis in terms of claimed lamp life and lumen output, but the technology is supported by more than one lamp manufacturer, providing a degree of competition which is not available with the Cosmopolis. The use of electronic lamp control gear is a given on these new lamp technologies, despite having lower life expectancy (and therefore higher maintenance cost to change out – with associated energy consumption with trucks, and crews required), than traditional wire wound though less efficient control gear. While

considered “old” technology, the high pressure sodium lamp remains one

of the most efficient, longer life lamp

sources available, which has significant reduction in maintenance requirements, especially in its twin burner version. Also missing was the compact

fluorescent as a mature, competing lamp technology. The evening ended with a tour of two installations, each one designed with different “eco friendly” lamp sources (Cosmopolis and LED). Both installations provided energy savings over the lighting that was previously installed. Of note was the comparison between the new installation and the existing one, where the existing installation was highly likely to be a non-compliant design. It would have been interesting to compare the results with a comparable “current technology” design. Insufficient and contradictory information provided about each installation led us to conclude that neither were particularly good examples

of a road lighting installation.

STREET LIGHTING

TECHNOLOGY SUPPLEMENT

2008/09

The Cosmopolis equipped offering appeared to be over-lit, and used luminaires that did not provide adequate control of light spill into adjacent properties. Discussion with the designer revealed that the design was carried out to meet a category V3 lighting requirement. There was a degree of confusion between the designer and the luminaire supplier on the night as to whether the specified lamp wattage had been used. The LED offering, for a category P3 roadway provided very sharp cut-off. The light output was so precise that, as people stepped off the road onto the footpath outside of the cone of light from each luminaire, they promptly disappeared from view. Vertical illumination was noticeably poor, and there were also gaps in roadway illumination where the pole spacing had been “stretched” to accommodate driveways. Indeed, the designer advised the installation would have performed better if the luminaires had been mounted 2m higher than they were.

Conclusion

So what did we come away with from the day’s attendance? Reinforcement of what we already knew. Yes, we can do a design if we’ve got all the relevant information from the manufacturer. And in a number of instances, Beca is carrying out the design using this technology. We’ve found that greater care needs to be taken with the fine details of the design when using new technologies, as traditional light distributions and cut-offs simply do not exist. The technology looks to be interesting and exciting, from a “using new technology” perspective. It brings fantastic opportunities and great potential. It is also really young technology that needs some more time to mature. We are advising our clients to say “yes, this is available, let’s try it”, and at the same time, to be selective in how and where the technology is used until it has been proven; not just from a lighting perspective, but from the perspective of standardization and capital, energy and maintenance costs.

Safely switching off the lights

O ne of the big questions about mercury-based fluorescent tubes is what to do with them once they have reached the end of their life. With a shortage of mercury disposal facilities in New Zealand and major concerns about the

health risks associated with mercury, a professional recycling service is required. Interwaste was established in 2005 and is a locally owned and run company that specialises in the recycling of fluorescent lighting.

A major part of Interwaste’s work involves the recycling of

mercury-based products and it is the only company that offers

a zero-to-landfill, 100 per cent recycling service of mercury-

based lighting. All components of the lamp including aluminium, glass, mercury and phosphor powder are recovered and recycled into products that can be reused in a variety of industries. Mercury is a highly toxic waste contained within all fluorescent lamps. If disposed of irresponsibly, it pollutes waterways, damages the environment and can impact on human health. Interwaste provides a safe disposal option by providing its customers with lined containers to safely store the lamps in. This minimises the risk of mercury exposure in the workplace and ensures companies comply with New Zealand environmental regulations. Interwaste’s staff members are trained in all areas of hazardous waste disposal and take pride in finding cost-effective, environmentally sustainable methods for disposal of hazardous waste streams.

sustainable methods for disposal of hazardous waste streams. NEW ZEALAND LOCAL GOVERNMENT - SUPPLEMENT 5

NEW ZEALAND LOCAL GOVERNMENT - SUPPLEMENT

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Zero net carbon streetlighting By SHAY BRAZIER and DUGAN DOHERTY T he imperative to reduce

Zero net carbon streetlighting

By SHAY BRAZIER and DUGAN DOHERTY

By SHAY BRAZIER and DUGAN DOHERTY

T he imperative to reduce carbon emissions is a challenge faced by all organizations and individuals. New Zealand has set a target of carbon neutral

electricity by 2020 and carbon neutral

stationary energy by 2025. The Auckland Sustainability Framework identifies eight shifts required to move to a sustainable Auckland, one of these shifts is to “Build a carbon neutral future”. For councils where the lighting of public spaces and roads typically accounts for between 30 and 50 per cent of CO2 emissions, there is scope for significant improvements. To achieve a zero net carbon streetlighting infrastructure a sequential approach is used that prioritises the most cost- effective measures where energy use is first reduced and then the remaining energy consumption is generated from a renewable source on site.

1. Energy efficient luminaries and lamps

Through the use of modern energy efficient luminaries and lamps such as

new generation metal halides a 30 per cent energy saving can be expected.

2. Intelligent lighting control

Intelligent lighting control systems have a number of advantages, including the ability to monitor lamp failures and energy consumption. With respect to reducing carbon emissions they have the advantage of allowing the lamp to be dimmed to the required light level. This

avoids lamp selection for the worst case after taking into account factors such as lumen depreciation and soiling which can potentially result in a more than 120 per cent oversizing. A dimming profile can be set for a 24-hour period, dimming lamps during times of

low pedestrian and vehicular activity. A typical dimming profile can be expected to reduce energy consumption annually by 30 per cent 3. Onsite renewable generation Through a combination of energy efficiency and intelligent control, lighting energy consumption - and therefore operational carbon emissions - can be approximately halved. This

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emissions - can be approximately halved. This Page 23 www.e3bw.co.nz enquiries@e3bw.co.nz eCubed Building

emissions - can be approximately halved. This Page 23 www.e3bw.co.nz enquiries@e3bw.co.nz eCubed Building

emissions - can be approximately halved. This Page 23 www.e3bw.co.nz enquiries@e3bw.co.nz eCubed Building

emissions - can be approximately halved. This Page 23 www.e3bw.co.nz enquiries@e3bw.co.nz eCubed Building

emissions - can be approximately halved. This Page 23 www.e3bw.co.nz enquiries@e3bw.co.nz eCubed Building

emissions - can be approximately halved. This Page 23 www.e3bw.co.nz enquiries@e3bw.co.nz eCubed Building
emissions - can be approximately halved. This Page 23 www.e3bw.co.nz enquiries@e3bw.co.nz eCubed Building
emissions - can be approximately halved. This Page 23 www.e3bw.co.nz enquiries@e3bw.co.nz eCubed Building

www.e3bw.co.nz enquiries@e3bw.co.nz eCubed Building Workshop work with Southern Perspectives to provide sustainable energy

www.e3bw.co.nz

enquiries@e3bw.co.nz

eCubed Building Workshop work with Southern Perspectives to provide sustainable energy solutions to the building industry.

eCubed are a group of building services and ESD specialists. We integrate traditional mechanical and electrical services engineering design with new ideas to help create the latest trends in sustainable design. We aim to reduce energy and water use by 50% compared to a conventional solution.

Southern Perspectives are renewable energy engineers who specialise in solutions for the built environment.

are renewable energy engineers who specialise in solutions for the built environment. www.s-p.co.nz enquiries@s-p.co.nz
are renewable energy engineers who specialise in solutions for the built environment. www.s-p.co.nz enquiries@s-p.co.nz

www.s-p.co.nz

enquiries@s-p.co.nz

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NEW ZEALAND LOCAL GOVERNMENT - SUPPLEMENT

STREET LIGHTING

TECHNOLOGY SUPPLEMENT

2008/09

Kaikoura solar trial a success

T he problem of lighting areas where there is no access to mains power could be a thing of the past with a new generation of solar lights hitting the marketplace. Kaikoura District Council has just completed

trialling two Solar Stream lights and district planner Matt Hoggard says the lights have proved to perform differently to standard streetlights. “The light spill from them is not as great, so they are really good in areas where you don’t want a great deal of spill or especially in areas where there is no access to the mains,” he says. Mr Hoggard says that when he checked the lights with a standard light meter, he got readings of 9.1 lux directly underneath the solar lights as compared to 8.4 lux directly underneath a 70W sodium light. However, at a distance of 10 metres from the light, the reading was 0.9 lux for the solar light and 1.5 lux for the sodium bulb, making the solar lights ideal for areas where light is required to be concentrated on a specific area. “I think they are ideal for rural junctions, for example, or where there is a need for low light-spill,” Mr Hoggard says. “We have an issue here with shearwaters, a sea bird; too much light spill attracts the birds because they think the road surface is an area of water, so they land on the roads. Because they are seabirds, they are unable to get airborne again from the road surface and many get hit by traffic. The lights are based on simple technology, says Nicola Martin from Solar Bright, the company supplying the lights. The units consist of a 50-watt LED, a 150-watt solar panel and two 120 amp-hour batteries buried in the ground at the base of the lamps. “The LEDs drain very little power, so even when you get a few very overcast days in a row the lights still work,” she says. The fact that the technology is simple makes it easy to install as well, which is a plus for councils.” The trial was a success and the council is keeping the lights. “There is a lot of public support for solar lighting; people are comfortable with the idea these days,” Mr Hoggard says. “I don’t think they will replace standard streetlights just yet, because the cost is prohibitive at the moment; you’d need a lot more lights on a street to achieve the same level of lighting. However, as the technology improves I think that might change. It’s something we’re going to see more of and I think it’s a good move to investigate solar lighting.”

think it’s a good move to investigate solar lighting.” SOLAR POWERED STREET LIGHTING Solar Bright offer
think it’s a good move to investigate solar lighting.” SOLAR POWERED STREET LIGHTING Solar Bright offer
SOLAR POWERED STREET LIGHTING Solar Bright offer a range of lighting systems to suit everyone
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NEW ZEALAND LOCAL GOVERNMENT - SUPPLEMENT

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Waikato retrofitting trial a success A trial of energy efficient street lighting for South Waikato

Waikato retrofitting trial a success

A trial of energy efficient street lighting for South

Waikato District Council has shown strong

savings can be achieved by changing from old-

fashioned street lighting to new energy-efficient

models.

