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Introduction

Xavier has two intertwining histories its location, and the school. Xavier is located on the island of Weno in Chuuk State on a hilltop the locals call Winiku. Ninety-six years ago the German Capuchins purchased the land that Xavier sits on, for the Catholic Mission to use as a copra plantation. Although at the end of World War I Germany lost its control of Micronesia and Japan stepped in, expelling all German missionaries and confiscating their property, until 1938 a wooden church and a priest's house marked the site. In the 1930s, the Japanese Imperial Navy chose Chuuk (Truk) Lagoon as the home for the Japanese naval fleet that was to control the Western Pacific. In 1938, the Mabuchi Construction Company of Japan was contracted by the Japanese Imperial Navy to construct a bomb-proof radio and communications center as part of the infrastructure for the fleet. Since then, the site has been familiarly known as Mabuchi. In 1944, this reinforced concrete building survived two direct hits from 500 pound bombs during Operation Hailstorm, an allied operation led by U.S. Navy and Marine forces. After World War II, Pope Pius XII, asked the Society of Jesus (Jesuits) to take responsibility for the Catholic Churchs presence in what had by then become known as the Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands (TPPI), commonly known as the TT (Trust Territory). Since the TT was administered by the United States, the Society of Jesus asked its U.S. Assistancy to take responsibility for the Churchs role. When Jesuits arrived at Mabuchi with deeds to the property and presented their desire to use the property for a school, the U.S. Navy was reluctant to return the property to the Church because of the Communications Center that was still standing. After much negotiation, agreement was reached for a very small sum of money, the Jesuits could have both the land and the building. On September 8th, 1952, Bishop Thomas Feeney, SJ, opened Xavier as a minor seminary at Mabuchi for boys to study for the priesthood, accepting 4 Palauan and twenty-one Chuukese boys. What was used then, and continues to be used today, as the main school building, is the Mabuchi built Japanese communications center. Within a year of its opening as a seminary, Bishop Feeney and the Jesuits realized that even more important than a seminary, what was needed in Micronesia at the time was an academic high school. Xavier High School thus became the first college-prep high school in Micronesia, graduating its first class in 1956. In 1976, Bishop Kennally, SJ, asked the Jesuits of the Region of Micronesia to seriously consider accepting girls at Xavier High School. Against the wishes of an overwhelming number of alumni, the Jesuits agreed, and in August, 1976, Xavier High School became one of the first co-ed Jesuit high schools in the world. Today, Xaviers entire enrollment is only 172 students, making it one of the smallest Jesuit Schools in the world, enrollment wise. Yet it draws its student population from three different countries, 6 different cultural and language groups, and from a geographical area that covers 4.5 million square miles of the central and western Pacific Ocean (to put this in perspective, the United States, including Alaska and Hawaii is 3.79 million square miles). While its enrollment might be small, its impact on the three young nations it serves has been significant. The Preamble to the Constitution of the Federated States of Micronesia states in part: We affirm our common wish... to preserve the heritage of the past, and to protect the promise of the future. We believe that Xavier High School is playing an important role in trying to honor that common wish.

Chapter I:

Student/Community Profile
and

Supporting Data

A. The School & Community


Xavier High School is a Catholic secondary school in the Jesuit tradition, located in Chuuk, Federated States of Micronesia. Xavier primarily serves students from the Republic of the Marshall Islands, the Republic of Palau, and the Federated States of Micronesia, although students from other countries, including most recently Japan, the USA, Kiribati, India, and the Philippines, occasionally enroll and graduate. Over the 60 years of its existence, Xavier High School has developed a rich school culture with many traditions. Figure 1. Map of Micronesia

Xavier opened its doors as a minor Catholic seminary in 1952, but almost immediately transitioned to a four-year academic high school for qualified males from Micronesia, thus becoming the first college-preparatory high school in the Northwestern Pacific. In 1976, Xavier became one of the first Jesuit high schools to enroll female students. While Xaviers first commencement in 1956 produced only five graduates, school enrollment has increased over the years, and now stands at over 170 students. Xavier High School has been operated continuously by the Jesuits of Micronesia since 1952. Jesuit priests and scholastics have held administrative positions since the beginning. The administrative offices of the school, faculty offices, a computer room, media and arts rooms, faculty and student dining rooms, girls lounge, a study hall, a gym, and offices of the maintenance department, are housed in the large, reinforced concrete Main Building built by the Mabuchi Construction Company in 1938 to serve as a communication headquarters for the Japanese Imperial Navy. In the summer of 2008, the Main Building was renovated by Mabuchi Construction Company at an estimated cost of $500,000 US Dollars.

Mabuchi shared with Xavier this estimate but they refuse to make it public, so competitors wont know their pricing strategy. 3

The majority of Xaviers students come from the islands of Micronesia. After World War II, the islands of Micronesia were administered by the United States as part of the Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands (TTPI). Beginning in the 1980s, the island groups of Micronesia separated to form three small sovereign island nations: The Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI), the Republic of Palau (ROP), and the Federated States of Micronesia (FSM). The RMI and the FSM became independent nations in 1986, when the U.S. Congress ratified their Compact of Free Association. Palau became an independent nation in 1994 when, after many unsuccessful attempts, Palau removed from their Constitution a nuclear-free clause and, only after which, the U.S. Congress ratified their Compact of Free Association. The separately negotiated Compacts of Free Association, ratified by each of these three nations and the U.S. Congress, entailed strong economic and political relationships that continue to the present. For example, the Compacts allow for free migration between the U.S. and the Freely Associated States, and the citizens of the Freely Associated States are eligible for Pell Grants, which is a compelling reason why the vast majority of the high school graduates from the Freely Associated States apply to colleges and universities in the U.S.

B. Location & Social Reality


Figure 2. Map of Chuuk Lagoon

Chuuk is one of the four states in the Federated States of Micronesia (FSM), the other three states are Yap, Pohnpei, and Kosrae. It is located approximately 7 degrees north of the equator and on a line of longitude approximately the same as the eastern coast of Australia. Chuuk consists of 19 high islands located inside a lagoon called Truk Lagoon (recently renamed Chuuk Lagoon), 10 atolls and 225 low coralline islands, of which many are located outside the lagoon. The lagoon is about 64 kilometers in diameter and has been formed by a barrier reef enclosing an area of 2,125 sq. kilometers of deep and protected waters. The islands are fringed with many mangroves that support diverse marine life. The fertile high islands contain native trees and plants, such as breadfruits, coconuts, mango, banana and taro. These fruits and crops, along with fish, have supported the subsistence livelihood and the lifestyle of Chuukese for many years. Xavier High School is located on Weno, one of the islands in the Chuuk Lagoon. Chuuk Lagoon is one of the worlds largest lagoons, covering an area of 822 square miles. The lagoon enclosed the main islands of Weno, Fefan, Tonoas, Uman, and Tol. Scattered outside the Chuuk Lagoon, lies the Mortlock, the Hall, and the Western Islands. Geographically, the population of Chuuk is widely scattered both within and outside the lagoon. Transportation among the lagoon islands and to the outer islands by boat or small airplane is expensive and erratic. Although home to beautiful islands and a strong family-centered culture, politically and economically, Chuuk State is a disaster zone, often viewed as the home of the unfortunate islanders. Chuuk is the poorest state in the Micronesian region in terms of per capita income and most other measures. Over the years since independence, it has gained notoriety, deserved or not, for administrative incompetence and mismanagement of funds. The roads are riddled with potholes and electricity is provided only intermittently. Health and education are deteriorated over the years. While infrastructures of the other three states within the FSM are improving, Chuuks infrastructures are collapsing and it seems that there are no solutions in sight to remedy the problem. Trash is everywhere, often dumped along the roads or in the mangrove swamps. Residents struggle to earn a subsistence living from the limited resource base that is already depleted by pollution and unsustainable methods of harvest. Compounding the states poor political reputation, Chuukese young men have become known in the region for their displays of belligerent drunken maliciousness. Almost every day, there is a loosed drunkard making troubles in the village or town. Almost often, fights break out between people because of drunkenness. Chuuk is one of the most unsafe places to live, especially when people are not sober. In recent years, as outmigration of the Chuukese has increased, their negative reputation has followed them to Guam, the Northern Marianas Islands, Hawaii, and areas of the US mainland where they have settled in large numbers. However, despite the problems in Chuuk, parents of Xavier students from the Republic of Marshall Islands, Republic of Palau, and other states of the Federated State of Micronesia continue sending their children to Xavier High School, which educates men and women who matriculate to universities and have gone on to become leaders of their island-nations.

Figure 3. Map of Chuuk State

C. Economic Background
The FSM 2010 Census (provisional count) estimates the current FSM population as 111,000, an increase of 4,000 persons over the 2000 Census count. Among the FSM states, Chuuk State has the largest population of 48,651 persons, as well as the highest population density of 993 persons per square mile, although its population has decreased by about 10% since 2000. The two main factors contributing to the drop in Chuuks population over the most recent 10-year period are the declining fertility rate and outmigration of Chuukese citizens to the US mainland and territories. The three independent island nations of Micronesia have an ongoing political and economic relationship with the United States stipulated in the Compacts of Free Association. The FSM and RMI entered into their Compacts with US in 1986 while Palaus Compact became effective in 1994. The US amended its agreements with both the FSM and RMI in 2003. While Palau proposed amendments to its Compact with the US in 2009, the $250 million in economic assistance it negotiated still awaits the approval of the US Congress as of 2011. A brief survey of the socioeconomic data of the FSM, RMI, and ROP confirms that they are still underdeveloped. The total Gross Domestic Product (GDP) for the three independent island nations of FSM, RMI, and ROP is $620 million, with an average GDP per capita of $2,213 for the FSM, $8,100 for Palau, $2,900 for the Marshall Islands. Economically, Palau is doing better than FSM and Marshall Islands. Many parents who enroll their children at Xavier find it hard to pay their childrens tuition. The cost of transportation from Marshalls, Yap, Palau, Pohnpei, and Kosrae to Xavier is high. Some parents can afford to send their children to Xavier and bring them homes for Christmas, some cant. So if you factor those cost into the cost of attending Xavier High School, some families pay much more than others. Fortunately, Palau and Marshalls seem to have more means, even though, with transportation, the cost is significantly higher. So, there is a disparity in how much parents pay for their childrens education based on the transportation cost in order to have their children attend Xavier High School.
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Xavier strives to maintain an affordable tuition and has a long-standing policy of accepting students regardless of the ability to pay school fees. The current annual tuition is $1,340, to which most students families must add several hundred dollars for air transportation. The estimate total annual actual cost of educating a student at Xavier is over $3,500. The Jesuits of New York and Micronesia Region, the FSM National Government, and other good-hearted and generous benefactors subsidize the cost of students education at Xavier. Economic difficulties at home encouraged Micronesians to leave their home islands for greener pastures in Guam, the Northern Marianas Islands, Hawaii, and the US Mainland. Since the introduction of the amended Compact of Free Association between the FSM and US, the FSM has experienced a decline in economic activity and rising unemployment. The reduction in Compact resources has caused a significant reduction in economic activity in the FSM. Real percapita incomes have fallen from $2,213 (2004) to $2,115 (2008), a reduction of $97. Due to the dearth of employment opportunities, the FSM, RMI and ROP continue to lose many of their most educated and productive citizens to overseas destinations as these nations reach the end of their terms of guaranteed financial assistance from the US; financial assistance for the FSM and RMI will end in 2023, whereas Palaus Compact funding will be terminated in 2025. Currently, these nations economies are extremely dependent on US aid money. Economic development strategies for each nation are focused on achieving economic sustainability and self-sufficiency by 2023 and 2025.

D. Demographic Data
The students who come to attend Xavier High School represent various islands, cultures and traditions within the Micronesian region. Although the 172 young men and women who compose the student body share the common label Pacific Islanders, they have richly different backgrounds. Most of the students attending Xavier speak multiple languages, with English as their second or third language. Faculty members are mostly volunteers from the United States, Australia, Japan, Indonesia, Burma, the Philippines, and Micronesia. All teaching faculty of Xavier High School have earned a Bachelors degree. Both students and faculty work together in seeking to build a community that is interdependent and mutually supportive. There is a daily lived articulation of Xaviers motto: Ut Omnes Unum SintThat All May Be One.

STUDENT BODY DEMOGRAPHICS


Gender Figure 4. Class Distribution, by Gender (SY 2011-12) Male Female Total Freshmen 21 27 48 Sophomores 29 16 45 Juniors 23 23 46 Seniors 16 17 33 Total 89 83 172 Percentage 52% 48%
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The number of female students enrolling at Xavier High School has increased. Since the period described by the most recent self-study during which approximately 60% of the student body was composed of male students, the gender disparity in enrollment has been narrowing. For example, the freshman class of SY 2011-2012 has more female than male students.

Figure 5. Composition of Freshmen Classes, by Gender (2006-2011) SY 06-07 No. % 22 54% 19 46% 41 SY 07-08 No. % 24 55% 20 45% 44 SY 08-09 No. % 25 53% 22 47% 47 SY 09-10 No. % 33 55% 27 45% 60 SY 10-11 No. % 33 65% 18 35% 51 SY 11-12 No. % 21 44% 27 56% 48

Male Female Total

A slight majority of candidates for admission to the school over the past 5 years have been males. Female students have tended to pass the Xavier Entrance Examination at a slightly higher rate than male students, but, among those who have passed, fewer females have applied to enroll and submitted complete applications. Disparities in the percentages of male and female students from class to class are primarily due to students who registered, but failed to enroll (more common for female students), and transfers out of the class. SY 2009-2010 had an increase in freshman enrollment. There was a decision made to enroll 60 freshmen that year to determine if Xavier is ready to have 60 freshmen. It was decided that 60 freshmen were too many for Xaviers limited human and material resources. In school year 2010-2011, there was a marked decrease in the number of enrolled female students due to a high rate of last-minute withdrawals by girls who had already registered. Some girls are afraid to come to Chuuk and live with host families. Some parents, while willing to send a son, are reluctant to send a daughter because of Chuuks reputation. SY 2011-2012 marked an increase in female enrollees corresponding to a high proportion of females passing the XHS Entrance Examination and the willingness of Chuukese families to host our female students.

Island-Nationality Figure 6. School Enrollment, by Island Nation and Grade (SY 2011-12) Nation of Origin Freshmen Sophomores Juniors Seniors Total Marshall 2 7 8 6 23 Kosrae 1 1 0 2 4 Pohnpei 17 16 16 7 56 Chuuk 18 13 14 10 55 Yap 3 3 6 4 16 Palau 4 5 2 3 14 Kiribati 1 0 0 0 1 Philippines 1 0 0 1 2 USA 1 0 0 0 1 Total 48 45 46 33 172 The majority of students who enroll at Xavier High School are from the States of Pohnpei and Chuuk. Pohnpei State has had the largest number of candidates who pass the Xavier Entrance Examination, for admission, and highest number of applications each year. The Freshman Class is the largest each year, as class size tends to be reduced by attrition with increasing grade level.

Figure 7. Ethnic Distribution, by Gender (SY 2011-2012) Marshallese Kosraeans Pohnpeians Chuukese Yapese Palauans Others Total Male 17 3 27 24 9 9 0 89 Female 6 1 29 31 7 5 4 83 Total 23 4 56 55 16 14 4 172 Percent 13% 2% 33% 32% 9% 8% 2%

Female candidates for admission from Chuuk apply to the school at significantly higher rate than those who reside outside of Chuuk. In asking for potential female candidates from other island why they decide not to come, the usual response from families is their reluctance to send a daughter to live in Chuuk.

Figure 8. Ethnicity Percentage Distribution (2006-2012) SY 06-07 No. % 19 13% 5 4% 44 31% 37 26% 22 16% 12 9% 2 1% 141 SY 07-08 No. % 17 12% 6 4% 43 29% 38 26% 24 16% 16 11% 2 1% 146 SY 08-09 No. % 22 14% 3 2% 40 26% 46 31% 22 14% 22 14% 2 1% 152 SY 09-10 No. % 28 16% 3 2% 51 29% 52 30% 23 13% 14 8% 1 5% 172 SY 10-11 SY 11-12 No. % No. % 28 16% 23 13% 3 2% 4 2% 53 31% 56 33% 58 33% 55 32% 15 9% 16 9% 14 8% 14 8% 1 5% 4 2% 172 172

Marshallese Kosraeans Pohnpeians Chuukese Yapese Palauans Others Total

Fairly consistent proportions of the student body have been composed of students from Chuuk and Pohnpei States. The numbers of applicants and proportions of admitted students from Yap have declined during the period since the previous self-study. Fewer Yapese students have been passing the Entrance Examination. The number of students from Kosrae State enrolled at Xavier, always small, has also decreased, with enrollment sustained by multi-ethnic Kosraean students from other locations. For many years Kosraen families, who are predominately Protestant were reluctant to send their children to a Catholic school, more recently Section A of Kosrae High School, has improved greatly, and Kosraens dont feel to send their children to Chuuk for a good education. There was an increase of student enrollment at Xavier, starting in SY 2009-2010. An administrative decision was made to enroll 60 freshmen in SY 2009-2010.

Religious Affiliation
Figure 9. Religious Affiliation Distribution (SY 2011-12) Catholic Other Christian Non-Christian Females 57 19 4 Males 67 24 1 Total 124 43 5 Percent 72% 25% 3%

Being a Catholic Jesuit school, there is always an expectation to have a larger number of Catholics enrollment at Xavier. Xavier welcomes students who are from other religious affiliations.

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Figure 10. Composition of Classes, by Religious Affiliation (SY 2011-12) Freshmen M F 17 20 4 4 0 3 48 Sophomores M F 17 9 12 7 0 0 45 Juniors M F 20 17 5 4 0 0 46 Seniors M F 13 11 3 4 1 1 33 Total M F 67 57 24 19 1 4 172 % Total M F 39% 33% 14% 11% 1% 2%

Catholic Other Christian Non-Christian Total

There are more male Catholics attending Xavier than female Catholics. One of the reasons parents sent their kids to Xavier is not just because of its academic reputation, but because Xavier is a Catholic and Christian school.

GRADUATION & RETENTION


Figure 11. Retention & Graduation Rate (SY 2006-2011) Class Enter as Freshmen of Male Female 21 2011 28 21 2010 21 16 2009 28 19 2008 21 16 2007 29 22 2006 30 115 Total 157 Graduate Male Female 16 15 16 14 22 11 17 18 21 7 20 15 112 80 Retention Rate Male Female 57% 71% 76% 67% 79% 69% 80% 94% 72% 43% 67% 68% 72% 69%

Total 49 42 44 40 45 52 272

Total 31 30 33 35 28 35 192

Total 64% 72% 74% 87% 58% 68% 71%

Approximately 71% of the students who enter as freshman graduate. The retention rate is higher for male students than it is for female students.

Figure 12. Retention & Graduation Rates with Transferred students (SY 2006-2011) Class of 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006
Total

Enter As Freshmen

Transfer (in)

Graduate

Retention Rate

F M T F M T F M T F M T 21 28 0 3 15 16 71% 57% 64% 49 3 31 21 21 0 1 14 16 67% 76% 72% 42 1 30 16 28 1 0 11 22 69% 79% 74% 44 1 33 19 21 0 2 18 17 94% 80% 87% 40 2 35 16 29 0 1 7 21 43% 72% 58% 45 1 28 22 30 0 0 15 20 68% 67% 68% 52 0 35 1 7 80 112 192 69% 72% 115 157 272 8 71% SY 2006-2011, there were 8 students who transferred into Xavier High School
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Figure 13. Graduation & Retention (SY 2006-2011)

ADMISSION AND GRADUATION RATES SY 20062011


Admitted Males Graduated Males Admitted Females Graduated Females

15

14

11 16

7 18 16

15

21

21

22 19 21 17

16

16

22

20

28 21 2011 2010

28

21

29

30

2009

2008

2007

2006

Male students complete their enrollment applications with a higher rate than female applicants. The number of female graduates has been consistent, except for Class of 2007. The composite graduation rate for the most recent six graduating classes is 70%. Disciplinary consequences and poor academic performance, along with voluntary withdrawals, have contributed to student drop out. SY 2006-2011, there were 157 male students admitted to Xavier and 97 graduated (71% graduated). SY 2006-2011, there were 115 female students admitted to Xavier and 80 graduated (70% graduated).

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Figure 14. Female and Male Withdrawal (SY 2007-2011)

STUDENT WITHDRAWAL, SY '07-'11


FEMALE MALE

2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 1 5 6

7 7 7 7 9 9

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Figure 15. Reasons for Withdrawal (SY 2007-2011)

VOLUNTARY 27%

DISCIPLINARY 38%

ACADEMIC 35%

In the past five years, 38% student withdrawals from Xavier were discipline-related dismissals. Another 35% of the students who withdrew were dismissed for academic reasons they were not making adequate progress toward graduation in terms of accumulated course credits 27% of student withdrawals were voluntary. Reasons cited for voluntary withdrawals include family relocation, financial concerns, homesickness, and health. Male students accounted for about 90% of withdrawal for disciplinary reason. .
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STAFF DEMOGRAPHICS
Figure 16. Composition of Full Time Administrators & Teaching staff, by Gender (SY 2011-12) Administrators Teachers Part Time Teachers Tutors Total Male 4 8 0 2 14 Female 0 3 2 0 5 Total 4 11 2 2 19

As a boys boarding school, the number of male teaching faculty has been always higher than female faculty.

Figure 17. Highest Educational Achievement of staff (SY 2011-2012) Doctorate Masters Bachelors Administrators 0 3 0 Teachers 0 1 10 Part Time Teachers 0 0 2 Tutors 0 0 0

High School 1 0 0 2

All teachers at Xavier must have a college (4 year college) degree requirement to teach in the classroom. Fr. Marc Roselli, S.J., the school Chaplain and one of the administrators is a fulltime teacher. One of our administrators has a high school diploma, but served in the US Army for 7 seven years. He is our Dean of Students. Two of our part time teachers are our full time supporting staff. Both hold a bachelors degree. Since SY 2009, Xavier High School has made a policy that all teachers must have a bachelors degree in order to teach. Two of our tutors are high school graduate from Aloysius College in Sidney Australia. Figure 18. National Origin of XHS Staff (SY 2011-12) Location United States of America Federated States of Micronesia Indonesia Japan Australia Philippines Total No. 10 5 1 1 2 3 22 % 45% 22% 4% 4% 8% 14%

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45% of Xaviers volunteers come from the United States of America. There are no Micronesia volunteers teaching at Xavier. All Micronesians are salaried teachers and administrators.

Figure 19. Organizational Affiliation of Staff (SY 2011-12) Type Jesuit Priests Jesuit Scholastics Jesuit Volunteer Australian Volunteers Japanese Volunteers (JICA) Independent Volunteers Micronesians Other Staff No. 2 1 4 2 1 3 4 3

OUTCOME DATA (Student Achievement Data)


Figure 20. Average SAT Scores, XHS and All SAT Test-takers 2006-2012
Graduating Class XHS Reading All Reading XHS Math All Math XHS Writing All Writing N XHS Testtakers % XHS Class Tested

2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012

392 410 389 408 413 403

503 502 502 501 501 497 -

415 432 436 423 443 434

518 515 515 515 516 514 -

423 437 419 456 450 434

497 494 494 493 492 489 -

35 28 33 32 29 30

89% 96% 94% 100% 80% 100%

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Figure 21. SAT Average Scores (SY 2006-2011)

SAT AVERAGE SCORES, SY 2006-2012


500 450 400 350 300 250 200 150 100 50 0 Class of 2006 Class of 2007 Class of 2008 Class of 2009 Class of 2010 Class of 2011 Class of 2012

Xavier students performance on the SAT has been fairly consistent in recent years, during which most junior and/or senior students have taken this college admissions test. Due to uncertainty in individual score estimates (i.e., the possibility of performance changes if students were administered a different but comparable set of test questions), and the relatively small size of Xaviers graduating classes, mean changes of 20-30 points across graduating classes would not be uncommon (see, for example, SAT One-Year Mean Score Changes, an interpretive guide available from the College Board website). The only change in class averages observed over the last 7 years that reaches this magnitude is the increase in SAT Writing scores observed for the Class of 2009. Other mean score changes are less than this amount, suggesting no statistically significant differences in average performance on each SAT section across successive years. XHS graduating class average scores on the SAT tend to be below the average score for all (primarily US) test-takers. Xavier students tend to exhibit the highest performance on the Writing section, and lie furthest below the US mean on the Critical Reading section. As another point of comparison, average section scores for SAT test-takers in the Class of 2011 (the most recent data available) whose first language learned was not English were 463 in Critical Reading, and 471 in Writing. XHS graduating class average scores are well below the 2011 Critical Reading average for all non-native English speakers, but recent XHS class average scores are only slightly below the 2011 Writing average for non-native English speakers. [The Mathematics average among non-native English speakers, 527, is greater than the average for all SAT test-takers likely due to a high average score among Asian non-native English speakers; this score will not be used as an reference point here.]
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SCORES

The relatively low SAT performance of the Class of 2008 on the Critical Reading and Writing sections reflected teacher observations about these students average academic skills, class participation and study habits, and the relatively low average GPA of this class (see Figure 31). 2010 SAT student scores are not available (Xavier has already made request to ETS to send the 2010 Test Scores and paid $300 to retrieve the scores) In the First Semester of SY 2011-2012, a SAT-prep course for the Junior Class was offered to prepare the juniors for the SAT.

Figure 22. SAT Critical Reading Percentiles, XHS Classes of 2006-2012 and All 2011 SAT Test-takers 800 700 600
25th Percentile 50th Percentile (Median) 75th Percentile

500
400 300 200 100

0
2006 2007 2008 2009 2011 2012 ALL 2011

Graduating Class
The figure above displays quartiles (percentiles) of the separate distributions of SAT test scores in the current and five previous XHS graduating classes, and among all SAT testtakers in the Class of 2011. (Percentiles for all SAT test-takers have remained fairly stable, 10 points, for the last five years; the most recent available statistics for 2011 were selected as representative.) A percentile is the value of the test score below which a certain percentage of all scores fall, if the scores are listed in rank order. For example, among XHS Class of 2006 Critical Reading SAT scores, the 25th percentile equals 350, indicating that 25% of reading scores for that graduating class were less than or equal to 350. Quartile values can be interpreted as representing typical scores within a distribution, since 50% of scores lie between the 25th and 75th percentiles.
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Xavier students scoring at the 50th percentile in XHS distributions of Critical Reading scores tend to score at approximately the same level as the 25th percentile in the corresponding distributions of scores for all SAT test-takers. Score values for the XHS student(s) lying at the 25th, 50th, and 75th percentiles of the span of all XHS Critical Reading SAT scores, in rank order, have remained relatively consistent across years.

Figure 23. SAT Mathematics Percentiles, XHS Classes of 2006-2012 and All 2011 SAT Test-takers 800 700 600 500 400 300 200 100 0
2006 2007 2008 2009 2011 2012 ALL 2011

25th Percentile 50th Percentile (Median) 75th Percentile

Graduating Class
Over the past four years, the disparity in Math scores between students scoring at the 25th and 75th percentiles of Xaviers distributions appear to have been decreasing slightly, suggesting that math performance is becoming more consistent across students within a class. Xavier students scoring at the 50th percentile in XHS distributions of Mathematics scores tend to score at approximately the same level as the 25th percentile in the corresponding distributions of scores for all SAT test-takers.

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Figure 24. SAT Writing Percentiles, XHS Classes of 2006-2012 and All 2011 SAT Testtakers

800
700 600 500 400 300 200 100 0
2006 2007 2008 2009

25th Percentile 50th Percentile (Median) 75th Percentile

2011

2012

ALL 2011

Graduating Class
Student score(s) at the 75th percentile of Xaviers rank order score distribution tend to lie at approximately the 50th percentile of the distribution of scores for all SAT test-takers, suggesting that XHS students tend to be reasonably well-prepared to produce collegelevel writing compared to other SAT test-takers.

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Figure 25. Mean SAT Scores, by Ethnicity, Classes of 2006-2012 (except Class of 2010)
800 700 600 500 400 300 200 391 375 407

Chuuk Marshall Pohnpei Palau

Yap
439 422 455 445 409 405 415 425 420 437 458 450

Critical Reading

Math

Writing

Given the total data from the Classes of 2006-12, sorted by ethnicity, Palauan and Yapese students achieved the highest scores, on average in the Critical Reading and Writing sections; Pohnpeian students achieved the highest scores, on average, on the Math section. Marshallese students earned the lowest scores, on average, on the Critical Reading, Math and Writing sections, followed by Chuukese students on all three test sections. The rank orders of SAT score means in the Critical Reading and Math sections are very similar to the mean rank orders by island-nation on the XHS Entrance Examinations in English and Mathematics, respectively, suggesting that initial freshman year achievement levels influence average achievement outcomes. Total SAT data for Kosraean students (n = 5), and students of other ethnicities (n = 3), is not shown.

Figure 26. Mean SAT Scores, by Gender, Classes of 2006-2012 (except Class of 2010) Critical Reading Female Male 411 395 Mathematics 426 431 Writing 450 423

Given the total data from the Classes of 2006-11, sorted by gender, male students achieved higher scores, on average, on the Mathematics section, while female students achieved higher scores, on average, on the Critical Reading and Writing sections. These
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statistics are consistent with the typical pattern of relative performance by gender displayed on language and mathematics achievement tests among secondary-school students in most countries. Figure 27. TOEFL Average Scores (SY 2006-2011)

Figure 28. XHS Graduating Class Average Paper-Based (PBT) TOEFL Scores, and Minimum Admission Requirements for Selected U.S. Universities TOEFL PBT Maximum Total Score University of Hawaii at Manoa Regular Admission XHS Class of 2006 Average Score XHS Class of 2007 Average Score XHS Class of 2010 Average Score XHS Class of 2009 Average Score University of San Francisco or Loyola Marymount University Regular Admission XHS Class of 2011 Average Score XHS Class of 2008 Average Score Eastern Oregon University or University of Hawaii at Hilo Regular Admission; University of Hawaii at Manoa Conditional Admission University of San Francisco Conditional Admission 677 600 568 563 562 556 550 548 538 500 460
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Chaminade University of Honolulu Regular Admission TOEFL PBT Minimum Total Score

450 310

The Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) is use to assess listening comprehension, Structure and Written Expression, and reading comprehension among non-native English speakers. In the figure above, Xavier graduating class average TOEFL scores are compared to minimum scores required to be considered for admission to selected US colleges and universities. These institutions represent schools to which XHS students have recently and/or historically tended to apply. The average TOEFL PBT score of students in most XHS graduating classes is adequate to allow consideration for regular admission to selective private (Jesuit) universities, like Gonzaga University or Loyola Marymount University, as well as less selective public universities, like Eastern Oregon University or the University of Hawaii at Hilo. Students scoring below the minimum TOEFL PBT score may be considered for conditional admission at some institutions, which typically entails additional language placement testing and/or required enrollment in non-credit English-as-a-SecondLanguage courses.

Figure 29. PSAT Critical Reading Percent-Correct Subscores, Class of 2012


0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100%

Determining Word Meaning [18] Author's Style, Tone & Technique [9] Reasoning & Inference [5] Organization & Ideas [10] Understanding Literary Elements [6]

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Figure 30. PSAT Critical Reading Percent-Correct Subscores, Class of 2013


0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100%

Determining Word Meaning [18] Author's Style, Tone & Technique [9] Reasoning & Inference [5] Organization & Ideas [10] Understanding Literary Elements [6]

Number of test items on which each percent-correct subscore is based shown in parentheses. Subscores based on few items should be interpreted with caution; however, the presence of a clear trend in relative subscore magnitude across years may suggest reading skills for which instruction should be increased or modified. Percent-correct scores tend to be relatively high in Determining Word Meaning (i.e., vocabulary in context), which is a weekly instructional topic in the English Skills courses, and Understanding Literary Elements, which tends to be emphasized in the Literature courses. Students tend to answer a relatively low proportion of the few questions requiring inference correctly, as well as fairly low proportions of questions regarding reading passage organizational structure and understanding ideas, and recognition of authors style and perspective.

Figure 31. PSAT Mathematics Percent-Correct Subscores, Class of 2012


0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100%

Numbers & Operations [9] Algebra & Functions [14] Geometry & Measurement [11] Data, Statistics & Probability [4]

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Figure 32. PSAT Mathematics Percent-Correct Subscores, Class of 2013


0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100%

Numbers & Operations [9] Algebra & Functions [14] Geometry & Measurement [11] Data, Statistics & Probability [4]

Number of test items on which each percent-correct subscore is based shown in parentheses. Subscores based on few items should be interpreted with caution; however, the presence of a clear trend in relative subscore magnitude across years may suggest math skills for which instruction should be increased or modified. Percent-correct test scores tend to be relatively high in Geometry, and low in Numbers & Operations. Since students sit for the PSAT in Semester 1 of junior year, their most recent complete mathematics course will have been Geometry in sophomore year. While arithmetic problems compose a large proportion of the XHS Entrance Examination in Mathematics, those problems tend to emphasize application of standard algorithms for the four basic operations, with any word problems covering number meaning or arithmetic presented in plain English. Numbers & Operations problems on the PSAT are almost exclusively word problems that require some degree of reasoning with English and mathematics vocabulary, as well as mathematics reasoning and computational ability.

Figure 33. PSAT Writing Percent-Correct Subscores, Class of 2012


0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90%100%

Grammatical Relationships between Words [12] Words & Phrases Used to Modify or Compare [8] Phrases & Clauses [8] Correctly Formed Sentences [6] Relationships of Sentences & Paragraphs [5]

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Figure 34. PSAT Writing Percent-Correct Subscores, Class of 2013


0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90%100%

Grammatical Relationships between Words [12] Words & Phrases Used to Modify or Compare [8] Phrases & Clauses [8] Correctly Formed Sentences [6] Relationships of Sentences & Paragraphs [5]

Number of test items on which each percent-correct subscore is based shown in parentheses. Subscores based on few items should be interpreted with caution; however, relatively low performance across years in determining relationships of sentences to the paragraphs in which they are contained may suggest instruction targeting this writing skill should be increased or modified.

Figure 35. Mean Cumulative GPA, Classes of 2006-2011 2006 GPA [4.5-pt scale] Std. Dev.
3.41 0.401

2007
3.29 0.560

2008
3.17 0.557

2009
3.23 0.527

2010
3.00 0.447

2011
3.25 0.532

The average cumulative GPA for students in the Class of 2006 is nearly a B+ average on the schools grading scale, while other class average GPAs correspond to a B. Class average GPAs may be weakly related to class average TOEFL total scores, although average GPA shows no consistent relationship with average total SAT score. Students who struggle to meet course academic requirements due to low English language proficiency are likely to earn low TOEFL scores. The Classes of 2006 and 2007 evidenced high average GPAs and TOEFL scores, while the Class of 2008 had a relatively low average GPA and TOEFL score.

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Figure 36. Mean Cumulative GPA, by Gender, Classes of 2006-2011 Female GPA [4.5-pt scale] Std. Dev.
3.29 0.401

Male
3.18 0.517

Overall
3.22 0.515

The mean cumulative GPA for female students over the past six school years is slightly higher than the mean cumulative GPA for male students. The larger variability among GPAs of male students, reflected in the larger standard deviation, is to some extent due to the larger number of males in the student body.

Figure 37. Mean Cumulative GPA, by Island-Nation, Classes of 2006-2011


4.50 4.00 3.50 3.00 2.50 2.00 1.50 1.00 0.50 0.00 3.13 3.00 3.17 3.39 3.20 3.18

Chuuk

Kosrae Marshall Pohnpei

Palau

Yap

The average cumulative GPA among graduating Pohnpeian students appears to be higher than the average GPA of other island-nation groups.