The initiative to trial these lights came partly from council wanting to trial energy-saving measures and from Odyssey Lighting being keen to test new lights in a real situation. Standard 150-watt high-pressure sodium (SOM) lights along Tokoroa’s Bridge Street were replaced by a mixture of lower wattage SON lamps, 160W metal halide lamps and Cosmopolis lamps of various strengths. Early results were impressive, says Odyssey’s David Raven, although he did point out that not all lights have been installed and the tested lights hadn’t achieved their full 100 hours bedding-in period when they were tested. Council officers and Odyssey are also awaiting input from councillors and police once all of the lights have been fitted. “We wanted to know could we use the existing infrastructure and just replace the luminaries, which would make it a much more viable option for the council,” Mr Raven says. “We’ve proved that the existing infrastructure can be used and now we are waiting for feedback from stakeholders on which sort of light they prefer. We’re also looking to trial LED

ABOUT MCKAY ELECTRICAL & INSTRUMENTATION McKay, established in 1936, is one of New Zealand’s largest
ABOUT MCKAY ELECTRICAL
& INSTRUMENTATION
McKay, established in 1936, is one of New Zealand’s
largest electrical engineering and contracting
companies, with a head office in Whangarei, and
branches in Warkworth, Kaikohe and Hamilton.
McKay strength lies in be able to undertake
most aspects of electrical contract work in house
including full electrical and control system design,
switchboard manufacture, electrical contracting,
and maintenance. McKay work across a variety of
industries including petrochemical, dairy, power,
marine, and infrastructure. McKay undertakes large
electrical installation projects and throughout New
Zealand, and across the world.
McKay has a strength in infrastructure support,
having a number of street light maintenance contracts
in Northland and the Waikato as well as significant
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Ph: +64 9 470 1910
Fax: +64 9 438 3429
Email: info@mckay.co.nz

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NEW ZEALAND LOCAL GOVERNMENT - SUPPLEMENT

8 NEW ZEALAND LOCAL GOVERNMENT - SUPPLEMENT lights at a later stage to see what the

lights at a later stage to see what the light looks like from those.” All of the old lighting was replaced with new “regular” lights prior to trialling the energy-efficient lights so as to ensure that like was compared with like. Key points from the initial trial are:

The new energy efficient lights could be retrofitted onto the existing infrastructure and still achieve cost and energy savings for council whilst complying to the lighting standard. Bridge Street in Tokoroa was chosen as it has a central median with mature trees and this causes irregular spacing of lights. This is important as it avoids a large capital cost for new infrastructure. The tested luminaires achieved a 33 per cent energy saving for the same compliant lighting levels with SON lamps, by replacing 150W lamps with 100W versions and new optics, which provided the same light at a lower energy cost. For CBD areas, the tested luminaires achieved a 9 per cent energy saving with greatly improved lighting levels and whiter light. “We still need to carry out a full cost benefit analysis to determine the payback period and also discuss these new lights with councillors and police,” Mr Raven says.

to determine the payback period and also discuss these new lights with councillors and police,” Mr

STREET LIGHTING

TECHNOLOGY SUPPLEMENT

2008/09

A new look at lighting costs

Congratulations to Waitakere City Council and their associates for their commitment and drive to organise the Streetlighting Forum and to focus local government’s attention on the opportunities to improve the efficiency and sustainability of their streetlighting assets.

T he introduction and uptake of new high output ‘sealed’

reflector technology streetlights has been stymied in

New Zealand by a lack of understanding of the new

technology’s benefits. When partnered with a ‘life

cycle cost-benefit’ approach rather than the current

first-cost principle approach to asset purchasing the benefits become clearly apparent. The high output reflector has the ability to deliver more light from the lantern; reduce the amount of light wastage (spill) and

concentrate the light on the road surface where it is required most. Power Solutions Ltd has discovered that with some new streetlighting products, by matching a new HID technology lamp with an optimised reflector it can significantly reduce lamp wattage, maximise light delivery and reduce energy consumption. There is also the added benefit of reduced maintenance costs that the new sealed optic technology brings. This cannot be ignored and when combined with the energy savings from reduced wattage lamps a more sustainable, energy efficient and environmentally friendly streetlighting design can be achieved by factoring the projected maintenance savings into the life cycle cost-benefit analysis and achieving significant energy and cost benefits over the 25-year life cycle of the asset. Power Solutions Ltd adopts a holistic approach to all designs. This approach ensures that key asset management fundamentals are incorporated into every design to optimise the spacings between luminaires. With the use of electronic software we are able to assess a number of different manufacturers’ products to ensure the most economic and sustainable solution is found. In every design it is of paramount importance to ensure that the correct road hierarchy is selected. The classification must reflect both traffic and pedestrian volumes and the individualise by road demographic to ensure the correct level of light is delivered

to meet the Local Government’s Code of Practice and AS/NZS

1158 suite of standards. Often overlooked in this process is local

government’s intimate knowledge of the area which combined

with the designer’s expertise gives a more appropriate and rational determination of road hierarchy.

A number of local government clients are currently enjoying the

of local government clients are currently enjoying the benefits of ongoing reduction in energy and maintenance
of local government clients are currently enjoying the benefits of ongoing reduction in energy and maintenance
of local government clients are currently enjoying the benefits of ongoing reduction in energy and maintenance
of local government clients are currently enjoying the benefits of ongoing reduction in energy and maintenance

benefits of ongoing reduction in energy and maintenance costs by this combination of smart reflector technology and design approach. For further information or details any of the new installation mentioned please contact Ray Wells of Power Solutions Ltd on

073498349.

PSL PowerSolutionsLimited Specialist Electrical and Energy Consultants • Streetlighting design, contract
PSL
PowerSolutionsLimited
Specialist Electrical and
Energy Consultants
• Streetlighting design, contract
management, cost benefit analysis
• Accredited Energy Auditors
• Energy & Facilities Management
• Electrical Industrial & Building
Services design
• Hazardous Area Design & Inspection
• Local Government Utilities design,
contract management
• Feasibility Studies & Concept
Development
Location:
The Business Hub
1209 Hinemaru Street
P.O. Box 691
ROTORUA
P: 07 349 8349
F: 07 347 8321
www.powersolutionsltd.co.nz

NEW ZEALAND LOCAL GOVERNMENT - SUPPLEMENT

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Lighting up the urban landscape By JOHN POTTER and JONATHAN WONG M ore than just

Lighting up the urban landscape

By JOHN POTTER and JONATHAN WONG

By JOHN POTTER and JONATHAN WONG

M ore than just transit routes, streets are pedestrian environments, supporting a wide range of pedestrian uses and activities by all sectors of society. Urban design principles have had a significant impact on the design

of the public realm where pedestrian needs and perceptions

are paramount in shaping the urban environment. Lighting design has progressed from its purely functional role of

meeting predefined lighting standards, to being an integral part of streetscape and public space design.

A number of considerations that need to be addressed by

urban designers and landscape architects working in the public realm and incorporating lighting design are discussed in this article. Lighting design is fundamental to creating “spaces, places and transport networks that are safer, with less crime and fear of crime” (The New Zealand Urban Design Protocol, 2005). It is also important in signalling community investment and improvement in an area (Welsh and Farrington, 2007) and is implicit in the Crime Prevention

Farrington, 2007) and is implicit in the Crime Prevention 10 NEW ZEALAND LOCAL GOVERNMENT - SUPPLEMENT

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Through Environmental Design (CPTED) best practices. Good lighting placement can overcome compromises in design, creating safe spaces. Careful placement of lighting fixtures, in combination with planting and street furniture can generate safer, and more versatile urban environments. This allows streets to become activated 24/7, increasing the range of available activities such as supporting alfresco dining, further contributing to a vibrant street and city environment and economy. In Nuffield Street, Newmarket, Auckland, lighting design and CPTED principles were used to transform this former back lane into a lively street precinct. Bars, eateries and retail boutiques create active edges providing passive surveillance late into the night. The lighting elements were grouped with street furniture to reduce kerbside clutter to free up more usable space. Lighting is vital in defining a legible pedestrian environment. The recently completed Beach Road in Auckland’s CBD, the streetscape lighting upgrade used multi function poles to lessen street clutter whilst improving visibility at bus stops and intersections. White (metal halide); reduced-glare lamps, consistent with Auckland City Council’s lighting policy for areas of heavy pedestrian traffic were installed to create a more natural, safer street appearance. An added benefit of the lamps is that they are energy efficient. The simple, elegant rhythm of columns along Beach Road, unifies the street, and differentiates the pedestrian thoroughfare from the built realm. Appropriate lighting design, can reveal the diversity and magic of a place. Through the form and composition combined with careful selection of type and intensity, designers can skillfully create spaces with ambiance. Specific features can be highlighted to create a real ‘sense of place’. In Nuffield Street, up lighters at the base of the street trees and fairy lights within the trees along with the distinctive façade lighting to create a magical quality that generates a festive spirit well into the night. Street lighting need not be confined to a functional ‘pole’. Along with street furniture and site specific lighting fixtures, landscape architects can combine elements to capitalise on design cues. In Whangaporoa town centre, the striking slimline street lights are more akin to art form; they collectively provide a distinctive counterpoint to the adjacent built form, defining the centre’s identity, and help to integrate the centre’s disparate buildings. A further example is part of the realignment of Wellington’s Evans Bay Parade, as part of Wellington’s urban coastline. The lights, encased in wooden pillars, make reference to an old graving dock that used to operate within the bay. Lighting has a key role in urban design practice; it fulfils the fundamental personal need to feel safe, while at the same time reflecting and enhancing the distinctiveness of the urban environment. John Potter – principal / landscape architect, and Jonathan Wong, urban designer, Boffa Miskell Ltd.

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Accelerating the uptake of efficient street lighting

W ith more than 330,000

street lights in New

Zealand, running

for more than 4000

hours each per year,

streetlighting consumes a significant amount of electricity. At around $18 million per year this is a major cost for ratepayers. The New Zealand Efficient Lighting Strategy (2008 – 2010) highlights the significant economic and environmental gains to be made through the adoption of more efficient lighting (including streetlighting) technology. The principal objective of the Strategy is to “strengthen naturally occurring, market delivered efficiency through interventions that remove barriers to technologically and economically viable efficient lighting opportunities”. It identifies the need to eliminate inefficient street lighting installations as one of six strategic goals and sets a pathway to accelerate the uptake of efficient technology. With a key role to promote and facilitate electricity efficiency, and a brief to fund programmes that provide incentives for cost-effective electricity efficiency, the potential savings from efficient streetlighting is certainly of interest to the Electricity Commission. From an investment perspective, the commission has an obligation to achieve electricity savings at the least cost, which means potential streetlighting initiatives

must be ranked against other investment options such as compact fluorescent lamps and more efficient halogen lamps. The extent to which the commission can commit funding is at a level at which the resulting energy savings make the investment economical (i.e. where the cost of achieving the savings is less than the cost of building new electricity generation plant). Energy-efficient streetlighting installations have multiple benefits for councils and communities beyond the obvious energy, maintenance and cost savings. These include improved lighting levels and visibility (which encourages people to undertake activities at night), greater safety (through improved visibility) and reductions in crime.

Although there is significant scope for local authorities to improve street lighting efficiency and save money (and while the other benefits can make it worthwhile economically and otherwise for councils to upgrade their networks) a number of barriers limit the ability to tap into these savings opportunities.

A Theme Audit of Streetlighting

published by the New Zealand Transport

Agency (NZTA) in 2007 identified some

of these barriers and also recommended

that the NZTA, Local Government New Zealand (LGNZ) and the commission

to work together to address some of the

issues and barriers identified. Earlier this year the commission

formed a street lighting working group including representatives from the New Zealand Lighting Council, NZTA, LGNZ, the Energy Efficiency Conservation Authority, and several councils. This collaborative approach (which drew

from the outcomes of the NZTA Theme Audit) has been instrumental in further defining the operational challenges and issues facing councils and key barriers to the uptake of efficient streetlighting, and identifying initiatives to address those barriers. Some of the key barriers identified include: knowledge of and information on streetlighting technologies; organisational structures; split incentives between developers and councils; procurement/ regulatory policies; stockpiles of low- efficiency mercury vapour lamps (encouraged by the retention of like- for-like replacement policies); tariff structures; un-metered streetlighting; existing infrastructure; funding/access to capital, and a focus on upfront capital cost. While it is possible to address some of these barriers (such as information) through targeted initiatives, others, (such as tariffs) are structural in nature and would require a carefully co-ordinated approach and significant investment of time and resources to resolve. Based on the outputs of the street lighting working group, the commission recently ran a closed tender for the development

of a comprehensive street

Page 23

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Council lights out on new paths L ighting Council New Zealand is the peak body

Council lights out on new paths

L ighting Council New Zealand is the peak body

of the lighting industry. It was formed in 2003 to

represent the interests of the industry in response

to anticipated changes within the building industry

due to impending revisions of the Building Code and

environmental and sustainability legislation. New Zealand has a reputation for embracing new technology and adapting it to suit local conditions. Lighting has been no exception and over the last 40 or so years the country has been well served by the industry despite import restrictions that were lifted only in the last two decades, and the demands made by what is, in world terms, a very small but relatively sophisticated market. As a socially responsible industry we saw the need for this new technology not only to be encouraged, but encouraged wisely. Lighting has long been recognised as both a science and an art and a broad education programme was seen a key to the future. As a result the industry has for many years supported an internationally recognised professional education programme conducted under the auspices of the Illuminating Engineering Society of Australia and New Zealand. Courses are run in reputable tertiary institutions in Auckland and Christchurch, allowing trade and graduate students to gain the theoretical

allowing trade and graduate students to gain the theoretical 12 NEW ZEALAND LOCAL GOVERNMENT - SUPPLEMENT
allowing trade and graduate students to gain the theoretical 12 NEW ZEALAND LOCAL GOVERNMENT - SUPPLEMENT
allowing trade and graduate students to gain the theoretical 12 NEW ZEALAND LOCAL GOVERNMENT - SUPPLEMENT

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NEW ZEALAND LOCAL GOVERNMENT - SUPPLEMENT

knowledge and skills required to undertake high-quality lighting design. This has been coupled with the traditional Kiwi “can do” attitude to practical matters to produce work that is consistently recognised to be of a high international standard. In the last five years members of Lighting Council and their technical staff have participated in committees concerned with lighting and safety standards covering general lighting requirements, emergency lighting, street and pedestrian lighting, electrical load limitations on commercial buildings and appliance safety and environmental issues. This has all taken place against a backdrop of closer technical links and standardisation with other markets, particularly Australia and also with Europe and Asian jurisdictions. To this end Memoranda of Understanding have been signed with LCA, the Lighting Council Australia and the Chinese Association of Lighting Industries. Council also has close links with the Lighting Industry Federation in the UK and many other similar organisations in Europe. It is also represented on the peak International Standards body, the IEC. Lighting Council members recognise the very complex nature of public lighting infrastructure. It suffers, as do many other parts of the lighting industry, from a division of responsibilities for capital and the ongoing power and maintenance costs to different cost centres, thereby making incentivisation of more cost effective, new technology installations a complex issue. This is particularly so for the existing installations which have many years to run to realise their twenty or twenty five year economic operational period. However there are considerable opportunities for new technology and products to be introduced on greenfield sites and city upgrade projects. Some authorities have already taken some steps in this direction with their upgrade plans, and have also taken up trials of new technology in small urban areas for the purpose of evaluating public lighting costs for the future. These moves are entirely in keeping with overseas authorities where the new technology has been introduced in city beautification projects and other areas where good public lighting can provide increased safety to residents or for the attraction of tourism with the floodlighting of public buildings. Some of these trials have been running long enough now to get realistic positive data on the very important running cost factors which represent by the largest proportion of the lifetime cost of any lighting installation. Members of LCNZ welcome the initiatives taken by some TAs to adopt new products and are actively involved in providing lighting equipment for projects including light sources as well as luminaires. Today, specifiers and clients in this market can gain access to all the major international technology available in the knowledge that local support at a very high technical level is available in New Zealand. Lighting Council can be contacted with regard to industry participation in energy management issues and the upcoming legislation on lamp and hardware recycling programmes. Council members have been involved with government departments in the run-up to the release of RFPs on energy initiatives, and the possible outcomes of the recent legislation on waste minimisation.

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Saving energy – it’s in the air

C ompressed air is often considered industry’s “fourth utility” (behind fuel, electricity and water), and is generally the most expensive. It consumes up to 20 per cent of industrial electricity usage, of which 20 to 40 per cent is

often wasted in avoidable inefficiencies. As businesses around the country continue to look for additional ways to cut costs in times of high power and fuel

prices, a new initiative by the Electricity Commission will help users of compressed air identify operational and energy saving opportunities. The Compressed Air Systems (CAS) Auditor Accreditation Scheme was launched by the Electricity Commission in July

2008.