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Figure 38. 2009 XHS Entrance Exam Average Percent-Correct Scores for Class of 2013 as Freshmen [2009-2010] and Sophomores [2010-2011] Math English Total 2nd Semester 2009 67% 77% 72% 2nd Semester 2011 77% 84% 79% XAVIER HIGH SCHOOL ENTRANCE EXAM SCORES
XHS Entrance Average Scores, 2009 XHS Entrance Re-take Average Scores, 2011

100% 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0%

84% 77% 67% 77% 72%

79%

Math

English

Total

One Area of Growth in Section A5 of the 2005-06 Self-Study suggested that to assess our students progress toward meeting the ESLRs in English and mathematics all students should retake the Xavier Entrance Examination at the end of their freshman year (p. 69). As described in the February 2009 Midterm Report, this proposal was not initially implemented due to concerns that most admitted students have earned high scores on the XHS Entrance Examsubstantial changes in students scores due to freshman year instruction are unlikely, and minor changes would be insignificant (p. 52). The 2009 WASC Visiting Committee report recommended that sophomores should be retested using the same XHS Entrance Exam form administered prior to their admission during the 2nd semester of 10th grade (p. 9). The VCs recommendation was implemented in 2nd Semester of 2011. The 2009 XHS Entrance Examinations in English and Mathematics were readministered to all students in the Class of 2012. Increases in average percent-correct scores on the Entrance Exam were observed in both English and Mathematics, with a slight gain in English and moderate gain in Mathematics scores. These gains indicate learning due to instruction during students freshman and sophomore years at Xavier.

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It should be cautioned that the XHS Entrance Exam is a teacher-produced (although standardized) test. The reliability and validity of its scores for measuring learning gains have never been formally tested.

Figure 39. 2009 XHS Entrance Exam in English Number-Correct Gain Score Distribution from 2nd Semester 2011 Exam Re-take for Class of 2013
25 20

Frequency

15 10 5 0
-10 to -6 -5 to -1 0 to 4 5 to 9 10 to 14 15 to 19 20 to 24

Change in Percent-Correct Score (%)

Highest possible Semester 2, 2011, change in percent-correct English score, given lowest initial (2009) and maximum English scores, is 41%. Because student scores on the XHS Entrance Examination in English tend to be close to the ceiling (maximum score) of the test, the highest possible change in percent-correct score for each student was less than 30% for nearly all students. In the scale of the test, small to moderate gains in English performance that are likely attributable to English instruction during students freshman and sophomore years at Xavier were observed for most students. The maximum percent-correct score among sophomore students on retest was 88%. Caution in interpreting the freshman and sophomore year English scores is warranted in that, unlike the Mathematics Exam, the English Exam content does not reflect any systematic survey of typical upper-elementary school English instruction, and so may not fully measure elementary school English achievement.

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Figure 40. 2009 XHS Entrance Exam in Mathematics Number-Correct Gain Score Distribution from 2nd Semester 2011 Exam Re-take for Class of 2013
10 9 8

Frequency

7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
-15 to - -10 to -6 -5 to -1 11 0 to 4 5 to 9 10 to 14 15 to 19 20 to 24 25 to 29 30 to 34 35 to 39 40 to 44 45 to 49

Change in Percent-Correct Score (%)

Highest possible Semester 2, 2011, change in percent-correct Math score, given lowest initial (2009) and maximum Math scores, is 66%. Content for the Mathematics Exam was sampled from multiple elementary school mathematics textbooks to fully represent elementary school mathematics achievement. In the scale of the test, moderate to large gains in mathematics performance that are likely attributable to math instruction during students freshman and sophomore years at Xavier were observed for most students. The maximum percent-correct score among sophomore students on retest was 96%. If the Mathematics Entrance Exam will continue to be used to measure student mathematics learning in the future, item-level analyses may identify skills on which students exhibit the most growth (e.g., numbers, arithmetic, measurement & data analysis, algebra, geometry).

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Figure 41. Relationship between 2009 XHS Entrance Exam in English Initial NumberCorrect Score, and 2011 Score Change
25 20

Score Change 2011

15 10 5 0 0 -5 -10 20 40 60 80

Initial Score 2009

Correlation between initial English Entrance Exam score (2009) and score change (difference between 2010 and 2009 scores) is -.76, indicating that students with lower initial scores tended to have larger score gains. This finding could suggest that (a) initial scores of high-performing students are so close to the maximum score that the test cannot adequately measure gains among these students, and/or (b) English instruction is targeted at a remedial level that tends to produce the largest score gains for the students who initially have the lowest scores. It appears that the XHS English Entrance Exam may not be an optimal tool to measure student learning in English usage & grammar, or reading comprehension.

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Figure 42. Relationship between 2009 XHS Entrance Exam in Mathematics Initial Number-Correct Score, and 2011 Score Change
40 30

Score Change 2011

20 10 0 0 -10 -20 20 40 60 80

Initial Score 2009

Correlation between initial Math Entrance Exam score (2009) and score change (difference between 2010 and 2009 scores) is -.54, indicating that students with lower initial scores tended to have larger score gains. Particularly given that initial scores on the XHS Mathematics Entrance Exam do not tend to be near the maximum score, it appears that the XHS Mathematics Entrance Exam may be a reasonably adequate test to measure student learning in mathematics.

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Chapter II

Expected S chool-wide Learning Results

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A.

Expected School-wide Learning Results

Xavier High School Students, Upon Graduation, Will Be: 1. Competent


A graduate of Xavier High School exhibits competency of a four-year college preparatory curriculum and has developed intellectual skills that go beyond intellectual competency and requirement for college entrance by integrating Gospel values and our Ignatian heritage. The graduate has become aware of and begun to practice the basic skills facilitating leadership and collaboration. By the time of their graduation, Xavier students will: learn to communicate effectively through comprehending, speaking, reading and writing English; begin to grow in an awareness of historical and current social issues both in Micronesia and in the world and have begun to realize the implications of these issues on various communities; develop the ability to think logically and critically, to recognize patterns and to apply mathematical concepts to everyday situations; integrate Gospel values in the decisions and actions of their daily lives. develop proficiency in conducting scientific investigations and in analyzing and reporting results. begin to understand the impact of technology on the future and gained skills to utilize new resources. have the opportunity to develop competence in co-curricular areas, including student governance, athletics and creative arts. become qualified applicants to be considered by competitive colleges and universities. demonstrate an understanding of the Catholic Churchs teaching about Jesus and his mission as well as the sacramental expressions of that mission.

2.

Conscientious

By the time of their graduation, Xavier students have begun to learn how to make moral judgments informed by Christian doctrine and traditions and have developed confidence in their ability to make the right decisions. The graduate has had opportunities to exercise leadership in the academic, extra-curricular and campus ministry domains. By the time of their graduation Xavier students will: learn how to discern what is right, good and true; they take initiative to act on the results of a discernment process. learn to open themselves to new experiences and have gained confidence in their ability to integrate these new discoveries into their own cultural backgrounds and value sets.
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developed a realistic familiarity with and acceptance of themselves. They appreciate their gifts and strive to develop their talents to the fullest, while also remaining conscious of and trying to improve upon their weaknesses. experience the benefits of self-discipline in creating a sense of order and efficiency in their lives and learned to be faithful in fulfilling responsibilities. develop a sense of individual spirituality through prayer, retreats and participation in the Sacraments. display an understanding of the relationship between faith in Jesus and being a person for and with others, which manifests itself in action based on the Churchs teaching on social justice;. begun to see the importance of their influence on public policy by critiquing laws already in effect, by modeling the policy-making process in their student government and, for older students, by voting.

3. Compassionate
By the time of their graduation, Xavier students have learned to respond to others as Jesus did by placing their talents, skills and knowledge at the service of their family, local community, the Church and their country. Xavier graduates walk with others of diverse cultural and ethnic backgrounds, in friendship and in empathy, to empower them. These attitudes have been informed by students experiences living in the Xavier community, learning in the classrooms, community service projects on their home islands, and by working with and for the local Sapuk and Chuuk communities. By the time they graduate Xavier students will: develop the habit of putting themselves in the place of others. form friendships with those of different cultural backgrounds and contributed to developing a spirit of Micronesian unity. begin to understand some of the demands of community building at a local, national, and global level. been prepared to enter the broader community as influential leaders and agents of positive social change.
Act as a person for and with others by serving people in need. demonstrate a loving attitude by overcoming personal prejudices and stereotypes. understand the connection between personal faith and the need for commitment to a just society, and in that commitment, recognize the needs of the disadvantaged;

B. The Process of Developing the ESLRs of Xavier High School

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Section 1: The basis of the ESLRs at Xavier High School The Expected School-wide Learning Results for the graduate have undergone changes throughout the history of Xavier High School. In all stages of their development, both when they were no more than guiding principles as the schools began to develop, through the present, where they now represent well thought out and clearly articulated goals that are embraced by all who are associated with Xavier High School, the traditional philosophies of Catholic schools and, in particular the Jesuit philosophy of education, first articulated in the Ratio Studiorum of 1599, and more recently in Ignatian Pedagogy: A Practical Approach, have played a key role. As articulated in both our Mission statement and our Philosophy, Xavier High School strives to form our students in the areas of competence, conscientiousness, and compassion in other words - the whole human person, the intellectual, spiritual, moral and ethical, physical, social, and emotional aspects of our students. This focus has been most important for us as a Jesuit School, while at the same time we attempt to recognize the particular needs of our students.

Section 2: History of ESLR Development at Xavier High School As stated above, the guiding principles for Xavier High School came primarily from a traditional Catholic and more specifically Jesuit philosophy of education. In preparation for its first accreditation in the 1990s, Xavier High School articulated a Philosophy of Xavier High School. Since that time several developments have helped Xavier High School in the generation of its current articulated ESLRs: In 1982, the Jesuit Secondary Education Association formulated a Profile of the Graduate at Graduation, a document that was to guide the development of expected learning results in Jesuit high schools worldwide. Xavier revised this document to create a Profile of the Xavier Student at Graduation from 1982 onward. In 1994, when Xavier began its first accreditation process, a summarized account of the Profile was incorporated into the Statement of Philosophy. For its first Focus On Learning accreditation in 2000, Xavier reformulated the Profile into ESLRs. The 2006 WASC accreditation process included a thorough reevaluation and restatement of the Mission Statement and ESLRs, although they still widely reflected the traditional philosophies of Jesuit education. Fr. Arthur, the director, recommended that the ESLRs be simplified and reduced in number from five to three based on a 1993 Jesuit Document Ignatian Pedagogy: A Practical Approach which quoted Fr. Kolvenbach (Fr. General of the Society of Jesus), who said of our Jesuit schools: We aim to form leaders in service, in imitation of Christ Jesus, men and women of competence, conscience, and compassionate commitment. This has become known at Xavier as the 3Cs. The Mission Statement and the ESLRs were aligned to reflect the 3Cs. As mentioned in the Preface, for the current WASC Self-Study, by the end of SY 201011, the faculty and SBA felt that Xaviers ESLRs continued to be very well aligned with the Mission Statement, and that no major changes needed to be made. Independently, while on sabbatical, Fr. Rich Reviewed the ESLRs using the Grad at Graduation as a guide. Apart from a
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few changes in bullet points, Fr. Rich came to the same conclusion as other stakeholders at Xavier, that the current ESLRs are still very relevant at Xavier. Fr. Rich introduced the ESLRs with their minor changes at the Faculty Development days in August, 2011. In an afternoon workshop on September 15th, Fr. Rich asked the faculty and seniors once again to look at the ESLRs with their minor changes, and to reflect on how, if at all, the seniors felt they had grown in the areas of the 3Cs. In a workshop the following Thursday, September 22nd, Fr. Rich asked the faculty and seniors to reflect on ways Xavier might be able to measure whether students are actually achieving the ESLRs. One thing that is new is a Philosophy of Xavier High School that is also aligned with the Mission Statement and the ESLRs. While there had been a Philosophy of Xavier High School for the 1995 WASC accreditation, it was conspicuously absent from the 2000 FOL and 2006 FOL WASC Self-Study Reports. Using the Xavier Mission Statement, ESLRs, The Grad at Graduation, and Ignatian Pedagogy: A Practical Approach, and looking at philosophies of other Jesuit High School across the U.S., Fr. Rich developed a new Philosophy of Xavier High School while on sabbatical that was adapted to the particular situation at Xavier, and aligned it with the Mission Statement and ESLRs. This he presented to the Board of Members, whose job it is to approve the philosophy of the school. The Board of Members adopted the newly designed philosophy at their September, 2011 meeting. Fr. Rich presented the ESLRs with their minor changes to the Xavier Board for their approval, in the fall of 2011. The Board approved them at their meeting on December 5th, 2011. The current ESLRs are the result of effort to recognize the particular needs of our students within the ideals of Jesuit pedagogy.

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Chapter III

Progress Report

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Chapter III: Progress Report

The WASC commission action letter in April 2006 directed the school to revise our action plans, clarifying timelines for completion, re-prioritizing the action plan items, deleting one item deemed by the Visiting Committee to be of low priority, and adding one (Action Item #3), based on the Visiting Teams recommendations. The action plans were restated during May June 2006. The result was (is) five (5) action goals, to which the school has been attentive since 2006. The Board of Directors participated in modifying the action plan during their May 2006 meeting. The action plan has been updated annually. Progress on the action plan is reported by the Director, and discussed, at biannual Board meetings. Limited progress has been made on Action Plan Item #1. Teacher recruitment and retention remain as areas for follow-up. Teacher training has become organized with the implementation of a formal Staff Development Plan, but is hindered by the high rate of teacher turnover. Limited progress has been made on Action Plan Item #2: develop responsive governance. Significant progress has been made on Action Plan Item #3, improving student safety and health on campus. Action Plan Item #4, aligning the curriculum with standards, is in progress. Some steps of Item #4 will require outside expertise. Significant progress has been made on Action Plan Item #5: integrating technology into the learning process. Continuing progress on Item #5 will require retaining a staff member who is able to maintain the schools computers and network. One of our JOVC volunteers, Takeharu Kogoruma, is currently in the 2nd year of a two-year volunteer contract with Xavier High School. In addition to maintaining the schools network for the past two years, Take sensei is training a local member of the Xavier Staff to continue his work of maintaining Xaviers computers and network.

The Progress Report is divided into two parts. Part I of the Progress Report has two sections: Part I, Section A) presents the 2006 amended Action Items, Xaviers follow-up on the Action Items, the WASC Midterm review Visiting Committees response to our follow-up, and Xaviers Response Since 2009. Part I, Section B): Apart from the five Action Items, the 2006 WASC Visiting Committee identified other Areas of Growth. Part IB identifies these Areas of Growth, and Xaviers responses to them. Part II of the Progress Report deals with the The Action Plan Going Forward and areas that Xavier should focus on, as reported by the Midterm Review Visiting Committee in March, 2009, and Xaviers responses to these areas.

PART I, SECTION A:

ACTION PLAN ITEM #1: XHS will attempt to recruit, form and retain qualified teachers and administrators. [Critical Area 1: The governing authorities and school
leadership should develop a comprehensive, long-range plan for recruitment, training and retention of staff in order to address the problems caused by the dependence on short-term
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volunteers. Critical Area 5: The school leadership should assist and supervise the faculty in developing a greater variety of teaching methods that promote active involvement of students in the learning process.

Results All teachers participate in research-based staff development program. One Wednesday each month, school is dismissed early so that all teachers may participate in 2 hours of in-service training or collaborative work relating that quarters staff development topic. Staff orientation lengthened to 8-10 days. Staff development program includes practice in designing performance-based learning. Staff development program includes focus on culturallyresponsive instruction for Micronesian students, and instruction for ELL students. NY Jesuit Province Education Office provided subsidy for continuing education coursework by Principal. A staff member was trained in I.T. by PREL, sponsored by Chuuk DOE. Quarterly peer observation continues. Principal observations with conferences increased, from biannually to quarterly. Increased subsidy from the Jesuits of Micronesia was designated for teacher salaries. Hired teachers/administrators on contract rather than as volunteers may improve retention/experience level Rey Dahilan- Math teacher, SY 07-08, SY 08-09 Martin Carl- Vice Principal SY 08-09

Evidence
Staff Development Plan

School calendar for teachers; parent letter

Orientation schedule Staff development materials

Staff development materials

Financial aid letters; billing statement Contract

Peer observation forms Principal observation forms; observation Budgets (SY06-07; 07-08; 08-09)

Contracts for pay above stipend level

Office configurations paired teachers within subject areas, and more experienced with less experienced teachers. Improved biannual student course evaluation results: all courses have some variation of teaching method; teaching methods seem

Observation 39 Course evaluation results

appropriate to course content. Implemented differentiated instructional methods through Staff Development (especially for Math and English). Evaluation of and response to student complaints has improved. Implemented action research portion of Staff Development. Student work shows active involvement in learning.
Differentiated Instruction forms

Personal communications Development Calendar Student work

Primary survey findings:


82% of teachers responded that the principal is knowledgeable about instructional resources 18% of teachers responded that the principal helps faculty interpret test results 36% of teachers responded that the principal uses clearly communicated criteria for judging staff performance 91% of teachers responded that the principal is a visible presence on campus to both faculty and students

Evaluation Findings of Principal at end of SY 2007-2008

Ongoing/Future: o Develop Recruitment Plan utilizing media (radio & newspaper), alumni, and parents o Continue recruitment at Jesuit universities in Philippines o Begin recruitment at Jesuit universities in U.S. o Begin recruitment of retirees in F.S.M. o Begin recruitment of qualified librarian o Focus staff development on integrated reading and technology, and cooperative learning methods o Systematically follow-up on student course evaluations with interviews of random groups of students or class officers for clarification/elaboration Response of 2009 Midterm Review Visiting Team: Xavier has made acceptable progress toward this goal, evidence of which includes: a smooth transition in personnel regarding the (Jesuit) Director position, from Father Leger to Father McAuliff; the retention of recent Principal Anne Traynor for five years; the retention of current principal Ellen Derby a year beyond her original commitment; the (salaried) hiring of Mr. Martin Carl and his being groomed as principal commencing in 2009-10; and the hiring of a (salaried) mathematics teacher in 2007-08 Intelligent, articulate, and altruistic Jesuit Scholastics and Jesuit Volunteers continue to serve at Xavier for, on average, 1.7 year
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commitments. This goal is couched in prudent language. . will attempt to . . After all, the remote location and the third-world nature of Chuuk are not the kinds of features that entice persons to put down roots. Evidence of the challenge that attends this goal came in the form of a succinct question addressed to the Visiting Committee, Whom can we attractthere are no cultural outlets in Chuuk? There is thus a sense in which it is unreasonable to expect other than the kinds of (remarkable) volunteer commitments that Xavier has come to experience in its 57 year history. These commitments seem to work.. On another note, the staff development program is well-conceived, as it is designed for a school with a high rate of staff turnover. Major features of the program include a two-week orientation prior to the beginning of teaching, presentation of best teaching practices (as supported by research), groupings that facilitate peer-observation and the maturation of nascent teachers, and the principals quarterly evaluation of teachers. Xavier Follow-up since 2009 Midterm visit: Attracting and retaining a qualified, professional faculty and staff continues to be a difficult task for Xavier. This is due, partly to Xaviers remoteness, partly to the poor infrastructure of Chuuk State, and partly to the fact that Xavier does not have the kind of operating funds needed to attract long term, qualified, professional faculty to a remote island with poor infrastructure. As a result, Xavier remains dependent largely on a volunteer faculty. In spite of the difficulties, Xavier has made some positive moves in this area. Mr. Rey Anthony Dahilan, a paid math teacher, has been with Xavier since SY 2007-08. Fr. Rich McAuliff, SJ, has been director of Xavier since SY 2008-09; Mr. Martin Carl, the principal, has been at Xavier since SY 2008-09, and his wife, Mrs. Carl, has been at Xavier as our school nurse since SY 2008-09. Fr. Marc Roselli, SJ, who joined the Xavier faculty and staff in SY 2010-11, is a veteran teacher of our Jesuit high schools in New York, and Abuja, Ghana, and has graciously accepted a request from the New York Provincial to join us here for an undetermined number of years. Having identified math and science as an area that Xavier would commit finances to hire a long-term faculty, during Christmas break of SY 2010-2011, Xavier recruited Mr. Chris Valdehueza, an electrical engineer who graduated from Xavier University in the Philippines, for a long term teaching position at Xavier, beginning SY 2011-12. Mr. Valdehueza was recommended by Mr. Rey Dahilan, our current salaried math teacher. Mr. Valdhueza graduated from Xavier University, the Jesuit university in Cagayan de Oro, Mindinao, Philippines, the same University that Mr. Dahilan graduated from. Mr. Valdehueza and Mr. Dahilan also had the same mentor, Fr. Cal Poulin, SJ, and Fr. Poulin also highly recommended Mr. Vadehueza for a position at Xavier. After following up with a resume, Xavier purchased Mr. Valdehueza airline ticket direct from Manila to Chuuk, to avoid the need for a transiting VISA through Guam. When Mr. Valdehueza tried to board his flight, Continental airlines refused to let him board, even though he had a letter of employment from Xavier High School with him. Xavier then paid for several additional flights so Mr. Valdehueza could apply for a transiting VISA through Guam to come to Xavier. When he was refused a VISA in Manila, Xavier flew him to Palau to apply for a transiting VISA from the U.S. Embassy in Palau. He was denied a VISA a second time. At that point, July, 2011, Xavier had no choice but to abandon its attempt to bring Mr. Valdehueza to Xavier for a teaching position. Xavier was able to fill his position with an
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American volunteer math and science teacher, but our goal was to hire a long term faculty member for Xavier. Xavier has also prioritized the following positions to commit its resources: 1) a principal; 2) a dean of students; and 3) a math teacher. As a result of studying some of our data from standardized tests, Xavier has identified the position of English teacher has our next priority for committing resources.

ACTION PLAN ITEM #2: XHS will continue to develop a responsive form of governance. [Critical Area 2: The governing authority and Director should work to develop a
responsive form of governance.] Results Evidence

Board went on retreat promoting principles of responsive Observation governance. Board members are discussing governance structure. Joint meetings of Board and Jesuit Consulters occurred. Meeting minutes (06/06, 06/07, 01/08, 10/08) Meeting minutes 06/07, 01/08) (06/06,

Communication and consultation between Board chairman, E-mail communications; and local Board members, and administrators throughout visits by chairman; the year has increased. observation Board meetings agendas have included more time for Meeting minutes policy discussion and goal-setting; discussion of annual 01/08, 06/08) budget details has been reduced. (06/07,

Increased number of Board members to include more E-mail communications women and an equal representation from all island districts. Board bylaws are under review. Meeting minutes (03/09); NY Jesuit School By-laws

Ongoing/Future: o Reach agreement about school governance model that should be implemented o Review school mission and ESLRs as compared to goals in by-laws; align o Explore periodic open meetings for students with Board, or adding single student member to Board

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Response of 2009 Midterm Review Visiting Team: This goal is directed to the reality of the Board at Xavier, whose members include representatives from the various island nations scattered over Micronesia. (The goal does not refer to the Jesuits whose commitment of personnel and money to the school has ever exemplified their mission as men for others.)..... Xavier has made acceptable progress toward this goal, evidence of which includes: an increase in the number of Board members, to include more women as well as an equal representation from all island districts; productive meetings of the Board with Jesuit Consulters; an increase in the number and quality of Board meetings. This increased quality includes ample discussion of policy matters and goal-setting, not simply budget tedium vitae; a review of Board Bylaws; and the Boards support for the school-vision of the current Director. Xavier Follow-up since 2009 Midterm visit: The Xavier board has just concluded a 2 year review of its by-laws. Mr. Rodney Jacob, a Xavier board member and lawyer spearheaded the review, working with the Jesuits of the New York Province and lawyers for the New York Province. The Newly Amended and Restated Articles of Incorporation, and The Newly Amended and Restated Xavier By-Laws were approved in May, 2011, with minor revisions approved at its December, 2011 meeting. (The Newly Amended and Restated Articles of Incorporation, and The Newly Amended and Restated Xavier By-Laws are available in Appendix A of this self-study report. A more complete discussion and evidence of Xaviers work in the area of Governance can be found in Chapter IV: Self-Study Findings, Category A2: Governance.)

ACTION PLAN ITEM #3: XHS will develop and implement a comprehensive plan to meet needs in campus safety, health and sanitation. [Critical Area 3: The
governing authorities, school leadership and staff should develop a plan to determine needs in campus safety, health, and sanitation in order to maintain student well-being.] Results Safety plan developed by teachers. Evidence Safety plan

Donation of materials, professional expertise and labor by Roof; main building Mabuchi Company to repair and reseal the roof of the Main Building, which was beginning to deteriorate. Buses were donated by private donors in Japan. School used large boats for class trips and school picnics. Drinking water was monitored closely for sanitation. Buses Receipts for boat rental Observation

Diet Purchasing officer increased food quantity, increased Student Kitchen menu local food, and purchased lower-fat meats. Hired local farmer to sustain local food growth on campus. Contract; observation
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Distributed toilet tissue for proper use of composting Purchase orders toilets. Qualified Infirmarian gives annual check-ups, refers Observation; credentials students to hospital or clinic as necessary, donations from the Catholic Medical Mission Board, totaling $500,000 over 4 years; weekly dental clinic visits. School administrators banned betelnut/tobacco use; they Handbook; parent letters also banned of drug/alcohol logo clothing. Study Hall/ moderator attendance observation Observation; schedule Contract Contract Contract Free time schedule; rosters; security

Improved supervision during school day.

Improved Security for day and nighttime. Hired full-time staff member for janitorial services. Hired full-time staff member for mechanic services. Hired full-time staff member for electric services.

Purchased a high-pressure water sprayer for cleaning, pressure sprayer particularly for shower house and toilet facility. Purchased eyewash station for Science Laboratory. Built more study hall desks; repaired old ones. eyewash station desks

Painted and refurbished three classrooms, both the exterior buildings and interior. Installed new lighting in classrooms and offices. lights

Weekly Health class offered to Sophomore students 1st class schedule semester. Full-time Dorm Moderator is on duty for boys supervision. boys schedule Purchased sports equipment with grant from Australia. sports equipment Small Grants

Installed additional toilets in Girls Restroom and renovated Aus Aid facilities. Scheme

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Ongoing/Future: o Fire and intruder procedures should be publicized and drilled o Seek grant for Health textbooks; add to Sophomore curriculum as full-time course o Purchase individual lockers for storage of all students academic materials o Install fans in classrooms o Continue to explore the possibility of hiring a fullor part-time professional counselor Response of 2009 Midterm Review Visiting Team: Xavier HS has made acceptable progress toward this goal, evidence of which includes: ongoing monitoring of drinking water; increases in food quantities for students, with attention to the purchase of lower-fat foodstuffs; the hiring of a local farmer to sustain food-growth on campus; provision of a qualified infirmarian to attend to students health needs; annual reception of $500,000 in medical supplies (!) from the Catholic Medical Mission Board; purchase of a highpressure water-sprayer for cleaning showers and toilet facilities; recent procurement of a major grant for (imminent) up-grading of girls restroom facilities; improvements in supervision of students and in campus security at night; hiring of 3 full-time staffa janitor, a mechanic, and an electrician; and major renewal of the main building (i.e., repainting interior and exterior walls and replacement and waterproofing of the decaying roof). Xavier Follow-up since 2009 Midterm visit: Xavier has a full-time nurse who lives on campus, and who has trained selected student infirmarians to help with non-critical issues on weekends. Although the $500,000 donation of medical supplies from the New York Medical Mission Board has ceased, Xavier gets medicine from generous individual donors (like Mr. Pouzar) and from the Xavier High School-Chuuk State Insurance Program. All Xavier High School Employees are required to have the Chuuk State Insurance and XHS pays premiums. At the end of each month, $8,000 worth of medicine is available for Chuuk State Employees. Our school nurse, Mrs. Carl, uses our Chuuk State health insurance to get medicine for the school (every month). Beginning with the SY 2010-2011, Xavier hired a full-time day watchman to watch the dorm area when students are in class, and watch the classroom areas when students are at lunch. Xavier has also put in place an Intruder Procedure plan that is incorporated in the student and faculty handbooks, are in place in each classroom, and have been practiced by students and faculty. For the summer of 2009, Mr. Pouzar built student lockers for the entire student population. They have been in place since the opening of SY 2009-2010. Xavier has rewired much of the original wiring on campus, has installed fans in 3 of the classrooms, has completed the girls bathroom facilities, and has received an Australian DAP grant for the purchase of 10 water filter systems for the student kitchen. Xavier also has received a Japanese Grass-roots Grant titled The Xavier Human Security Project which is earmarked for the purchase of 2 new used buses and a 9-seat, four-wheel drive van (to go into areas where the buses cannot go) so that all of our female students may travel to school inside of vehicles, instead of sitting outside, on the back of pick-up and flatbed trucks, exposed to the elements.
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At the beginning of the current SY 2011-12, Xavier has hired a gardener to grow and provide vegetables for both the student and faculty dining rooms. During the summer of 2011, Xavier began its renovation of the boys shower room. We are waiting for a pending grant to be able to tile the shower-room and complete the renovation. Xavier also has an Australian SGS (Small Grant Scheme) grant pending to renovate the boys benjo. Finally, Xavier has hired a new dean of students/dorm moderator who monitors and supervises students during non-school hours.

ACTION PLAN ITEM #4: XHS will align the curriculum with U.S. and F.S.M. standards to ensure students participate in a sequential, integrated, challenging and relevant 9-12 program. [Critical Area 4: The school leadership and faculty should
collaborate in the development, assessment, and supervision of a coordinated and sequential 912 program, with an integrated skills curriculum that focuses on mathematics, reading, and writing.] Results Evidence Increased principal observation (once per quarter) with Principal observation forms; post-observation meetings. meetings Consistent student course evaluations. Data from standardized testing shared with teachers. Course Evaluation form Staff meeting hand-outs agendas; course

Review and revision of course competencies in English, Restated Math, Science and Typing/Computer. competencies

Defined course competencies for Social Studies and New course competencies Religion Developed curriculum guides for Social Studies. Curriculum guides

Developed curriculum guide for the freshman Study Skills Curriculum guides course; integrated Study Skills course material into other classes. Tutoring provided for students on Academic Probation. Observation; parent letter

Collected mid-quarter grades for students on Academic Mid-quarter grade sheets Probation. Summer remedial studies offered for freshmen. Remedial studies schedule; parent letter; course materials
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Restated the math entrance exam to reflect content that 2007 XHS Entrance Exam student should learn through Grade 8, as indicated in F.S.M. National Standards. Restated the reading comprehension sections of the English 2007 XHS Entrance Exam entrance exam to incorporate passages of different types of writing at different reading levels. Summer prep program offered for incoming students from Parent letter; Chuuk. materials Hired qualified math teacher on contract. Rey Dahilan contract course

Implemented Integrated reading staff development for reading handouts; two consecutive quarters. observation form syllabi; Integrated, on-going units of SSR (silent, sustained reading) course recommended books shelf in Literature and English Skills courses provided. in Library All senior students are now required to enroll in English course requirement table; and Mathematics courses, as recommended by the Board of Board meeting minutes Directors. (06/06)
Primary survey findings:

Math Skills interviews 38% of students study math for 20 minutes per day, the
recommended study time for each subject 20% of students math study practices are inadequate; 80% of students skills are adequate or good Difficulties cited frequently include: understanding word problems, working with fractions, percentages or square roots, and the fact that math problems have one correct answer only

survey

and

Ongoing/Future: o Define course competencies for Japanese and Chuukese o Review and revise curriculum guides for English, Math, Science and Social Studies to align with standards and course competencies o Produce curriculum guides for Religion and Typing/Computer Skills aligned with standards (as possible) and course competencies o Develop summative assessments to measure student proficiency relative to course competency standards o Develop formative assessments to measure student progress toward course competency standards o Test and refine initiatives to improve students learning of reading skills o Publicize content of the new Math Entrance Exam to public and private elementary schools
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Response of 2009 Midterm Review Visiting Team: This goal may be the most challenging of the goals that Xavier has set for itself because of the multifaceted nature of what is meant by standards, because of a transitional staff, and because achievement of the goal is partially dependent on resources (textbooks). Xavier HS has made acceptable progress on the goal, but there is yet the need for more formal and systematic identification/accomplishment of standards at Xavier, and so this goal goes forward in 2009 as a salient curriculum task for the school.. Xavier HS has developed its curriculum in two ways: with an eye on student outcomes (i.e., ESLRs), creation of curriculum guides, consisting of content area units within an overall subject/course; and identification of course competencies, consisting of academic skills relative to knowing (intellect) and doing (will) that any given course cultivates. Xavier has done a respectable job of developing and delivering a curriculum in core subjects according to these two understandings of curriculum. In particular, the work of one or two teachers in creating course data bases along these lines is altogether commendable. But one may legitimately wonder whether the Xavier curriculum work conforms to content standards that are sufficiently comprehensive, sufficiently reputable. After all, what is meant by content standards are the essential and complete contents of a course (and of sequential courses) that a state or a Catholic diocese (or FSM) has established for its schools. So, for example, there are California content standards, and Hawaii content standards, and etc. But there are no national (i.e., USA) content standards even though many states have many of the same content standards, and even though many content standards are informed by determinations of national bodies such as the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics. To reiterate, there are (only) state standards in the USA. Moreover, a check of the internet for uniform and comprehensive FSM standards revealed that these were in draft form and bore a 2006 copyright. Thus, when the above goal mentions US and FSM standards, one is left to wonder whether Xaviers curriculum is content diffuse, thus insufficiently sequential and integrated. Xavier might be better served were it to norm its curriculum to one source of content standards, say, Californias1. This norming would begin by settling on one source, it would move to accessing this sources standards for each of the subjects that constitute the XHS curriculum, and then it would include the (systematic) work of mapping Xaviers curriculum in order to, as it were, locate where the standard is taught/mastered. The latter work would include making sure to adapt the Xavier curriculum to incorporate (important) standards not hitherto taught To be realistic, this goal is influenced by textbooks. In the best of all worlds a school would be able to afford state-of-the-art textbooks normed to cutting-edge content standards. . in the best of all worlds. At Xavier, affording state-of-the-art textbooks for every student in every subject is not possible. This fact must be acknowledged by all (including accreditors), even as all can agree that this item (current textbooks) ought to be a priority item in the budget. The best hope for progress on this goal is a hope that is grounded in a genuine estimation of the teachers whom Xavier attracts. These teachers do not come to Xavier as such. That is, they generally do not possess formal training as teachers. And this lack of training only adds to the
1

This is NOT a plug for CA standards as such. It is an encouragement for the deliberate selection of one source of content standardschallenging standards at that, so as to satisfy the Jesuit commitment to intellectual excellence and so as to regularize the work of mapping the accomplishment of standards over Xaviers curriculum. For that matter, the choice of a source of standards might be informed by advice from the Pacific Region Educational Laboratory.

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degree of difficulty in attainment of the goal. But there is sense in which this degree of difficulty is overcome. This sense derives from human capital, the teachers themselves. They are welleducated, intelligent, creative, altruistic, and idealistic young adults. Moreover, what they accomplish in their (brief) sojourn at Xavier is meritorious. Through dealing discipline, constructing course content, leaning on each other, learning from each other, making mistakes and amending them, and heeding their wise Jesuit mentors, they succeed in serving the educational aspirations and needs of Micronesian youth. Because of their qualities and their work, these teachers transitional presence at Xavier is more presence than transition. They leave lasting and positive impressions. They are a credit to Xavier. Finally here, lest the truth not be served, it is important to state (that) Xavier High School has acted with professional integrity in identifying curriculum guides and course competencies, and this work has had the effect of promoting students incorporation of the ESLRs and other standards that the school has identified. Xaviers Follow-up since 2009 Midterm Review: Xavier has not made much progress on Action Plan #4 since the Midterm review. All seniors are now required to take 4 courses (Math, Science, English, and Religion), plus two electives. As of SY 2011-12, seniors have to take 6 courses each semester. As a result of our Midterm review, and recommendations by the team to align our curriculum standards to one place instead of multiple (e.g. FSM and California standards), Xavier has been in contact with St. Ignatius Prep in San Francisco. St. Ignatius Prep, a Jesuit high school in San Francisco, has been working on a developing their course content based on the Grad at Graduation, and applicable state/national (California) standards. They will have completed their work by May, 2012, and have said they will be happy to share with Xavier High School, what they have done. St. Ignatius Prep, with a student enrollment of 1,450 and a faculty and staff of 150, has the resources to do this kind of work, and sharing it with Xavier High School is what the network of Jesuit school across the U.S. (JSEA) have been doing for decades sharing resources. Xavier will then further refine St. Ignatius work to fit our uniquely Micronesian culture. This will addressed fully in our School-wide Action Plan.

ACTION PLAN ITEM #5: XHS will acquire and maintain technology, and integrate it into the learning process. [Critical Area 6: The governing authorities, school
leadership and staff should develop a long-range plan for acquiring and maintaining technology and integrating it into the learning process.] Results Evidence A staff member was trained in I.T. by PREL, sponsored by T.R. Mori contract (06-07) Chuuk DOE. Hired full-time I.T. coordinator. T.R. Mori contract (07-08)

20 reconditioned laptop computers for students were Laptops donated.