The Scheme emerged from studies of compressed air systems management in New Zealand, which identified a scarcity of compressed air expertise independent of the compressed air equipment industry. The commission considered that to be a significant barrier to businesses seeking advice on compressed air systems best practice design and operation. Through a CAS stakeholder group that included representatives from the compressed air equipment industry and compressed air users, the commission developed the scheme to independently ‘accredit’ compressed air systems auditors. CAS stakeholder group members and the commission determined that compressed air audit recommendations would be more credible, and follow-up efficiency actions be more likely to proceed, if the CAS auditors operated according to an independent standard and were accredited by an independent body. Long-time practitioner in the compressed air industry and technical advisor to the Electricity Commission Mike Allen said: “This scheme is a welcome initiative. It’s long overdue, to be honest. On an individual site level, a systematic CAS audit can identify some attractive savings - many of them free or involving low cost measures. On a national level, if recommendations from the audits are implemented, the savings could be significant.” The CAS auditing guidelines and reporting standard on which the scheme is based has been developed by the commission and the CAS stakeholder group, and is being maintained by the commission. The standard requires a total system approach CAS auditing and a focus on identifying cost-effective solutions.

To be accredited under the scheme, an auditor must have satisfactorily completed an approved CAS Education course and demonstrate practical capability in CAS auditing according to the standard referred to above. Completion of the CAS education course (provided by the University of Waikato) is a prerequisite of applying for accreditation. Dr James Neale, course facilitator at the University of Waikato said: “The most positive outcome from this whole process will be the raised awareness of the specialised skills required to design, operate and maintain a CAS at or near best practice standards. System auditors require a specialised understanding

of what can actually be a complex process that is too often trivialized at the detriment of energy efficiency and life cycle costs.” The CAS Auditor Accreditation Scheme is administered by the Energy Management Association of New Zealand (EMANZ). Erin Roughton, spokesperson for EMANZ said: “This initiative is timely. Saving energy and using energy more efficiently is a key issue for many of today’s businesses. EMANZ is delighted to be involved in this initiative given our broader experience through the Energy Auditor Scheme that we established some years ago. The most effective way to identify savings is from an audit undertaken by a reputable auditor. The scheme is a good fit for us as an association

– there are many synergies. Standards are high and that’s what industry can expect from this scheme. We have received several applications for accreditation so far and look forward to receiving even more.” To encourage New Zealand industry and the CAS auditors to be more active in pursuing compressed air systems efficiency, the Electricity Commission is currently also funding CAS audits for larger New Zealand compressed air users. In the near future, only CAS auditor accreditation will be funded by the Commission. Further details about all aspects of the scheme including the process to become an accredited CAS auditor, the costs involved, and details about the education course can be found at www.compressedairaudit.org.nz Additional information is also available from:

Connie Crookshanks, provisional scheme administrator, EMANZ 027 472 8038 or connie@ compressedairaudit.org.nz Dr James Neale, course facilitator, Energy Research Group, University of Waikato 0272 555 659 or jamesn@ waikato.ac.nz Amanda Hunt, programme systems co-ordinator, Electricity Commission 04 471 8632 or amanda.hunt@ electricitycommission.govt.nz

Commission 04 471 8632 or amanda.hunt@ electricitycommission.govt.nz NEW ZEALAND LOCAL GOVERNMENT - SUPPLEMENT 13

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Lighting pathways - streetlighting and the NZ Transport Agency By JULIAN CHISNALL S treetlighting is

Lighting pathways - streetlighting and the NZ Transport Agency

By JULIAN CHISNALL

By JULIAN CHISNALL

S treetlighting is an area with potential for gains in both efficiency and safety through the progressive introduction

of newer technologies. However, it is essential to ensure that during any push for efficiency or environmental sustainability in streetlighting, the provision of appropriate levels of lighting is not forgotten. Many existing lighting installations fall below the lighting levels prescribed in the current standard (AS/NZS1158). One of the benefits of newer lighting technologies is they can provide more light to areas that require it, for the same or less cost. If streetlighting is improved, this will be beneficial for both provider and user. As a funder of transport activities, the NZ Transport Agency (the NZTA) takes an active interest in the maintenance and upgrading of existing and new infrastructure installations. We recognise that there are barriers to the implementation of new technologies, and we want to do our part to assist asset managers in their decision-making. Several concerns have arisen from observations during recent procedural audits and technical reviews, including supply agreement irregularities, continued use of obsolete technologies, increasing interest in new technologies and their uptake, and concerns about councils’ ability to provide appropriate lighting to achieve safe and secure

networks while still reducing energy consumption . Obviously both capital and maintenance expenditure are key considerations for councils, so any opportunity to improve standards for the same or less cost is of interest. In order to assess the contribution provided by councils’ street lighting installations and management towards meeting the outcomes of the NZ Transport Strategy (NZTS), and determine if there was any need to make changes to standards, guidelines and processes at national and council level, a theme audit was programmed. Twenty local authorities were approached and data was gathered to assess the management practices and standards of their streetlighting infrastructure, in relation to meeting the outcomes of the NZTS. In November 2007, the findings of the Theme Audit of Streetlighting (2007) were published. The theme audit concluded that streetlighting contributes towards four of the five objectives of the NZTS: assisting safety and personal security; improving access and mobility; protecting and promoting public health; and ensuring environmental sustainability. Further, it was found that there is a general need to enhance skill levels and knowledge in street lighting technology. Tariff structures and fault repair agreements were two areas where joint action by the NZTA, Local Government New Zealand, and the Electricity Commission was identified as a means to effect change.

One third of the councils surveyed were charged for street lighting energy supply on an annual lump sum cost basis. Such a structure offers little incentive for councils (or energy suppliers) to invest in improving the energy efficiency of their infrastructure. This aspect was outside the scope of the theme audit, but has been a topic of further discussion. Many councils commented on delays in getting repairs made to underground streetlighting cables. The reported average outage from cable faults was 32 days. This is unacceptably high, with unlit streets risking the safety and security of users and leaving councils unable to meet community level of service expectations. A number of councils commented that they have no direct relationship with network companies and that these companies are reluctant to enter into service agreements. As with tariff structures, the issues surrounding supply infrastructure were outside the original audit scope, but have been discussed subsequently. The principal types of lamp in use are high pressure sodium (76 per cent of total stocks) with older technologies, mercury vapour (15 per cent) and fluorescent (5 per cent), the other significant types. Some councils have significant stocks of these outmoded lamps. In some instances programmes to upgrade these to more modern types of lights are unrealistically long. Fittings at the end of their working lives become unreliable, causing unpredictable demands on maintenance programmes.

unreliable, causing unpredictable demands on maintenance programmes. 14 NEW ZEALAND LOCAL GOVERNMENT - SUPPLEMENT

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Present-day pressures are to improve the efficiency of lamps, both as light producers and for environmental reasons. Changing mercury vapour and fluorescent lamps to more efficient and effective lamps that will provide much better levels of service to the public is a desirable outcome. Street lighting inventories are not as complete or as well verified as the inventories for pavement assets. This is despite the capability to store (and manipulate) streetlight data being available in the various asset management systems in use, and a general acknowledgement that councils should hold accurate inventories for asset valuation purposes. The report made a number of recommendations and suggestions to both councils and the NZTA. For councils:

include lighting deficiencies in safety management system (SMS) deficiency databases or Asset Management Plan processes;

require a statement of design compliance for new installations similar to that specified in AS/ NZS 1158 “Road Lighting” before handover; and

ensure renewals programmes are realistically based in relation to stocks of outmoded lamps and the deterioration of old fittings.

In addition, the report supported councils:

considering the adoption of a lighting strategy document in line with the requirements of AS/NZS 1158;

considering the use of “white” lights to floodlight pedestrian crossings; and

adopting a design life of 20-30 years

for assessing “whole of life costs” of installations. For the NZTA:

foster the development and establishment of introductory and refresher level courses in street lighting standards and technology, for both asset management and urban planning disciplines; and

discuss the issues raised in the report

with Local Government NZ with a view to initiating joint action to obtaining better levels of service from suppliers and for users. Subsequent to the theme audit,

STREET LIGHTING

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theme audit, STREET LIGHTING TECHNOLOGY SUPPLEMENT 2008/09 discussions have been held with a number of organisations

discussions have been held with a number of organisations to disseminate the findings. Mike Jackett, an independent consultant who conducts training on the street lighting standards for NZIHT, advised on the audit. Mike, along with Graeme Culling of Betacom, is using the recommendations and suggestions from the audit in the NZIHT training courses. Both are also members of the review group for the AS/NZS 1158 (Streetlighting standard). The findings are being used to inform discussion around future amendment of the standard and the implications for industry and local/central government. The review findings have been discussed with Stuart Ross (Electricity Commission) and Geoff Swainson (Local Government NZ). Earlier this year, Julian Chisnall (NZTA Technical Audit Manager) and Rob Merrifield (author of the audit report) joined a small industry working group coordinated by the Electricity Commission. The group has been working through the issues raised by the theme audit and subsequent discussion. As a key issue is the likely cost of adopting the newer technologies, NZTA is keen to see information on whole-of- life costing being made available to allow asset managers to make robust long- term decisions around the maintenance and upgrading of their streetlighting infrastructure. NZTA was heartened by the impressive turnout to the September streetlighting

seminar hosted by Waitakere City Council, where a number of newer technologies were showcased and two recent installations were visited on a night tour. This event clearly indicated the level of interest in the issues identified during the theme audit. There was much discussion during the seminar and it was great to see all parties freely discussing their views and opinions. It was obvious to most who attended that a half day discussion was only a taste of things to come. As with all new technologies, there may be some elements of overambitious marketing or fragility of supply which may taint the particular technology. Early adopters may encounter problems that need to be worked through in relation to costs, design considerations, maintenance procedures etc. The NZTA would encourage discussion of any issues through case studies or presentations at fora such as the RCA Forum, Ingenium, TRAFINZ etc to ensure that any learnings are passed on for the benefit of the industry. In the long-term, the adoption of cost effective and environmentally affordable lighting systems will improve the transportation network for all users and ensure that the objectives of the NZTS are met. A copy of the theme audit report can be obtained from the NZ Transport Agency’s Smartmovez website (www.smartmovez. org.nz). Julian Chisnall – technical audit manager, NZ Transport Agency