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Computer Lab was set up with 25 laptops/PCs enough student Computer Room computers for one section of students to work individually. Back-up batteries purchased for all student and staff batteries; antivirus software computers to reduce damage due to frequent power outages; antivirus software installed on all computers. Integrating technology staff development quarter. Handouts; tech observation forms

Increased number of Internet computers for students and Billing statements teachers by switching from dial-up to T1 line. Loaded Microsoft Office suite onto all computers in student Computer hard drives lab. Loaded Encyclopedia Britannica program onto computers in teacher lab and some student computers. all Computer hard drives

Reorganized curriculum to accommodate Typing in Class schedule freshman year; integrated some content from basic Computer course into Typing. Trained student computer lab proctors. Observation

Installed Cybera software to allow monitoring and blocking software of computer lab use from a remote location. Installed Clareline course software. Integrated technology into selected courses. Cataloged equipment in Science Lab storeroom. Purchased additional science laboratory equipment. software integrating technology handouts; lesson plans Storeroom Storeroom

Science lab equipment and reagents donated by Tokyo Chemistry and Biology equipment; Physics Marine Rotary Club and Clarion University of PA equipment Chemistry, Biology, and Science lab equipment, science textbooks, and math Physics equipment textbooks donated by the Chuuk State Department of Biology, Physics, Algebra I, Education. Geometry, Algebra II, and PreCalculus books Grant provided for LCD projector/screen from Yokwe Yuk LCD projector Womens Club [Marshalls].
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2 class sets of scientific calculators donated by former calculators teachers. Shared hard drive installed for teachers, with delineated XHS Faculty Hard Drive folders for unit-building. Student Center constructedwhich will include nine Student Center design plans computer stations (open even when Computer Lab is not). Applied for a 2nd JICA (Japanese Overseas Volunteer Core) JICA application who will upgrade and maintain computer systems. Applied for a grant from the Yokwe Yuk Club for Grant application computerized library cataloging system.
Primary survey findings:

Technology Use survey and interviews 60% of freshmen students report learning new technology use
skills through their courses. All classes, although predominantly junior and senior students, report needing more practice with Internet research, and more guidance about how to research effectively. All classes note the need to increase Internet speed in the student Computer Room

Ongoing/Future: o Expand computer lab (2nd lab or larger space) o Install additional Internet lines (or other strategy) to increase speed o Evaluate content and sequence of tech use within courses to identify appropriate times for preliminary instruction, and any gaps in preliminary instruction or content o Consider scheduling 1-semester senior elective in Computer Science, Multimedia/Web Design or Information Technology if an instructor is available o Consider expanding the library resources by building onto the actual building and also cataloging all resources on a computer database o Establish Radio station, working with Chuuk State, on campus

Response of 2009 Midterm Review Visiting Team: Xavier HS has made acceptable progress toward this goal, evidence of which includes: hiring of a f/t I.T. coordinator (2007-08) and arranging for the services of a JICA (Japanese Oversees Volunteer Core) person skilled at I.T. (current year); increasing internet access by replacing dial-up with a T-1 line; procurement of 25 laptops/PCs for the computer lab; installation of softwareMicrosoft Office, Encyclopedia Britannica, Cybera, Clarelineonto computers in teachers study room and onto some lab PCs; provision of a word processing course for freshmen; installation of a shared hard-drive for teachers in their study room; planning for nine
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computer stations in the (under-construction) Student Center. Even as the school has made acceptable progress on this goal, the goal is yet operative because of the significance of technology for educationin particular, the computer; because of the constantly expanding capacities of computer-assisted instruction; and because of students affect/skills at computer use. -----------------------------Xavier Follow-up since 2009 Midterm visit: In SY 2009-10, Xavier introduced computers to the Student Center, but due to the slow internet connectivity this has been delayed until March, 2012, when ADSL will be available at Xavier. During the summer of 2011-2012, all faculty offices have internet accessibility.

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In addition to amending and then responding to the imperatives of its school-wide Action Plan, Xavier did a thorough assessment of every discrete growth point from its 2006 Self-Study. A number of these points were embraced in the (integral, amended) Action Plan. Those that were not received responsible attention, leading the Visiting Committee to commend Xavier for its exhaustive self-scrutiny. (Some of these points will receive mention in the next section of this report.)

PART I - SECTION B: Responses to Areas of Growth Identified in the Schools Self-Study: In addition to the 5 Action items identified and responded to above, the 2006 WASC Visiting Team identified other Areas of Growth that Xavier should address. These also were responded to in our 2009 Midterm Report, and are reported here. Xaviers responses to these areas of Growth since the 2009 Midterm Review are in bold type. The school has made progress on aligning the school program to the ESLRs. The Board of Directors is now updated on the progress made on the schools Action Plan at each meeting. In the past three years, the schools Directors have made intentional efforts to engage the school community in the local community. Teachers have begun to align the curriculum with standards under the guidance of the Principal. Improving teacher and administrator retention would have a positive impact on student learning, and continues to be a critical area of need. Other continuing areas of need include identifying funding sources to cover rising food and utilities costs, and maintaining school facilities and vehicles. Immediate measures have been taken in SY 08-09 to increase the schools revenues. Some of those ways include 1) creation of a Xavier High School brochure, which accompanied a letter sent to all former donors and volunteers, Jesuit Communities of the New York Province, and alumni of each island district; 2) Alumni Association commitments of $6,000 per district for SY 08-09 and $10,000 from each for SY 09-10 and SY 10-11.

A: Organization for Student Learning Areas of Growth (A1): School Purpose The ESLRs must undergo more frequent review to serve as a relevant guide for the schools program. Every three years, the ESLRs will be reviewed by the Board, administrators, teachers and student groups to assess whether or not they still correspond to the schools direction as envisioned by the Board and perceived by all stakeholders.
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The ESLRs were substantially restated during SY 2004-05. Reviewing the ESLRs at the beginning of SY 2008-09, teachers and administrators determined that they still accurately describe the desired outcomes for our Xavier graduates. The ESLRS will be revisited at the beginning of SY 2009-2010. adaptations will be incorporated into the full study report in 2012. Xaviers response since the Midterm Review: The director, while on Sabbatical, revisited the ESLRs during SY 2010-11, comparing Xaviers ESLRs with the Jesuit Secondary Education Associations (JSEA) Grad at Graduation. The JSEA is Sustained efforts to align the schools program with the ESLRs are reliant on the recruitment and retention of more long-term teaching staff members and administrators. The school maintained the same Director and Principal from SY 2005-06 through SY 2007-08, allowing work on the aligning the school program to the ESLRs to be sustained consistently over a three-year period. Re-emphasis of service and religious activities has encouraged students to achieve the ESLRs of conscientiousness and compassion. Planning and evaluation of student summer Community Service Projects have increased: classes attend informational meetings in mid-May, during which they have the opportunity to ask questions about expectations for the projects. Parents and site supervisors receive letters explaining the project expectations. A teacher conducts follow-up interviews with each senior based on the content of their reflection papers and journals. Site supervisors are requested to submit confidential evaluations of the students performance. Student involvement in preparing for religious services has increased, which has led to more active participation by students in the services. A few campus traditions that conflicted with the ESLRs have been altered or eliminated. Utilizing the principle of backward design, we have made progress in aligning our curriculum to the ESLRs. In SY 2007-08, with guidance from the Principal, teachers used the ESLRs to revise or develop course competencies, outlines of skills and knowledge that students should learn in each course. Teachers are currently revising or developing curriculum guides for each course that are aligned with the course competencies, and with F.S.M. or U.S. curriculum standards, as possible. The current process of curriculum development and alignment has been ongoing since Semester 2 of SY 2007-08. In spite of continued low teaching staff retention, and the administration turnover in SY 2008-09, improved documentation, and communication among the outgoing and
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Any changes or

incoming administrators, has made it possible to sustain the process of aligning the school program with the ESLRs. A planned effort should be made to incorporate parents in reviewing future drafts of the ESLRs. The ESLRs have not been modified since SY 2004-05, prior to the previous Self-Study. ESLRs will be revisited prior to SY 2009-2010. (Parents should be incorporated in future review and modification of the ESLRs.) Xaviers Response since the Midterm Review: Xavier has not as yet found a proper way to incorporate parents into the draft stage of review and modification of the ESLRs. In part this is due to the vast distances involved in including parents in the review process, and in part because it will entail a whole education process to help parents understand the essence of a Jesuit Education. As the Profile of the Grad at Graduation points out in its introduction, the Profile needs to be understood within the context of the mission and characteristics of Jesuit education.

Areas of Growth (A2): Governance


The Board needs to continue collaborating with the school Administration to develop and refine the use of the new governance model. Communication and consultation between all Board members and administrators throughout the year via e-mail should be more frequent. Communication has improved in the past year. New Board members from various island districts have been recruited to ensure that alumni and parents are well informed, no matter where they reside. Biannual meetings, inviting all Board members have been scheduled as well. Xaviers Response since the Midterm Review: As mentioned above in Part IA, and explained fully in Chapter IV: A2 Governance, and as evidenced by our Newly Amended and Restated Articles of Incorporation and Newly Amended and Restated Xavier By-Laws, which are found in the appendices of this SelfStudy Report, Xavier has refined and clarified its new governance model. Where the 2005-06 Self-Study Report stated, and the Visiting Team concurred, the role of the Major Superior in relation to Xavier and its board, needed to be clarified. There is now a Board of Members, and a Board of Directors. Certain responsibilities are reserved to the Board of Members. The director sits on both the Board of Members and the Board of Directors, and his role is clearly defined in the Articles of Incorporation. We believe that Xavier is now on the cutting edge for New York Jesuit schools, in relation to its
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Articles of Incorporation and its By-Laws. In addition, the Xavier board unanimously approved a motion that the Principal of Xavier High School be included as an ex-officio, non-voting member of the Board, as a way of increasing communication. While Xavier needs to continue to educate the Board as to what is proper to a board, and to continue to educate the board in the characteristics of Jesuit education, we have made much progress in the area of governance, and the board and the administration do communicate regularly with each other. The Xavier Organizational Chart reflects this two-tiered board. The role on the Board of the Regional Superior for the Jesuits needs to be clarified. Effective April 2009, a new Regional Superior for the Jesuits will take over. His role on the Board should be determined before this transition takes place. Xaviers Response since the Midterm Review: As mentioned above, with the adoption of the Newly Amended and Restated Articles of Incorporation, and the Newly Amended and Restated Xavier By-Laws, the role of the major superior is clearly defined. He is the head of the Board of Members, and an ex-officio, voting member of the Board of Directors, with qualified veto power. Board meetings agendas should include sufficient time to plan many aspects of the schools future, including, but not limited to, financial matters. Xaviers Response since the Midterm Review: As can be seen from agendas and Minutes of Board meetings, more time is allotted to plan for Xaviers future, and to come to a deeper understanding of the Characteristics of Jesuit education. the December, 2011 meeting, time was spent on Do You Speak Ignatian? and on understanding the relationship between Xaviers Philosophy, Mission and ESLRs. It is one of the reasons that the Principal is now an ex-officio, non-voting member of the board, and his presence allowed for a discussion on ways that Xavier might increase scores on standardized tests, and how Xavier might help 7th and 8th graders in elementary schools around Micronesia understand the mechanics of taking the Xavier Entrance exam. One of the outcomes of the discussion, as a way to help Xavier, was to ask St. Anthonys Catholic Elementary school in Guam to take the Xavier Entrance exam, so Xavier might have some comparison with students in Micronesia who are taking the test.

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Areas of Growth (A3): School Leadership


All school leaders should have adequate training. This necessitates additional studies for administrators, staff development for teachers, and routine training sessions for student leaders. In June 2006, the Principal completed two independent study graduate Education courses through St. Peters College, New Jersey. As part of the coursework, a researchbased Staff Development Plan for the school was developed. The Staff Development Plan has been implemented during SY 2006-07, 2007-08 and 2008-09. The plan includes a 10-day Teaching Staff Orientation during the 2 weeks before school begins. Continuing staff development includes quarterly peer and Principal observations focusing on given topics, seminars on research-based teaching methods, and curriculum alignment work. Training sessions for student leaders have been integrated into the week of planning meetings for the Student Senate prior to the start of each school year. Topics of the Senate training sessions for SY 2007-08 included school needs, mission & goals, organization and communication for leadership, conflict resolution, and school policies. This week of Senate training needs to be followed by additional training sessions throughout the school year. Xaviers Response since the Midterm Review: Xavier realizes that there is always more that needs to be done in this area. As of the current SY 2011-12, all administrators, faculty and students have gone through Do You Speak Ignatian? which is now included in the back of the Faculty and Student Handbooks. Before Xavier stakeholders can understand Xaviers Mission, Philosophy and ESLRs, they need to understand some of the crucial aspects of Jesuit education, such as cura personalis (car of the person), and the Magis (willingness to do the more.) All administrators, faculty and students also reviewed Xaviers Philosophy, Mission and ESLRs. Staff development continues on a monthly basis, and continues to include both peer and principal observation. In addition, beginning in SY 2009-10, Xavier has made available to all faculty a booklet called Teacher Preparation Days, which is a condensation of Harry and Rosemary Wongs The First Days of School. In the summer of 2010, the Principal and Acting Director attended a meeting of Jesuit Secondary School Administrators in Fukuoka Japan, as part of their professional development. Topics of discussion included how Jesuit how Jesuit School in the region of East-Asia might better network with each other, and the role of the laity in Jesuit Schools. The current director has begun to work with the principal on pursuing a Masters in Catholic School Administration. Existing leadership structures should undergo biannual review by the Board, teaching staff and Student Senate. This recommendation has not been fully implemented. The Principal has been formally evaluated by the teaching staff using a standard form each semester since the end of SY
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2007-08. Director.

The teaching staff should conduct a similar biannual evaluation of the

Xaviers Response since the Midterm Review: Xavier now believes that although it is proper that the Principal be evaluated by the teaching staff, the director should more properly be evaluated by the Board of Directors. Xavier now has a tool to do this, and it did conduct its first Board Evaluation of the Director at the end of its December, 2011 Board meeting. More formal collaboration between the teaching staff and Student Senate may encourage student Senators to recognize their role as leaders of the school. A few Student Senate members have been requested to participate in one session of the Faculty Orientation. A few Student Senate members have volunteered to join the teachers in focus groups studying particular critical areas. Before SY 07-08, the Student Senate participated in 6 half-day leadership training sessions, in addition to their usual planning sessions before the school year. Formal leadership training for the Student Senate is recommended to continue with more follow-up by the Senate Moderator and administrators or teachers during the school year. In January of 2009, the Student Senate conducted a self-evaluation of their own role and effectiveness in the school. This type of evaluation should continue each semester. Findings from this study will be available for the Visiting Team. Xaviers Response since the Midterm Review: At the end of the Faculty Orientation and the Student Body Association (SBA) orientation in August, 2011, the administration brought back an old Xavier tradition of hosting a joint faculty, SBA, Administration picnic barbeque at the Blue Lagoon, as a way of showing support for Xaviers Mission, and for each other, and as a way of showing how much more can be accomplished when everyone is pulling in the same direction. The school should seek resources to continue development of Leadership Institute sessions for all students. Most topics in Leadership Institute sessions, which primarily covered good governance, communication, and health, have been integrated into the regular school curriculum. Student evaluations indicated that student learning during SY 2004-05 Leadership Institute sessions was limited. All teachers were requested to serve as group leaders during the Institute; many teachers reported that they lacked the depth of knowledge of chosen topics needed to guide significant student learning. In addition to the Leadership Institute sessions, students have heard talks from the Ambassador of the United States to the Federated States of Micronesia, the Republic of Palau, and the Republic of the Marshall Islands. In addition the Ambassadors from
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Japan and Australia to the Federated States of Micronesia, the Republic of Palau, and the Republic of the Marshall Islands have visited campus and spoken to the students. In addition to the class and summer (individual) Community Service Projects, students have been active in our outreach to the Sapuk Village community. Beginning in January 2009, groups of students tutor at Sapuk Public Elementary School each morning. Through this experience, our students gather a grassroots understanding of the challenges facing public education here in Chuuk (i.e. student and teacher absenteeism, lack of materials and resources, poor infrastructure, etc.). Xavier students are becoming more aware of the challenges that face them as future leaders of their communities and countries. Xaviers Response since the Midterm Review: Xavier still needs to find funding for its leadership program, but some progress has been made. Xavier students are now regularly selected for the Junior Statesman Program in the U.S. each summer, and for both the FSM and International Close-up Programs. Each of these programs is designed to promote leadership and to help realize leadership potential.

Areas of Growth (A4): Staff The school and Board must develop a long-term strategy for hiring qualified administrators and teaching staff members and retaining them. The school should plan to hire an Assistant Director, Principal and Dean of Students who will be able to remain at the school for at least four years. The school should seek to retain one teaching staff member in each subject area with more than two years of teaching experience. Since SY 2006-07, the Regional Superior of the Jesuits of Micronesia has been allocating additional funding to the school for teacher salaries so that administrators can hire teachers, rather than relying solely on volunteers. One credentialed teacher (Mathematics) has been employed for the last two years; a second credentialed teacher (Science) was retained for five years; a third credentialed teacher (Social Studies) has volunteered the last two years. A variety of strategies continue to be used as necessary to hire administrators and staff members. In some semesters, the Assistant Director and/or Dean of Students positions have been vacant. Limited progress has been made on teacher/administrator retention. The possibility of hiring additional credentialed teachers or administrators from the Philippines or South Pacific nations, or through career/volunteer centers at Jesuit universities in the U.S., should be pursued.

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Xaviers Response since the Midterm Review: As mentioned above, in SY 2008-09, Xavier hired Mr. Martin Carl, as vice-principal, with the intention of his moving into the role of principal in SY 2009-10. Mr. Carl is now in his 3rd year as Principal of Xavier High School, and is expected to be with Xavier at least as long as his daughter is attending Xavier High School, which is another 3 and years. Xavier hired a dean of students for SY 2010-11. Xavier has hired a new dean of students for the current SY 2011-12, a Xavier alumnus from the class of 2003.. The dean is committed to a three year contract. As mentioned above, Xavier also hired a new math and science teacher for SY 2011-12 that was supposed to be for a multi-year contract, but because of VISA problems, he was not able to come to Chuuk. This continues to be a concern to Xavier, and we have identified as our next critical area for funding the hiring of an experienced English teacher. This will be difficult, as Xaviers ability to recruit Americans for this job is limited, but more importantly, because there is little to offer someone to come to Chuuk. One of the Midterm reviewers reminded us that while we need to exert every effort in accomplishing this goal, we also need to be realistic. The reviewer noted What are you going to offer them for coming to Chuuk and Xavier to work - a trip to Guam every weekend for shopping and movies?

The school and Board should continue attempts to hire Micronesian teachers and administrators. A qualified, Micronesian Assistant Principal was hired on a one-year contract for SY 2008-09. One Micronesian was hired to teach during Sem. 2 of SY 2006-07, and was retained through Sem. 1 of SY 2007-08. Hiring qualified Micronesian teachers and retaining them for more than one year continues to be a challenge. Many Xavier graduates are invited to work for the national and local governments, with whom Xavier salaried cannot compete. In addition, many graduates of Xavier choose to remain in the United States after graduating from U.S. colleges because the Micronesian job market is so saturated. The deteriorating infrastructure in Chuuk (poor road condition, erratic power, sanitation) and its negative reputation for violence, makes it challenging to attract qualified faculty and staff for long term employment at Xavier High School. Xaviers Response since the Midterm Review:

Beginning in SY 2009-10, Mr. Martin Carl became Principal of Xavier High School. In SY 2010-11, Mr. Jeffrey Panuel was hired as Dean of Students, and in SY 2011-12, Mr. Hilary Hosia, class of 2003, was hired as Dean of Students. Ms. Yumiko Lomongo, class of 2007, and a Gates Millennium Scholar, and recent graduate of Dominican College in California, was hired for the spring semester of SY 2011-12, and has graciously extended her contract with us for SY 2011-12, before she returns to college. Finding and retaining local, qualified Micronesians for positions at Xavier continues to be a struggle, as most qualified people
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(usually Xavier alumni) continue to find much better salaried jobs in the government and public sectors, either in Chuuk, or at the national FSM government in Pohnpei, or have decided to remain in the U.S. after college. Contracts for long-term administrators and teachers should include provisions for staff members who do not possess professional credentials to complete relevant coursework in Education at the schools expense. The school solicited and received funding from the NY Jesuit Province to allow the previous Principal to complete 6 graduate Education credits. All administrators and teachers currently on staff either possess credentials or are short-term. Xaviers Response since the Midterm Review: While not yet explicitly stated in our contracts, we are working with Mr. Rey Dahilan to help him obtain a masters degree in math, while still remaining at Xavier. As mentioned above, we are looking at ways of funding for the current principal to obtain masters in Catholic School Administration. Both of these are, however, in the preliminary stages.

Areas of Growth (A5): School Environment

The school and Board must develop a long-term strategy for hiring qualified administrators and teaching staff members and retaining them. The school and Board should continue attempts to hire Micronesian teachers and administrators. Contracts for long-term administrators and teachers should include provisions for staff members who do not possess professional credentials to complete relevant coursework in Education and/or Counseling at the schools expense. This is addressed in A4 Growth Areas. Xaviers Response since the Midterm Review:

Apart from what was mentioned above, nothing further has been done in this area.

The menu in the student kitchen should be evaluated for nutritional content. The menu in the student kitchen should include enough fruits and vegetables to meet the nutritional requirements of adolescents. There have been efforts to purchase more local produce and fish, and lower-fat meats, but the menu in the student kitchen is still limited by the availability of local and imported fruits and vegetables. At the beginning of SY 2008-2009, a local farmer was hired to maintain the growth of local fruits and vegetables on the perimeter of campus. There
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have been more local foods available, but this recommendation has not been fully implemented. Xaviers Response since the Midterm Review: Beginning in SY 2011-12, a gardener was hired by Xavier to increase the amount of local fruits and vegetables available on campus, for both students and faculty. We are harvesting cucumber, long beans, cabbage, pumpkin, breadfruit and eggplant, in addition to Papaya, bananas, mangos, and in season, melons. While students like the fruit, it is still an uphill battle to get them to eat their vegetables. At present, we are not producing enough vegetables to supply the student kitchen. Food storage and preparation methods used in the student kitchen should be monitored more frequently. Cooks should be trained in food safety, and the school should retain cooks who are willing and able to maintain adequate food safety standards. The schools Purchasing Officer and Kitchen Supervisor, Rufina Defang, directly oversees food storage and the preparation of most student meals. According to the Infirmarian, the instances of reported student illnesses attributable to food prepared and served in the Student Kitchen are decreasing from about six during SY 2005-06 to about three during SY 2006-07 and one in SY 07-08. Student complaints about food preparation in the student kitchen have also decreased. Xaviers Response since the Midterm Review: Apart from buying a new student stove and freezer, nothing further has been done in this area. To prevent the spread of disease, sinks should be installed in the student dining hall and toilet facilities so that students may wash their hands. One sink was reinstalled in the student dining hall. There are two sinks in the girls restroom. At least one sink should be installed in the boys toilet facility. Xaviers Response since the Midterm Review: Xavier currently has an SGS grant pending to renovate the boys bathroom (benjo.) When funding is granted, there will be 4 sinks in the boys bathroom. There are now 4 sinks in the girls bathroom. Otherwise, Xavier has not progressed since 2009. Plans to improve the worship space on campus by building a new chapel should be executed. The Madonna della Strata Chapel was constructed during Semester 2 of SY 2007-08. The chapel was officially opened on May 28, 2008. The open-air chapel is designed with island-style architecture, and overlooks the Chuuk lagoon. The new chapel can comfortably accommodate about 250 people.
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In addition to formal schools masses, the chapel has increasingly become the focal point for the local Chuukese Catholic community of Sapuk village. With the assistance of the Xavier students, Sunday School classes have begun for the children of Sapuk. On February 22, 2009, twenty-one children from Sapuk were baptized into the Catholic Church. Xaviers Response since the Midterm Review: As shown above, this recommendation has been fully acted on. At the end of each school year, students and staff members should be surveyed about the school environment. This would allow the Leadership Team to monitor the schools environment, as perceived by community members. Survey results could be used to measure the effectiveness of improvements that have been made at the school, and to formally collect suggestions for additional improvements. A school environment survey of teachers was conducted in June 2008. The results of the survey will be available for the Visiting Team.

Areas of Growth (A6): Reporting Student Progress

Teachers must understand and agree upon a standard system for assigning effort and profile grades. The school handbook specifies student behaviors that merit an effort grade of 1. At the beginning of each school year, teachers are required to distribute course syllabi that include explanations of the academic and effort grading systems for each course. The Principal offers guidance to teachers about the process of assigning effort grades. The procedure for determining student profile (character) grades by consensus in a faculty meeting has been re-instituted. [In SY 2004-05, an administrator assigned profile grades using the mode of the suggested grades submitted by teachers.]

Xaviers Response since the Midterm Review: The Xavier faculty understand and agree upon a standard system for assigning effort and profile grades. It is articulated clearly in the faculty and student handbooks.

The school must continue efforts to locate, and track the progress of, alumni.

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Some female alumni were located prior to the celebration of the 30th Anniversary of Female Student Admission in May 2007. Alumni of the Class of 2007 have been tracked for one year since their graduation. There have been significant efforts to establish Alumni groups in each island district. Currently, there are groups in each district who have organized committees. In September 2008, the school director began meeting with alumni groups in each of the six island districts served by Xavier High School. To date, meetings have been held with alumni groups in Chuuk (September 2008), Pohnpei (January 2009), Palau (February 2009), and the Marshall Islands (March 2009). In addition to helping each district reorganize and elect new officers of their alumni associations and giving them target goals for financial assistance, and email has been built of those alumni living in Micronesia and abroad. Much progress has recently been made in tracking Xavier alumni. For example, each member of the class of 1998 has been contacted via email. Xaviers Response since the Midterm Review: There are currently eight Friends of Xavier (FOX) communities: Chuuk, Pohnpei, Marshall Islands, Yap, Palau, Saipan, Hawaii, and in the mainland U.S. By the end of SY 2011-12, there will also be a FOX Guam. These FOX groups have been helpful in locating our alumni. In addition, thanks to the help of two alumnae, a Xavier database of alumni was developed in SY 2010-11. Currently, two of our faculty, both alumni, are continuing to fill in the gaps, using Facebook and other social media sources. The database should be 90% complete by February, 2012. The school must evaluate the assessment tools currently in use to determine if they can be used to accurately evaluate student understanding. Curriculum guides and assessment tools currently in use must be evaluated to determine if they evaluate students progress toward meeting course competencies, that is, student progress toward the ESLRs. Once the assessment tools have been designed to assess progress toward the ESLRs, teachers will be asked to collect samples of student work for teachers in future years to use as benchmarks for assessment. Teachers using similar assessment tools in various subject areas will be asked to align their benchmark papers and agree on common rubrics for grading. Addressed in Results, Evidence and Ongoing/Future Actions for Action Plan Item #4.

Xaviers Response since the Midterm Review: This remains a serious concern at Xavier and will be addressed in our School-wide Action Plan at the end of this report. Xavier has made some progress in identifying a plan for moving forward. St. Ignatius Prep, a Jesuit High School in San Francisco that is also WASC accredited is finishing a new Curriculum guides and standards that will incorporate both California State standards and the Jesuit Secondary Education Associations (JSEA) Profile of the Grad at graduation. Their work will be complete in
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May, 2012. Xavier has been in contact with St. Ignatius Prep, and as a fellow Jesuit school, they are very willing to share their curriculum guides and standards with Xavier. Xavier will then proceed to adapt SIs work, and adapt it to our local situation.

To ensure the accuracy of student records, and save the time spent by staff members calculating and checking grades, a computer program for grade keeping should be purchased. Monies have not been budgeted to meet this recommendation, judged to be of relatively low priority in the previous three school years. Xaviers Response since the Midterm Review:

In SY 2011-12, FileMaker Pro for multiple users was purchased and installed. The programs are not compatible, data is scheduled to be transferred from the current program Access to FileMaker Pro during the summer of 2012.

To compare the achievement of our students to that of students in other schools and to assess our students progress toward meeting the ESLRs in English and mathematics, (1) all students should be required to take the College of Micronesia Entrance Exam during their senior year, (2) students should have the opportunity to take the SAT and TOEFL on any dates they choose during their junior or senior years, (3) all students should take a standardized exam during their sophomore year at the schools expense, and (4) all students should retake the Xavier Entrance Examination at the end of their freshman year. (1) Since 2006, the school has paid test fees for any students who wish to take the COM Entrance Test. In 2006 and 2007, all seniors were required to take the COMET, but a few students intentionally underperformed on the test. Sitting for the COMET is now optional, but most seniors choose to take the test. Analysis of the COMET results for all FSM high schools, provided by COM in 2006 and 2008, offers a measure for comparing Xaviers outcomes to those of other regional schools. However, the test instrument and scoring rubric have varied too substantially each year for comparison of the results across years to be valid. (2) Xavier was designated the SAT test center for Chuuk in SY 2006-07, alleviating the difficulties with testing students in a timely manner that occurred during previous years. Test dates for the SAT, TOEFL and ACT are publicized to students during College Counseling and to their parents via letter. In the Classes of 2006, 2007 and 2008, 100% of students took the SAT or ACT at least once; more than 45% of students in each year took the SAT or ACT twice. The availability of fee waivers for the SAT and ACT has improved students access to these tests: over 60% of students in each class have used test fee waivers. Effective in SY 2006-07, all senior students are required to sit for the TOEFL unless they achieve a SAT Critical Reading score of 550 or greater. The Principal communicates with the TOEFL test center in advance to assure that the center
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is prepared to administer the test. Student test results are now stored in spreadsheets so they can easily be disaggregated. (3) Since SY 2006-07, all students have taken the PSAT in Semester 1 of their junior year, when students are eligible for fee waivers. Administration of the PSAT during Semester 1 of sophomore year is cost-prohibitive. The Stanford-10 testing program was considered for sophomore level. However, test materials were not purchased because the science and mathematics sections of the Stanford-10 are designed to test progress through a K12 integrated Science and integrated Math curriculum, and are not well-aligned with the schools curriculum and students elementary school curricula. The Stanford English Language Proficiency Test (High School) and Stanford Diagnostic Mathematics Test 4 could be appropriately used to identify sophomore students who need remedial help in English or math. Administration of these tests would be relatively inexpensive beyond the initial investment in reusable test booklets if the tests were hand-scored using the provided rubric rather than submitted to Harcourt for machine-scoring. Scoring these tests, followed by analyzing the results, could also be a valuable professional development opportunity for our teachers. Purchase of these test materials should be further considered, with purchase of the Stanford ELPT given priority. (4) Since most admitted students have earned high scores on the XHS Entrance Exam, substantial changes in students scores due to freshman year instruction are unlikely, and minor changes would be insignificant. Use of standard summative assessments in each course from year to year may be the most feasible method for producing reliable data on the performance of freshman and sophomore students. (5) Introducing AP course offerings has been considered. Challenges include maintenance of qualified teaching staff members in specific subject areas, ability of students to pay the test fees, preparation of significant numbers of students for accelerated course work, and concerns about division of school resources between required courses and accelerated courses. SAT Subject Area tests are available for students who wish to attempt to earn college credit for their coursework. A few students who apply have the opportunity to take AP communication and government-related courses through the Junior Statesmen Summer School program. If students are interested, trials could be run of ordering AP exams in different subject areas to be administered to senior students. (Biology, English Language and Composition, Environmental Science, Physics B, and/or Psychology are suggested subject areas. AP testing in English Language and Composition or Physics B would be the most immediately feasible based on the current curriculum; testing in English Language and Composition might enhance the current senior English Skills course.) Gauging from student interest levels and their performance on the trial testing, the school could evaluate the option of submitting curricula to earn official AP designations for certain courses and prioritizing those subject areas for teacher retention. Alternatively, students could annually be given the option of taking AP tests in courses that will reach collegelevel without the school seeking to maintain AP designation of the same courses from year to year.
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Xaviers Response since the Midterm Review: Xaviers response since 2009 is more fully explained above in Significant Developments of this report, and in Chapter IV: A6, Reporting School Progress. Xavier uses Standardized test results to assess students preparedness for college coursework. Both Juniors and Seniors have a course in College Counseling, which helps them prepare for standardized tests. Today, all Xavier students take the pre-PSAT exam in September of their junior year, the PSAT in October of their Junior year, the ACT in February of their Junior Year, the SAT in May of their Junior year, and the SAT and the TOEFL exam in November of their Senior year. Since SY 2009-10, all Xavier seniors take the College of Micronesia Entrance Exam in March of their senior year. The result of this exam is also used to assess seniors readiness to do college coursework. Beginning this SY 2011-12, in an agreement with Chaminade University in Hawaii, all seniors apply to Chaminade. Chaminades Assistant Director of Admissions comes to Xavier during the fall semester and is able to tell which students are accepted, which ones need to wait for standardized test scores, which ones are on a waiting list, and which ones are denied admission. A record of the results of this is kept on file at Xavier. Beginning in SY 2011-12, a data base of all seniors, and the colleges and universities they have applied to, and the schools they have been accepted to has been created by our college counselors, and is on file at Xavier. Beginning SY 2011-12, 8th graders from St. Anthonys School in Tamuning, Guam will take the Xavier Entrance Exam. This will be used as a diagnostic tool to see how Micronesian 8th graders compare to students in Guam, and to try to assess the quality of the Xavier Entrance Exam.. We are aware of the limitations of this diagnostic tool, given the fact that St. Anthonys is a private, Catholic school that can choose to be selective, whereas many of the students in Micronesia who take the Xavier Entrance Exam are from public schools. But we believe it may be of help. The college counseling program should continue to be developed to prepare junior and senior students to be qualified, confident applicants to competitive colleges and universities. The College Counseling program at Xavier is now the best provided by any school or other agency in the region. Communication with parents about college preparation begins in the summer before students junior year, and continues through senior year, with information about standardized testing, college application deadlines, and FAFSA requirements. The program has been extended to begin in Semester 1 of junior year; all students are required to enroll. The college preparation units of the course have been restated to integrate more material specific to Micronesian college-bound students, and more lessons related to financial aid. PSAT and TOEFL preparation lessons have been added to the existing SAT preparation in the course. All students take full-length PSAT, SAT and TOEFL practice tests on Saturdays prior to their test dates.