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Keeping New Zealand in the dark 16 By STEVE BUTLER I t is almost impossible
Keeping New Zealand in the dark
Keeping New Zealand
in the dark

16

By STEVE BUTLER

By STEVE BUTLER

I t is almost impossible for most of us to imagine the time, long before the invention of the light bulb, when the stars were bright enough to cast shadows. Nobody wants to go back

to dark alleyways, but we also know that artificial light can pollute as well as illuminate. Scientists are only now studying how

perpetual twilight affects the lives of birds and other animals, but there is no doubt that a clear, starry night has become a diminishing human pleasure. Over the past hundred years the natural patterns of the planet’s day-night light cycles have been heavily modified, particularly in urban areas. A full moon at night provides illumination levels of around one lux, with clear moonless nights reaching less than 0.001 lux, about a thousand times less. In sharp contrast, New Zealand streetlights can provide upwards of 25 lux.

Lighting practices have traditionally reduced initial capital investment by installing fewer, brighter luminaires which spill light as widely as possible across the area to be lit, and beyond.

Subsequent ongoing energy costs have not been of concern. This has led to wasteful conditions such as glare and light spill outside of the area to be lit, including upwards into the sky. Light spill is wasted energy. Two Japanese astronomers in the late 1990s estimated waste energy from light spill from many cities around the world by assessing satellite images. They estimated Auckland’s waste energy

at 5.73 GWh per year. These satellite

images were used to create the well known world at night photo, showing

the world’s urban areas spilling light into space.

A Street Lighting Energy Efficiency

Study in 2001 from the Energy Efficiency Conservation Authority (EECA) reports that 159 GWh is used by all territorial authorities to supply their streetlights.

NEW ZEALAND LOCAL GOVERNMENT - SUPPLEMENT

Work by the ICLEI-Local Governments for Sustainability-Australia/New Zealand in the South Australian Strategic Action Planning Guide for Sustainable Public Lighting estimates that 60 to 65 per cent savings can be made through the use of new technology lamps and luminaires that direct light to the required area. This would mean annual savings of around 98 GWh if all New Zealand streetlights were upgraded. But the benefits are greater yet. This 98GWh represents approximately 200GWh of fossil fuels that could remain in the ground each year as Ministry for Economic Development figures show that there are losses of at least 50 per cent from energy source to end user through the New Zealand’s national grid system. The greenhouse gas savings from this is equivalent to removing 26,000 light passenger vehicles from New Zealand roads. Astronomers initially filled the role of “canaries of the night” warning the all was not well in the night environment.

This warning has been taken up by other sectors including ecologists, human health researchers, energy advisors, and climate change campaigners. Supporters of the call for energy efficient and environmentally friendly lighting include:

International Energy Agency, International Dark-Sky Association, International Astronomical Union, European Union, UK Parliament, UNESCO as key agency for the International Year of Astronomy 2009 and its Dark Sky Awareness Cornerstone Project, Starlight Declaration of the International Conference in Defence of the Quality of Night Sky, and Electricity Commission, EECA and Lighting Council NZ with their NZ Efficient Lighting Strategy New techniques and shielding technologies can direct the more precise amounts of light to the area to be lit, while preventing unattractive glare and light spill. By using these new technologies, territorial authorities can not only achieve the standard of lighting required, but also use fewer poles and fittings and significantly reduce energy consumption and maintenance costs The RASNZ, as inaugural signatories to the New Zealand Urban Design Protocol, has been raising awareness of the value of the night environment. This includes supporting the Illuminating Engineering Society of New Zealand Lighting Awards. Over the past four years, the RASNZ has taken great pleasure in presenting three awards for lighting excellence. In 2006 the Ports of Auckland

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TECHNOLOGY SUPPLEMENT

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won the award when they replaced 1300 floodlights with 650 new environmentally friendly floodlights. These new highly efficient OptiVision lights by Philips Lighting resulted in 10 times less light spill and substantially less glare. The resulting electricity savings could power 400 average households for a year. The 2007 award was won for the Building 3 Post Office Precinct in Queenstown designed by Robert Warner and Stephen Page of Cosgrove Major Consulting Engineers, Christchurch. An excellent attempt has been made to tightly control the lighting; not only to enhance the beauty of the building but also to minimise light pollution and glare. The 2008 award was won by Paul Wilson of the Queenstown Lakes District Council and Andrew Wray of Modus Lighting for the Wanaka waterfront playground project. “The lantern matches our earlier style of pendant lantern but has significantly improved energy efficiency, glare control and protects the night sky from unwanted light spill,” Mr Wilson said. It is particularly pleasing to see two recent awards in the Queenstown Lakes District following the development of the Southern Light Strategy by QLDC. The council’s work on the Southern Light Strategy is well noted around the country and its determination to implement the strategy is appreciated. In the North Island, Waitakere City Council’s recent Advancing New Zealand’s Street Lighting Technologies forum is an excellent example of the leading thinking required to initiate change throughout New Zealand.

thinking required to initiate change throughout New Zealand. Further events are proposed to cover other aspects

Further events are proposed to cover other aspects of outdoor lighting. The RASNZ is pleased to see the technological changes that are occurring within the lighting industry, and is keen to see greater awareness amongst territorial authorities of the need to effectively manage the impacts of lighting on the night environment. All of us can be winners, financially, aesthetically and environmentally if new lighting technologies are applied with care and concern. Steve Butler – Royal Astronomical Society of New Zealand – DarkSkies Group; design champion – NZ Urban Design Protocol.

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NEW ZEALAND LOCAL GOVERNMENT - SUPPLEMENT

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CASE STUDY: Harper Avenue street lighting upgrade Harper Avenue is a significant arterial corridor in

CASE STUDY: Harper Avenue street lighting upgrade

Harper Avenue is a significant arterial corridor in Christchurch, linking northwestern suburbs to the central city and bisecting picturesque Hagley Park. Balancing high traffic volumes with a high profile made this a challenging project.

DESIG N+ENGIN E E RI NG

www.connetics.co.nz

PROJECT SCOPE

Connetics was appointed by the Christchurch City Council to undertake a full lighting upgrade on Harper Avenue. This included replacing older-style lights and poles with a system that meets current standards and performance requirements.

that meets current standards and performance requirements. Managing the logistics was also a challenge. As a

Managing the logistics was also a challenge. As a category V2 road, Harper Avenue carries some of the city’s highest traffic volumes.

SOLUTIONS

Connetics carried out straight-road and curve- road lighting calculations to ensure maximum spacing between lights while achieving full compliance. Computer modelling was backed up with on-site assessment and measurement.

The use of high-efficiency lighting technology achieved a dramatic reduction in energy use over several circuits. Most luminaires were reduced from 250 watts to 150 watts. With integrated control gear, these also provide significantly longer life and lower maintenance costs. On-site work was carried out in sections, with extra resources assigned to safety, lane control and traffic management.

RESULTS

The new lighting provides high standards of visibility for road users and enhanced the visual appeal of Harper Avenue as a prominent gateway to the central city. Trees, bridges and other features are well protected and illuminated, pedestrian lighting enhances public safety and parkside vistas have been retained.

Overall lighting levels are excellent with good uniformity, no obvious shadow areas and very little ‘zebra’ effect (alternating light/dark). The upgrade is also fully compliant with the City Council’s draft infrastructure design standard. Increased energy efficiency and high performance specifications have contributed to lower operational and maintenance costs.

“Connetics’ project management on this upgrade was excellent. They developed an appropriate and effective design, and carried out the installation to a high standard. This was a difficult site to design for and to work on, but Connetics’ expertise ensured our requirements were fully met. They resolved unforeseen problems quickly and kept us well informed at all stages throughout the project.”

Geoff English Asset Engineer, Christchurch City Council

The project was complicated by high traffic volumes, pedestrian usage and crossings, the presence of large trees on both sides, a narrow volumes, pedestrian usage and crossings, the presence of large trees on both sides, a narrow median, bridges, and complex intersections.

sides, a narrow median, bridges, and complex intersections. OUR RESPONSE Connetics’ role began with a comprehensive

OUR RESPONSE

Connetics’ role began with a comprehensive project assessment. Early in the design process we made a recommendation to retain the lighting system in the existing median strip to reduce the disruption of relocating trees and other infrastructure.

The Connetics team also managed the liaison with residents and stakeholders, made regular checks with the City Council, and gained necessary approvals from electricity network operator Orion. Connetics was also responsible for the initial 12-month maintenance period.