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The Principal regularly communicates with admissions officers at the colleges to which students are applying. The Principal has explored the possibility of arranging admissions visits by representatives of colleges on the U.S. mainland. In response to our students interest, private universities are making generous financial aid offers to our qualified students. A listing of all scholarships targeting Micronesian students has been compiled, and is posted in a classroom along with other information about the college application process and standardized testing. The availability of College Board and other application fee waiver/deferral request forms has encouraged students to apply to multiple colleges; application fees were waived or deferred for 53 applications from Class of 2008 students. The Principal has petitioned Federal Student Aid to modify the FAFSA on the Web so that eligible non-citizens can sign the form on-line. Since 2007, all students have completed a course exit survey, the results of which have been used to modify the college counseling program. Tracking of the Class of 2007 in the semester following graduation indicates that 54% of the class enrolled in 4-year colleges, and 21% enrolled in 2-year colleges. The college enrollment rate has increased above the 12% in 4-year, 29% in 2-year initial enrollment rates reported for the Class of 2005. Xaviers Response since the Midterm Review: In addition to the above, all seniors have to have applied to at least one college or university before the end of the 1st semester. Since at least SY 2009-10, Chaminade Universitys Assistant Director of Admissions comes to Xavier High School to interview prospective students. Beginning this SY 2011-12, Xavier has an agreement with the Assistant Director of Admissions that all Xavier seniors will apply to Chaminade, and Chaminade will share the results with Xavier. Since SY 2009-10, all Xavier seniors take the Entrance Exam for COM-FSM (College of Micronesia- FSM). The results of the Entrance test are made public, including who is accepted, and who is accepted directly into credit level courses, and shared with Xavier. As mentioned above, and in the Significant Developments, since SY 2011-12, the college counseling program has procured fee waivers for all seniors for the PSAT, SAT, and ACT, and half-waivers for all seniors for the TOEFL exam. all Xavier students have been granted fee-waivers for Chaminade University, St. Martins University, Loyola Marymount University, University of San Francisco, Loyola College, Baltimore, and four other colleges or universities of their choice.
Areas of Growth (A7): School Improvement Plan

The Board and Leadership Team will work to develop a school wide strategic action plan by July 2006. Assessment to evaluate the progress of the action plan will be completed according to a timeline. Board meetings will serve as one forum for monitoring the action plans.
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The Action Plan was restated in May 2006 to address the Critical Areas noted by the 2006 WASC Visiting Team. The Board participated in modifying the action plan during their May 2006 meeting. The action plan has been updated annually. Progress on the action plan is reported by the Director at biannual Board meetings. Xaviers Response since the Midterm Review: The leadership team, led by the director of Xavier High School will monitor the Schoolwide Action plans, and the director will report progress to the Board. This needs to be explicitly stated under Duties of the Director in the Faculty and Student Handbooks. It will also be recommended to the Board of Members that the Board By-Laws be amended to include monitoring the implementation of the School-wide Action plans, under Duties of the Board. The Director be evaluated by other stakeholders. Teachers conducted an evaluation of the Principal at the end of SY 2007-08. The director, upon completion of his first year, will be evaluated by faculty, staff, and students at the end of the SY 2008-2009. Xaviers Response since the Midterm Review: The Newly Amended and Restated By-laws clearly states that one of the duties of the Board is to evaluate the Director on a yearly basis. The first evaluation of the Director by the Board was conducted after the December, 2011 Board meeting. The school should continue efforts to intentionally foster a good relationship with the local Sapuk community. Since 2006, the school has hosted an annual Workers Appreciation Day picnic, planned by students, for the local classified staff and their extended families. Since 2006, the freshman class has performed their annual community service project in Sapuk. Groups of students and teachers have continued to represent the school community at funerals in the local village. Each school year, efforts are made to hire a Chuukese Language & Culture instructor for the freshman students; a curriculum guide will be developed for this course, modeled after the Japanese I and II curriculum guides. Opportunities for interaction between the school community and local Catholic community have increased significantly through the initiation by the schools Director of frequent common religious services: planning for these services is shared by the school community and local community. Since January 2008, the Director has met regularly with local political and traditional leaders to evaluate the school/community relationship. In SY 07-08, six female students were sponsored by families in Sapuk; in SY 08-09, four female students were. The new director, Fr. Rich McAuliff, has built upon Fr. Arthur Legers initiatives to build our relationship with the local Sapuk community. In August 2008, the director
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announced to the Sapuk community that Xavier High School will offer five scholarships a year to Sapuk Elementary School students who pass the Xavier Entrance Exam. The purpose of this offer was to encourage parents to get more involved in their childrens education, especially in holding teachers accountable for showing up to school each day. In Xaviers 57 year history, no Sapuk Elementary student has passed the Xavier Entrance Exam. In September 2009, the Australian Ambassador agreed to collaborate with Xavier High School in assisting Sapuk Elementary to monitor a Small Grant Scheme to build new bathroom facilities. Xavier will help build the facility. In September 2009, Xavier students worked with a visiting group of Australian high school students from St. Ignatius College Riverview (Sydney, Australia), and the Sapuk community to clean and paint the school facilities. In October 2009, Xavier High School opened a store for the local Sapuk community. After purchasing a business license, we began selling rice, flour, kerosene, diesel fuel, and gasolineall items that no other store in Sapuk sells. This allows people to purchase these items locally, rather than traveling into the town center. In January 2009, Xavier received funding from the Australian government to purchase a new pump. This is utilized to pump water from Xaviers water catchments to the nearby 1-million gallon water storage tank. This water supply no only serves Xavier, but the local Sapuk village as wellwhich is most needed during the dry season. Also in January 2009, Xavier students, through Christian Life Communities (CLC), began tutoring at Sapuk Elementary School every morning. In February 2009, Xavier dedicated one of its Australian volunteers, Thomas Carr, as a full-time teacher at Sapuk Elementary School. Tom has been a tremendous asset to the school and brings them up to use Xaviers sports facilities each day at noon, when classes typically finish. Lastly, Xavier has dedicated a room in its new student center to be a Tutoring Center. The tutoring center will be available to Sapuk elementary school students on Saturdays for special tutoring with Xavier students and in the evenings as a place for them to do homework. With the erratic island power, evening power is guaranteed on Xaviers campus when the generator is used. Xaviers commitment to the local Sapuk community will continue to deepen as we seek to be a transformative agent at the grassroots level and help our own Xavier students reflect on the idea of Conscientious Leadership. Xaviers Response since the Midterm Review: Xavier feels that it has done so much in this area that it reached the level of Significant Developments, and is explained fully in that section of this Self-Study Report. Xaviers response is also articulated in Chapter IV: A5: School Environment, since it has had a
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positive effect on Xaviers relationship with the Sapuk community. Since SY 2010-11, two Australian GAP year volunteers are full-time teachers at Sapuk Elementary School. As a result of their initiative, there is now afternoon school at Sapuk Elementary school, perhaps the only public elementary school in Chuuk state that has afternoon classes. CLC continues to go down to Sapuk every morning and tutor. INSY 2011-12, Xaviers Chivalry In Action team (CIA) went down to Sapuk Elementary School every evening for 8 days, and cut the schools recreation field with machetes. Due in part to Xaviers outreach to Sapuk Elementary School, for the first time in Sapuks history, it rose from 44th (last) to 15th in the public school rankings for Chuuk State. This has dramatically changed the attitude in Sapuk towards education. At a PTA meeting in late November, 2011, 75 parents chowed up for the meeting.

B: Curriculum and Instruction


Areas of Growth (B1): What Students Learn Curricula must be developed for the religion and foreign language courses, and the existing curricula in other subject areas must be aligned with standards. After the curriculum is restated, resources will need to be invested in textbooks to match the curriculum. A curriculum guide was developed for Japanese I and II by a certified Japanese Language teacher. Curriculum guides for the Social Studies courses were developed by a certified Social Studies teacher and a teacher from F.S.M. World History textbooks to accompany the new Social Studies curriculum, which includes 4 semesters of World History, were reviewed using book samples and World History textbook adoption reviews from other schools available on-line. The currently used textbook, Holt World History: People & Nations (1993/2000), overall, is judged to be the most historically accurate text available, although the older edition is missing the most recent modern history. It was decided that 25 additional Holt World History textbooks should be purchased to complete two full class sets, and that supplemental materials would be used to cover recent modern history. 25 World History textbooks were purchased. After developing a course competency table, the Religion department reviewed textbook samples obtained from Ave Maria Press for the freshman and senior Religion courses, and purchased 100 textbooks. The Religion department determined that the textbooks for the sophomore and junior Religion courses were still appropriate to allow students to meet the course competencies. In SY 08-09, book samples of Pacific Literature were reviewed for integration into the Literature curriculum. Effective in SY 06-07, as recommended by the Board of Directors, all senior students are required to enroll in mathematics. In March 2007, new Pre-calculus and Calculus textbooks (50 each) were donated by Chuuk DOE, replacing the 20 damaged, collegelevel texts that had been used as supplemental materials for the senior mathematics
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course. By June 2009, a curriculum guide will be produced for the senior mathematics course. A curriculum has been produced for an Elementary Music course. Some musical instruments and equipment, as well as a set of textbooks to accompany portions of the course, have been donated. A Visual Arts curriculum is being developed. The schools ability to offer art courses continues to be restricted by the limited number of teachers and sporadic availability of teachers trained in the arts. Addressed in Results, Evidence and Ongoing/Future Actions for Action Plan Item # 4. Xaviers Response since the Midterm Review: SY 2010-2011, 60 Micronesian Government: Yesterday, Today, and tomorrow textbooks were donated to Xavier by Chuuk Department of Education. Another 60 Over Seas and Time: A Micronesia Textbook, were also donated to Xavier by Chuuk State Department of Education. Another 50 Pacific Islands and Territories Textbooks were purchased for the freshmen social studies class. Since SY 2010-2011, the Social Studies curriculum had changed to the current sequence. Pacific Studies is offered to the freshmen in the first semester, and Micronesian history is offered in the second semester. World History is currently offered to the sophomore for a year. Juniors take World History in the First Semester and World Geography in the Second Semester. The seniors take Civics as an elective. SY 2010-2011, Old Testament Textbooks were purchased for the Junior Religion Class. 50 new Freshmen Religion textbooks were purchased for SY 2011-2012. Since SY 2010-2011, Religion, English, Mathematics, and Science were the four core courses offered at Xavier. All Xavier students are required to have 4 credits course hours in Math, Religion, Science, and English Seniors as graduation requirements. Pre-calculus and Calculus course curriculum has been created for mathematics. In SY 2011-2012, a Math Review course is being offered to the seniors (students who are not capable of taking Calculus). Since SY 2009-2010, music courses have been offered to juniors and seniors as electives. 15 guitars have been donated to Xavier from different generous donors. SY 2009-2010, Art Appreciation course was offered for both seniors and juniors as an elective. Art Appreciation course was offered again in the First Semester of SY 2011-2012 to the seniors. Since SY 2009-2010,a Latin course has been added to the freshmen curriculum.

Current Xavier teachers have little or no experience using standards or educational research to guide curricular development. This project will take several years. Our ability to begin and continue the curriculum revision process, consulting content area standards, is contingent on hiring a teaching staff that includes professional and/or long-term teaching staff members.

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In SY 2007-08, with guidance from the Principal, teachers restated or developed course competencies, outlines of skills and knowledge that students should learn in each course, aligned with the ESLRs. Teachers are currently revising or developing curriculum guides for each course that are aligned with the course competencies, and with F.S.M. or U.S. curriculum standards, as possible. Outside expertise will be required to evaluate the curriculum guides before final working drafts can be produced for consistent use. The four professional teachers on staff during SY 2007-08 provided guidance to the others in beginning the curriculum revision process. Xaviers Response since the Midterm Review: Since SY 2009-2010, curriculum guides have been revised every year. Due to the high rate of teachers turnover, new instructors were required to revise the curriculum guides. Curriculum guides for new electives course have been developed. There has not been outside expertise to evaluate Xaviers curriculum guides.

The school should continue to make changes so that the educational opportunities for female students are equal to those for male students. In SY 08-09, females composed 45% of the student body (as compared to the 47% female enrollment in SY 07-08 and 41% in SY 05-06), due to increased admission of female students. Since SY 05-06, the Principal has been designated to assist the Girls Moderator in coordinating efforts to address problems between female students and their sponsor families. During the Female Student Orientation prior to SY 2007-08, with most parents and sponsors of female students in attendance, the Principal collected feedback on their suggestions for school improvement; parents request for improved communication regarding school events is being addressed. Computer lab hours reserved for female students has made computer access more equitable. The feasibility of providing laptop computers for female students to use at home is being evaluated. During Afternoon Study (50 minutes), only female students are allowed to leave the Study Hall to seek tutoring from teachers; male students may seek tutoring during Evening Study (105 minutes). In SY 07-08, groups of female students were invited to participate in 19 weekend academic, social or religious events on campus; participation for all weekend events was 98-100%; in SY 04-05, 05-06 and 06-07 there were between 10 and 14 weekend events, with participation for female students ranging from about 85-100%. Parents now receive informational letters with permission slips three to five days in advance of each weekend event. The number of weekend events planned to include female students has steadily increased, as have participation rates for female students.

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Since SY 05-06, there have been consistent, intentional efforts to promote equal representation of female and male students in extracurricular educational contests and conferences during the selection processes or promotion of these opportunities. Xaviers Response since the Midterm Review: Since SY 2009-2010, two female staff have been assigned by the Principal to supervise and assist the needs of our female students. At the beginning of each school year, the school invites sponsors and parents of our girls for a Female Student Orientation workshop. Female students and their parents/sponsors, took time to discuss and make suggestions/recommendations in how to address the needs of the female students. Since SY 2009-2010, female students have compute access both in the morning and after school. During the 55 minutes morning study, the computer lab is available for the female students use only. Male students are not allowed to use the computer lab during this morning study period (the male students use the computer lab in the evening and during weekends). Teachers have office hours for the female students in the morning and after school. Since SY 2009-2010, mostly the senior female students come up on school campus to use the school facilities for college work. More and more female are involved in academic competitions, such as debates and essay contents. Some female students have represented Xavier in JSA and Close Up Programs. SY 2010-2011, two female students were selected to attend JSA Program in USA.

The school needs to provide adequate computer and Web access for faculty and students. Erratic power availability hinders the functioning of the school. Addressed in Results, Evidence and Ongoing/Future Actions for Action Plan Item #5.

Library resources are inadequate. The library should subscribe to several current periodicals. The school should acquire collections of recent nonfiction books. The library resources remain inadequate, although some attempts have been made to correct the problems. In August 2007, the Chinese Government donated a collection of 300 books, CDs, and CD-ROMs about China to the school library. Solicitations have been made to acquire a similar collection from the Government of Japan. Donated news magazines are now available in the Library, but often not until several months after their publication date. Library resources remain an area of improvement. Additional shelving was installed so that books from the Book Room were located to the main collection. In February 2009, Xavier submitted a grant proposal to the Yokwe Yuk Womens Club in Kwajelein, Marshall Islands, for a computer and software to computerize our library catalog. In April 2009, a donation of fiction and non-fiction books from a Jesuit High School in Dallas, Texas, will arrive to add to the library collection.
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Xaviers Response since the Midterm Review: SY 2010-2011, SY 2011-2012, book donations from individuals and Jesuit schools in the U.S. were sent to Xavier.

Areas of Growth (B2): How Students Learn Teaching staff members have little or no prior experience using education research to improve their teaching methods or the assessment tools they currently use. The school and Board must develop a long-term strategy for hiring qualified administrators and teaching staff members and retaining them. Contracts for long-term administrators and teachers should include provisions for staff members who do not possess professional credentials to complete relevant coursework in Education at the schools expense. Addressed in Results, Evidence and Ongoing/Future Actions for Action Plan Item #1. Xaviers Response since the Midterm Review: Since SY 2010-2011, all Xavier teaching staff are required to have a bachelors degree in order to teach. Mr. Carl, (principal), Mr. Dahilan (math teacher), and Mrs. Carl (nurse) have been at Xavier for more than 3 years.

The school must seek financial resources to obtain media and materials that would enhance, or are necessary for, student achievement of the ESLRs. The annual school budget has been increased from $370,656 for SY 05-06 to $385,050 for SY 08-09 due to increased subsidy by the Jesuits of Micronesia; a portion of these additional funds is designated for instructional materials and technology. Since SY 0607, the State of Yap has begun making appropriations to Xavier for partial payment of utility bills. In May 2008, the school submitted a grant application to the PATS Foundation (NY Jesuit Province) for student locker and science textbooks. In December 2008, the school submitted a grant application to AusAID for a renovation of the girls restroom facilities. In December 2008, the school was given a grant by the Japanese Government to build a Student Learning Center (essentially renovating an existing structure on campus). There are also two pending grant proposals to the Yokwe Yuk Womens Club for 45 Chemistry textbooks and a computer/software to computerize our library catalog. Addressed in Results, Evidence and Ongoing/Future Actions for Action Plan Item #5.

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Xaviers Response since the Midterm Review: SY 2010-2011 and SY 2011-2012, more book donations for Xavier. Algebra I Textbooks (not brand new, but still in good conditions) were donated by an individual to Xavier.

Areas of Growth (B3): How Assessment is Used Results of assessments currently in use must be analyzed to determine whether or not they measure student progress toward the ESLRs. The types of assessment used in each course may need to be altered based on the results of this analysis. Outside expertise will be required to produce a more standardized, research-based assessment structure that measures student achievement of the course competencies, which are aligned to the ESLRs. During SY 2006-07 and 07-08, authentic assessments to replace the Semester 1 and 2 exams in Chemistry and Semester 2 exam in Physics, and to measure students achievement of the Science Competence ESLR were developed, administered and refined. Addressed in Results, Evidence and Ongoing/Future Actions for Action Plan Item #4. Xaviers Response since the Midterm Review: Teachers use multiple modes of assessment to judge student progress; essays, tests, quizzes, questions/discussions, debate, critical thinking questions, lab reports, skits, math and science problems, speeches, reflection papers, presentations, songs, and verbal responses to questioning. Most assessment methods are appropriately matched to instructional methods and learning goals.

Student, peer and principal evaluation of courses and instruction must continue on a regular basis. Addressed in Results, Evidence and Ongoing/Future Actions for Action Plan Item #1.

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Xaviers Response since the Midterm Review: Since SY 2009-2010, every semester, a course evaluation was administered. Students spent 15 minutes to evaluate each course they take. Results of the evaluation are shared with the teachers during teacher-principal conversation. Principal conducts evaluation quarterly.

Sophomore students should take a standardized test so that we can assess students progress, relative to students at other schools, after the first half of their Xavier education. While we still do not have an assessment test for sophomore year, all junior students now take the PSAT in 1st Semester. Spreadsheets are now used to store and analyze student scores on junior- and senior-level standardized tests. This is addressed in A6 Growth Areas. Xaviers Response since the Midterm Review:

Starting SY 2010-2011, the sophomores were required to re-take the Xavier Entrance Examination. Results of the re-take examination are available in Chapter 1 of this SelfStudy.

Comments from student course evaluations should be considered during the curriculum revision process. Comments from student course evaluations and surveys, particularly those regarding reading and technology skills, which have been confirmed and clarified through interviews are being considered during the current curriculum revision cycle.

C: Support for Student Personal and Academic Growth


Areas of Growth (C1): Student Connectedness Staff turnover affects the teaching staffs connectedness with students and with each other. The dedication and concern that our staff shows the students are exceptional, but it does not
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ease the transition we face each year. It is difficult to maintain programs consistently when staff numbers and abilities fluctuate. Addressed in Results, Evidence and Ongoing/Future Actions for Action Plan Item #1.

Xaviers Response since the Midterm Review: This will always be an area to address at Xavier. It is hoped that once we have course curriculum guides and standards that can be passed on from teacher to teacher. What then becomes most important is that there is continuity at the Administrative level. The female students do not have as much time to utilize the teaching staff and campus resources as the male students do. This can affect their academic progress and overall feeling of connectedness with the Xavier community. This is addressed in B1 Growth Areas. Xaviers Response since the Midterm Review: Because the female students live off-campus, it will always be true that in once sense they have less time to utilize the teaching staff and campus resources than the males do (In spite of this, the statistical evidence shows that the female students, as a group, do better than our male students academically. For example, this SY 2011-12, the number of females on the Honor Roll from the freshman, sophomore, and senior classes far outnumber the number of male students. Only in the junior class, are there more males on the Honor Roll than females.) But Xavier has worked hard at trying to give the female students equal access. When female students are on campus, they have priority availability with the teaching staff. There are also times when females have priority access to the computer lab. There is a special afternoon study provided to the female students, to make up for what they may not be able to do in the evenings. A few of our students struggle with personal issues that should be addressed by a mental health professional or counselor; having one as a staff member would be ideal. The schools staff consistently includes 1-2 religious clergy members who have training and/or pastoral experience in counseling. A professional counselor remains on the list of hiring priorities.

Xaviers Response since the Midterm Review: There are still no resources in Chuuk state for diagnosing learning disabilities. This is a problem, but it does have the one benefit of our not being able to over diagnose which can
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be a problem in many other places. Xavier does have two priests with professional training an experience in spiritual direction, and at least one of them has had training in group counseling.

Areas of Growth (C2): Parent and Community Involvement 1. The Leadership Team should seek feedback from more parents regarding the schools program. Incorporating formal attempts to collect feedback into meetings with groups of parents will probably be the most effective way to encourage parents to voice their opinions. Formal attempts to collect feedback during meetings with groups of parents in each island nation during 2006 produced meaningful feedback. Meetings should be held at least biannually in every state/nation that specifically address parent suggestions from previous meetings, and progress on the schools action plan. The director is meeting with parents (and alumni, many of whom are parents of current students) in his visits to each island district. Appropriate issues and concerns, like the Boards directive to institute a uniform policy, has been addressed with parents in Pohnpei, Palau, Chuuk, and Majuro between January and March 2009. Xaviers Response since the Midterm Review: Since SY 2009-10, the director has visited each district once a year. He speaks to both parents and FOX community members, sharing what is happening that year at Xavier, sharing with them Xaviers Mission and Philosophy, and helping them understand the characteristics of Jesuit education. These meetings are well publicized in advance, and there is always a question and answer period at the end of the presentation. There is also time for parents to meet privately with the director, if they feel a need to do so. Since SY 2011-12, the Student Handbook is available on the Xavier website for parents to look at, and to offer any suggestions after having read it.

Meetings between administrators and parents on Weno and other islands should continue to be held regularly. Meetings between administrators and some parents from each island have occurred annually. Xaviers Response since the Midterm Review:

Answered above. Xavier should continue efforts to engage with the local community.
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This is addressed in A7 Growth Areas.

Xaviers Response since the Midterm Review: Our engagement with the local Sapuk has been fully addressed above and in the Significant Developments section of this Self-Study Report. In addition, Xavier invites St. Cecelia Elementary School, Saramen Chuuk Academy, and Sapuk Elementary School to join us at Xavier for Cultural Day, which is held every other year. Since SY 2009-10, Xavier has done a HAP (Higher Achievement Program) for selected students from each of the public elementary schools on island. The purpose of this summer school program is to help 7th and 8th graders increase their math, reading and English skills, so that they have a better chance of passing one of the high school entrance exams.

D: Resources Managements and Development


Areas of Growth (D1): Resources The school needs to find funds to hire and retain teachers on a long-term basis. The annual school budget has been increased from $370,656 for SY 05-06 to $385,050 for SY 08-09 due to increased subsidy by the Jesuits of Micronesia; most of these additional funds are designated for teaching staff and administrator salaries. Since SY 06-07, three or four teachers or administrators per semester have been employed on salary. Since SY 05-06, two teaching staff members have remained at the school for more than two years. Xaviers Response since the Midterm Review: Xaviers budget for the current 2011-2012 SY is $515,838, an approximately 34% increase since SY 2008-09, and a 39% increase since SY 2005-06. And this, in spite of the poor global economic situation since 2008. This is due in large part to the generous support of the New York Province of the Society of Jesus which has increased its annual subsidy to Xavier from $49,992 in SY 2005-06 to $130,000 in SY 2011-2012, an increase in FSM Aid to Private Schools from $45,185 in SY 2005-06 to $71,346 in SY 2011-2012, and an increase in private donors from $179,468 between SY 2000-01 and SY 2005-06, to $574,692 between SY 2006-07 through January, SY 2011-12. SY 2008-09, and SY 2011-12 represent the major increases, largely due to the Japanese Grassroots grants received in those years.

The school needs to continue to look for ways to address the high costs of electricity, food and transport.
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Since SY 06-07, the State of Yap has begun making appropriations to Xavier for partial payment of utility bills. Increased subsidy from the Jesuits of Micronesia covered the balance of the increased utility cost in SY 06-07, but utility and food costs have continued to rise. In SY 07-08, a $100 annual tuition increase was used to balance the budget. The school is currently exploring a partnership with St. Ignatius College Riverview (Australia) that may yield additional donations. We continue to conserve utilities funding by operating the schools generator only during periods when electricity is needed. The schools Purchasing Officer monitors food costs weekly, and makes adjustments to the student and faculty menus as necessary to produce meals that are relatively nutritious and inexpensive. A grant proposal to USDA Rural Development for addressing Xaviers power needs through solar power will be submitted during SY 2009-2010. Xaviers Response since the Midterm Review: High costs of electricity, food and transport continue to be a reality in Chuuk. However, Xavier has replaced its incandescent and florescent lights with low energy light bulbs in the study hall, dining hall, boys shower room, and classrooms . In addition, in SY 2010-11, Xavier received a $20,000 grant from the Sarita Kenedy-East Foundation for a new 50Kw diesel generator. The new generator runs much more efficiently than the old 125Kw generator, actually costs less to run than using island power, and allows us to have electricity throughout school hours, which is needed for the use of computers and video and power-point presentations. In addition, Xavier High School received $48,000 worth of designated donations for new used buses, and another $103,690 Grass-roots Grant from the Government of Japan for the purpose of buying two additional buses and a 4-wheel drive, nine passenger van.

Areas of Growth (D2): Resources Planning All the stakeholders should be informed about the resource plan and future planning so that they might be aware of the schools challenges. Since SY 05-06 stakeholders have periodically been informed about the state of the schools finances and upcoming fundraising initiatives. Faculty and students have been informed of different grant proposals and are apprised of future plans. The director has informed parents and alumni at various district meetings during SY 08-09. The Board has also asked the director to develop a Vision for Xavier at 75 What Xavier will ideally look like in its 75th year (currently in 57th year).

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Xaviers Response since the Midterm Review: While visioning 15 years out is laudable, as we celebrate our 60th anniversary this SY 2011-2012, Xavier is more realistically looking five years out and Visioning Xavier at 65. This will be addressed in our School-wide Action Plans. An annual plan for the maintenance and repair of the school that includes a schedule, anticipated materials and equipment purchases, and a list of maintenance tasks for the year, needs to be developed. Maintenance, and maintenance planning, remains as an area of improvement. Xaviers Response since the Midterm Review: Since 2008, Xavier has increased the amount of money it has committed to equipment purchases and maintenance tasks. In addition, Xavier has been active in seeking grants to update its facilities, including a Japanese Grass-roots Grant to convert the old chapel into a Student Center, an Australian Small Grant Scheme grant to refurbish and enlarge the girls bathroom facilities, an Australian DAP grant to buy a pump to pump water to our million gallon tank, a $20,000 grant from the Sarita Kenedy-East Foundation for a new generator and two Yokwe Yok Womens club grants for the purchase of new textbooks. For SY 2011-2012, Xavier has received 3 grants: A Japanese Grass-roots Grant for $103,690 for the purchase of new vehicles; an Australian DAP Grant for .$2,190.00 to buy 10 Katadyn water filters for the student dining hall; and a grant from the Sarita KenedyEast Foundation for $21,420.00 for a flatbed truck. We have one grant pending: an Australian Small Grants Scheme Grant for $18,598.98, for renewing the boys shower house and Benjo;

PART II: The Action Plan Going Forward


In no particular order, the following observations might lend momentum to forward progress regarding the goals and other discrete improvements intended by Xavier. Xavier is called to take seriously what it wrote in the section Ongoing/Future at the end of each action goal. [See Part II of the Midterm Report, pp. 33-43] Xaviers Response: This was addressed above, under Ongoing/Future. A review of ESLRs may result in identification of educational behaviors per ESLR that more readily lend themselves to measurement. Might such a review be accomplished by a cadre of teachers whose tenure at Xavier is ending, individuals familiar with the
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successes and shortcomings of realizing intended student outcomes? [see p. 44 of Xaviers


Mid-Term Report]

Since SY 2009-10, Xavier faculty revisit our ESLRs each year during our Faculty Orientation Days. During this current SY 2011-2012, Xavier faculty and seniors spent 2 Thursday afternoons in Home groups to see how we might be able to rephrase our ESLRs in terms that will make them easier to measure. (Cf. notes from ESLR Home Group meetings.) This continues to be a challenge to us, as many of the behaviors we state are intangible. But we have begun to track conscientious and compassionate behaviors by tracking the number of students who sign up for the Christian Life Community (CLC), and for the Chivalry in Action (CIA) Team each Saturday, and the number of students who sign up to be tutors for at Risk and probation students. Goal #4 has been addressed here. (pp. 6-7) Explicit recommendations to Xavier re this Goal include (i) have realistic expectations for faculty retention; (ii) continue to make wise selections in determining the positions to be salaried; (iii) ensure that updated textbooks is a priority item in the budget; (iv) settle on a source for content standards; (v) map Xaviers curriculum in order to locate where each standard is learned; (vi.) adapt the Xavier curriculum to incorporate (important) standards not hitherto taught; (vii) as necessary, educate and otherwise empower the principal to lead in the work of curriculum alignment to standards. Kindly realize that the work of Goal #4 will extend over a number of years.

The 10 days given to orienting the faculty to their teaching responsibilities are well conceived. Is the length of this orientation period sufficient? Might planning effective instruction receive more than one (morning) session? Are any/all of the orientation topics rehearsed in the course of the year?... Also here, the increase technology goal might find expression in one of the (morning) sessions during orientation. Teachers are especially reminded on this point that students use of technology to foster learning is paramount.

Xaviers Response: The 10 days orientation for the teaching faculty at the beginning of each school year serves the teachers well. Considering the composition of faculty of Xavier High School each year, the 10 days orientation serves it purpose by orientating teachers about Xaviers academic and other programs that Xavier High School offers to students. During the 10 days orientation, teachers are introduced to various topics to prepare them for their teaching assignments. Topics such as Xavier High School Mission Statement, Xavier ESLRs, Xavier Philosophy, Jesuit Educational Pedagogical Paradigm, Code of Ethics, Classroom Management, Teaching Strategies, Lesson Plans, Differentiated/Varying Instructions, Learning Styles, Multiple Intelligences, Integration Technology Lesson Plan, Discipline, Plagiarism, Cooperative Learning, and other topics. Since the orientation lasts only 10 days, these topics are rehearsed throughout the school year during faculty/staff development/inservice training sessions.
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Xavier High School faculty and staff live on school campus. They attended the orientation during the day time, but during the evening, these dedicated and committed teachers spend hours after hours preparing for their classes. During weekends, they continue to work and gather educational/ teaching materials for their classes. Older teachers become mentors to newer teachers and sharing of ideas and teaching experiences take place during these informal encounters. Older teachers mentor their new colleagues, not just during these 10 days of orientation, but throughout the school year. Throughout the year, the faculty and staff are required to attend faculty/staff development/in-serving trainings. For each month, the school administration prepares inservice training sessions for the teachers and educational research-based topics are presented to the teachers as part of the effort to help teachers continue to improve their teaching assignments. During these in-service trainings, the faculty and staff are always reminded about the importance of integrating technology into their daily, weekly or monthly lesson plans. Teachers are totally aware of the importance of integrating technology into their lesson plans. References: 1. Orientation Schedules 2. Staff/ Faculty Development Plan

The Visiting Team (VT) noticed that (even) public school students are in uniform, Xavier students are not. Why not? Uniformsneat, lightweight, attractiveappear to the VT to give meaning to the unum in ut omnes unum sint. The students could design them.

Xaviers Response: Xavier implemented this recommendation at the beginning of the 2009-10 SY. Female student representatives and their moderators designed their uniforms. We are currently in our 3rd year of having uniforms.

Standardized testing is generally a gate-experience of one kind or another. The Entrance Exam gets one into Xavier. The SAT gets one into college. But such testing could also present an opportunity to gauge student growth in knowledge and so to infer the effectiveness of Xaviers academic program. For example, Xavier declares, Sophomore students should take a standardized test so that we can assess students progress . . after the first half of their Xavier education. (p. 58 of Mid-Term Report) Here, the school may wish to have sophomores take the Entrance Exam (again) in the spring of 10th grade and then compare and contrast students end-of-10th grade results with their beginning-of9th grade results. After all, it would never do to allow standardized testing to be no more than a gate experience. Faculty should always set aside time to ponder the consequences for curriculum/instruction of the results that students achieve on standardized tests such as the two mentioned here.

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Xaviers Response: Xavier has implemented this recommendation. Beginning in the 2010-11 SY, all sophomores take the Xavier Entrance exam again in their spring semester. In a school with significant teacher turnover, institutional memory can suffer. Indeed commendable are the efforts that teachers make to archive lessons, units, classroom management tips, FAQs, etc. so that faculty do not have to re-invent the wheel every year. . . . At the same time, as history can be a burden, the intention of all archiving ought to be knowledge for freedoms sakethe freedom of the next teacher to (prudently) use, adapt, or discard historical matter in the interests of fostering student achievement. Xaviers Response: The data base does have course curriculum guides. Xavier will address the need for Curriculum standards in its School-wide Action Plans. The current directors visionfirst articulated publicly to the Board in October of 2008deserves to be amplified and implemented; not least, implementation of the Bellarmine Initiative, the Regis Initiative, and the radio station initiative.

Xaviers Response: This still needs to be addressed.

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CHAPTER IV:

SELF-STUDY FINDINGS

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Category A: Organization for Student Learning

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A1. School Purpose


To what extent has the school established a clear mission statement that reflects the beliefs and philosophy of the institution? To what extent is the mission further defined by adopted Expected School-wide Learning Results that form the basis of the educational program for every student? To what extent has student/community profile data impacted the development of the school purpose and expected school-wide Learning Results? To what extent have representatives of the entire school community been involved in the development/refinement of the purpose and ESLRs? Is there consistency between the school purpose, the ESLRs, and the school program?

Findings The Statement of Philosophy of Xavier High School is a clear articulation of what we believe about ourselves as a school. It is anchored in the larger philosophy of Jesuit education, most recently articulated in the Characteristics of Jesuit Education, published in 1986 to coincide with the 400th anniversary of the original Ratio Studiorum, the Ignatian Pedagogy, published in Rome, in 1993, and most recently, What makes a Jesuit High School Jesuit?, published in 2000 Jesuit Secondary Education Association. Elements of Xaviers current Statement of Philosophy were written in 1980, and have since formed the basis for the schools philosophy. The most recent formulation of the Philosophy was approved by the newly created Board of Members, the highest ranking governing body of Xavier High School, at its 1st meeting in September, 2011. The Xavier High School Mission Statement, which underwent a thorough revision for the 2005-06 Accreditation, is clear and succinct, and sums up in one sentence the Philosophy of Xavier. Both the Mission Statement and the Philosophy reflect the broader philosophy of Jesuit education throughout the world so much so, that when students from St. Ignatius High School in Sydney Australia (another Jesuit High School) come to visit Xavier each year for a cultural immersion, our students and

Evidence Philosophy of Xavier High School Characteristics of Jesuit Education (on file at Xavier) Ignatian Pedagogy: A Practical Approach (on file at Xavier). What makes a Jesuit High School Jesuit? (On file at Xavier).

Philosophy of Xavier High School Characteristics of Jesuit Eduation Ignatian Pedagogy: A Practical Approach What makes a Jesuit High School Jesuit?
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theirs already start with the common ground of a shared Jesuit philosophy of education.

Xavier Mission Statement Conversations with students and faculty Notes from St. Ignatius visit

Xaviers ESLRs were developed for the 200506 accreditation, and are clearly connected to, and flow from the Philosophy and Mission Statement. All three incorporate what are commonly called the 3 Cs Competence, Conscientious, and Compassionate.

Characteristics of Jesuit Eduation Ignatian Pedagogy: A Practical Approach What makes a Jesuit High School Jesuit? Philosophy of Xavier High School Xavier Mission Statement Xavier ESLRs Observation Student and Faculty Handbooks Conversations with students and faculty Observation Conversations with students and faculty Xavier Student Handbook Xavier Faculty Handbook Notes from faculty meetings Notes from SBA meetings Observation (students reciting Mission Statement during Morning Assembly)
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The Mission Statement is clearly displayed to all in a central location on the campus. The Philosophy, Mission and ESLRs are prominently located in the Xavier Student and Faculty Handbooks, and are reviewed at the beginning of each school year. Because they state very clearly what we believe about ourselves as a school, together, the Philosophy, the Mission, and the ESLRs shape everything that is done at Xavier High School from academic courses, to Profile grades, to CLC (Christian Life Community) to the CCSP Projects all of them have developed out of our Philosophy, Mission and ESLRs. During the SY 2010-2011, the school principal met with the faculty and the Student Body leadership to inform them about the importance of the WASC Preparation. The Principal asked the faculty and the SBA leaders to reflect on the Mission Statement and ESLRs of 2006. Several meetings of students and teachers took

place during the SY 2010-2011 to review and evaluate the Mission Statement and ESLRs. Students and faculty were asked to study and know by heart the Mission Statement. Every morning during assembly, students and teachers are called upon to recite the Mission Statement. Parents and other stakeholders of Xavier High School were informed about the ELSRs and the preparation of the WASC SelfStudy Report.