TECHNICAL CHALLENGES

Retaining the median location required existing cabling to be reused in existing locations. Some poles were also reused, while the location of new poles had to be carefully planned in relation to trees, bridges and other structures.

reused, while the location of new poles had to be carefully planned in relation to trees,
reused, while the location of new poles had to be carefully planned in relation to trees,

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Lighting a path ahead

G lobal climate change is one of the world’s biggest

challenges. How we generate and use energy

is a crucial part of the way we adapt to this

challenge. Energy efficiency and renewable

energy offer cost effective solutions to our climate

change problems. And they come with additional benefits – we lessen our impact on the environment, improve the health of our communities, develop more competitive businesses and demonstrate leadership, both here and overseas. Leadership needs to come from all quarters, including central and local government, if we are going to meet our emission reductions goals, and it is a role that is being taken seriously by both parties. New Zealand now has energy strategies that clearly define where we want to be and how we are going to get there. The New Zealand Energy Efficiency and Conservation Strategy (NZEECS), launched in October 2007, is the action plan to make the most of our energy efficiency and renewable energy opportunities. The strategy recognises that if we want to motivate and encourage change, the public sector need to lead by example by reducing their own energy use, and facilitating change in their communities. One of the ways that local authorities can reduce their own energy consumption is through the use of efficient street lighting. It is estimated that street lighting costs local authorities throughout New Zealand $18m per annum and generates over 25,000 tonnes of CO2 emissions. Earlier this year, the Electricity Commission formed the street lighting industry working group to look into ways of reducing the amount of electricity we use in this area. Government representatives and members of the lighting industry are working to understand all of the opportunities and what role new technologies might play. What they come up with will determine the next steps local government can take to start to realise the potential savings. Progress has already been made in some areas. In June 2007, the Sea Breeze residential subdivision in Whangamata, Coromandel was the first region in the southern hemisphere to install the ‘CosmoPolis’ white light system. These lights, manufactured by Phillips Lighting, use 10 per cent less energy than orange-glow high-pressure sodium lamps, whilst providing greater safety through better visibility. Since then Waitakere City Council has also installed more than 200 of these lights in part of their catchment area. In September 2008, Waitakere City Council hosted a day- long seminar “Advancing New Zealand’s Street Lighting Technologies” in recognition of the growing interest in this area. The support from Waitakere City Council for their peers is outstanding – it demonstrates that through working together and sharing our experiences on similar challenges we can realise the benefits of successful energy management sooner. Lighting technology is advancing quickly. Recently Auckland International Airport was awarded a grant to enable them to test and independently monitor LED lights in some of the airport’s car parks. It is expected that this project will reduce their CO2

emissions by 60,000 tonnes over the next 10 years. The Energy Efficiency and Conservation Authority (EECA) supports local government to achieve their energy efficiency targets. For the first time this financial year, local authorities are able to apply for grant funding for demonstration projects of

to apply for grant funding for demonstration projects of street lighting costs local authorities throughout New

street

lighting costs local

authorities throughout New

Zealand $18m per annum

local authorities throughout New Zealand $18m per annum new and underutilised energy efficiency technologies.

new and underutilised energy efficiency technologies. Street lighting projects that use a new technology that could be replicated by other councils could qualify under this grant programme. EECA also offers low-cost loans to local authorities and other Crown organisations to help energy efficiency projects get off the ground. This article has been supplied by the Energy Efficiency and Conservation Authority (www.eecabusiness.govt.nz 04 470 2220).

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NEW ZEALAND LOCAL GOVERNMENT - SUPPLEMENT

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The sustainability of streetlights in New Zealand By IAN SHEARER T he 340,000 streetlights in

The sustainability of streetlights in New Zealand

By IAN SHEARER

By IAN SHEARER

T he 340,000 streetlights in New Zealand use 148 million kWh of electricity, release around of 30,000 tonnes of carbon dioxide, and cost local government and the New Zealand Transport Agency (NZTA) more than $20m in energy and

network charges per year. The potential for energy efficiency and greenhouse gas (GHG) savings from new streetlighting technologies and operating regimes is substantial. This article reviews the development and operation of the ICLEI Oceania coordinated Sustainable Public Lighting (SPL) programme in Australia, and recommends the implementation of a similar programme for New Zealand. ICLEI - Local Governments for Sustainability is an international association of local authorities that have made a commitment to sustainable development. Worldwide, ICLEI has nearly 1000 local government members, and

ICLEI has nearly 1000 local government members, and 20 NEW ZEALAND LOCAL GOVERNMENT - SUPPLEMENT many

20

NEW ZEALAND LOCAL GOVERNMENT - SUPPLEMENT

many more councils participate in a large number of sustainability programmes. ICLEI Oceania operates in our region through separate not-for-profit companies in Australia and New Zealand. ICLEI Oceania supports councils with the Communities for Climate Protection – New Zealand programme with funding from the Ministry for the Environment. That programme is part

of ICLEI’s international Cities for Climate Protection Campaign. Reviews of barriers to the implementation of new, more energy efficient streetlighting technologies and operating techniques have been produced for the Energy Efficiency and Conservation Authority (EECA) and the Electricity Commission. The “New Zealand Efficient Lighting Strategy”, developed by a joint industry- government working group, includes some street lighting elements, but involved little local government input. Standards organisations in Australia and New Zealand are considering changes to the current A/NZ 1158 streetlight standard. Minimum energy performance aspects are being considered. However, it is the new European Union energy efficiency standards that are likely to drive the future regulatory environment for streetlights in New Zealand. Streetlighting contributes to many outcome areas of the New Zealand Transport Strategy including:

Assisting safety and personal security Improving access and mobility Protecting and promoting public health, and Ensuring environmental sustainability. However, an NZTA review noted that streetlight electricity tariff structures were confusing, inconsistent, and a disincentive to energy efficiency; that there were difficulties in working with network companies; that some councils have significant stocks of obsolete luminaires; and that streetlighting inventories are not as complete or as well-verified as inventories for pavements. At present, almost all streetlights in New Zealand are fed from un-metered supplies and the electricity usage is charged on an estimated load basis. Thirty per cent of councils are charged for streetlighting energy and network services on an annual lump sum cost basis. The inability to measure actual loads and establish load profiles and then measure and validate savings from the introduction of new technologies or control approaches is a major barrier to implementation of improvements. Regulatory barriers to the acceptance of advanced streetlight dimming control systems and software-based energy metering systems, which are available in Europe,

have not yet been solved.

Page 22

and software-based energy metering systems, which are available in Europe, have not yet been solved. P

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TECHNOLOGY SUPPLEMENT

2008/09

A sustainable fund for efficient streetlighting

Photo by Allan Lee
Photo by Allan Lee
By BILL HEAPS

By BILL HEAPS

I n today’s financial climate, capital for infrastructure investment projects is likely to be more difficult to source and, in tighter economic conditions, budget constraints add further

difficulties. On the other hand, private investors are seeking opportunities that provide low risk and good security for their funds. From an environmental perspective, the world’s economic woes may mean reduced appetites to fund energy efficiency projects that reduce carbon emissions. This is because such projects tend to be diverse and have difficulty defining and delivering measurable returns. One type of investment opportunity that has the potential to resolve all the above issues and provide improved infrastructure for communities is streetlighting. It is possible to combine both public and private investment capital to upgrade our aging street lighting infrastructure and provide good returns through the savings realised by reduced energy and maintenance costs. The barriers to investment in efficient streetlighting can be categorised as arising from technological, policy or financial issues. In the technological category, the lighting industry is rapidly developing new lighting hardware and lighting controls that are largely addressing many of the technological barriers. Solutions are being proposed that will overcome the metering and fixed charge barriers. TLAs now need to think creatively and develop policy frameworks that will encourage innovation and investment in infrastructure. Introducing frameworks that will enable private investment in TLA owned infrastructure projects will present real opportunities for communities to benefit from improved services with a lower impact on rates. The proposition is that, for efficient streetlighting, a new type of funding

mechanism can be developed. This mechanism will enable both public and private funding to be used with returns generated from energy and cost

efficiencies. This type of capital funding removes the requirement for efficiency projects to compete with others for a share of the TLA capital budget and produces a secure, long-term investment for superannuation and other low risk schemes. The proposed funding mechanism would be:

1. focused only on streetlighting;

2. designed to attract new funding into the market;

3. appeal to long term low risk and ‘green’ investors; and

4. produce secure returns as a result of long-term contracts with TLAs and the ongoing requirement for street lighting

Establishing such a funding mechanism for streetlighting would allow TLAs to

carry out the streetlighting investments

in a systematic way using the most

efficient technology on the market whilst

at the same time, achieving modern

lighting standards for the community. Repayments to investors are made through the energy and other cost savings that are made over an initial contract period. Essentially, the TLA agrees to pay the running costs that it would have incurred had the investment not been made and the difference between this and the actual (reduced) costs repay the

capital and provide interest to investors. After the capital has been repaid via the savings, the TLA will receive the full ongoing benefits of the reduced costs.