Principals message to sponsor families and parents XHS Website Directors Visits to the island districts (Continental Airline Tickets & Power point presentations) Yearbooks School On The Hill, by Floyd Takeuchi Xavier Mission Statement Xavier Philosophy Xavier ESLRs Observation

The entire Xavier Community and stakeholders believe that the schools Mission Statement, the schools philosophy, and the schools ESLRs are still applicable in guiding the school into the 21st Century. The Mission Statement of Xavier High School is: The Mission Statement of Xavier High School is to educate students to be competent, conscientious, and compassionate leaders whose lives are called by the Christian service of service. The Mission Statement summarizes the ESLRs which include the qualities of a Christian leadership that are presented in competence, conscientiousness, and compassion. Xavier High School educational programs are set up to help students become competent, conscientious and compassionate leaders whose lives are guided by the Christian call of service. Xavier High School offers a holistic educational approach and all students are expected to graduate from Xavier with competency, conscientiousness, and compassion. As a Jesuit high school, Xavier is part of a world-wide school system based on the Characteristics of Jesuit and Catholic education. Xaviers Philosophy, Mission and ESLRs all take into account the global dimension of Xaviers being part of a world-wide network of Jesuit Schools. The yearly visits of students from St. Ignatius High School, Sydney Australia, and the Australian GAP Year volunteers from St.

Conversations with students Conversations with faculty and administrators Conversations with St. Aloysius GAP year volunteers Characteristics of Jesuit Education
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Aloysius Jesuit High School in Sydney, Australia reinforces the global part of Xaviers Philosophy, Mission and ESLRs.

What makes a Jesuit High School Jesuit Ratio Studiorum Xavier Mission Statement Xavier Philosophy ESLRs Xaviers change from a minor Seminary to an academic, college prep high school. Xaviers change from an all-boys high school to a co-educational institution in 1976, in response to Bishop Neylons request. Introducing the ICU program in Chuuk (and later in Yap) responding to the
decline in Xavier Entrance Exam results.

The Philosophy and ESLRs clearly articulate (and the Mission by inference) that Xavier is located in a specific culture and local context, and that student learning takes place in this local context. The demographics from our Student and Community Profile influence our Schools Purpose and Mission.

Xavier needs to work with parents and alumni to help them understand that they have an important role in helping Xavier develop ESLRs that reflect the Philosophy, Mission, and Schools Purpose. This has been difficult in the past because of the vast distances from which we draw our students, but with the directors visits to the districts and the new Xavier website, progress can be made in this area.

Conversation with director and principal

Areas of Strength: The Philosophy, Mission statement and ESLRs of Xavier High School are clearly articulated and supportive of each other. The clarity of the Philosophy, Mission Statement, and ESLRs, and their interrelatedness, helps students to see the connection between the Mission Statement and ESLRs and our school-wide program, from academic courses to our extra-curricular activities, such as CLC, and CCSPs.
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The Philosophy, Mission and ESLRs clearly reflect both the fact that Xavier is part of the worldwide network of Jesuit education, and the local context in which Xavier is located. The Philosophy and Mission Statement are reviewed by the Administration, faculty and student body on a regular basis. Parents are increasingly brought into the review process through the website, and through the directors trips to each district each year. Xaviers Philosophy, Mission and ESLRs have helped Xavier to maintain its Catholic identity.

Areas of Growth: There is an on-going need to help students move beyond memorizing Mission Statements and mottos, to interiorizing them, and understanding them. We also understand that this is an on-going process. Because Xavier is a Jesuit School, which has 450 years of tradition in education, parents are reluctant to do anything but agree with the Jesuit Philosophy and Mission. Parents tend to send their students to Xavier (or any Jesuit school) because they already buy into the Jesuit model of education. This often times makes it difficult to receive meaningful feedback regarding the Philosophy, Mission and ESLRs. Xavier needs to continue to work with parents and alumni to help them understand that although the Philosophy and Mission might be Jesuit, parents have an important role in developing ESLRs that will reflect the Philosophy and Mission.

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A2. Governance
Does the governing authority adopt policies that are consistent with and connected to the school mission statement and support the achievement of the Expected School-wide Learning Results? To what extent does the Board delegate implementation of these policies to the professional staff? How does it monitor results? Are there clear policies and procedures regarding the selection, composition, and specific duties of the board? What kind of training is provided to new or prospective board members?

Findings Until 2009, the governing authority of Xavier High School was essentially the Major Superior of the Jesuits of Micronesia, who delegated most of his authority to the Director of Xavier High School. Xavier had a Board of Directors, which sometimes acted deliberatively, but more often than not in an advisory role. This led to confusion as to what was the role of the board. In fact, Xavier reported in part, in its 2005-06 Accreditation: The former chair credited the following factors for the reactive governance model presently used by the Board: 1. The long process of revising the bylaws of the Board 2. The scarcity of committed people to sit on the Board 3. The change in the Regional Superior of the Jesuits in Micronesia 4. The format of the meeting - too much time spent on the Directors report The different understandings of the role of the Board. At its March, 2009 meeting, the Board of Directors (of whom the major superior is a member) asked itself two questions: 1) Which is the best model of Board for Xavier High School? Two-tiered, or single tiered? And at an even more basic level, since form follows function: 2) What is the role of the Board at Xavier High School? Is it

Evidence Xavier Board Meeting Agendas Minutes of Xavier Board Meetings Report from Rodney Jacob detailing what New York Province Schools were doing. Newly Amended and Restated Xavier By-Laws Older edition of Xavier By-Laws Newly Amended and Restated Articles of Incorporation Old Articles of Incorporation

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consultative? Advisory, Deliberative? Since these were questions that Jesuit High Schools in New York were also asking, the Board asked one of its members, Mr. Rodney Jacob, a lawyer from Guam to begin a review of the Xavier By-Laws and Articles of Incorporation. Mr. Jacob contacted the Assistant for Secondary Education for the New York Province of the Society of Jesus, Fr. Vin Biagi, SJ., to seek assistance and find out what the New York Jesuit High Schools were doing with regard to board by-laws. Fr. Biagi put Mr. Jacob in touch with lawyers in New York who were actively working through the same questions as Xavier was, and over the course of a 2-year period, worked through a revision of Xaviers By-Laws that 1) respected Canon Law, 2) respected the Mission of Xavier High School as a Jesuit Institution, and 3) would give the board deliberative powers. After a presentation of progress at the February, 2011 board meeting, and further revisions, the board formally approved the revised and amended Xavier Board By-Laws and articles of Incorporation, by email vote on May 19th, 2011. At its meeting on December 5th and 6th, 2011, the board made some further revisions, which they recommended to the newly created Board of Members for approval. In January, 2012, the Board of Members approved the further revisions.

To insure that the essential Philosophy and Mission of Xavier High School remains Jesuit, the newly approved RESTATED AND AMENDED ARTICLES OF INCORPORATION OF XAVIER HIGH SCHOOL (Hereinafter referred to as Amended Articles of Incorporation), and the AMENDED AND RESTATED BY-LAWS OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF XAVIER HIGH SCHOOL (hereinafter referred to as the Amended By-Laws) state

Newly Amended and Restated Xavier By-Laws Newly Amended and Restated Articles of Incorporation

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two distinct levels of governing authority of Xavier High School; a Board of Members of the Corporation (hereinafter referred to as Board of Members) and a Board of Directors (Hereinafter referred to as Board of Directors). Members of the Board have the following exclusive and reserved powers: 1) Approve decisions with respect to the purchase, sale, mortgage, lease or other disposition of real property of the Corporation; 2) adopt, amend or repeal any provision of the Articles of Incorporation, merger, or consolidation or dissolution of the Corporation; 3) adopt, amend or repeal any provision of the Corporations ByLaws; 4) elect and approve members of the Board of Directors and remove members of the Board of Directors; 5) approve the appointment of the Director; 6) approve changes in the Philosophy or Mission of Xavier High School. One of the areas of growth under A2: Governance in our 2005-06 Self-Study Report stated that The role on the Board of the Regional Superior for the Jesuits needs to be clarified. Our Amended By-Laws clearly articulates the role of the Regional Superior of the Society of Jesus in Micronesia: He is an ex-officio member of the Board of Directors, and is Chairman of the Board of Members. As Chairman of the Board of Members, Decisions of the Board of Directors may be contravened only by the veto of the Superior of the Jesuits of Micronesia, presented in writing within two months of the action of the board. Apart from the powers reserved to the Board of Members, the Board of Directors clearly have deliberative (not consultative or advisory) authority. Article 4: Structure of the Amended By-Laws states in part: Subject to the reserved and exclusive powers of the Members as provided by the Articles of Incorporation, as may be amended from time to time, a Board of Directors in whom is rested full authority over and responsibility for the Corporation in the pursuit of its purposes as provided by the Articles of Incorporation, as may be

Newly Amended and Restated Xavier By-Laws

Newly Amended and Restated Xavier By-Laws Newly Amended and Restated Articles of Incorporation

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amended from time to time, and shall have all powers permitted by law to a Board of Directors. The Board delegates the day to day managing of the Corporation to the Director and his administrative staff and faculty. Section 3 of Article 4: Structure states: A school staff, whose duty it is to manage the Corporation in accord with the Articles of Incorporation, these By-Laws and the directives of the Board of Directors. Since Board members come from many different islands there is no tendency to micro-manage the affairs of the school. They do monitor results at their Board meetings, through the Directors Report, the Principals Report, and the Treasurers report that are reported at the Board meetings, and from periodic reports to the Board from the Director. Xaviers Amended B-Laws provide clear policies and procedures regarding selection, composition, and duties of the Board. The Ignatian and Jesuit way of proceeding with education entails a very specific philosophy that includes the formation of the whole human person, cura personalis (care of the person), and the Magis (an ingrained willingness to always do the more, or go the extra mile). As a result, to date, the emphasis on Board development has focused on making sure that Xavier board members have a familiarity with the Ignatian and Jesuit understanding of education. All Board members are given a copy of Do You Speak Ignatian?, Ignatian Pedagogy: A Practical Approach, and The Characteristics of Jesuit Education. All board members understand that the Board is a deliberative body, although because most board members are alumni of Jesuit schools, they will tend to defer to Jesuit members on the board. Xavier recognizes a need to continue to work with the board, particularly in understanding its strategic role in giving direction to the school, and avoiding micro-managing areas that rightly belong to the professional staff.

Newly Amended and Restated Xavier By-Laws Directors Report Principals Report Treasurers Report

Newly Amended and Restated Xavier By-Laws Characteristics of Jesuit Education Ignatian Pedagogy: A Practical Approach What makes a Jesuit High School Jesuit? Board Agendas Minutes of Board meetings

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Areas of Strength: The Newly Amended and Restated Articles of Incorporation and Newly Amended and Restated By-Laws are clear, and support Xaviers Philosophy and Mission. The Newly Amended and Restated Articles of Incorporation and Newly Amended and Restated By-Laws clearly state the Board of Directors role in the governance of the school. The Newly Amended and Restated Articles of Incorporation and Newly Amended and Restated By-Laws clearly articulate the role of the Major Superior in relation to the Board of Directors and in the governance structure of Xavier High School. The Board of Directors is actively engaged in the Mission of Xavier High School, and in its oversight role to make sure that Student Learning is taking place at Xavier. The Board is beginning to understand at a conscious level the Ignatian and Jesuit character of the school, and the Jesuit language that articulates that character.

Areas of Growth: There is a need for professional development of the Board to understand the role of the board, helping them to find the balance between a hands-off approach on the one hand, and micro-managing on the other. Because of the vast distance, the director needs to continue to use the internet to keep the Board informed.

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A3. School Leadership

To what extent does the school leadership, a) make decisions to facilitate actions that focus the energy of the school on student achievement of the ESLRs (School-wide learner outcome?), b) empower the staff, c) encourage commitment, participation & shared accountability for student learning??

Findings Since SY 2007-2008, the school has had 2 administrators: the Director and Principal, but in SY 2011-2012, the school has four administrators: the Director, Principal, Dean of Students, and the Chaplain. The Director has full responsibility in envisioning the direction of Xavier High School. Every school year, the Director recruits and hires staff who will be effective in implementing school programs and promoting students learning. The Director communicates with Jesuit Volunteer Corps (JVC) in the United States, requesting teachers who can fill particular open teaching assignments at Xavier High School. The Principal assigns teachers to teach academic courses, as well as fulfill other responsibilities, such as club moderator, advisor, or coach, based on the needs of the school, and teachers areas of expertise. At the beginning of each school year (SY 2010-2011, SY 2011-2012), the Director, Principal, and Chaplain conduct faculty/staff orientation and training. The administration spends 10 days to orient the teachers about the Mission, Philosophy, ESLRs, and Ignatian Pedagogy, and introduce various researchbased educational topics, such as Classroom Management, Differentiated Instruction, Learning Styles, Cooperative Learning, Lesson Planning, and Grading, which are discussed with teachers to prepare them for their teaching assignments. Teaching assignments, the class daily schedule, the school calendar, and the grading system are explained to the teachers. Following

Evidence SY 2011-2012 Handbook Directors Email Correspondence Jesuit Volunteer Corps XHS Mission Statement XHS Philosophy SY 2011-2012 Teaching & other assignments SY 2011-2012 Daily Class Schedule

SY 2011-2012 Faculty/Staff Orientation and Development Schedule SY 2011-2012 Faculty Orientation Handbook Staff Development Materials

SY 2010-2011, SY 2011-2012 Monthly Staff Development Schedule

SY 2011-2012 Teaching Assignments


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this 10-day staff orientation, the Principal conducts monthly faculty in-service training sessions to help teachers enhance their teaching skills. The Dean supervises students daily activities outside the classrooms. The Dean monitors student disciplinary infractions and enforces school policy. The Dean supervises weekend activities for the boys who live on the school campus. The Dean also works closely with members of the Student Government, and advises them on issues concerning student affairs. The Chaplain is responsible for the spiritual growth of students and staff. He creates and implements the religious programs of the school. In SY 2011-2012, every Monday morning, the leadership team of Xavier High School meets to decide how the human and material resources of the school can be allocated to promote student learning. Evaluations of each weeks activities are made and plans for future activities and how to implement them are addressed. The Principal is evaluated by the faculty at the end of each semester. This ensures communication between the faculty and principal, and is helpful in the on-going professional development of the Principal. The principal supervises the daily academic activities of the school and has immediate authority over curriculum and instruction, teaching staff development, testing and counseling. The Principal works closely with teachers for the implementation of all schools programs. The Principal monitors teachers work by visiting the classes for observations. After observing classes, the Principal shares his findings with teachers. He identifies points of each lesson for commendation, and guides teachers in considering aspects of the lesson, or their instructional methods in general, which could be improved. The XHS administration has high expectations of teaching staff. XHS teachers are expected to prepare instruction that guides students to meet

Deans Job Descriptions Detention and Saturday Work List SY 2011-2012 Boys Weekend activities Student Body Association By-laws Campus Ministry Program SY 2011-2012 Daily Mass Schedule Staff/Faculty Retreat Materials Minutes of Administration meetings

Principal Evaluation Forms Conversations with faculty XHS Curriculum and Co-curricular Programs College Counseling Program Daily Class Schedule SY 2010-2011, SY 2011-2012 Lesson Plans Principals Class Observations Principal and teachers conversations SY 2011-2012 Teaching & other Assignments
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the schools content standards, attend staff development workshops, serve as advisors to school clubs, coach sports teams, tutor students, proctor the study halls, take care of students on a personal level, and lead students in retreats and community service projects. Teachers work a minimum of 15 hours a day, 7 days a week. The majority of Xavier teachers are volunteers. They are dedicated and committed to their work with a full heart. XHS Administration empowers and encourages students to be leaders. Students are elected to represent their classes. Other students are selected by the school administration to serve as dorm manager and prefects, shower house manager and prefects, dining hall manager and prefects, library manager and prefects, Student Center manager and prefects, Computer Lab manager and prefects, Study Hall manager and prefects, Pig Pen manager and prefects, and Labor manager and prefects. Other students lead our school clubs, such as Christian Life Community, Human Rights Club, Engineering Club, Environmental Club, Drama Club, and Three Towers (Publication). Our student officers participate in a one-week leadership workshop before classes begin.
The school support staff is essential to the function of Xavier High School. Administrators empower the support staff by providing them with working tools they need to do their work, as well as open lines of communication. The support staff is responsible for maintaining and securing the school facilities, vehicles, and campus grounds. The Administration hires security guards to provide for security and safety of the students, staff, and school property. Cooks are hired to cook meals for students and staff. Cleaning personnel are hired to maintain the cleanliness of the buildings, and to provide laundry service for school staff and male students.

Faculty/Staff monthly meetings SY 2005-2012 Curriculum Guides Cura Personalis List (Advisee List) Observation

SY 2011-2012 Student Body Association membership list

SY 2011-2012 Managers and Prefects Lists Clubs Membership Lists

SY 2011-2012 Student Senate Orientation Schedule XHS Employee Handbook Employee Contracts M & R Lists Student Laundromat Washing Schedule Faculty/Staff Laundromat Washing Schedule

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Areas of Strength: Xavier has a very committed and dedicated faculty. Xavier has a diverse faculty and students with diverse skills and talents. The teacher-student ratio is small, enabling teachers to know their students well. There is a healthy working relationship between teachers, students and administrators. Shared leadership among all members of the community working toward common goals creates a strong bond the Xavier family. The administration works closely with the Student Body Association, and brings them into the decision making process on various issues. Administrators, staff, and students accept accountability for students academic improvement and success. The administration at Xavier High School work as a team, and support the promotion of Xaviers Philosophy, Mission Statement and ESLRs, and of making them a lived reality at Xavier High School. The Administration works hard at promoting a good school spirit among the students and the faculty at Xavier, based on the Philosophy, Mission and ESLRs. The Administration works hard at making sure there is an open-door policy with faculty, staff members and students. The administration, working with our faculty, has been very committed at finding creative ways of enhancing our limited resources, and using them for the promotion of student learning and the living out of our ESLRs.

Areas of Growth: The continuing low number of long-term staff and administrators hinders continuity of the school program. Training and development for school staff and administrators, particularly for the principal in curriculum development and assessment, is an ongoing need. Student leaders should have on-going student training workshops throughout the school year, and not just at the beginning of a school year.
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A4. Staff

To what extent are the school leadership and staff a) qualified for their assigned responsibilities, b) committed to the schools purpose, and engaged in ongoing professional development that promotes student learning?

Findings The Director of Xavier High School has a Masters of Divinity from the Jesuit School of Theology (JSTB) in Berkeley, California, and has done two years of graduate work in philosophy at Fordham University in New York City. He received an Honorary Doctoral Degree (Doctor of Public Service, Honoris Causa), from the College of Marshall Islands, in 2008. The Principal has a M.A. in Educational Leadership from San Diego State University. The majority of teachers working at Xavier are volunteers. The Director recruits and hires volunteers or salaried teachers to meet the current needs of the school. As at many schools, math and science teachers are an ongoing need. In 2007, the school recruited a qualified math teacher under a salary plan intended to promote his retention; he has been at the school for 5 years. Finding a science teacher is still a struggle, but Xavier specifically requests the Jesuit Volunteer Corps (JVC), which places two teachers on a twoyear service agreement at the school each year, to send English, math or science teachers. All classroom teachers at Xavier have Bachelors degrees. Since SY 2009-2010, it is the intent of Xavier High School not to allow non-degree staff to teach. This policy addresses concerns expressed by parents (SY 2006-2007) that Xavier teachers should meet the FSMs minimum qualification for secondary school teaching, which is a Bachelors degree. JVC, JICA, and the Jesuit Provincial of Indonesia send volunteers and Jesuit Scholastics to Xavier after a thorough evaluation of their skills to match the needs of

Evidence Credentials

Directors and JVCs emails correspondence Sir Rey Anthony Dahilans Work Contract

JVC Commitment to Xavier

SY 2009-2010, SY 2010-2011, SY 2011-2012 Teaching Assignments Credentials

Communications between Director and Jesuit Provincial Communication between Director and
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Xavier High School. Both JVC and JICA conduct orientation and training for their volunteers before sending them to their work sites. Jesuits Scholastics have had extensive educational training as part of their Jesuit formation before joining the Xavier community. Peer Review: Once a semester Xavier teachers will take turns sitting in on each others classes. After the class the visiting teacher will give feedback to his/her fellow teacher about the class. Our Xavier faculty have found this Peer Review of Classes very helpful for their own growth and development as teachers. Xavier High School has a long-standing relationship with St. Aloysius College, a Jesuit high school in Sydney, Australia. Every year two high school volunteers from St. Aloysius College are sent to Xavier for a one-year service program. These two Australian volunteers are instrumental in marking the Xavier Entrance Examination, and work as tutors for our students. They also teach at the Sapuk Elementary School as part of Xavier Community Outreach and Community Service Program. School administrators and faculty commit themselves to the mission and purpose of the school. Administrators and faculty work more than 15 hours per day, seven days a week. On weekends, the teaching faculty is busy checking students work and making lesson plans. Throughout the school year, the teaching faculty and staff attend staff development. They serve as class moderators and club advisors. They conduct retreats and community service projects on the weekends. They coordinate and run our fitness and sports programs. They serve as coaches for our varsity sports teams. They administer and proctor standardized tests on weekends. The faculty spends countless hours working with students, both in and outside of the classroom. The leadership and staff work as a team and help each other in fulfilling their duties and responsibilities. When a teacher is sick or

JICA Office Communications between Director and JVC Office

Conversations with faculty Conversations with Principal Peer Review Teacher Forms Peer Reviewer Forms Communications between St. Aloysius College and Director VISA Records Xavier Tutoring Program Xavier Study Hall Proctors Observations at Sapuk Elementary School SY 2011-2012 Faculty/Staff Development Schedule

SY 2011-2012 Advisors List SY 2011-2012 Moderator List SY 2011-2012 Assignments College Counseling Program Observation Conversations with administrators and faculty
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absent, faculty members take turns in covering the class (including the principal and dean), so a class doesnt have a free period or study period for lack of a teacher. In creating such an environment, the leadership and staff are role modeling for the students helping students to understand the concepts of conscientious and compassionate, and the Jesuit characteristic of the Magis. It is very difficult to find qualified people to give on-going workshops to our faculty. In spite of this, when qualified people do come to Chuuk and Xavier we do try to make use of their expertise. When faculty from St. Ignatius High School in Sydney Australia came to Xavier as moderators for their students cultural immersion trip, they gave an after school workshop to our faculty on multipleintelligences and teaching strategies, and on the Ignaitian Pedagogical Paradigm (IPP). When Mr. Juan Flores, the Director of Admissions at St. Martins University in Lacey Washington came to recruit students for St. Martins, he gave an after-school workshop to our faculty on how to write effective letters of recommendation. When Mr. Floyd Takeuchi came to Xavier, he talked to students about how to write effective stories for the school newspaper, and was a guest lecturer in a senior Micronesian Civics class.

Conversations with students Do you Speak Ignatian, in the Student and Faculty Handbooks

Conversations with faculty Conversations with the Principal Conversations with students

Areas of Strength: Volunteer teachers are selected by Jesuits or cooperating volunteer organizations for their technical skills and competencies. Teachers commit both skills and time to teach students during and outside of school hours. The Director and Principal have long experience as school administrators. Teachers are evaluated by both students and the principal, and analysis of the evaluations show teachers ability to teach and relate to students is positive.
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Principals observation of teachers contributes to teachers professional growth. Xaviers administration and faculty are deeply committed to the schools purpose. Xaviers faculty and staff are deeply committed to the Magis and role model it for the Students. Faculty Peer Review of classes are a collaborative way of promoting professional development.

Areas of Growth: Outside experts should be recruited to conduct staff development and trainings each semester, but given Xaviers isolation, this is very difficult. There is a need to hire qualified science teachers for extended commitments of 3 or more years. In general (not only Xavier), new teachers instructional skills improve greatly over the first 2 years particularly, the students of 1st-year teachers, tend not to perform as well academically as other students, since the teachers are just learning to teach; by year 3, most teachers are fairly proficient, so having a teacher even for 3 years, rather than 2, is very helpful.

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A5. School Environment


Does the school have a safe, healthy, nurturing environment that reflects the schools purpose? Is the school environment characterized by a respect for differences, trust, caring, professionalism, support, and high expectations for each student?

Findings Xavier students come from 3 different nations, and 8 different cultures and language groups. Therefore learning to respect each, other and to respect differences, in ethnicity, culture, sex, and religious faith, is extremely important at Xavier High School. This is reflected in our Mission Statement, our Philosophy, and in our ESLRs, and is stated very clearly in the Student Handbook, especially under the Student Conduct and Disciplinary Policies, which reads in part: The staff at Xavier High School strives to create a safe learning environment by addressing the needs of both the community and the individual through an equitable disciplinary policy. A Xavier student is expected to abide by all school rules, behave in a mature and responsible manner, act courteously, respect school property and attend class every day. The Principal supervises student conduct during class and study time, and during cocurricular activities. The Dorm Moderator supervises the residential life of male students. The Director deals with serious disciplinary matters that are referred by the Dorm Moderator or Principal. While the Principal and Dean of Students have authority over all disciplinary matters, the Director reserves the right to levy disciplinary measures not explicitly listed below when students promote or engage in activities that are in conflict with the philosophy and values of Xavier High School. School-wide Policies: The foundation of Xavier High School is Jesus Christ. Upon this foundation the 3 Towers of

Evidence

Student Handbook Conversation with students Conversations with faculty Conversations with administrators

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Respect, Integrity, and Trust are built at Xavier. 1. Respect: Because we are all Gods creation, The number 1 school-wide policy at Xavier is respect. Everyone at Xavier is expected to show respect at all times. The Director and Principal are expected to show respect to faculty members, staff, and students. Faculty members are expected to show respect to other faculty members, staff, administrators, and students. Students are expected to respect themselves and other students, faculty, staff and administrators. Everyone is expected to respect the campus and school property (this includes announcements placed on bulletin boards), other peoples property, public property and environment. Failure to show respect will not be dealt with lightly. 2. Integrity: Xavier students are expected to be people of Integrity, and are expected to act with integrity at all times. By integrity is meant that, with a developed conscience, Xavier students know in their heart the difference between right and wrong, and will choose to do right. 3. Trust: Xavier students are expected to be trustworthy. No real relationship with God, with others, or with self, can deepen or last, if it is not built on trust.(Handbook, pp 20-21.) Disciplinary Code: 1. Individual Responsibility for the Welfare of Others As a member of the Xavier community, each Xavier student has the responsibility to promote the general welfare of all members of the school community. Part of this responsibility is the obligation to inform school authorities about persons or incidents that may threaten the safety and welfare of other students, or cause injury to any member of the school community. Students are encouraged to be responsible members of the school community by
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stopping others from fighting. Any student who encourages or cheers others to fight will also be subject to disciplinary action. Possession of a deadly weapon on campus is a serious offense. 2. Respect for the Property and Rights of Others: As mentioned above, Respect is the number 1 school-wide policy. Therefore: Xavier students treat other members of the Xavier community, including administrators, staff and other students, and of the local Sapuk community, with respect. Students are expected to respect the property of others. Opening, searching or removing items from school bags, desks or lockers of another student, or from classrooms or offices without permission, will subject the offender to disciplinary sanctions. Students have the right and responsibility to maintain possession of their assigned textbooks. Students will care for school property, including textbooks, equipment and buildings. Damaging or vandalizing school property is prohibited. 3. Building Community: In order to create a community out of people with different cultures and languages all students will speak English at ALL times. Students will not use profane language. Exclusive relationships are discouraged since they can be divisive to community. Public and private displays of affection are prohibited.(Handbook, pg. 28). Faculty Handbook: Beginning in SY 201112, there is a separate Xavier Faculty Handbook. The faculty handbook has everything that is included in the Student Handbook, but in addition includes a thorough section on Profession Ethics, which emphasizes that Xavier promotes a safe,

Xavier Faculty Handbook Conversations with faculty

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healthy, nurturing environment that reflects the schools purpose, and works for a school environment that is characterized by a respect for differences, trust, caring, professionalism, support, and high expectations for each student? The Faculty Handbook states, in part: Overview: As a Catholic community, upholding Christian values is central to Xaviers mission, identity, and educational goals. As such, Xavier requires administrators, faculty and staff to observe high standards of business and personal ethics in the course of carrying out their duties and responsibilities. As employees and representatives of the school, we must practice honesty and integrity in fulfilling our responsibilities. Xavier emphasizes legal and ethical conduct because how we do our work is as important as the work we do. These principals and guidelines apply to each employee of Xavier. You are expected to demonstrate the highest standards of public trust and conduct by: Being honest, trustworthy, and ethical; Adhering to all FSM, Chuuk state, and local laws and regulations; Protecting Xaviers reputation and assets, including factually reporting hours worked and assets used; Acting responsibly to to avoid conflicts of interest and other situations potentially harmful to Xavier; Not accepting any gift or favor that might appear to influence professional decisions or actions. One of the specifically Jesuit characteristics of education is cura personalis, the care of the person. As is explicit in its Philosophy and Mission, Xavier is not just about academic growth and achievement. Its essentially concerned with the growth of the whole human person. All members of the faculty and administration take this characteristic very seriously.

Conversations with Administrators

Xavier Mission Statement Xavier Philosophy Faculty and Student Handbook, Appendix A: Do You Speak Ignatian Conversations with faculty
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Xavier Honor Code: Beginning in SY 201112, before academic classes even begin, all students spend the first two mornings in their classrooms with the class moderator and officers of the SBA to read through the Xavier Student Handbook. At the end of this process, at the Mass of the Holy Spirit, each student signs and brings forward the Xavier Honor Code, acknowledging they understand the values promoted at Xavier High School, and choose to live by them. The emphasis on the values found in the Xavier Mission, Philosophy and ESLRs, and the values stated above in the Student and Faculty Handbook, all work together to promote a sense of real self-worth in our Xavier students. Each year, the incoming freshman class is mentored by the senior class. The seniors select a name for the freshman class, and will hold several meetings with the freshmen, to help them feel at home at Xavier, and to help them begin to understand Xaviers values. For the 1st quarter, the freshman boys live together in the dorm with the senior boys. By 2nd quarter, when they have learned how to navigate for themselves at Xavier, the freshmen move in with the sophomores in the lowers dorm, and the juniors move into the uppers dorm with the seniors. School nurse: Since SY 2008-09, Xavier has on its staff, a full-time school nurse. The nurse is available daily from Monday to Friday, and since she resides on campus, is available for emergencies on weekends also. The school tracks the health forms of all students, and is aware of any special health needs that a particular student might have. As mentioned in our Chapter III: Progress Report, although the $500,000 donation of medical supplies from the New York Medical Mission Board has ceased, Xavier gets medicine from generous individual donors

Conversations with students Student Handbook Signed Xavier Honor Codes (available in the School Office.) Conversations with students Conversations with faculty Photos of Xavier Honor Code Signing on the Xavier Website. Observations Conversations with Principal, Director, and faculty

Conversations with seniors and freshmen Conversations with administrators

Xavier Contracts Conversations with School Nurse Conversations with student infirmarians Student health records Conversations with students
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(like Mr. Pouzar) and from the Xavier High School-Chuuk State Insurance Program. All Xavier High School Employees are required to have the Chuuk State Insurance and XHS pays premiums. At the end of each month, $8,000 worth of medicine is available for Chuuk State Employees. Our school nurse, Mrs. Carl, uses our Chuuk State health insurance to get medicine for the school (every month). As a way of both helping the nurse, and encouraging Peer care, the school nurse has trained several student infirmarians to assist her with non-emergency issues on the weekends. Outreach to Sapuk community: As mentioned in the Significant Changes chapter of this Self-Study Report, Xavier has consciously reached out to work with its local community, especially, but not limited to, the area of education. This outreach, and the changes it has helped to make in the local Sapuk Elementary School, has had the added benefit that Xavier has never enjoyed a better relationship with the Sapuk community than it does at this time. This has meant a much safer campus and environment both for our students, and for their property. Maria dela Strada Chapel: The new chapel at Xavier, which opened at the end of SY 200708, offers the students and faculty a quiet space where they can find quiet and solitude, which is important on such a small campus. XAVIER DAY: Every year, Xavier celebrates the anniversary of its patron saint, Francis Xavier, on December 3rd. The day begins with a school-wide mass, and continues for a day and a half, with games, activities, and a closing Barbeque dinner. All local staff, many people from the local Sapuk community, and many parents and Xavier alumni join the events of the two days. Although many of the races and games are similar, Xavier students make a big distinction between the competition at Xavier Day and the competition at Chuuk State High Schools Track and Field Day. Track and

Conversations with faculty, administrators, staff and students Conversations with Xavier security Conversation with Australian GAP Year volunteers Conversations with local Sapuk Elementary School faculty and staff Observations Conversations with faculty and students Observations

School Calendar Conversations with students, faculty, and administrators

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Field Day is about competition. Xavier Day is about community and friendship. Cultural Day: Once every two years, the Xavier students celebrate Cultural Day, when students from each culture performs dances from their home islands, and share myths food and handicrafts. It provides students an opportunity to stay connected with their own local culture in an era of rapid cultural change. Emmaus Retreat: Each year the junior class participates in the Emmaus retreat (explained more fully in C1). Juniors go off-island for four days to reflect on their faith, and their relationship with God, with others, and with themselves. For most juniors, this is the first time that they have been encouraged to trust their classmates, (and the Campus Ministry) and to share parts of their lives. It is done in a very caring and supportive surrounding, and for many Xavier students, the Emmaus retreat remains one of the most memorable experiences of their years at Xavier. Bullying: Although bullying is rare at Xavier, there are incidents. Xavier is alert for any bullying that might take place in the dorm or on the buses. The dean/dorm moderator has worked with the seniors to report any incidences, and bus drivers are required to report incidences that they see. The Student Handbook clearly does not condone bullying: 1. Individual Responsibility for the Welfare of Others As a member of the Xavier community, each Xavier student has the responsibility to promote the general welfare of all members of the school community. Part of this responsibility is the obligation to inform school authorities about persons or incidents that may threaten the safety and welfare of other students, or cause injury to any member of the school community. Students are encouraged to be responsible members of the school community by stopping others from fighting. Any student who encourages or cheers others to fight

Conversations with juniors and seniors Conversations with CM Team members School Calendar

Student Handbook Conversations with students

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will also be subject to disciplinary action. Possession of a deadly weapon on campus is a serious offense. 2. Respect for the Property and Rights of Others: As mentioned above, Respect is the number 1 school-wide policy. Therefore: Xavier students treat other members of the Xavier community, including administrators, staff and other students, and of the local Sapuk community, with respect. Profile grading: Profile Grading evenings (Explained fully in A6, below) give every faculty member who teaches a student a chance to get a fuller picture of the student by sharing with other faculty members particular experiences related to the student in the areas of Responsibility, Integrity, Initiative, and Concern for Others. This often beneficial to a students advisor, who can then share with the student from a wider perspective. Every faculty member has office hours when a student can visit, either to talk about an academic matter, or something of a more personal nature. Since both the faculty and the male students are on campus 24/7, priority for office hours is given to the female students when they are on campus. Faculty will often meet with students in a more informal atmosphere in appropriate places on campus. Because of its concern for student safety, Xavier has fundraised $163,000 during SY 2011-12 on buses and a 4-wheel drive van. This will allow our students, and particularly our female students who ride to and from school every day, not to have to sit outside on the back of flatbed trucks or pick-up trucks, protecting them not only from the elements, but from the possibility of being pachinkod or harassed by people who are drunk. Intrusion Plan: Because of an incident where a knife wielding drunk came on campus during SY 2008-09, Xavier has developed an

Conversations with faculty and administrators

Faculty office hours Conversations with students Conversations with faculty

Grant Proposals and Grants approved Observations Conversations with students Conversations with faculty and administrators Financial records Student Handbook
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Intrusion Plan to deal with any similar incidents in the future. The Intrusion Plan is posted in each classroom and each building on campus. It is also included in the back of the Student and Faculty Handbooks. To date, there have been no other incidents on campus. May 1st Workers Appreciation Day: Every year, Xavier celebrates the work of our Support Staff, by hosting a mass, lunch, and an afternoon of games and fun for the workers and their families. For the Freshman class, this is their 1st major responsibility as a class, organizing the days events, setting up and cleaning up, and cooking a barbeque lunch for the workers. In this way, the student body also has a chance to be involved in a special way both in thanking the Support Staff on behalf of the student body, and in helping the leadership thank the Support Staff for their great generosity throughout the year. There is also a year-end picnic for the support staff on one of the islands in the lagoon. This is the administrations way of thanking the support staff and their families for their dedication throughout the year. A big priority for Xavier High School is to keep the campus clean and healthy. This is done by doing daily Morning Glory cleanup, afternoon campus and classroom cleaning, as well as more extensive weekly cleaning. The girls bathroom and shower facilities was expanded and renovated through an Australian SGS (Small Grant Scheme) Grant, in SY 200910.

Intrusion Plans posted in classrooms Conversations with students, faculty, and security

School Calendar Conversations with students Conversations with Support Staff

Observation from on-site visit Conversations with stakeholders

Observation Financial records Documents from Grant Observations Conversations with make students Financial records

While the Boys shower house was renovated last summer, the boys benjo (bathroom) is in great need of renovation, since it dates back to World War II. Xavier is aware of the need and does have a pending SGS grant with the government of Australia to renovate it.

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Areas of Strength: Having a professional nurse on campus allows Xavier to make more informed decisions as to whether a student or faculty member needs serious attention. Xavier High Schools religious and ethnic diversity provide real-life occasions for promoting our Philosophy and living our ESLRs, by respecting differences among our student and faculty populations. Xavier High Schools Student Handbook provides clear rules and expectations as a way of promoting a safe and healthy environment. Xaviers outreach to the local Sapuk community, and especially to Sapuk Elementary School, has had the added benefit of enhancing Xaviers relationship with the surrounding community, creating a safe environment in the neighborhood off-campus. The presence of a dean of students on campus who is responsible for students following rules and procedures outside of school hours, has increased the sense of having a safe, healthy, and nurturing environment. Xavier has invested in new buses and other vehicles to transport our students safely to and from campus. Xavier High School has invested in new campus buildings, and the renovation of other buildings, in an effort to promote a safe and healthy environment for student learning. The Mabuchi Companys humanitarian project for Xavier High School, of painting, plastering and water-proofing the main building in the summer of 2008, has greatly enhanced the school campus, and promotes a safe and healthy environment. Xaviers investment in a new generator, both ensures that there is adequate lighting when island power is not on, and allows students to continue their student learning. Xavier has invested in a drainage system in front of the main building, and in sidewalks, to enhance a safe and healthy environment, especially during the rainy season.

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Areas of Growth: There is need to continue on-going maintenance in order to makes sure that older buildings are still safe and conducive for learning. Because of Xaviers limited resources, there is always a temptation to defer regular maintenance at Xavier. The boys bathroom facility is in immediate need of renovation. The JVI house is in need of renovations. The student kitchen is always in need of routine maintenance. Since our students and faculty have a day of prayer each year, Xavier should offer a day of prayer for our support staff as well. Our maintenance staff is in need of professional development, and in need of a professional carpenter and professional mechanic.

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A6. Reporting Student Progress

To what extent do the Leadership Team and teaching staff regularly assess student progress toward accomplishing the schools Expected School-wide Learning Results? To what extent does it report student progress to the rest of the school community?

Findings Each students progress at Xavier High School is assessed in a variety of ways, both traditional and non-traditional. In addition to regular, periodic reporting of academic course work, reporting of student progress toward accomplishing the schools ESLRs take place in the following areas: Reporting progress in Christian Community Service Projects (CCSP); Effort grades, and Profile grades. Student progress is reported out in a variety of ways, but primarily through the report card. The report card is sent to parents (and in the case of separated or divorced parents, to both parents) either by mail, or by email attachment. With our female students, the report card is also sent to the host families. Student progress is reported out to the student through the students advisor, explained below, under Advisor/advisee. Report cards, which carry academic grades, profile grades, and classroom effort grades (given in each subject, based primarily on participation in class and completion of homework and class assignments) are compiled and given out quarterly. This 3-part report card is a sign to every one of the importance In keeping with its Philosophy and Mission,, and the tradition of Jesuit Education, Xavier High School places a strong emphasis on educating the whole human person, and forming competent, conscientious and compassionate leaders. The link between competent and conscientious and compassionate is strengthened by the fact that no student can make the honor roll if he/she has any 3s or 4s in their profile grades

Evidence Report cards Profile grades Christian Community Service Project Reports

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or effort grades. Student progress in Academic course work is reported through the GPA, on an un-weighted 4.5 scale. While report cards with progress in academic course work are issued on a quarterly basis, mid-quarter grades ar given through faculty advisors to their advisees, with who the advisor reports both the progress made and deficiencies encountered by the student. As of this writing, Xavier faculty and administration are having a conversation whether Xavier should switch from a 4.5 GPA scale to a 4.0 GPA scale. EFFORT GRADES: Effort grades are given as an indication of how each student uses his or her natural abilities and prior academic background in each course. At the beginning of each semester, teachers explain their expectations of student effort in each course. Students effort may be judged based on the following behaviors: (i) preparedness for class, (ii) attentiveness in class, (iii) participation in class by asking and answering of questions, (iv) quality and promptness of homework, (v) seeking help outside of class as necessary and (vi) consistency in his/her performance in relation to his/her capacity as a learner. Scale:
1 = Commendable 2 = Satisfactory 3 = Needs to improve 4 = Definitely unsatisfactory

Mid-quarter reports Conversations with faculty and students

Report Cards Student Handbook Conversations with students Conversations with faculty

PROFILE GRADES: In addition to academic testing, the leadership and faculty regularly Report Cards assess each students progress in the areas of Responsibility, Initiative, Integrity, and Student Handbook Concern for Others, by way of Profile grading. Profile grading has been a part of Xaviers way Notes from Profile Meetings of proceeding since at least the early 1980s. The profile evaluation seeks to describe how Conversations with students well the students life at Xavier reflects the school mission and ESLRs, particularly Conversations with faculty compassion and conscientiousness. Profile grade sheets are distributed before the end of Conversations with Administrators the quarter and teachers take time to consider each students progress toward meeting the
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goals above. Before report cards are given at the end of each quarter, there are a series of faculty/ leadership meetings to discuss each students profile grades. All those who teach a particular class - for example, freshmen, or sophomores meet with the principal, dean and director, and discuss each student individually. Each teacher comes prepared with the class roster, and the profile grades he/she thinks the student deserves, and comments about that student. If there are disagreements among the teachers, they discuss why one teacher feels one grade is deserved, while another thinks a different grade is deserved. The dean of students is present, and Reports from the Dean are made available. When consensus has been reached on a particular student, the teachers move on to the next student. The Principal collates completed profile sheets, and an average is worked out for each student with the assistance of records from the Dean/Dorm Moderator. The Principal also summarizes the comments made by each teacher about individual students, noting a students areas of strength and areas in which improvement is needed. These profile comments are shared with the student by his or her advisor and can be used as a starting point for further discussion. While this is a time consuming process, it both helps the teachers get a more complete picture of each student, and helps the student to get a picture of how others understand him/her as a person. Faculty advisors should be able to tell any of his/her students why they got a particular profile grade.
Profile Values: Responsibility: Attentiveness in and out of class, fulfillment of assignments in class and in work periods, observation of school rules, response to personal growth suggestions. Concern for Others: Helps others to study and to work; shares his or her talents with others freely and willingly, including those from other islands; is 119

respectful of others in and out of class Integrity: Sense of moral values manifested by actions and language; truthfulness; respect for school property and personal property (both ones own and others), sacred times and places, religious obligations and respect for school goals. Initiative: Inside and outside of class, volunteers services and helpful ideas; does more than what is required without being asked. Scale 1 = Commendable 2 = Satisfactory 3 = Needs to improve 4 = Definitely unsatisfactory

Advisor/Advisee meetings: All students are assigned to a faculty advisor. All students must see their advisor to get their grades each quarter. The advisor reports out the report card to the advisee, reviewing with the advisee his/her academic grades, effort grades and Profile Grades, and will give the advisee a copy of the comments made by teachers at the Profile Meeting which is held at the end of each quarter to assess a students progress in the areas of Responsibility, Integrity, Initiative, and Concern for Others. The faculty advisor will also use this time with the advisee to set goals and objectives for the next quarter. Beginning this current SY 2011-12, each student has in his/her Student Handbook, a section to record all homework grades, test grades, and quiz grades. The advisor can look at this record to help a student assess why he or she received a particular grade. Honor Roll/Honor Assemblies: To recognize exemplary student achievement during each quarter, an Honor Roll is compiled listing the names of those students who meet the following criteria:
First Honors: GPA of 3.5 or higher; effort average of 1.4 or lower; no grades of D or F; no effort or profile grades of 3 or 4

Student Advisor/Advisee Lists Results of Profile Meetings Student Handbook Conversations with students Conversations with faculty

Student Handbook Honor Roll Lists Conversations with students Conversations with faculty
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Second Honors: GPA of 3.0 or higher; effort average of 1.6 or lower; no grades of D or F; no effort or profile grades of 3 or 4.

Conversations with administrators

At the end of each quarter, the Xavier Honor Roll is posted, and Honor Roll Students are honored at an Honor Roll Assembly, where they are publicly acknowledged in front of their peers. Special Awards: At the awards ceremony at the end of each school year, awards are given to students in each grade who have excelled in certain areas throughout the year. Awards are given to students with the highest GPA, the best Effort average, the best Profile average In addition, the following awards, determined by the faculty are given: School Spirit Award, Outstanding Athlete Award; Gifted Musician Award; Leadership Award; Responsibilities Award; Most Improved Award; and Hard Worker Award. Senior awards, given at graduation are based on the graduates entire four-year performance at Xavier. In addition, the highest award given at graduation is the Bishop Kennally Award. This award is earned by the graduate who, in the opinion of the students and faculty, most clearly embodies Ignatian qualities, as listed in the Student Handbook. At Risk/Probation: At every mid-quarter, a list of at risk/probationary students is posted on the school bulletin Board. At risk and probationary students are assigned for afternoon study, ad may be assigned a tutor for a particular subject. For these students, the afternoon study is mandatory and takes primacy over extra-curricular activities. Beginning in SY 2010-11, at the end of their Sophomore year, all Sophomores retake the Xavier Entrance Exam. The results of the test are used to assess whether there has been growth in student learning during a students first two years at Xavier High School. (This was recommended by the WASC Midterm Visiting Team.) Reporting of Standardized Testing: Xavier Award Ceremony documents and certificates Graduation Ceremony documents Student Handbook Conversations with students Conversations with faculty

At Risk/Probation lists Observation of afternoon study period Conversations with students and faculty

Results of Retaking the Xavier Entrance Exam are on file in the School Office Chapter I: Student and Community Profile and Supporting Data of this Self-Study Report
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uses Standardized test results to assess students preparedness for college coursework. Both Juniors and Seniors have a course in College Counseling, which helps them prepare for standardized tests. Today, all Xavier students take the pre-PSAT exam in September of their junior year, the PSAT in October of their Junior year, the ACT in February of their Junior Year, the SAT in May of their Junior year, and the SAT and the TOEFL exam in November of their Senior year. All students also take the College of Micronesia Entrance Exam in March of their senior year. The result of this exam is also used to assess seniors readiness to do college coursework. Failures and Academic Probation: Students achieving a GPA of less than 2.0 during a quarter are automatically placed on Academic Probation. These students may be assigned to attend tutoring sessions. Students on probation may not participate in extracurricular activities scheduled during Study periods. Students on Academic Probation are expected to show improvement in their class work and in their use of study time. Halfway through each quarter, the Principal collects grades for students who are on probation to monitor their progress. Beginning in SY 2011-12, in cases where students are put on academic probation, the Director will write a letter to the parents or guardians, explaining the situation, and its ramifications. At the discretion of the administration, students at risk academically may be asked to sign a contract that will make clear the conditions for successfully being taken off atrisk. Students in grades 10-12 who have three or more academic failures should not be promoted. Freshmen who have three or fewer academic failures will attend summer school; but those with more than three failures should not be promoted. At the end of each school year, the

Results of Pre-PSAT Scores Results of PSAT scores Results of ACT Scores Results of SAT scores Results of COM-FSM Entrance Exam Conversations with Juniors and Seniors Conversations with College Counselors

Probation Lists Student Handbook Letters to Families School Calendar

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administration, in consultation with the full faculty, will decide which students need to transfer to another school, which students will return on academic and/or disciplinary probation, and which students will be asked to repeat a school year. The offer to repeat a school year should be rare. All returning students on academic probation may be dismissed from Xavier if they do not earn a grade of 70% (C) at the end of the first semester. Upon returning, they sign a contract detailing this.

Areas of Strength: The multiple areas in which Xavier reports assessment of school progress academic grades, effort grades, Profile Grades, and Christian Community Service Project Reports clearly communicates to students and their parents that Xavier takes seriously it Mission and ESLRs. The Profile meetings allow teachers and administrators to get to know students at a deeper level, and give advisors much more than just a number to report to their advisees. Reporting student progress to parents (and in the case of separated or divorced parents, to both parents), and to host families of the female students, helps to insure that all people responsible for a student are knowledgeable about the students progress. The reporting of at Risk and Academic Probation students at the end of each midquarter, helps both advisor and advisee be able to correct the situation before it is too late to recover. The increase in standardized testing at Xavier and the closer monitoring of seniors performances on the College of Micronesias (COM-FSM) Entrance Exam and the rate of acceptance at Chaminade University, helps Xavier to assess the effectiveness of its school program. Special awards at the end of the year are decided on in a collaborative way by all faculty.

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Areas of Growth: Getting report cards into the hands of all parents is still erratic. Return to Sender and Undeliverable, and parents reporting that they are still waiting for their childs report card, is too frequent. As a faculty and staff, we need to do more at Xavier High School in helping students deepen their understanding of the Profile areas, especially the area of Initiative, which is a foreign concept in Micronesian culture. Xavier needs to add end of the year awards based on academic achievement, such as Best in Math Award, and Best in English Award.

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A7. School Improvement Process

To what extent does the Leadership Team facilitate school improvement driven by action plans that will enhance quality learning for all students? Does the Leadership team have school community support and involvement? Does it effectively guide the work of the school? Does it provide for accountability through monitoring the school-wide action plan?

Enhancing Quality Education: Findings On a long-term level, Xavier High Schools School-wide Action Plans emerge from our self-study reports. The leadership team looks at the major growth areas that emerge from the report and develop them into school-wide action plans. For example, the revised Action Plan #2 from the 2005-06 Self-Study Report stated that Xavier High School will continue to develop a responsive form of governance. [Critical Area 2: The governing authority and Director should work to develop a responsive form of governance.] Beginning in 2009, the Board began a review of its By-Laws in an effort to make clarify the role of the Board and to help insure that it take a more active role in the guidance of the school and its Mission and ESLRs, and not just involve itself in the finances of the school. The Board review of its By-Laws was a two-year process that has resulted in the Newly Amended and Restated Articles of Incorporation, and the Newly Amended and Restated Xavier By-Laws. The yearly review and revision of our Student Handbook and its most recent revision that includes not only policies and procedures, but also the school calendar, a section of math and science tables, tips for writing a paper, and a section where students can keep daily track of their grades, is directly related to Action Plan #3 for SY 2011-12. Evidence Newly Amended and Restated Articles of Incorporation Newly Amended and Restated Xavier By-Laws Agendas of Xavier Board Meetings Minutes of Xaviers Board Meetings

Xavier Student Handbook for SY 201112

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The building of the new chapel was directly linked to the Mission and ESLRs of Xavier High School.

Mission Statement ESLRs Observation Conversations with Principal Conversations with math teacher Conversations with dean of students Financial records

As a result of our planning process and our School-wide Action plans, Xavier has identified key positions at Xavier that are critical for growth in student learning, and has increased financial resources to these areas. While Xavier continues to rely on volunteer faculty, Xavier now has a salaried Principal, a salaried Dean of Students, and a salaried Math teacher. Based on analysis of data from Chapter 1, Xavier will look at ways to increase financial resources for a salaried English teacher. Enhanced College Counseling Program: The enhanced College counseling program, which, since SY2011-12 includes a college counseling course for juniors that meets once a cycle, is directly related to the leadership teams desire to see more of our Xavier students applying for, being accepted to, and enrolling in competitive colleges outside of Micronesia. The college counseling program includes a number of opportunities for students to become familiar with standardized testing.

Conversations with Students Conversations with college counselors

School Community Support & Involvement Findings Monthly Staff Meetings: Monthly staff meetings offer opportunities for on-going staff development, sharing of ideas on what works in the classroom and what doesnt. The principal presents topics, such as cooperative learning methods, and peer review, and the faculty have opportunities to discuss these topics, in both small groups and large group discussions. There is an opportunity for faculty to make suggestions for policy changes to the Evidence

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student or faculty handbook. Faculty show their support and involvement through peer review, welcoming fellow teachers into their classroom, and getting constructive feedback from them afterwards. Students have an opportunity to show support and involvement through course evaluations that they do at the end of each semester or school year, depending on the course. The principal shares the results of these evaluations with the individual teachers Open Door policy: Because of Xaviers small size, it has always had an open door policy, where faculty are free to walk into the principals office, or the directors office, and share ideas or concerns about Xavier High School, or about some part of Xavier. If a faculty member shares an idea or a concern that the faculty member says is shared by a number of faculty, or if the principal or director think its a good idea or a concern that needs more airing, it will be brought up either at Tuesday evening Porch Prayer, or in the monthly staff meetings. Profile Meetings: Profile meetings, held each quarter, give faculty and administration a chance to sit together to review the performance of each student. This is a very collaborative way of the leadership team and faculty working together to assess student achievement. SBA meetings: As described in the SBA Policy Manual, the purpose of the Student Body Association is to discuss the issues concerning the student body; voice their constituents concerns to the rest of the school community or the administration if necessary; guide and lead their constituents in accomplishing the schools goals and living up to the schools mission statement; create activities that the school community can participate in and to offer suggestions in areas where student leadership can be improved. The SBA Constitution also allows for a link committee, whose purpose is to: promote leadership among the SBS members; discuss

Conversations with teachers

Examples of course evaluations Conversations with students Conversations with faculty Conversations with faculty

Conversations with faculty and administrators Profile Grades Profile report sheets SBA Constitution Conversations with SBA Officers Conversations with administrators

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issues and upcoming events with a representative of the administration; to act as a link between the student body and the administration. Morning Assemblies: Morning Assemblies, officially run by the SBA officers, but attended by all faculty and administration, offer an opportunity for all members of the school community to interact with each other, sharing announcements, and important reminders of school policies, Mission Statement and ESLRs. It also helps all stakeholders know what is going on that day what clubs, classes, or districts have meetings, when and where if teachers need to see advisees, it also gives them a platform for announcements. It also offers an opportunity to clarify a policy or procedure that needs clarification, or an opportunity to announce a new policy. Directors meetings with Support Staff: As need throughout the year, the director will sit with different areas of the Support Staff maintenance, drivers, cleaning ladies, cooks, security, and inform them of new policies, and solicit their input as to how Xavier can run more smoothly. He will also share with them the financial status of the school, or the water status, and ask for their ideas on conservation. The Xavier Support Staff show their support through their great generosity. They work weekend, evenings and holidays when needed, and are willing to come to Xavier when there is an immediate need for their service. Xavier could not survive without their generosity. Xavier also depends on the Support Staffs help in making sure that students are respecting the proper policies and procedures of the school. Tuesday Porch Prayer: Every Tuesday evening throughout the school year, the faculty and administration gather at 6:00pm on the faculty porch, to share a brief evening prayer together, and then to go around the porch giving each person an opportunity to share things they think are important regarding the running of the school, or just to disseminate

Observation Conversations with students and faculty

Conversations with Support Staff Support Staff Policy Manual

Conversations with Support Staff Conversations with students, faculty and administrators Support Staff Policy Manuals

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information needed for the smooth running of the school. End of Year Staff Evaluation Days: At the end of each school year, the faculty and administration sit down for 2 days to review the school year that just ended. During these evaluation days, faculty members are given an opportunity to share what they think worked and worked well, and what didnt work. They are given an opportunity to make suggestions for new policies for the handbook, or suggestions to modify or do away with current policies. They have an opportunity to make requests for textbooks or other aids for their particular classes. One of the most important tasks of the Evaluation Days is to review and to make recommendations to the principal and director, regarding students who face possible dismissal, either for disciplinary reasons, or lack of academic performance. There is a discussion about each at risk student, as to what would be in the best interest of the student, and what is in the best interest of Xavier High School. The recommendations include 1) Promoted, but returning under academic or disciplinary probation; 2) Allowed to return and repeat the school year just completed; 3) dismissal from Xavier High School. The principal and director listen to the recommendations, and in most cases, accept them. In a few cases where the principal and director might not act on the facultys recommendation, they present their reasons why, and try to come to a consensus. In the end, it is the director who has the final decision, but it is done with much support and involvement of the faculty and staff working together.

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Effectively Guiding the Work of the School Findings Ultimate responsibility for guiding the work of Xavier High School resides with Xavier Board of Members, and the Xavier Board of Directors, to whom the Members have authorized to direct the workings of the school. This was not always clear under the old Xavier By-Laws, but is very clear in the newly Amended and Restated Articles of Incorporation and the newly Amended and Restated Xavier By-Laws. Recognizing its responsibility, the Xavier Board included the following specific duties in its newly Amended and Restated Xavier By-Laws at its December 2011 Board meeting: 1) To determine basic school policy, ensure that the ESLRs, Philosophy, and Mission of Xavier High School is faithfully implemented, and to set new directions for the school as the times demand; 8) To make an annual evaluation of the Schools performance in accordance with its Philosophy, Mission and Expected School-wide Learning Results; 9)To review on a yearly basis, Xaviers Philosophy, Mission, and Expected School-wide Learning Results, and recommend changes to the Board of Members, as occasion demands. The Board of Members approved the newly revised Duties of the Board through an email vote in January, 2012 While the Board of Members and Board of Directors have the ultimate responsibility to guide the working of the school, on a day to day basis it is the responsibility of the Xavier High School Administration to effectively guide the work of the school. It does this in a variety of ways. At the beginning of each school year, the director and principal conducts Faculty Orientation Days. As a result of an earlier accreditation, the Faculty Orientation Days were extended from eight to ten days. The first week is primarily geared to helping Evidence Newly Amended and Restated Articles of Incorporation Newly Revised and Amended Xavier ByLaws Board Agendas Minutes of Board Meetings

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faculty and teaching staff understand the Mission and Expected School-wide Learning Results at Xavier, and how they relate to each other. At the beginning of the SY 2011-12, it also included the new Philosophy of Xavier High School that was approved by the newly created Board of Members at its initial September, 2011 Members meeting. Throughout the year, the leadership team helps the faculty and students stay focused on the Mission, Philosophy and ESLRs of Xavier High School at Morning Assemblies, at Faculty Staff Meetings, at Campus Ministry Meetings, at daily and particularly school-wide liturgies. The Philosophy, Mission and ESLRs are prominently featured at the beginning of the Student and Faculty Handbooks, as a way of showing that everything else that follows in the handbooks. Beginning with SY 2011-12, Xavier faculty, staff and SBA Officers took two mornings in classrooms, with every student, reading through the Philosophy, Mission, and ESLRs, and the rest of the Student Handbook. At the end of the process the entire school celebrated the Mass of the Holy Spirit which traditionally kicks off the beginning of the school year. During the liturgy, students signed the Xavier Code of Honor, acknowledging that they had read through the handbook, and that they understood the values being promoted at Xavier High School. The principal conducts monthly staff meetings, where everyone is constantly reminded to ask the question: In light of our Mission Statement, Philosophy and ESLRs, is student learning going on, and how can we help our students grow in student learning? Topics are discussed to look at ways that our faculty can help promote student learning. Examples of topics discussed include, Multiple Intelligences and Learning Styles,

Conversations with students Conversations with faculty Student Handbook

Student Handbook Conversations with students Conversations with Faculty Minutes from SBA meetings and Orientation Copies of signed Xavier Honor Codes on file in the School Office.

Copies of topics discussed at Monthly Staff meetings Conversations with Faculty and Principal Notes from Staff Meetings

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Assessing Student Learning, and Generating Student Interest. The monthly staff meetings also give faculty and administrators time to address concerns about students, about different styles of classroom management techniques, and ways of proceeding that are raised by the faculty.

Accountability through Monitoring of the School-wide Action Plan Findings As mentioned above, as a result of the newly Amended and Restated Articles of Incorporation and the newly Amended and Restated Xavier By-Laws, ultimate responsibility for monitoring the Schoolwide action plan resides with the Xavier Board of Directors. However, day to day monitoring resides with the Xavier administration, who report directly to the Board of Directors at the Xavier Board meetings. The director is an ex-officio voting member of the Board, and the Principal is an ex-officio non-voting member of the Board. Prior to 2011, the principal of Xavier High School presented a Principals Report at each board meeting, but was not a member of the board. At its February, 2011 Board Meeting, the Board unanimously voted to make the principal an ex-officio member of the Board, as a way of indicating that the Board wants to be actively understanding their the academic dimension of Xavier High School. One way that the Board monitors the progress of the School-wide Action Plan, is through the yearly evaluation of the director, which states in part, under the category Institutional Effectiveness: (The director) Adheres to and actively promotes the WASC accreditation process, Evidence School Board By-laws Minutes of Board Meetings Conversations with Principal and Director

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including the new standards; (The director) Ensures that Xavier is making overall progress towards its goals.

The 2005-06 Xavier Self-Study Report, stated in part, under Chapter IV: A7: Formal methods were not used consistently to monitor the action plans developed in 2000; therefore, progress on the action plans was not regularly assessed or reported, and the proposed timelines were not adhered to or revised. The Board and Leadership Team will develop a system for assessing the progress of future action plans and reporting progress to all stakeholders, and will share responsibility for monitoring their completion. To make clear that the administration has the day to day responsibility for monitoring the progress of the School-wide Action Plans, it will be stated explicitly in the SY 2012-13 Xavier Faculty and Student Handbooks, under Duties of the Director, and Duties of the Principal.

Recommendations for changes Handbook for SY 2011-12.

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Areas of Strength: The ESLRs have been developed directly from the philosophy and Mission of Xavier High School. The Xavier administration and leadership team believe deeply in the Philosophy and Mission for Xavier High School, making it easier to promote Xaviers ESLRs both with faculty and students. The Profile meetings at the end of each quarter, and the year end of year Staff Evaluation Days provides the administration and faculty with a collaborative way of working together to assess student achievement. Xavier High Schools Action Plans result from growth areas that emerge from the selfstudy report, especially Chapters I: Student/Community Profile and Supporting Data, and Chapter IV: Self-Study Findings, and from data that shows where student learning is weak. All School-wide Action Plans are ultimately directed toward enhancing student learning.
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The role of the Xavier Board in the monitoring of the schools improvement in light of the Schools Philosophy, Mission and ESLRs, is clearly articulated in the Newly Amended and Restated Board By-Laws, under Duties of the Board. The Boards yearly evaluation of the director will help to insure that there is a clear line of communication in monitoring the progress of the school.

Areas of Growth: The director and principal need to monitor more carefully the implementation of its School-wide Action Plans. This is made difficult, both by the rate of turnover of faculty and administration at Xavier, and by the fact that our faculty and staff are pretty stretched between full-time teaching, attending staff meetings, involvement in after school extracurricular activities and clubs, preparing classes and lesson plans, chaperoning off-island Christian Community Service Projects, and participating in class retreats, leaving little time and energy for giving full attention to the Action Plans. To make clear that the administration has the day to day responsibility for monitoring the progress of the School-wide Action Plans, it will be stated explicitly in the SY 2012-13 Xavier Faculty and Student Handbooks, under Duties of the Director, and Duties of the Principal. The leadership team needs to make sure that Action Plan committees understand their tasks and responsibilities in implementing the School-wide Action Plans.

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Category B: Curriculum, Instruction and Assessment

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B1. What Students Learn

To what extent does the school provide a challenging, coherent and relevant curriculum for each student that fulfills the schools mission and results in student achievement of the Expected Schoolwide Learning Result of Competence?

Findings All students enroll in a college-preparatory course sequence, including 4 years each of mathematics, English, science and religion coursework. Senior students have the option to choose from among three elective courses. Depending on teaching staff availability and expertise, in most semesters, one elective course will be offered for sophomore and/or junior students. Graduation requirements have been increased to 28 credits, reflecting greater credit requirements in non-elective courses for Senior students, who are now required to take two semesters each of Mathematics, English and Science, in addition to Religion. The Mathematics and English requirements were instituted in SY06-07 at the recommendation of the Board of Directors, and the Science requirement added in SY10-11 by school administrators. Teachers integrate content from other subjects into their own lessons to offer interdisciplinary learning, including but not limited to: Technology and study skills in all subject areas; Mathematics, English skills, literature and science in social studies; literature in English skills; Social studies and science in mathematics. Across subject areas, teachers integrate content that will be relevant to students in Micronesia.

Evidence School Handbook: Course requirements table Class schedules (SY06-07 to SY11-12)

Minutes of June 2006 Board meeting School Handbook: Course requirements table SY 2010-2011 Board of Directors minutes of meetings

Lesson plans Observation by departments Student Work

Lesson plans with connections to Micronesia Curriculum guides Curriculum guides


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Action Plan #4 from the amended 2006 SelfStudy was to align the curriculum with U.S. and F.S.M. standards to ensure students

participate in a sequential, integrated, challenging and relevant 9-12 program. Progress on this action plan has been hindered by teacher and administrator turnover, and lack of professional expertise in some subject areas, but some significant progress on alignment was made by the English Department. Until content standards could be developed for each course, to ensure basic alignment between course goals and the ESLRs, in SY05-06, departments produced sequential course competencies, statements of the primary expected student outcomes and performance levels for each course offered. From SY05-06 to SY07-08, curriculum guides, which are essentially lists of subject-area content and skill standards assembled into content units, were developed by teachers for about of core courses, as well as some elective courses. It became apparent as curriculum guides were reviewed by subsequent course instructors, and by the Principal, that for many courses, there was only partial agreement about content that should be included in XHS standards; course content was fluctuating as the curriculum guides were being revised each year, sometimes heavily, and only some guides appeared likely to be well-aligned any chosen external standards. To provide additional guidance for curriculum guide development, content standards from California, along with those from FSM, were selected to guide any further modification or development of curriculum guides. By SY08-09, curriculum guides had been developed for all core and elective courses offered. Curriculum guides for all English Skills and Literature courses, identified as a priority area for alignment due to student needs in reading comprehension, as well as the Chemistry course, were aligned to California and FSM standards. (Given that the FSM national content standards have not been approved as of SY11-12, and for simplicity, there is no plan to align additional XHS curriculum guides to this source.) In 2009, the WASC midterm visiting committee re-

Course competencies Observation by Principal

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emphasized the need to align Xaviers curriculum with external standards. Between SY09-10 and SY11-12, curriculum guides were developed for most new electives that were offered. Existing curriculum guides were also modified to match the course competencies determined by departments for each course. However, these revisions of the guides were not based on external content standards. To expedite accomplishment of Action Plan #4 from the 2006 Self-Study, a new strategy relying heavily on external expertise is currently envisioned; this plan is summarized in the Areas of Growth section below. A formal curriculum guide presenting course content and skill standards has been developed for the Freshman Pacific Studies & Micronesian History course. A complete class set of new Pacific Studies textbooks has been purchased for the course. Students gain a basic understanding of the Catholic faith, Christology, Christian Morality, and World Religions through Religion and Social Studies courses. The ESLRs anticipate that Xavier students will be prepared to be qualified applicants to competitive colleges and universities. Since SY06-07, a College Counseling course that meets once each six-day cycle has been offered for Junior and Senior students to help students prepare for standardized admissions tests, college applications, and major selection, among other topics. In SY11-12, the portion of the College Counseling course devoted to SAT preparation was scheduled as a separate course for Junior students also meeting once each cycle. Students engage in mandatory physical fitness periods to develop skill in athletic pursuits and maintain good health. Boys participate in fitness every day after school while girls attend three days per cycle. Students also participate in Varsity level sports in Boys and Girls Basketball, Volleyball, Soccer, and Track & Field. Boys also participate in wrestling.

Freshman Social Studies curriculum guide Pacific Studies textbooks

Religion and Social Studies syllabi

Curriculum guide for Junior and Senior College Counseling Course handouts and materials

Student Athlete Rosters

Intramural Team Rosters

Daily Schedule
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There is also a co-ed intramural softball league, with games occurring within the first semester. To foster English vocabulary development, a Latin course has also been added to the freshman curriculum. In SY10-11, literature guides for many of the books in the Literature curriculum were purchased to provide teachers with lesson plan ideas. Literature teachers report that the guides have been useful. Although current World History textbooks are dated, teachers require students to read about and respond to current events in the English Skills, Social Studies, and Science courses. Students know what material they will learn, and how they will be assessed, in most courses. On the first day of class, students are provided with course syllabi that explain how teachers will calculate academic grades and assign effort grades in each course. Syllabi are turned into the principal prior to the inception of classes to ensure academic rigor. Students report that coursework and homework are challenging.

Observation by Principal
Latin course syllabus

Literature guides Teacher feedback

Periodical photocopy handouts

Course syllabi Notes and materials from staff development session

Observation by principal

Student Course Evaluation summaries

To what extent does the school provide a challenging, coherent and relevant curriculum for each student that fulfills the schools purpose and results in student achievement of the Expected Schoolwide Learning Result of Conscientiousness through successful completion of any course of study offered?

Findings Junior and Senior students participate in guided retreats, while Freshmen and Sophomore students participate in Prayer Days. Students attend and sponsor schoolwide masses held on special occasions in addition to Sunday Mass. Daily Masses are offered every morning and various student groups prepare and participate in sponsored

Evidence

School calendar Campus Ministry Calendar Principals Observation


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Mass every Wednesday morning. All male students attend Deo Gratias, a self-evaluative reflection and prayer in the Jesuit tradition, weekly. Through all courses, students are given opportunities to foster their achievement of ESLRs for conscientiousness. For example, Religion students relate moral lessons of the Bible and church teaching to their own lives. In addition, Social Studies students are asked to compare historical people, cultures, and events to their own personal experiences and feelings. Curriculum guides have been updated to reflect how conscientiousness has been incorporated into each course. In 2011, a grade monitoring sheet has been added to the student handbook so that students are able to track all of their grades in their classes. Some students also write reflection papers on their coursework as it relates to the ESLRs. Advisors also encourage students to become aware of their personal development by completing both formal and informal selfevaluation. One question at the end of the course evaluation form asks students to provide a response about whether or not they have been putting their best effort into each course. Students learn about themselves through the perceptions of faculty and staff by receiving profile grades and comments, followed by an intentional conversation with their individual advisor. Students are evaluated on their progress displaying school values relating to Responsibility, Concern for Others, Integrity, and Initiative. The student handbook, updated prior to SY 2011-12, reflects some additional policies and more clear procedures relating to student discipline. Prior to the school year, all students sign the Xavier Honor Code pledging to follow school policies. Students who violate certain school policies are asked to write reflection papers referencing the policy violation. Student prefects are supervised by the Dean of Students

Retreat Schedules SY 2011-2012 Daily Schedule Course Curriculum Guides Student Feedback

Student handbook Student work Curriculum Guides Advisee Goal Sheets Grade Sheets Student Course Evaluation Summaries

Profile grades Profile Comments

Student Handbook

Xavier Honor Code Principals Observation


140

and must hold other students accountable relating to different areas on campus. Students elected to the Student Senate participate in a week of leadership training that emphasizes decision-making and communication skills, and their role as servantleaders within the school community. Application of various time management strategies (e.g., daily and weekly schedules, prioritized to-do lists) is taught and practiced in the Study Skills and College Counseling courses. Long-term assignments with periodic task deadlines foster development of time management skills.

Reflection Papers

Notes and materials from Student Senate training session

College Counseling and Study Skills syllabi Lesson Plans

To what extent does the school provide a challenging, coherent and relevant curriculum for each student that fulfills the schools purpose and results in student achievement of the Expected Schoolwide Learning Result of Compassion through successful completion of any course of study offered?

Findings Xavier High School encourages students to become compassionate individuals who will be prepared to contribute positively to their communities. Students are required to participate in various forms of community service throughout their time at Xavier. Each school year, classes participate in a Christian Community Service Project, usually doing work to meet the needs of a local parish. In addition, incoming Juniors and Seniors are also required to complete individual community service during the summer months. They work for various nonprofit agencies in their island nations, such as schools (Higher Achievement Program, Intensive Care Unit), public health departments, hospitals, conservation programs, and government offices. Students keep journals and use these to write reflection papers, which they submit to show what they have learned from their experience.

Evidence

Reflection papers Community Service Project journals School Calendar Christian Community Service Project schedule Graduation Requirements Chivalry in Action Sign-up sheets
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Throughout the school year, male students are also encouraged to participate in a weekly Chivalry In Action program where students provide service to the surrounding community. Curriculum guides have been updated to reflect how compassion has been incorporated into each course. All teachers use cooperative learning to allow students to learn from their peers. Research suggests that Micronesian students particularly benefit from use of cooperative learning methods, as, traditionally, learning outside of a school setting would be a collaborative venture, not pursued in isolation; relatively little instruction in the social skills necessary for cooperative learning needs to occur among our students, who tend to be able to learn very effectively from their peers. Every two years, Cultural Day occurs and allows students to both present their own culture and gain appreciation for other island cultures.