A combination of TLA and private

investors provide a sustainable fund which is then used to finance efficient streetlighting projects that meet the fund’s criteria. Through aggregation of several projects, economies of scale and improved purchasing can be obtained. Cashflows from energy efficiency and other cost savings are used to provide returns to investors and, if appropriate, provide bonuses to participants (e.g. designers and suppliers). Other sources of

funding that assist these types of projects may be available from government agencies such as EECA and the Electricity Commission. The structure of the fund may also allow for a positive balance to be generated and retained, allowing the fund to grow and finance an increasing number of projects. The Sustainable Capital Company is currently developing a proposal for TLAs to investigate the options and structures that could form the basis for the sustainable fund. At this stage, it is intended that an initial group of TLAs that are committed to working together to find a financial solution to efficient lighting investment will be identified. The TLA group would work with the Sustainable Capital Company and interested lighting industry participants to develop a framework for the fund. Pilot projects would then be identified and an investment prospectus developed. Following the establishment and operation of a number of pilot projects, it would be possible to undertake a national rollout of the sustainable fund. Public and private funding of infrastructure projects provides solutions to the current financial issues facing TLAs and investors. Streetlighting technology provides significant opportunities to create wealth and have a positive environmental impact. Policy changes and new approaches may be required to overcome barriers to innovative new means of financing projects. The creation of sustainable fund type mechanisms for financing infrastructure projects may provide an important pathway for TLAs. New efficient street lighting technology looks to be an ideal candidate for developing and road testing the sustainable funds concept. Bill Heaps – managing director, Strata Energy Limited; director, the Sustainable Capital Company. TLAs interested in becoming one of the initial group can contact Mark Copsey of the Sustainable Capital Company on 0274 212 335.

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22 Page 20 Public Lighting in Australia In Australia, public lighting energy use has grown

22

Page 20

22 Page 20 Public Lighting in Australia In Australia, public lighting energy use has grown 45

Public Lighting in Australia

In Australia, public lighting energy use has grown 45 per cent over the past 14 years and it produces approximately 1.15 megatonne of CO2 per year (Poulton et. al, 2005). On average, it

is the second largest source of local

government corporate GHG emissions, accounting for about one third of councils’ corporate greenhouse gas emissions (but up to 70 per cent in some cases) and one third of their electricity bill. Streetlight electricity costs Australian local government more than $A100 million per annum.

Australian CCP councils’ average annual corporate GHG emissions

Research by the Australian Government indicated that reductions of up to 65 per cent in energy consumption

were possible without compromising public safety or aesthetics (Poulton et. al, 2005). Despite this significant abatement potential, and many individual projects undertaken by councils, the uptake of new technologies and practices has been limited. Only one council has successfully retrofitted its entire public lighting stock (Coffs Harbour City Council, NSW in 2005).

A review recommended the

establishment of a Sustainable Public Lighting (SPL) programme to deal with the barriers. The three main barriers were market and regulatory barriers; limited local government capacity; and poor coordination of existing efforts. Streetlight services in Australia are generally funded by councils but electricity distribution businesses own and control the assets. Distribution company barriers included unfamiliarity with new SPL products, entrenched attitudes and behaviour, and upheavals in management and ownership regimes. Local authorities often lacked the information, skills and resources to participate effectively in dialogues and contract negotiations with distribution businesses about public lighting.

The market/regulatory and local government capacity barriers were also exacerbated by a diffusion of information on appropriate resources. Technical research and information dissemination was uncoordinated and poorly funded, and it was difficult for councils to access the up-to-date and detailed data required for decision- making.

The Australian Sustainable Public Lighting Toolbox

Since 2003, ICLEI Oceania had been helping Australian councils complete street lighting projects as part of the Cities for Climate Protection programme. This experience was captured and developed further when the Australian Federal Government contracted ICLEI Oceania to develop the Australian Sustainable Public Lighting Toolbox, and make those resources freely available to all councils on the web (http://www.iclei.

org/?id=2474).

The main resources available through the Australian SPL toolbox include:

Public lighting calculator, showing energy and greenhouse savings from changing a council’s existing lighting stock with different efficiency options

Guides, tools and templates for creating action plans.

A developers’ guideline and checklist,

and a developers’ guide to solar public

lighting. Model streetlighting community survey forms.

Innovative streetlighting policies, as examples. Reports and case studies, and

A free technical Q&A service for public

lighting queries.

Important lessons for New Zealand

The potential for significant savings

of energy, GHG emissions and dollars

from improvements to streetlighting system should be a strong focus for New Zealand councils. Experience from the

work of leading Australian councils in the sustainable public lighting

NEW ZEALAND LOCAL GOVERNMENT - SUPPLEMENT

programme confirms that these savings are easier and more cost effective to achieve through collective action. The development of a sustainable public lighting programme for councils in New Zealand should incorporate the following key elements. It should:

Be structured to establish inventories, goals and action plans. Provide advice on council management structures that clarify and consolidate asset and data management, technical understanding and capacity. Incorporate sustainable public lighting strategies, policies and guidelines. Provide guidelines for engaging the community and developers in the planning and design of new installations for council-owned lighting. Build the business case to garner senior management and council support for broader changeovers. Establish national or regional action groups of councils and other stakeholders to share technical options and strategic barriers. Facilitate the working together to implement trials, undertake tariff negotiations, advocacy, research and/or financial modelling. Facilitate the development of large- scale project models for financing and bulk procurement, the establishment of revolving energy funds, and investigate energy performance contracting opportunities. Australian and New Zealand streetlighting standards are the same and the actual technologies used and the design requirements are similar, but the asset management processes used and the ownership of public lighting are different. Much of the information and tools in the Australian SPL Toolbox could be converted and modified for use in New Zealand. ICLEI Oceania would welcome the opportunity to work with local and central government and the street lighting industry to make this happen for New Zealand. Ian Shearer – FIPENZ, ICLEI Oceania’s programme coordinator for the Communities for Climate Protection – New Zealand.

STREET LIGHTING

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STREET LIGHTING TECHNOLOGY SUPPLEMENT 2008/09 Page 6 is an excellent outcome by any measure. To go

Page 6

STREET LIGHTING TECHNOLOGY SUPPLEMENT 2008/09 Page 6 is an excellent outcome by any measure. To go

is an excellent outcome by any

measure. To go further however and achieve the goal of carbon-neutral lighting, zero carbon electricity is required. There are a number of ways to achieve this, to generate on site at the proposed street lighting location small scale renewable energy technologies can be used. Most street lighting installations will have ready access to a grid connection. Utilising grid connect inverters generated energy can be fed directly into the grid avoiding the need for storage, e.g. batteries (and associated cost and maintenance). Grid supply can meet the peak energy demand requirements meaning that the renewable energy system can be optimised to generate the average energy consumption of the lighting installation. Energy generated when renewables

resources are available (e.g. sunlight during the day) can fed to the grid gaining CO2 credits. These credits offset the use of “dirty” electricity that is used for lighting at times when energy from renewable sources is not available. As the majority of street lighting is in urban areas photovoltaics (PV) are generally most suited small scale renewable generation technology. Small wind turbines are the other option but often have low energy yields in built up areas due to low average wind speeds and high turbulence. They also have greater maintenance requirements. For a hypothetical installation with 3.6 km of road, 170 square metres of crystalline PV would generate the 24 MWh of electricity required by the energy efficient lighting installation on an annual basis (based on Auckland irradiance

levels). Approximately 50 square metres of PV per kilometre of road. This is a very small area given the huge amount of roof space on buildings in New Zealand. Where possible the roof space of public buildings and structures could be used. Alternatively roof leases are a common mechanism used international to secure un-utilised private roof space for energy generation. At present solar PV technologies are an expensive means of generating electricity, with poor paybacks. Combined with energy efficiency measures this approach to carbon neutral lighting does however have paybacks well within the life of the system and a positive return on investment. Shay Brazier – Southern Perspectives and Dugan Doherty – e Cubed Building Workshop.

Page 11

lighting resource kit and aand Dugan Doherty – e Cubed Building Workshop. Page 11 universal streetlighting infrastructure design standard

universal streetlighting infrastructure design standard (IDS) which are to be rolled out to all councils in 2009 by way of a structured promotion, education and training programme. This programme will target the information barrier as a priority, as well as barriers relating to split incentives, procurement/regulatory policies and the focus on up-front capital cost. The resource kit is intended to provide councils with resources on available street lighting technologies, as well as tools to compare new technologies and assess the benefits, develop street lighting policies that incorporate relevant electricity efficiency considerations, and present robust business cases for network upgrades. The IDS, which will set universal, standard specifications

for new installations, will help ensure new installations deliver high quality light output while minimising electricity consumption. While this will support councils to achieve their energy efficiency targets, other barriers, such as mercury vapour lamps, tariff structures, and un-metered street lighting may limit the savings that can be achieved. More work is required to determine the extent of mercury vapour lamps within street lighting networks and in council stockpiles, better understand tariff structure constraints across councils, and investigate metering and billing opportunities to allow councils to receive the electricity savings and financial benefits that modern street lighting control systems can provide. The outcome of this further work will inform

potential future programmes. Attendance and industry participation at the Waitakere City Council’s September street lighting forum “Advancing New Zealand’s Streetlighting technologies” highlighted the growing interest in efficient streetlighting. This, combined with the LED and metal halide trials currently underway in some districts highlights the momentum that is beginning to gather, and the growing opportunities to work together and share knowledge and experiences on a national basis. The commission’s proposed street lighting programme will build upon this momentum by addressing some key barriers to the uptake of efficient technologies and providing practical support for councils to achieve their energy efficiency targets.