Course Curriculum Guides

Cooperative Learning Lesson Plans Principals Observations Teacher-Peer Observations

SY 2011-2012 Cultural Day Schedule of Activities

Areas of Strength: The school is progressing toward creating a more equal learning environment for male and female students. Students have ample electricity and computer resources to complete research assignments. Library resources are increasing through book donations and magazine subscriptions. Student Library Prefects manage the library well in the absence of a professional librarian. Students understand and work toward the ESLRs on a daily basis. Faculty have revised and updated curriculum guides and course competencies. Anecdotal evidence suggests that rates of college application and admissions to, enrollment in, retention in, and graduation from 4-year colleges and universities were considerably higher between 2006 and 2010 than between 2001 and 2005. Rates of retention in, and graduation from, 2-year colleges and universities also may have increased slightly. A notable fraction of recent graduates have obtained college degrees in, or are pursuing, Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM)-related majors,
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such as Environmental or Marine Science, Mechanical Engineering, or Nursing. Two Class of 2007 graduates are currently enrolled in Masters degree Programs. Opportunities for students to participate in regular community service in the local village, in addition to the periodic opportunities afforded by class community service projects, have greatly increased. The school has clarified requirements and goals for Christian Community Service Projects conducted prior to Senior year, emphasizing the relationship between these projects and the ESLRs. Student CCSP journals and reflection papers demonstrate developing understanding of social issues in Micronesia, and most supervisor reports commend student responsibility in carrying out their assigned duties. Areas of Growth: The school should align its curriculum with content standards from a single source to ensure that students participate in a sequential, integrated, challenging and relevant 9-12 program. The schools English Skills and Literature curriculum guides have been aligned to Californias (1997) English Language Arts content standards. Prior to SY11-12, Xavier solicited help with standards development from St. Ignatius Preparatory School, a Jesuit high school in San Francisco. It was hoped that Xavier might obtain curriculum guide-type documents that have been developed by an experienced professional teaching staff, aligned to both Californias content standards and the Jesuit values that compose Xaviers ESLRs. St. Ignatius Prep has been working on a developing their course content based on the Portrait of a Graduate at Graduation, and California state content standards, and have agreed to share their results with Xavier, when they have completed their work in May, 2012. Xavier will then further refine St. Ignatius work to fit our uniquely Micronesian context. This will be addressed in Chapter V: School-wide Action Plans. Test results from the PSAT, SAT and TOEFL suggest that the school should look critically at (a) current curriculum in the English Skills and Literature courses, as well as (b) instruction across all courses, making modifications as needed to provide more direct instruction in, and practice with, reading comprehension strategies for both informational and narrative texts. This will be addressed in Chapter V: School-wide Action Plans. Intentional planning to hire and retain experienced, professional and/or otherwise wellqualified teachers for Mathematics and Science subjects should continue to be a priority, as allocation of teachers by volunteer organizations does not routinely provide qualified candidates to fill these positions. Once the schools content standards are set, periodic review should be scheduled every 3 5 years, but annual revision should not typically be required. Teachers should be encouraged, supported and supervised in planning and implementing instruction that addresses the schools content standards, as set forth in the curriculum guides or other standards documents. This will be addressed in Chapter V: School-wide Action Plans.

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B2. How Students Learn


To what extent does the professional staff use research-based knowledge about teaching and learning? Does the professional staff design and implement a variety of learning experiences that actively engage students at a high level of learning consistent with the schools purpose and ESLRs?

Findings Teachers use a variety of teaching methods that are content area- and learning goal-appropriate: student presentations, student- and teacher-led group discussions, cooperative learning, lecture, group and individual projects, drama enactments, laboratory experiments, and demonstrations. In each course, students are challenged to express their understanding in several different forms: essays, tests, quizzes, acting, art projects, student questions/discussions, debate, critical thinking questions, lab reports, math and science problems, speeches, reflection papers, presentations, verbal responses to teacher or peer questioning, and/or PowerPoint presentations. Research indicates that students are more likely to meet expected learning goals if they are aware of the goals. Professional development sessions on lesson planning have emphasized making the goal of a lesson clear at the beginning and reviewing at the end of a lesson. Teachers remind or question students about how the days lesson is related to previous course material. Some teachers use rubrics, provided to students at the time an assignment is given, that show how the teacher will grade a paper, presentation, or project. Assigned seating charts in the freshman, sophomore, and junior classes intentionally locate students of different achievement levels, as well as genders and island-nationalities, to each seating area; students often carry out cooperative work by seating area, presenting opportunities for students to practice

Evidence
Observation by Principal Faculty Meeting Minutes Faculty Peer Evaluations

Student Work Observation by Principal Faculty gradebooks

Lesson plans Professional development session outline and sample lesson plan handouts Grading rubrics Observation by Principal and teachers

Seating Charts

144

explaining course content to their peers, and to ask questions in a low-pressure setting. Some, but not all, of Xaviers freshman students could be classified as English Language Learners (ELLs) non-native speakers of English who are not fully fluent in oral and/or academic English at the time of school entry. Research indicates that English Language Learners, at-risk students, and the general student population benefit from cooperative learning. All teachers use cooperative learning to allow students to learn from their peers Students report that homework reinforces what they learn in class. Daily assignments vary, however, teachers are encouraged to assign 20 minutes of homework every day. Some teachers explicitly teach study skills that are appropriate for their courses. Teachers teach students how to take notes on the information presented in class. In the Study Skills class that meets once each six-day cycle, freshmen students practice using various reading, writing, speaking, note-taking, test-taking, and study skills. To address concerns about student preparedness for college-level reading based on consistently low average SAT and PSAT Critical Reading performance across years, despite increased training in test-taking skills, in addition to aligning the English curriculum to Californias content standards, several initiatives addressing reading instruction were undertaken beginning in SY07-08. Teachers participated in a staff development workshop on active reading (i.e., reading comprehension) strategies, which was followed by two successive quarters of professional development focused on reading across the content areas. In peer observation teams, teachers observed lessons focused on teaching and practicing comprehension strategies, recording their observations on an evaluation form designed for reading lessons, and then met to discuss their observations. Similarly, the principal observed each teacher

Cooperative Learning Lesson Plans Teacher Evaluation Forms Principals Observation

Study Hall Proctor Schedule Observation by Principal Notes and Materials for Study Skills course

Staff development workshop outline and materials Observation forms

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implementing an active reading lesson, and they then met to discuss successful lesson features, and consider methods by which future lessons could be improved. From SY08-09 to SY10-11, Sustained Silent Reading, a reading intervention that promotes reading fluency and enjoyment by permitting students regular, frequent, uninterrupted time in class reading a self-chosen book appropriate for their reading level, which they are encouraged to continue reading in their free time, was implemented in all Literature courses, as well as some English Skills courses. In SY11-12, SSR was replaced in most Literature courses by book report assignments, which require students to read self-selected books outside of class and write short papers for credit. Research suggests that ELLs acquire vocabulary most effectively when new words are embedded in reading passages. For students who are already fluent in oral English and fluent readers, however, word lists may be an efficient means to build academic English vocabulary. Since SY07-08, due to concerns about student performance on vocabulary portions of the COM Entrance Test, vocabulary instruction in the English Skills, Literature and other courses has been more frequently integrated into reading. PSAT results from recent graduating classes indicate that among all discrete reading skills measured by that test, students performance on vocabulary items is highest. To increase students access to reading materials in all courses, the school has solicited textbook donations and directed the budget for instructional materials specifically to textbook purchases. Since SY2005-06, the school has acquired complete class sets of textbooks for Biology, Physics, Algebra I, Geometry. Algebra II, Pre-calculus, Calculus, Pacific Studies, Freshman Religion, Senior Religion, and Art, as well as enough World History textbooks to complete one class set (although they are not of the most recent edition, and the

Course syllabi Recommended books shelf in library Student work

Vocabulary lists Lesson plans PSAT results

Textbooks

146

curriculum requires two class sets), and novels to complete class sets for the Literature courses. The daily schedule includes multiple periods of time for students to study. Teachers and students share responsibility for proctoring in the study hall. Female students are given 45 minutes of afternoon study three times per cycle, with probation students given an additional 45 minutes. Male students have 1 hour and 40 minutes of supervised study Sunday through Thursday evenings. There is also a mandatory morning study that lasts for 55 minutes for all students. These study periods are supervised by teachers and proctored by student leaders. During study periods, teachers provide office hours for students with academic needs. Research suggests skill-based learning is a particularly effective instructional contentmethodology system for Micronesian students, as skill development is culturally-valued, and hands-on practical learning experiences mirror the types of learning that would traditionally have taken place in homes and local communities. Skill-based learning is emphasized in courses, and in the extracurricular activities that supplement coursework. For example, Accounting students manage the Galley (School Store). The Environmental Club offers the opportunity for students to apply the ethic of care for the environment emphasized in Science courses. Students on the Campus Ministry Team, a selective student organization that was doubled in size during SY 07-08 in response to high student interest, build leadership skills and foster the development of compassion among other students participating in service projects or retreats. All student clubs and organizations enroll members from different island-nations, providing time for students to practice speaking English, their common language, with their peers. Students show critical thinking through application of coursework in various ways:

Study Skills syllabus Daily Schedule Study Hall Proctor Schedule Study Hall Attendance Binder Observation by Principal

Observation Course Syllabus Daily Class Schedule Club/organizations Rosters

Observation by Club Moderators and Principal 147

Building of district huts, Engineering Club, operating the galley, tutoring for the Christian Life Community (CLC) and probation students, leadership and public speaking in Student Body Association (SBA), Campus Ministry (CM) Team, and Student Managers and Prefects. Students also demonstrate critical thinking and analysis through coursework such as papers, tests, and projects. Transfer students are automatically placed on probation for the first quarter to ensure proper adjustment to the curriculum and coursework, which implies assignment to tutoring, frequent monitoring of grades by the students academic advisor, and no club or varsity athletics participation. Over the past five years, school administrators have actively sought external enrichment learning opportunities for interested students. Each summer break, one or two students have been selected as scholarship recipients for the Junior Statesmen of America (JSA) monthlong program held at universities in Washington, D.C. or other US cities, where they enroll in college-level history, government and communications courses. A two-student team annually represents Xavier at the Chuuk State and, often, FSM National, Debate contests. Students frequently participate in essay contests sponsored by various government and nonprofit agencies. During SY07-08, two students participated in a tenday environmental seminar conducted in the Hawaiian Islands by Brown University. In summer 2008, two students traveled to China representing the FSM to participate in educational programs for youth from around the world coinciding with the Olympic Games. Teachers utilize media and materials that enhance student learning. Teachers make use of the internet to research course content or lesson planning ideas. Technology is available (projectors, laptops, video cameras, TV/DVD player) to present information or show films to the class. Teachers also use community resources to enhance learning, for example,

Student coursework demonstrating analysis Examples of tests administered demonstrating application and/or critical thinking

Observation by Principal SY 2011-2012 Probation List

JSA transcripts Debate and other contest trophies, plaques, and certificates

Media Room Computer Lab Junior English Skills Public Speaking Videos Student PowerPoint presentation slides 148

service-learning opportunities offered by local parishes and at the Sapuk Elementary School, and science field trips to the Korean SouthPacific Ocean Research Center. The school has acquired and maintained additional computer technology, and integrated it into the learning process [Action Plan #5]. Freshman and sophomore students each take a Computer Skills course that meets twice a cycle. Since SY07-08, the staff development program has focused on integrating technology across content areas for two quarters. In SY11-12, teachers report requiring students to use the Internet to conduct research, use a word processor, and present PowerPoint presentations in some courses. Students have ample electricity, provided by a new, efficient generator, and computer access, improved by several major and minor donations of computer hardware over the past five years, to complete research assignments. Retention of at least one staff member trained in IT through most school years has maintained a computer lab with enough computers for simultaneous use by one class section of students. In SY 2011-12, textbooks and materials for an Art Appreciation course were donated by a teacher. An unused room on the 2nd floor of the Main Building was converted into an art studio for use by a Senior elective Art course. The school library now subscribes to three current periodicals. The librarys resources have been supplemented by several book donations. Accessibility and usability of the library during students study and free times, as well as during classes, has been increased since SY05-06. The current system of library management by a team of students, overseen by a faculty member, is effective in maintaining the librarys resources. There is still a great need for recent nonfiction and fiction library books. As of SY 2009-10, it has been school policy that all teachers at Xavier must possess a Bachelors Degree, meeting FSM national

Computer Skills syllabi Lesson plans integrating technology Staff development session outline and materials; corresponding observation forms

Computer lab Generator Student work

Art studio Art textbooks

Library, including recently-donated books Student manager roster

Observation by Principal Course Instructor List 149

requirements for secondary school licensure. Over the past five years, there has been an intentional effort to hire and retain teachers who are graduates of Teacher or other Education programs; although retention of qualified and experienced teachers remains an ongoing challenge, between 2 and 4 such teachers have employed at the school each school year. In SY 2011-12, approximately 5/6 of courses are taught by teachers who have taken relevant college-level coursework in the given field. Teachers have continued participation in components of the Staff Development Program that was first instituted in SY 05-06. Once each semester, teachers observe their peers as they implement teaching strategies introduced in one of the monthly in-service workshops. The Principal also conducts an annual observation of teachers, followed by individual debriefing sessions during which the Principal and teacher discuss the lesson observed, any of the teachers concerns, and the teachers goals to improve instruction. The content of teacher orientation and in-service sessions (also the topics on which peer and principal observation are based), have been drawn from literature on professional development or practitioneroriented summaries of education research by the Principal or an experienced qualified teacher. The Leadership Team seeks to promote a collegial atmosphere in which teachers feel comfortable being evaluated by students, peers, and administrators, and using the results of these evaluations to improve their courses and teaching. Teachers report that their own teaching has benefited from their observations of others teaching styles and from comments suggested to them by other teachers on their observation teams.

College Transcripts & Resums

Notes and materials from staff development meetings Principal and peer observation forms

Observation Conversations between Faculty and Principal Faculty Meeting Minutes

150

Areas of Strength: The creativity, flexibility, and enthusiasm of the teaching staff, most of whom are recent college graduates and new teachers, allows them to conceive of, and guide students through, a variety of learning experiences. During the past five years, the consistent availability of professional and/or experienced teachers on staff has provided a major asset to other teachers. Long-term teachers have assisted by leading staff development, demonstrating professional work habits and instructional practices, and offering advice about day-to-day instructional matters. All Xavier teaching staff live on campus, allowing conversation relating to teaching strategies and classroom management to take place frequently outside of school time. Both in coursework and extracurricular activities, teachers and administrators design and supervise authentic learning experiences for students.

Areas of Growth: After the school curriculum is aligned to external content standards, staff development and support focusing on using content standards to design varied and appropriate instruction will be needed. This will be addressed in Chapter V: School-wide Action Plans. The schools efforts to modify instruction to improve students reading comprehension should be evaluated, and possibly new methods for reading instruction implemented and supervised. This evaluation, and training on any new methods, may require outside expertise. This will be addressed in Chapter V: School-wide Action Plans. In spite of increased computer resources, student use of Internet resources for research projects is hindered by consistently slow Internet speed. (We have been told that there will be ADSL capability by March, 2012.) Library resources are inadequate. The school should acquire collections of recent nonfiction books. The school is currently lacking a librarian that does not share duties as a full time teacher or student. The school should invest resources in a part-time librarian. This will be addressed in Chapter V: School-wide Action Plans.

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B3. How Assessment is Used

To what extent is teacher and student use of assessment frequent and integrated into the teaching/learning process?

Findings In each course, teachers use multiple modes of assessment to judge student progress: essays, tests, quizzes, questions/discussion, debate, critical thinking questions, lab reports, skits, math and science problems, speeches, reflection papers, presentations, songs, and verbal responses to questioning. All credit courses finish each semester with a cumulative exam. Exams last for two hours and are meant to assess all items that were learned over the course of the semester. Exams are worth 20% of the students semester grade. On most assessment occasions, assessment methods are appropriately matched to instructional methods and learning goals. For example, in courses or course units that emphasize skill-based learning, student progress in monitored using performance, or authentic, assessment. (Since SY05-06, performance assessment has periodically been a focus topic for staff development.) In the future, as curriculum content is more systematically aligned with external content standards, and instructional methods perhaps modified for new content units, there will be a need to ensure assessment methods continue to be varied and appropriately matched to learning goals. Research suggests that modesty concerns render Micronesian students hesitant to respond verbally to teacher questioning in class. In some courses, teachers have begun using a student-directed peer questioning technique to encourage students to demonstrate understanding of lesson objectives. Teacher

Evidence

Student work Final exams Sample tests and faculty evaluation of tests Final exams Student transcripts
Performance assessment staff development session outline

Teacher observation

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reports on implementation of this questioning method suggest that students are sensitive to the learning needs of their classmates, intentionally creating opportunities for students at lower achievement levels, and more introverted students, to answer questions. Research indicates that students are more likely to reach the expected level of performance if they are aware of the expected level of performance via rubrics and/or work exemplars. Rubrics, used in some courses, show students the performance level they will be expected to achieve and quantify the reasons why students earn given grades. Examples of where rubrics are used include: essays, projects, speeches, & debate. In department meetings, teachers developed rubrics to assess particular types of student performance in different classes in order to be more consistent for students throughout their enrollment. Standardized testing of students currently takes place prior to their admission to Xavier High School, at the end of their sophomore year, and during their junior and senior years when students sit for the PSAT, SAT, ACT, TOEFL, and College of Micronesia Entrance Test. Test results are shared with students by their advisors, and with teachers and parents by school administrators. Faculty submit academic and effort grades for students at the end of each quarter. Quarter grades for each course are determined from student scores on various types of assignments and assessments as outlined in syllabi provided on the first day of class. Teachers calculate grades for students at the midway point of each quarter. Freshmen students, as well as any student on Academic Probation, receive their mid-quarter grades from their advisors. Through Xaviers academic advisement system, a small group of students is assigned to each teacher, who has special care for these students academic and personal growth over one or more school years. Research suggests

Essay, speech, and other grading rubrics by department

Test results from Xavier Entrance Exam, PSAT, SAT, ACT, TOEFL, and College of Micronesia Entrance Test

Student Transcripts
Student Report Cards

Course syllabi Advisee grade reports Guidelines for advisors

Advisee grade reports Guidelines for advisors


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this type of individualized advisement is associated with improved academic performance, as well as increased student feelings of connectedness to school. Academic advisors challenge and support both struggling and excelling students to evaluate their performance, and consider their academic strengths as well as ways by which they could pursue academic or personal growth. Advisors also encourage students to become aware of their personal development by completing both formal and informal selfevaluation. In SY 2011-12, a grade monitoring sheet previously used in individual courses was added to the student handbook so that students are able to track their grades in all of their classes. Course evaluations completed by students midway through each semester are designed to determine which ESLRs students are progressing toward and how learning is being accomplished. One question at the end of the course evaluation form asks students to provide a response about whether or not they have been putting their best effort into each course; student responses tend to demonstrate fairly candid self-evaluation.

Action plans/goals for individual students Honor Roll List Probation List

Advisee Goal Sheets

Student Handbook

Student Course Evaluation Summaries

To what extent are the assessment results the basis for measurement of each students progress toward the Expected School-wide Learning Results

Findings Assessment results in each course are the basis for academic grades, which should measure student progress toward the ESLRs. During Faculty Orientation, teachers are reminded of and introduced to the ESLRs and how to integrate these into course materials and curriculum guides.

Evidence Schedule for Faculty Orientation Student Handbook Curriculum Guides


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Profile grades and comments, in which all teachers participate and come to a consensus, assess a students Responsibility, Concern for Others, Integrity and Initiative, which indicates student progress toward meeting the ESLRs. Quarter grades for each student are reported to parents, guardians, and sponsors in quarterly report cards. Conversations also occur with parents and sponsors of students throughout the year should the circumstance arise where guardians need to be notified of academic progress of their student. Results from standardized college admission tests (PSAT, ACT, SAT, TOEFL) are used to determine whether our students have become qualified applicants to be considered by competitive colleges and universities. A few courses administer frequent pre- and post-tests to assess progress in student knowledge and understanding over time. Students report that course material and assessments reflect their progress toward the ESLRs. To address concerns about student preparedness for college-level reading based on consistently low average SAT and PSAT Critical Reading performance across years, despite increased training in test-taking skills, several initiatives were undertaken beginning in SY07-08, including increased staff development targeting reading comprehension instruction, implementation of SSR in the Literature and English Skills courses, purchase of textbooks and novels to facilitate reading instruction, and attention to vocabulary instruction. Due to SAT scores that fall below the average for all SAT (mostly US) test-takers, during Junior year, students are enrolled in a semester long SAT Preparation Course, as well as Junior College Counseling (another test preparation course dedicated primarily to the ACT). In addition, Senior College Counseling focuses on SAT and TOEFL preparation for the first semester, as well as direction in college

Profile Comments Profile Grades Profile Meeting Schedule Report Cards Letters/emails to parents Communication between Principal, Director, and Parents PSAT, ACT, SAT, and TOEFL results Average test scores for U.S. students
Tests Lesson plans

Student Feedback

Staff development workshop outline and materials Observation forms Literature and English Skills course syllabi Textbooks

Average SAT and PSAT scores by graduating class College Counseling Syllabi

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applications. In addition, standardized test scores are provided to faculty to show where, on average, students struggle the most. Teachers are then able to adjust their teaching methods to work toward a more thorough comprehension of course material. Evaluation of assessment instruments (tests/quizzes or rubrics) and student work produced to (a) diagnose student learning needs and (b) suggest assessment improvements was a quarterly topic for staff development during Semester 2, SY05-06, Semester 1, SY07-08, and Semester 1, SY1112. Teachers participated in analyzing test results to assess student achievement in their courses, either with peers during department meetings, or individually. During some of these semesters, staff development meetings targeting assessment evaluation were accompanied by peer and principal observation with follow-up focused on assessment. Teachers conduct peer observation of other teachers as one component of the Staff Development Program. Teachers meet and discuss in small groups ways to improve teaching methods and then meet as a faculty for a large group dialogue. Toward the end of each semester, the Principal observes one class period of each teacher. The principal records observations and uses these notes when discussing Staff Development in staff meetings. Course evaluations conducted each semester, and discussed with the principal, provide teachers with student feedback that can be used to modify instruction.

Standardized test score distribution handouts Practice test scores Staff development session schedule, outlines and materials Student work with teacher analysis Principal observation

Teacher Evaluation Forms Notes from Staff Development meeting Notes from small group meetings Principals Evaluation Forms Staff Meeting Minutes
Student Course Evaluation Summaries

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To what extent are the assessment results the basis for the allocation of resources?

Findings Students on Academic Probation in a math course are assigned to work with a volunteer student that excels in math skills. These students meet three times a week to improve math coursework. Students on Academic Probation for Physics are also required to attend Physics tutoring daily with their teacher. Tutoring also occurs in Freshman English Skills. The college counseling curriculum includes scheduled meetings between the college counselor and individual junior and senior students. The college counselors make time available outside of class to meet for individual assistance in the college counseling process. Students are encouraged to seek guidance from the college counselors and academic advisor. The Director and college counselors have also worked to bring college admission counselors to Xavier High School or have been in contact with admission counselors across the United States in order to create scholarships or lines of communication for students. Teachers and administrators use assessment results including academic, effort and profile grades, and, in some cases, standardized test scores, to identify students likely to benefit from extracurricular enrichment activities periodically supported by governmental or nongovernmental agencies. Since SY 08-09, some students who have not made adequate progress toward graduation in a given school year have been permitted to repeat a grade, rather than being encouraged to transfer to another school. This policy change promotes increased retention, and gives students an additional opportunity to complete their diploma. The school invests additional resources in these students to ensure that they are adequately college-or career-ready by the

Evidence Tutoring schedule Principal observation Record of student grades pre- and posttutoring

College Counseling Curriculum Guide Communication between XHS and colleges

Principal observation

Class enrollment lists (SY08-09 to SY11-12)

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time of their graduation. Due to consistently low average performance in reading comprehension on standardized tests, in SY10-11, the school protected its budget for purchase of instructional materials, and directed a large portion of the allotted amount to purchase of textbooks and novels. Although the school has limited financial resources, and sometimes inconsistent resources of professional expertise in the content areas, the commitment of teachers, administrators and students provides the school with unusually high resources of time, energy and creativity that can be applied to student learning. Research on ELL, at-risk, and struggling students, in general, indicates that one of the most successful interventions to improve their academic achievement is increasing instructional time. Effective in SY 06-07, the daily school schedule was reorganized. The previous school schedule was composed of seven 40-minute class periods each day including 1-2 study periods for most students, and a two-hour free time from 3:00-5:00pm. Class periods were reduced to six per day, and lengthened to 50 minutes each. This rescheduling permitted both teachers and students to focus their work efforts on a smaller number of content areas, as well as to better prepare for and develop the various extracurricular activities occurring during the free time, and allowed for improved supervision of the fewer study periods in the schedule so that those times could be used effectively for individual study.

New textbooks and novels

Daily schedule

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Area of Strength: Although continued work is needed to make use of test results more systematic, results of standardized and classroom assessments are being interpreted and used by teachers and administrators to modify curriculum and instruction, focusing attention on preparing our students for success in college-level reading and writing. Teachers use a variety of assessment types to measure student learning in each course. Teachers use the results of evaluations by peers and the Principal to improve instruction in their courses.

Area of Growth: Courses of first year teachers could be evaluated by their students quarterly, and all other courses could consistently be evaluated at the end of each semester by students in order to improve teaching methods and course content. The school should consider purchase of a commercial diagnostic reading test to monitor the reading skills of Freshman, Sophomore, and Junior students. This will be addressed in Chapter V: School-wide Action Plans.

After the school curriculum is aligned to external content standards, additional staff development and support encouraging design of appropriate assessment to measure progress through the new curriculum will be needed. This will be addressed in Chapter V: School-wide Action Plans.

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Category C: Support for Student Personal and Academic Growth

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C1. Student Connectedness

To what extent are students connected to a system of support services, activities and opportunities in the school and within the community that meet the challenges of the curricular/co-curricular programs in order to achieve the Expected School-wide Learning Results?

Findings Campus Ministry: The New York Province Society of Jesus on-going commitment to Xavier High School is most notable in its committing a second Jesuit to Xavier (at a time when finding Jesuits to staff Jesuit Schools in New York is very difficult). In addition to teaching, this has allowed Xavier to strengthen its Campus Ministry team by providing a school chaplain. The Campus Ministry, under the guidance of the chaplain provides a team of students and faculty who guide classes on Days of Prayer, off-campus weekend retreats, and Christian Community Service Projects, where students not only have the experience of the retreat or project, but also have guided reflections on their experiences, helping them in their own personal growth, growth in their relationship with others, and with God. The guided reflections also help students connect the experiences to Xaviers Mission and ESLRs. It also is a concrete way of helping student CM team members grow in leadership. #2 Conscientious - The graduate has had opportunities to exercise leadership in the academic, extra-curricular and campus ministry; Learn to open themselves to new experiences and have gained confidence in their ability to integrate these new discoveries into their own cultural backgrounds and value sets; Developed a realistic familiarity with and acceptance of themselves. They appreciate their gifts and strive to develop their talents to the fullest, while also remaining conscious of and trying to improve upon their weaknesses. Display an understanding of the

Evidence Organizational Structure Student Handbook School Calendar Conversations with CM Team Conversations with students

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relationship between faith in Jesus and being a person for and with others, which manifests itself in action based on the Churchs teaching on social justice; #3 Compassionate Form friendships with those of different cultural backgrounds and contributed to developing a spirit of Micronesian unity. Religious/Spiritual Life: As mentioned in our Philosophy, Xavier High School publicly declares itself to be a Catholic School, in the Jesuit tradition. Therefore, under the guidance of the Campus Ministry team, in addition to the religion curriculum built into the daily class schedule, numerous other opportunities are a part of life at Xavier that are aimed at helping students and the Xavier community as a whole, grow in its spiritual life, in its Catholic and Christian identity, and in Competence, Conscientiousness, and Compassion: Mass: Daily mass is celebrated on campus during morning study. It is optional for students to attend. Each Wednesday is a sponsored mass, where different classes, districts, student groups, and faculty take turns sponsoring the mass preparing readings, songs, and petitions, and also for sharing the reflection on the readings for the day. Sunday mass is celebrated at 5:15pm, and is mandatory for the boys community that live on campus. If a student is not Catholic, they may try to find a church service of their denomination in Sapuk village, but they are still expected to attend the 5:15pm mass at Xavier. Community Prayer: The freshmen and Sophomores each have one Prayer Day during the school year, led by members of the Campus Ministry team. Every Sunday evening at 7:15pm, the boys student community on campus participate in the Deo Gratias, a 15minute prayer inspired by Ignatian Spirituality (the Ignatian Examen). Retreats: The Junior and Senior classes have off-island weekend retreats the Juniors participate in the Emmaus Retreat, and the Seniors do a Graduation retreat after final exams and before Baccalaureate Mass and

Student Handbook Student Calendar Conversations with students Conversations with CM team members Observation

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Graduation. These retreats are led by the Campus Ministry team, faculty members, and on occasion, by guest facilitators. Reconciliation Services: During Advent and Lent, a reconciliation service is scheduled for the school community. In addition, opportunities for confession, and or spiritual direction is available on an individual basis throughout the school year. In addition the faculty and administration do a weekend retreat once a semester. In all of these activities, (with the exception of individual confession) all students/faculty are expected to participate, regardless of their professed religious denomination. Xavier makes no attempt to proselytize students (in fact, if a student says he/she would like to become Catholic, it is encouraged that they do this on their home island, after consulting with family, in order to make sure it is a real desire, and not just while they are at Xavier. The support for religious, faith and spiritual development give students the opportunity to grow in the following ESLRs: #1 Competence integrating Gospel values and our Ignatian heritage; Integrate Gospel values in the decisions and actions of their daily lives; Demonstrate an understanding of the Catholic Churchs teaching about Jesus and his mission as well as the sacramental expressions of that mission; #2 Conscientious have begun to learn how to make moral judgments informed by Christian doctrine and traditions and have developed confidence in their ability to make the right decisions; has had opportunities to exercise leadership in the academic, extracurricular and campus ministry domains; learn how to discern what is right, good and true; they take initiative to act on the results of a discernment process; developed a realistic familiarity with and acceptance of themselves. They appreciate their gifts and strive to develop their talents to the fullest, while also remaining conscious of and trying to improve upon their weaknesses; develop a sense of
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individual spirituality through prayer, retreats and participation in the Sacraments; display an understanding of the relationship between faith in Jesus and being a person for and with others, which manifests itself in action based on the Churchs teaching on social justice; #3 Compassionate have learned to respond to others as Jesus did - by placing their talents, skills and knowledge at the service of their family, local community, the Church and their country; develop the habit of putting themselves in the place of others; understand
the connection between personal faith and the need for commitment to a just society, and in that commitment, recognize the needs of the disadvantaged.

Emmaus Retreat: Although mentioned above, the Emmaus Retreat needs special mention at Xavier. Like many Jesuit High Schools, Xavier requires all its juniors to participate in the four day long Emmaus Retreat. Using the Emmaus Booklet as a guide, the Campus Ministry team create group and individual exercises that help instill the schools Motto Ut Omnes Unum Sint (that all may be one) in each students heart. Throughout the event, students are given the opportunity to reflect on their relationship with God, self, classmates and with others. After meditating, students form group discussions and share their spiritual, emotional and personal thoughts. Towards the end of the retreat, the Campus Ministry team offers the whole class a time to evaluate their relationship with each other; a traditional discussion time designed to break down individual boundaries and for students to respect each others strengths and weaknesses. The event concludes with the handing to each Emmaus partner a cross, with students saying where they are being led it is a symbolic rite of passage for every Xavier student, and one of the most memorable Xavier experiences for most alumni. (ESLRs #2 Conscientious, and #3 Compassionate.) Christian Life Community (CLC): The Christian Life Community is somewhat unique

Conversations with students Conversations with CM team members School calendar Emmaus Retreat manual

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as a club, in that it operates on a daily basis. Members are divided into teams, with a team leader, with a different team serving each morning as tutors at Sapuk Elementary School. Each team tutors once every other cycle. During the cycle that a team is not tutoring, they have a reflection period, to reflect on what they are doing, in light of the Gospels. The Xavier CLC is partly responsible for the remarkable turn-around at SES. CLC gives students a very concrete opportunities to grow in the following ESLRs: #1, Competence has begun to grow in an awareness of historical
and current social issues both in Micronesia and in the world and have begun to realize the implications of these issues on various communities; #2 Conscientious has

displayed an understanding of the relationship between faith in Jesus and being a person for and with others, which manifests itself in action based on the Churchs teaching on social justice; #3 Compassionate have learned to respond to others as Jesus did - by placing their talents, skills and knowledge at the service of their family, local community...; walk with others of diverse cultural and ethnic backgrounds, in friendship and in empathy, to empower them. These attitudes have been informed by students experiences living in the Xavier community, by learning in the classroom, by community service projects on their home islands, and by working with and for the local Sapuk and Chuuk communities; developed the habit of putting themselves in the place of others; formed friendships with those of different cultural backgrounds and contributed to developing a spirit of Micronesian unity; begun to understand some of the demands of community building at a local, national, and global level; been prepared to enter the broader community as influential leaders and agents of positive social change; learned how to act as a person for and with others by serving people in need; demonstrated a loving attitude by overcoming personal
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prejudices and stereotypes; understood the connection between personal faith and the need for commitment to a just society, and in that commitment, recognize the needs of the disadvantaged. Christian Community Service Project (CCSP): Each school year, the Freshmen, Sophomore, and Junior classes participate in weekend Christian Community Service Projects in local villages or parishes.. Projects may include cleaning, maintenance or repair work designated by traditional, community, or parish leaders who have assessed a particular need in their respective communities. Campus Ministry team members lead group prayer, guide individual and group reflection, and assign work responsibilities. In addition to the above CCSP program during the school year, there is a CCSP Project require of students in the summers between their sophomore and junior year (80 hours required), and in the summer between their junior and senior year (160 hours required.) These projects enable students to serve people in need, in a thoughtful and reflective way. The CCSP projects also allows students to work with people outside the school community, in their home islands, and in a professional setting. Traditional CCSP sites include translating for people or offices, assisting people in filling out legal forms, tutoring and teaching in summer school programs, assisting in the hospital, and volunteering at local environmental NGOs. At the end of each project, students are required to write a reflection on their CCSP experience, and review it with the principal of Xavier High School. The CCSP program and Projects give students the opportunity to grow in the following ESLRs: #1 Competence Begin to grow in an awareness of historical and current social issues both in Micronesia and in the world and have begun to realize the implications of these issues on various communities; #2 Conscientious Learn to open themselves to new experiences and have

Student Handbook Conversations with students Conversation with faculty and principal Samples of student reflection papers School calendar

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gained confidence in their ability to integrate these new discoveries into their own cultural backgrounds and value sets; Experience the benefits of self-discipline in creating a sense of order and efficiency in their lives and learned to be faithful in fulfilling responsibilities; #3 Compassionate Begin to understand some of the demands of community building at a local, national, and global level; been prepared to enter the broader community as influential leaders and agents of positive social change; Act as a person for and with others by serving people in need; Understand the connection between personal
faith and the need for commitment to a just society, and in that commitment, recognize the needs of the disadvantaged.