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DIRECTORY
DIRECTORY
Consultants
Consultants

Babbage Consultants Ltd Level 4, 68 Beach Rd Auckland 1010 PO Box 2027 Auckland 1140 Ph: 09 379 9980 Fax: 09 377 1170 admin@babbage.co.nz www.babbage.co.nz

Fax: 09 377 1170 admin@babbage.co.nz www.babbage.co.nz Beca PO Box 6345 Auckland 1141 Ph: 09 300 9000,

Beca PO Box 6345 Auckland 1141 Ph: 09 300 9000, Fax: 09 300 9300 www.beca.com

Auckland 1141 Ph: 09 300 9000, Fax: 09 300 9300 www.beca.com Boffa Miskell Ltd PO Box

Boffa Miskell Ltd PO Box 91250 Victoria St West Auckland 1142 Ph: 09 358 2526 Fax: 9 359 5300 info@boffamiskell.co.nz www.boffamiskell.co.nz

Carbon Market Solutions 187 Peachgrove Rd, Enderley, Hamilton 3214 Ph: 07 853 6220 wayne@carbonmarketsolutions.com\ www.carbonmarketsolutions.com

Connell Wagner PO Box 9762 Newmarket, Auckland 1149 Ph: 09 520 6019 macritchiea@conwag.com

Auckland 1149 Ph: 09 520 6019 macritchiea@conwag.com Connetics PO Box 2237 Christchurch 8140 Ph: 03 353

Connetics PO Box 2237 Christchurch 8140 Ph: 03 353 7200 Fax: 09 353 7201 enquiries@connetics.co.nz www.connetics.co.nz

E Cubed Building Workshop

P O Box 300 6503

Albany 0752 Ph: 09 442 2333, Fax: 09 442 2338

enquiries@e3bw.co.nz

www.e3bw.co.nz

LDP Ltd PO Box 302545 North Harbour, North Shore City 0751 Ph: 09 414 1004, Fax: 09 414 1005 Auckland@ldp.net www.ldp.net

Odyssey Energy PO Box 23004 Dalesford, Hamilton 3254 Ph: 07 858 3460, Fax: 07 858 3461 www.odyssey.co.nz

PSL PowerSolutionsLimited
PSL
PowerSolutionsLimited

Power Solutions Ltd

P O Box 691

Rotorua 3040 Ph: 07 348 8348, Fax: 07 347 8321 admin@powereng.co.nz www.powereng.co.nz

Fax: 07 347 8321 admin@powereng.co.nz www.powereng.co.nz Southern Perspectives PO Box 301067 Albany, North Shore

Southern Perspectives PO Box 301067 Albany, North Shore City 0752 Ph: 09 889 3011 enquiries@s-p.co.nz www.s-p.co.nz

Other Suppliers
Other Suppliers
889 3011 enquiries@s-p.co.nz www.s-p.co.nz Other Suppliers Fel Group PO Box 12430 Penrose, Auckland 1642 Ph: 09

Fel Group PO Box 12430 Penrose, Auckland 1642 Ph: 09 526 5660 Fax: 09 526 5661 Sales@felgroup.co.nz www.felgroup.co.nz

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NEW ZEALAND LOCAL GOVERNMENT - SUPPLEMENT

Installation and Maintenance Contractors
Installation and
Maintenance Contractors

Electrix PO Box 1688 Shortland Street, Auckland 1140 Ph: 09 270 1700 Fax: 09 270 1701 info@electrix.co.nz www.electrix.co.nz

Interwaste PO Box 53099 Auckland Airport, Manukau 2150 Ph: 09 256 8534 Fax: 09 257 2380 info@interwaste.co.nz www.interwaste.co.nz

McKay 40 Northway St Te Rapa Hamilton Ph: 07 850 4264 Fax: 07 850 4265 Service.waikato@mckay.co.nz www.mckay.co.nz

Organisations
Organisations

Electricity Commission Po Box 10041 The terrace, Wellington 6143 Ph: 04 460 8660 Fax: 04 460 8879 info@electricitycommission.co.nz www.electricitycommission.co.nz

EECA PO Box 388 Wellington 6140 Ph: 04 470 2200, Fax: 04 499 5330 info@eeca.govt.nz www.eeca.govt.nz

Energy Management Association of New Zealand c/o P O Box 97453 SAMC 2240 Auckland Ph: 09 262 1405 Fax: 09 262 1406 ema@ema.org.nz www.ema.org.nz

ICLEI Communities for Climate Protection PO Box 23293 Wellington 6140 Ph: 04 471 1982 office@iclei.org.nz www.iclei.org/ccp-nz

Lighting Council NZ PO Box 12434 Thorndon Wellington 6144 Ph: 04 494 1540 Fax: 04 494 1549 admin@ecanz.co.nz www.lightingcouncil.org.nz

NZ Transport Agency Private Bag 6995 Wellington 6141 Ph: 04 894 5400 Fax: 04 894 6100 info@nzta.govt.nz www.nzta.govt.nz

Royal Astronomical Society of NZ 52 Duncan Street Invercargill 9810 Ph: 03 211 2421 urbanstars@rasnz.org.nz www.rasnz.org.nz

Ph: 03 211 2421 urbanstars@rasnz.org.nz www.rasnz.org.nz Massey University Private Bag 102904 North Shore, North

Massey University Private Bag 102904 North Shore, North Shore City 0745 Ph: 09 414 0800 Fax: 09 443 9704 r.speed@massey.ac.nz www.auckland.massey.ac.nz

09 443 9704 r.speed@massey.ac.nz www.auckland.massey.ac.nz Waitakere City Council Private Bag 93109 Henderson 0650 Ph:

Waitakere City Council Private Bag 93109 Henderson 0650 Ph: 09 836 8000 Fax: 09 836 8001 info@waitakere.govt.nz www.waitakere.govt.nz

Technology Suppliers
Technology Suppliers

Advanced lighting Technology Unit 8, 25 Airborne Rd Albany, North Shore City 0632 Ph: 09 415 6332 Fax: 09 415 6255 mark@adlt.co.nz www.betaled.com

STREET LIGHTING

TECHNOLOGY SUPPLEMENT

2008/09

Alphatron PO Box 100217 North Shore Mail Centre, Auckland 1333 Ph: 09 414 5520 Fax: 09 414 5580 sales@alphatron.co.nz www.alphatrononline.com

Betacom PO Box 112259 Auckland Ph: 09 579 0434 Fax: 09 579 0372 sales@betacom.co.nz www.betacom.co.nz

Boier Energy Saving Technology NZ Ltd 14 Lucienne Drive Ranui, Waitakere 0612 Ph: 09 832 2265 sales@boier.co.nz www.boier.co.nz

0612 Ph: 09 832 2265 sales@boier.co.nz www.boier.co.nz Eco Friendly Light & Power Ltd Po Box 128-289

Eco Friendly Light & Power Ltd Po Box 128-289 Remuera Ph: 09 573 1600 Fax: 09 573 1601 sales@ecofriends.co.nz www.ecofriends.co.nz

Fax: 09 573 1601 sales@ecofriends.co.nz www.ecofriends.co.nz Infinity Lighting P O Box 15269 Tauranga Ph: 07 544

Infinity Lighting P O Box 15269 Tauranga Ph: 07 544 7400 Fax: 0800 124 632 enquiries@infinitylighting.co.nz www.infinitylighting.co.nz

enquiries@infinitylighting.co.nz www.infinitylighting.co.nz IPS Operations NZ Ltd PO Box 25001 Wellington 6146 Ph: 04

IPS Operations NZ Ltd PO Box 25001 Wellington 6146 Ph: 04 472 0802 Fax: 04 472 0803 jp.fanselows@law.net.nz

Ph: 04 472 0802 Fax: 04 472 0803 jp.fanselows@law.net.nz Mark Herring Lighting PO Box 332 Christchurch

Mark Herring Lighting PO Box 332

Christchurch Mail Centre, Christchurch

8140

Ph: 03 365 6020 mark@lights.co.nz

Centre, Christchurch 8140 Ph: 03 365 6020 mark@lights.co.nz Modus Lighting Ltd Private Bag 41919 St Lukes

Modus Lighting Ltd Private Bag 41919 St Lukes 1346 Ph: 09 815 8400 Fax: 09 815 8401 enquiries@moduslighting.co.nz www.moduslighting.com

Solar Bright

P O Box 30 163 St Martins

Christchurch

Ph: 03 981 9844 Fax: 03 981 9844 Nicola@solarbright.co.nz www.solarbright.co.nz

Strata Energy Limited Level 2, Thorndon Rise 95-99 Molesworth St PO Box 12332 Thorndon, Wellington Ph: 04 890 5292 Fax: 04 471 0319 info@stratergie.co.nz www.stratergie.co.nz

Fax: 04 471 0319 info@stratergie.co.nz www.stratergie.co.nz Philips NZ Ltd P O Box 1041 Auckland Ph: 09

Philips NZ Ltd

P O Box 1041

Auckland

Ph: 09 477 4400, Fax: 09 477 4401 info@philips.co.nz www.philips.co.nz

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