Clubs and Extra-Curricular Activities: Xavier provides students with a wide range of clubs and extra-curricular activities CLC, Drama club, Yearbook, Environmental Club, 3-Towers (school newspaper), Engineering club, and Human Rights Club, and the Campus Ministry team, where students have to go through an interview process before being accepted. In all of these activities, students are given opportunities to grow in ESLRs #2 Conscientious and #3 Compassionate (as cited above under CM team). Prefects: In addition to the above mentioned activities there are groups of student Prefects who monitor different places or activities. They include librarians, dorm prefects, dining hall prefects, shower house prefects, study hall prefects, Task managers, labor managers, laundry prefects, computer lab prefects, pig pen managers, Student Center prefects, and sports equipment prefects. These activities and responsibilities afford opportunities for students to grow in the following ESLRs: #1 Competence has become aware of and begun to practice the basic skills facilitating leadership and collaboration; have the opportunity to develop competence in cocurricular areas, including student governance,

Club members lists Lists of clubs and meeting Times Conversations with students Conversation with club moderators

Prefect Lists Conversations with Prefects Student Handbook ESLRs

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athletics and creative arts; #2 Conscientious Experience the benefits of self-discipline in creating a sense of order and efficiency in their lives and learned to be faithful in fulfilling responsibilities. Close-Up and Junior Statesmen Programs: Each year, Xavier students are among those chosen from Micronesia to participate in the Close-Up U.S.A. program, the local Close-Up FSM program. and the Junior Statesman Programs. In the Close-Up program, Xavier students join other students from Micronesia to visit Washington, D.C., and New York, and or Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The purpose of the Close-up program is to help students see democracy at work, either at the local FSM level, or at the U.S. national level. Xavier participants in the Junior Statesman Summer School program join students from the U.S. at one of three university campuses: Stanford, Georgetown, or Princeton. Along with debate and regular classes (including Advanced Placement and Law Classes), students participate in a Speaker's Program in which notable speakers talk about current issues to the students. The purpose is to get students interested in public affairs. (ESLRs #1 Competence, #2 Conscientious). Debate: Each year, Xavier participates in the Annual Chuuk State Debate which is open to all high schools in Chuuk State. The winner of the Chuuk State debate, represents Chuuk State in the FSM National Debate, held in a different state in the FSM each year. This provides Xavier students opportunities to grow in the following ESLRs: #1 Competence learn to communicate effectively through comprehending, speaking, reading and writing English; begin to grow in an awareness of historical and current social issues both in Micronesia and in the world and have begun to realize the implications of these issues on various communities; develop the ability to think logically and critically, to recognize patterns; Have the opportunity to develop competence in co-curricular areas, including

Conversations with student participants Conversations with administrators Essays and applications of past applicants

Debate Trophies and plaques Conversations with Students Conversation with Debate moderator Student Handbook

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student governance, athletics and creative arts; #2 Conscientious begun to see the importance of their influence on public policy by critiquing laws already in effect. Interscholastic Sports: While there are certain sports at Xavier that take place on the interscholastic level, the Chuuk Interscholastic Sports Council (ISC) unfortunately reflects much of what is wrong in Chuuk State in general Coaches and referees often allow and condone cheating, schedule games when they know another team cannot show up, teach values (knowingly or unknowingly) that are in contradiction to the values of fair play, good sportsmanship, and honesty. Even this, however, allows our students who participate in interscholastic sports to experience the contrasting values at work, and to grow from experiences where they have been treated unfairly. Participation in interscholastic sports gives students the opportunity to grow in the following ESLRs: #1 Competence Have the opportunity to develop competence in co-curricular areas, including student governance, athletics and creative arts; #2 Conscientious Learn how to discern what is right, good and true; they take initiative to act on the results of a discernment process; Appreciate their gifts and strive to develop their talents to the fullest, while also remaining conscious of and trying to improve upon their weaknesses. ICU Program: The ICU program at Xavier was designed to help 8th grade students from Chuuk State to develop enough competency in the areas of English and math, to be able to be accepted and succeed at Xavier High School. The ICU program has been in effect since the previous accreditation. Since Chuuk State is the home island of Xavier High School, and since around 2007-08, almost no student from Chuuk State (either private or public elementary school) has been able to pass the Xavier Entrance exam, Xavier began the ICU program to help 8th graders from Chuuk State

Conversations with team members Conversations representatives with Xavier ISC

Conversations with coaches ISC schedules

Conversations with ICU graduates Conversation Director with ICU program

Results of ICU Program

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develop enough competency in the areas of English and math to allow them to attend and succeed at Xavier High School. At the end of the four-and-a-half week program, the ICU teaching staff make recommendations to the principal and director as to who they think should be accepted. It is Xaviers commitment to helping Chuuk State, whose education system is the weakest in the FSM. As a result of the success of the ICU program in Chuuk, Xavier students from Yap have requested, and have run an ICU program in Yap state, where the number of 8th graders passing the Xavier Entrance exam have declined in recent years also. These efforts have role modeled a number of the Xavier ESLRs to both Xavier students, potential Xavier students, and the larger community of Chuuk State, including: #1 Competent Begin to grow in an awareness of historical and current social issues both in Micronesia and in the world and have begun to realize the implications of these issues on various communities; #2 Conscientious learn how to discern what is right, good and true; they take initiative to act on the results of a discernment process; Learn to open themselves to new experiences and have gained confidence in their ability to integrate these new discoveries into their own cultural backgrounds and value sets; #3 Compassionate Develop the habit of putting themselves in the place of others; Been prepared to enter the broader community as influential leaders and agents of positive social change; Act as a person for and with others by serving people in need.; understand the
connection between personal faith and the need for commitment to a just society, and in that commitment, recognize the needs of the disadvantaged.

Tutoring: Xavier offers tutoring to at risk students, probation students, and any student who asks for it, both in the afternoons (boys and girls) and evenings (boys only). Tutoring is done by course teachers, other teachers who

Conversations with students Conversations with faculty and


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have a facility in a needed subject, and by our Australian GAP Year volunteers. The generosity of our teachers in being willing to spend extra time with at risk students provides concrete instances cura personalis (care of the person), and magis (a willingness to do the more) two of the important characteristics of Jesuit education. It also helps at risk students to grow in #1 Competence Growing in competency of a four-year college preparatory curriculum and has developed intellectual skills that go beyond intellectual competency and requirement for college entrance by integrating Gospel values and our Ignatian heritage. Peer Tutoring: In addition to tutoring by our faculty and Australian GAP year volunteers, students who are excelling in subjects volunteer to tutor fellow classmates, or students in grades below them. This not only helps the student who is struggling but is just as importantly an opportunity for the peer tutor to grow in the following ESLRs: #2 Conscientious ...has become aware of and begun to practice the basic skills facilitating leadership and collaboration. The graduate has had opportunities to exercise leadership in the academic, extra-curricular and campus ministry domains; Student Advisors: As mentioned in the Xavier Student Handbook, cura personalis (care of the individual) is a characteristic of Jesuit education, meaning that each teacher is is to have special care for an identified group of students. Each student at Xavier has an academic advisor. At the beginning of the academic year, the principal assigns students to a teacher who will act as their advisor. Usually the student will be assigned to the same teacher as long as the teacher remains at Xavier. For senior year, seniors are invited to choose who they would like to have as their academic advisor. At the end of each quarter, advisors receive copies of their advisees grades. Each advisee meets with his or her advisor to discuss both

administrators Conversations with Tutors Quarterly report for at risk/probationary students Daily schedules and bulletin board announcements

Conversations with Peer tutors Conversations with recipients of Peer tutoring Conversations with Principal Conversations with Australian GAP volunteers

Student Handbook Conversations with student advisees Conversations with faculty advisors Conversations with administrators Report cards with comments Observation

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his/her academic grades and effort grades, and also their Profile Grades in Responsibility, Integrity, Concern for Others and Initiative. The advisor also discusses with the advisee the different comments that faculty had when discerning their Profile Grades for that particular advisee.. These meetings between advisor and advisee are confidential. It is the advisors responsibility to encourage their advisees to seek the help they need, whether from other teachers, administrators, or spiritual advisors. These quarterly meetings between advisor and advisees promote the growth of the following ESLRs: #1 Competence Integrate Gospel values in the decisions and actions of their daily lives; #2 Conscientious learn how to discern what is right, good and true; they take initiative to act on the results of a discernment process; Developed a realistic familiarity with and acceptance of themselves. They appreciate their gifts and strive to develop their talents to the fullest, while also remaining conscious of and trying to improve upon their weaknesses; Experience the benefits of self-discipline in creating a sense of order and efficiency in their lives and learned to be faithful in fulfilling responsibilities; #3 Compassionate Develop the habit of putting themselves in the place of others. Class Moderators: In addition to individual student advisement, each class has a Class Moderator, who is responsible for the care of the students in that class and is responsible for making sure that the classroom is well taken care of by the class. The moderator accompanies the class on CCSP weekends, supervises class projects and participates in class meetings. The moderator is alert for any divisions that might arise within a class, and to look for ways that class members can support each other and work together as a class. Since the moderator must know the class well, he/she must be someone who is teaching the class during the year, or has taught the class in a previous year.

Student Handbook Observation Conversations with students or classes Conversations with class moderators

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Areas of Strength: Xavier provides a variety of extra-curricular activities to support student growth outside classroom. The CCSP and CLC offer students, not just a chance to do community service, but an opportunity to then reflect on the service they have done, and to share their reflections in a supportive and constructive atmosphere that helps them to make the connection between the concept of service and Xaviers Mission and ESLRs. Profile Grading System coupled with the system of advisor/advisee offers a way for faculty and students to work together in a supportive atmosphere on the students growth in Competence, Conscientiousness, and Compassion. Religious/spiritual life at Xavier, and particularly the junior Emmaus Retreat and the senior Retreat before graduation, afford our students opportunities to take time out and reflect on their life and its experiences, in a guided and supportive atmosphere. The Society of Jesuss Commitment to Xavier in sending a second Jesuit as both teacher and Chaplain. The Student Body Association offers students a collaborative way to address student issues, and to gain leadership experience by being brought into the schools decision making process on various issues. Opportunities to participate in the JSA and Close-up Programs help students to connect to a wider student population and gain self-confidence that they can succeed, not just at Xavier, but in the wider world.

Areas of Growth: The number and kinds of clubs we can offer each year, in part depends on the expertise of the faculty we have. The transient nature of our faculty makes it less easy for our students to be able to trust and open up to them. Neither Xavier nor Chuuk State have the professional resources to assess, and to deal with certain personal issues that might hinder a students ability for academic or personal growth.

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The female students, living off-campus, do not have the same opportunities as the boys, who are on-campus 24 hours a day, to establish a sense of connectedness to the school. There is a need for on-going development and training of student leaders, not just during orientation at the beginning of the school year, but perhaps at the beginning of both semesters.

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C2. Parent and Community Involvement

To what extent does the Leadership Team employ a wide range of strategies to ensure that parental and community involvement is integral to the schools established support system for students?

Findings Communicating with parents has always been difficult at Xavier. Xavier students come from 3 different nations, 6 different island states, covering approximately 4.5 million square miles of Pacific Ocean plus Guam, Hawaii and Kiribat. Even in the best of places, technologically speaking, this would be difficult. Add to it the lack of decent technology infrastructure and poor internet access, and the problem is compounded. Even relying on the postal system is difficult, when many families dont have Post Office boxes, and many parents live on other islands in the lagoon, or in outer islands, where you have to rely on a boat operator to get a letter to parents. Even though the internet is very slow, parents are able to download important news, and the Xavier Student Handbook from the Xavier Website. Report cards are mailed to all parents of students every quarter. Beginning in SY 201112, if parents are separated or divorced, copies of the report card is sent to both parents. In addition, beginning in SY2010-11, report cards are sent via email attachment to parents who have email accounts. As mentioned above, it is sometimes difficult to get report cards to parents who live in the outer Islands, or who have no P.O. Box. Finding concrete ways to live out its Mission Statement has been behind Xaviers outreach to the local Sapuk Community. As mentioned above in Signifcant Changes, the outreach Xavier has made toward Sapuk Elementary School has both helped our students understand in a very concrete way the

Evidence Observation Maps Conversations with students, administrators and faculty.

Xavier website (www.xaviermicronesia.org)

conversations with students Conversations with registrar

Conversations with students and faculty Conversations with local community members and SES faculty and administrators and students
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implications of living out Xaviers Philosophy, Mission, and ESLRs, and have had the added benefit of making life on campus and off, much safer. Host Families: Every year Xavier finds Chuukese families who are willing to host female students from other districts Palau, Yap, Pohnpei and the Marshall Islands. This SY 2011-12, there are 32 host families, housing 45 female students. These families open their homes to Xaviers female students at no cost. Each host family accepts her host daughter with the expectation that it will be for the entire four years that the student is at Xavier High School. During the four years that the students live in these homes, they are taught the Chuukese culture and how to adapt to a new way of living. Xavier High School maintains contact with these sponsor/host families throughout the girls stays, in order to address any concerns that may arise. The host families are a concrete example of community support for Xavier. Without host families it would be almost impossible for Xavier to continue as a co-ed institution. Xavier High School ensures contact with these sponsor/host families throughout the girls stays in order to address any concerns that may arise. So much are they considered family that, at their request, beginning in SY 2010-11, host families receive copies of report cards for the girls they sponsor. Most Xavier boys have local community people who sponsor them. Most of them are families of Chuukese male students. Some host families were classmates of a students parents, and still have close contact with their former classmates, welcoming their children into their homes. If a male student has permission from home, they may spend weekends, and Christmas and Easter break with their sponsor families. These boys get a chance to experience life off-campus, and learn more about the local Chuukese culture. Whereas our 2005-06 Self-Study Report stated that 3 of our faculty/staff had local host

Observations

Contact information for sponsor families Notes from meetings with female students and their parents or sponsors Girls Orientation minutes that happens annually Sponsor permission Slips regarding the female students Conversations with female students Conversations with Sponsor/host families Host family Lists

Sponsor for boys permission slips Weekend sign-outs

Observation
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families, in the current SY 2011-12, 9 of our foreign faculty and staff have host families. This cultural immersion has been helpful in getting our faculty to experience the local culture that they dont necessarily experience if they remain isolated on Xaviers campus. As a way of living out the Xavier Mission, students are required to participate in Christian Community Service Projects (CCSP) both on their home islands during the summer, and on various islands in Chuuk State during the school year. Each academic year, classes participate in a CCSP, doing work to meet the needs of a local Church parish or community. Freshmen do their 1st CCSP in Sapuk, since this is Xaviers immediate community. Sophomores and Juniors travel to other islands in the Chuuk lagoon. During the weekend, which is led by the Campus Ministry team, students reflect as a group on their experience what they are doing, why they are doing it, and how it relates to our Xavier Mission. Incoming juniors and seniors are also required to complete Christian Community Service Projects during the summer. They work for various nonprofit agencies in their island nations, public health departments, hospitals, conservation programs, summer school programs as teachers and aides, and government offices. Each student has to write a reflection paper on their summer experience. The principal reviews the CCSP reflection papers with each student. Local gifts from Sapuk community: This SY 2011-12 is the first year in memory that local residents of Sapuk municipality have brought local fruits and produce to Xavier not to sell, but as a gift. This is an indication that Xaviers outreach and commitment to Sapuk Elementary School has strengthened our support with the local community. Also, as a direct result of our outreach to our local Sapuk community, and especially SES, Fr. Rich was asked to be a member of SESs School Improvement Team. (SIT) Each year, Ambassadors of foreign

Conversations with faculty/staff

School calendar

CSP completion forms, journals and reflection papers Conversations with students and Campus Ministry team members Conversations with Principal Samples of Reflection papers School calendar

Conversation with Principal Conversations with cooks and students Conversations with SES administration and local Sapuk community Conversations with Fr. Rich

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Governments with embassies in the FSM Australia, Japan, and the U.S., and FSM leaders and dignitaries come to Chuuk. Almost always, they will make the trip up to Xavier to speak to our students. This connects our students with people in leadership positions, and gives them an opportunity to question leaders about the progress and direction of their country. For graduation in 2010, the President of the FSM, a Xavier alumnus, was the graduation speaker. The entire diplomatic corps assigned to the FSM came for Xaviers graduation in spite of the bad roads. Governments of Australia, Japan: Since SY 2008-09 Xavier High School has received one SGS (Small Grant Scheme) grant and two DAP (Direct Assistance Program) grants from the government of Australia, and two Grassroots Grants from the Government of Japan. The assistance from these two countries who have embassies in the FSM, is a sign of commitment from foreign Governments. The Ambassadors of the U.S., Australia, and Japan have all indicated that they very much support Xaviers desire to remain in Chuuk. The number of admissions directors from colleges and universities coming to visit Xavier High School continues to increase. While some schools do not come on a regular basis (Loyola Marymount University, Farleigh Dickenson), others such as Chaminade University in Hawaii come on a regular basis. Chaminade and Xavier have worked out an agreement where all Xavier seniors finish the application for Chaminade before the Assistant Director for Admissions comes in late October or early November. He reviews the seniors applications, and can tell students during his visit whether students are accepted, deferred pending further standardized test scores, or not accepted. He can also tell those accepted whether they will qualify for credit level courses. Xavier has also an agreement with the College of Micronesia, FSMs national college, for all Xavier seniors to take the COM-FSM

Conversations with students and administrators Photos of graduation

Receipts of deposits in Treasurers Office

Conversations with seniors Conversations with college counselors COM-FSM Entrance Exam Results Records of Chaminade application results

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Entrance Exam. Seniors are told who has passed the Entrance exam and whether they can enter directly into credit-level course, or must take remedial courses. Work with these colleges and universities not only helps Xavier to know how effective it is in the area of student achievement, but is a great support for our seniors where, because of its isolation and slow internet, applying to college can be very daunting. Every January, Xavier High School students, faculty and administrators are actively involved in the Diocesan Catholic Schools week. This includes participating in a mass with the students of all three Catholic Schools on the island of Weno, essay writing, community clean-up projects, student exchange programs, and sports and activities with the other Catholic Schools. Until Xaviers transportation crisis prohibited . it in SY 2010-11, Xavier students sponsored the English language mass on the 2nd Saturday of each month at Holy Family Church downtown. The students prepared the readings, the songs, and did the altar serving. This practice should resume in February, 2012, as our transportation crisis has been solved. In SY 2011-12, for the first time, Xavier High Schools SBA has held several joint meetings with the SBA of Saraman Chuuk Academy (SCA). This has helped foster a closer relationship between the 2 Catholic High Schools on island, as witnessed by SCAs SBA members attending Xavier day this year, and Xaviers SBA being invited to, and attending SCAs Christmas Performance downtown. Each year for Xavier Day, alumni and members of our local Sapuk Community are invited to watch the games and activities. This SY, 2011-12, members of the Saraman Chuuk Academy Student Body Association were also invited and joined in the Xavier Day Activities. This is also done for Cultural Day which takes place once every two years, and for graduations.

Conversations with students and faculty and administrators

Conversations with Junior and Senior students Conversations with Xavier Administrators Conversations with Fr. Rosento, pastor of Holy Family Parish. Conversations with SBA members Minutes from Xavier SBA meetings

Conversations with student, faculty and administrators Conversations with local Xavier staff

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There are three Xavier FaceBook Pages and Go to FaceBook and search for three Xavier FaceBook Groups. The largest, Xavier. Xavierites has 750 members. The number of conversations with students Pages, Groups, and members are an indication of community support for Xavier that stretches around the world Chuuk State and FSM aid to Private Receipts of deposits in Treasurers Schools: Each year Xavier High School Office receives financial support from the Chuuk State Government and the FSM National Government, in the form of Aid to Private Schools. Chuuk State supports its Chuukese students at Xavier, and FSM supports all students at Xavier. Chuuk State aid averages $7,000/yr, and FSM Aid to Private Schools averages around $73,000/yr. Graduation and Chuukese parents: Before graduation each year, the director and Ms. Conversations with seniors Rufina from the school office, begin a series of meetings with the families of Chuukese Conversations with parents seniors, and the host families of non-Chuukese seniors who are living with them. The families Conversations with Xavier administrators prepare and finance the graduation dinner, providing food for 500 people. Areas of Strength: The Outreach to the local Sapuk Community and especially Sapuk Elementary School, has helped Xavier Students to feel a connection with the wider Sapuk community, and has made Xaviers Mission and ESLRs more than just words on paper. District FOX meetings with the director have helped both the students to stay connected with their home districts, and has been a valuable way for Xavier to connect with parents, alumni, benefactors, and potential new students. In a sense the FOX district meetings act as a substitute for PTA meetings, which are logistically impossible. The new Xavier Website with the Student Handbook and School calendar posted, Xavierite Facebook pages, and parents email addresses have all aided greatly in providing a connectedness with family, alumni, and benefactors that wasnt previously available. Chuukese families who host our female student population, provide a connectedness for the female students to the larger Chuukese community.

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Support from the Governments of Japan and Australia not only provide valuable resources for Xavier, but as importantly help students make the connection between our foreign donors and the Mission and ESLRs Conscientious and Compassion. Support from FSM national government in the form of Aid to Private Schools, supports Xaviers being able to increase its operational budget to support students in different support systems. The willingness admission directors and recruiters from U.S. colleges and universities to come to Xavier to administer Entrance Exams applications to all our seniors, helps our students feel connected to the larger world, and supports them in making the next step in their educational lives. The increased number of Xavier faculty members who have local Chuukese host families, not only is an off-campus support for the faculty, but helps them understand the Micronesian and Chuukese cultural context in which they are teaching, which becomes a further support for our students.

Areas of Growth: Xaviers isolation makes it difficult to connect with the wider community in meaningful ways. Lack of professional services in Chuuk, either government or private, make it difficult assessing whether a student is struggling because of laziness, or from more serious problems.

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Resources Management and Development

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D1. Resources To what extent are the resources available to the school sufficient to sustain the school program and are they effectively used to carry out the school mission and student achievement of the Expected School-wide Learning Results?

Findings Limited financial resources does affect learning at Xavier High School. Even with fundraising and Aid to Private Schools, important needs, like equipment, lab materials, and adequate salaries to keep qualified staff, often have to be put on hold. While fundraising efforts have been very successful, raising enough funds to hire and retain qualified administrators and teachers continues to be the greatest challenge. Despite the tenuousness of our financial situation, Xavier has been able to maintain a reasonable tuition in order to make itself available and affordable to a wider spectrum of families. For the boys, tuition, room and board for one year is $1,340. For the girls, tuition and bus fees for one year is $1,240. There is a strong effort at Xavier to find tuition assistance for truly needy students. This is usually done on a case by case basis, finding generous donors who are willing to support particular students. In most cases, when Xavier finds a donor, we make sure that the donor is willing to support the student for as long as that student is attending Xavier High School. If a particular donor is only willing to support a student for 1 year, Xavier finds other donors who will pick up that students assistance for the duration of his/her schooling at Xavier. The amount of assistance varies from student to student, depending on particular family

Evidence Observations Xaviers Operating Budget

Conversations with students Letters home students Financial records to newly accepted

Bernard Thulag fund Financial Records

Conversations with Director

Conversations with Treasurer

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situations. While Xavier has not been able to add to its endowment fund, it has not had to draw from its endowment fund. Xaviers endowment now stands at a very modest $214,271.13, as of June 30, 2011. While Xavier may have a very limited operational budget, apart from current bills, Xavier is debt free. FOX Communities: The recent establishment of FOX Communities in each district is becoming a crucial part of Xaviers financial support. Since 2009, Xavier alumni have contributed $50,000 to Xavier. While this seems like a small amount, alumni contributing to their alma maters is a foreign concept in Micronesia, where the government is expected to pay for everything. New Chapel: After many years of holding liturgies in a classroom in the main building due to deterioration of the main chapel, the Madonna De La Strata Chapel was dedicated and opened before graduation. The chapel is used on a daily basis, and is open for use by the local Chuukese Catholic Community for Sunday and Feast Day masses. On Christmas and Easter the Chuukese Catholic Community and Xavier come together and do a joint English/Chuukese Mass. In 1998, Winzler & Kelly Consulting Engineers, did a structural evaluation of the main building at Xavier High School. Their Executive Summary stated: The structure is in remarkably good condition for its age. With the repairs and rehabilitation measures recommended herein, along with a regular and diligent maintenance program, it should remain completely serviceable for the foreseeable future. The Mabuchi Company renovation in the

New York Province Report to Xavier

Financial records

Financial Records Reports from FOX Communities

Observation Conversations with students and faculty

Observation Conversation with seniors Plaque commemorating the Mabuchi Companys renovation Photos of old and newly renovated building Copy of Winzler & Kelly, Structural
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summer of 2008, has ensured that the main building is safe, functional and protected from degradation by the elements. In January, 2009, Xavier High School received a Japanese Grassroots Grant for $89,000 to convert the old Xavier Callaghan Chapel into the Callaghan Student Center, with an assembly Hall with multiple computer stations, bookstore, and two small multi-purpose rooms for tutoring, and/or small group work. The tutoring center is utilized by Xavier students, as well as students from Sapuk Elementary, with whom Xavier has developed a mentoring program. The construction of the Student Center has provided the school with a covered area to conduct morning assemblies, and is used daily. A reliable source of electricity is essential for any high school, but even more so at a boarding school. In Chuuk, the norm for island power is an alternating 4 hours on, 4 hours off at its best. As a result, Xavier has always relied on a generator for times when there is no island power. The generator that was installed in the 1990s was much too large for the needs of the school, and was inefficient. By 2009, it was deteriorating rapidly, belching black smoke that covered the chapel floor with soot every day. The generator was also using two and one half gallons of diesel ($17) an hour to operate. In April, 2010, Xavier submitted a grant request to the Sarita Kenedy-East foundation for a new generator. The grant was accepted in December, 2010, and was bought and shipped from the U.S. and installed. The installation of the new, more efficient, generator has allowed the school to have a reliable source of power for evening study and nighttime class preparation. New Vehicles: Graduation, 2011, and all of the needs for transporting, students, parents, guests, and graduates, along with the Chuuk road conditions, caused a dramatic transportation crisis at Xavier during the summer of 2011. At the end of graduation, only one of Xaviers three buses were

Evaluation of the Main building at Xavier High School

Grant documents Observation

Observations Conversations with students Conversations administrators with faculty and

Correspondence from Sarita-Kenedy East Foundation Finance records

Financial records of donations of Donors Japanese Grassroots Grant Approval Observations


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operating. Only one of two pick-up trucks was working, and none of our flatbed trucks was functioning. Without adequate transportation, approximately 48% of our student population would not be able to get to campus (certainly not in a timely fashion), and student learning at Xavier would be greatly impacted. In response to this crisis, that developed at graduation, 2011, Xavier has raised and spent $163,000 in SY 2011-12 toward the purchase of new vehicles. Renovated Shower House: During the summer of 2011, Xavier renovated its boys shower house.

Observation Conversations with male students Invoices for materials Observation Samples of art work

The addition of an art classroom and new musical instruments is an example of Xaviers commitment to the growth of the whole human person. The main building and classrooms are kept in working order by Maintenance and Repair. Amongst other repairs, the senior classroom has been retiled and a drainage system has been installed in the courtyard to prevent flooding in times of heavy rains. Xaviers support departments, including maintenance and repair, security, faculty and student kitchen cooks, cleaning and laundry, are run and staffed by local residents of Sapuk Village. Through maintaining good relations with the Sapuk community, and by employing community leaders as the heads of Maintenance and Repair and also Security, the school ensures it is not only employing a reliable staff, but it has helped to reduce security issues with the local community. The Staff Policy Manual, outlining employment policies and, has helped to define responsibilities among staff, leading to a greater sense of job security. In addition, the worker contracts, and the Support Staff Policy Manual include the Support Staffs role in

Receipts and invoices Observation

Observations Conversations with Support Staff Employment Records

Staff Policy Manual Worker Contracts Conversations with Support Staff


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helping to promote the Philosophy, Mission, and ESLRs of Xavier, and now includes policies on drinking and driving, and on the selling of betel nut and cigarettes to the students. This is important to ensure the safety of students and uphold the Xavier mission, and to help the support staff feel an integral part of the Xavier community Whenever possible, on-campus student welfare is improved especially regarding the male students. The dorm facility has been updated with new mosquito screens and mattresses. However, the boarders bunks are in need of repair or replacement. The shower house of the boys had undergone major renovation but still needed to be tiled to be more hygienic. The boys benjo is in need of immediate repair, as it dates back to the World War II era. Xavier recognizes this need, and has an Australian SGS (Small Grant Scheme) grant pending to remedy this situation. Acquisition of new industrialized kitchen stove made the quality of food in the student kitchen improved in hygiene and nutrition. In 2009, Xavier received an SGS (Small Grant Scheme) Grant from Australia to build a new bathroom and shower facility for our girls.

Observations Financial Records Conversations with students Conversations with administrators and faculty Correspondence from Grant providers

Correspondence from Grant Providers Observations Fiancial Records Conversations administrators Observations Financial Records with students and

The Quickbooks accounting software has been an effective tool in providing monthly income statement and bi-weekly cash flows reports to show the transparencies of the receipts and disbursements of the school funds. These reports had been made available to the board of directors, director and principal on a monthly and bi-weekly basis. Moreover, a comparative income statement report against the budget ensures the school is operating within the approved budget.

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Timely collection of tuition payment has been a problem over the year but with the new school policy of not letting a student take an exam without tuition payment have helped in lessening the unpaid tuition every semester. Over the past five years, at the end of each school year, outstanding tuition and fees has decreased from 17% to 3%.

Conversations with students Financial records Conversations with administrators Copies of letters home to parents

Areas of Strength: Xaviers modest tuition, room and board and bus fees are affordable for a large segment of the Micronesian population. Xavier finds financial support and donors for students from low or no-income families. No one is turned away from Xavier because of a lack of financial resources. Xaviers budget and corresponding income have risen steadily since SY 2008-09, enabling Xavier to commit more resources towards student learning programs, and learning resources. Increased donors and financial resources have allowed Xavier to renovate and update the Xavier campus from the renovation of the main building to the new chapel and student center, new sidewalks and drainage system, boys shower room. Xaviers committed support staff, in spite of their lack of professional training, and with limited resources, have miraculously kept vehicles moving and generators running. The Xavier Board of Directors, in cooperation with the Director and the treasurer and her Quickbooks accounting software, are managing the oversight of the Xavier budget in such a way that balances the need for quality education that maximizes student achievement with the reality of scarce resources.

Areas of Growth: The school needs to find funds to hire and retain teachers on a long-term basis, for regular maintenance needs, and for replacing depreciated assets.

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D2. Resources Planning

To what extent does the Board and the school execute responsible planning for the future?

Findings Evidence The newly Amended and Restated Articles of Incorporation and the newly Amended and Newly Amended and Restated Xavier Restated Xavier By-Laws helps to insure that By-Laws the Xavier Board works closely with the school and its leadership in executing responsible planning for the future. Particularly under Duties of the Board, #8 To make an annual evaluation of the Schools performance in accordance with its Philosophy, Mission and Expected School-wide Learning Results, helps to insure that responsible planning must be done in light of the Philosophy, Mission and ESLRs of Xavier. According to Xaviers 2006 Self-Study Report, with the help of the Xavier Boards assistance, Xavier developed a Resource Priority Plan in Resource Priority Plan order to realistically determine the needs of the school. Strategies were developed to facilitate Observations implementation of the plan. According to the 2006 Self-Study Report the Resource Priority Plan included: 1. Completion of major capital projects to upgrade the physical plant, enhancing the school environment; 2. Creation of a faculty endowment to support the recruitment and retention of a full-time Micronesian teaching staff; 3. Construction of a new school chapel, which will be the locus of a renewed emphasis on the spiritual and liturgical life of the school community; 4. Drafting of a long-range maintenance plan for the upkeep of all school facilities; 5. Developing a plan for allocating money for textbook purchases 6. Implementation of a technology improvement plan, which includes Internet accessibility to all students,
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faculty and staff. While the new administration was unaware of the Resource Priority Plan, We have implemented much of the Resource Priority Plan. (For example, the renovation of the main building, the completion of the chapel, and the new Student Center have all upgraded the physical plant, and enhanced the school environment. We have not, however, created a faculty endowment. The current administration believes that one Xavier Endowment is enough to focus on now, and that, although the retention of qualified Micronesian faculty is something important to work for, we are seeking to increase our sources of income (as mentioned in Significant Developments since 2006) in order to pay for qualified Micronesian Faculty. At its February, 2011 Board meeting, the acting director, Fr. Dave Andrus, presented the Board with a Xavier High School Infrastructure Development Plan that prioritized needs from SY 2011- SY 2015 on a #1 to #5 basis. While the current administration is using this document as a guideline, it is used only as a guideline, and is not strictly adhered to. Textbook acquisitions was a #1 priority on the Infrastructure Development Plan Xavier has made good progress in making sure that Xavier students have adequate and updated textbooks in most courses. This has been done through both a donation project from Fordham Prep High Jesuit High School in the Bronx, and purchases. The budget for textbooks in SY 2011-12 is $44,472.00. As the leadership Team and faculty of the school are constantly living in close proximity, everyone is made aware of areas in which the school is in most need of resource allocation. When there are surplus funds available, faculty and staff are welcome to ask for their priority needs. The director and principal will assess the priorities, and allocate funds accordingly. This is not an ideal way, but it has been useful.

XHS Infrastructure Development Plan 2011-2015

Textbook purchases Donated books from Fordham Prep Textbook room SY 2011-12 budget Infrastructure Development Plan Conversations with faculty Conversations with Principal and Director

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Although Xaviers financial situation has improved greatly over the past 4 years, it is still difficult to do strategic planning when, because of our financial situation, the operational budget cannot even include depreciation of assets. In spite of this drawback, a Strategic Master Plan that encompasses all aspects of planning at Xavier needs to be developed to maximize student learning at Xavier High School. This document, endorsed by the Board of Directors, would be used regardless of turnover in administration.

Observations Financial Reports Cash Flow Reports Conversations with director

Areas of Strength: Xavier High School does well in providing quality education to a wide economic range of students, with very limited resources.

Areas of Growth: Xavier High School, under the direction of the Xavier Board of Directors, needs to develop a Strategic Master Plan for Xavier High School, that will involve the input of all stakeholders encompass a comprehensive plan that assesses Xaviers needs for quality faculty and staff, faculty and staff professional development, equipment and information technology needs to deliver student learning programs, and a financial plan to meet these needs. (This will be addressed in our School-wide Action Plan.)

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Chapter V

School-Wide Action Plans

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ACTION PLAN #1: The school will benchmark its curriculum with content standards and course competencies from a single external source, adapted to our local situation, to ensure that students participate in a sequential, integrated, challenging and relevant 9-12 program.
Rationale: An integrated, sequential curriculum that is guided by external standards is essential for increased achievement in student learning to take place at Xavier. With turnover rate of teachers at Xavier being as high as it is, a curriculum that is benchmarked with content standards from a single external source will create a structure that will help new teachers understand what they need to teach in their courses. In addition, new teachers will be given specific course competencies at the beginning of their course planning to ensure all academic standards are fulfilled. Using the curriculum standards of St. Ignatius Prep, a Jesuit High School in California, as a model for Xavier, will help Xavier align its curriculum to both California standards and the JSEAs standards of the document Revisioning the Grad at Graduation, while still adhering to the local environment. Growth Target: All subjects of the Xavier Curriculum will be benchmarked with content standards and course competencies from a single external source, and adapted to our local context, by June, 2013.

Task

Person(s) Responsible
Director

Resources
Jesuit Connections with St. Ignatius Prep

Assessment of Progress
Updates on Content Standards Development Standards will be at Xavier by August, 2012 Updated Curriculum Guides given to Principal

Timeline

Methods of Reporting Progress

Obtaining St. Ignatius Prep Standards

SY-201213

Will be reported at Faculty Orientation Days, August, 2012 Faculty/staff meetings

Principal

Staff Training in development of course competencies

St. Ignatius Prep Course Competencies Development of Course Competencies Workshop with S.I. Prep Personnel Development of Course Competencies follow-up Workshop JSEAs Revisioning the Grad at Graduation Curriculum Guides

SY 201213 and ongoing

Faculty Orientation Days August, 2012 Faculty/Staff meetings Updated curriculum guides

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Updating overall course philosophies to match JSEA Standards

Principal Department Heads Faculty Faculty Principal

JSEAs Revisioning the Grad at Graduation

Updated Curriculum Guides given to Principal Faculty Evaluations Updated Course competencies given to Principal Faculty Evaluations Faculty Meetings Updated curriculum guides given to Principal Evaluation of Curriculum

SY 201213 and ongoing

Reported out at Faculty Orientation Days, 2013

Addition of Course Competencies to current Curriculum Guides

St. Ignatius Prep Course Competencies

SY 201213 and ongoing SY 201213 Second Review SY 2014-15

Reported out to Faculty at Staff Evaluation Days Reported out at Faculty Orientation/Development Days Reported out to Faculty at Staff Evaluation Days Reported out at Faculty Orientation/Development Days Reported out to the Board through Principals Report to the Board

Final Revision and updating Of XHS Curriculum Guides, in light of the Course Competancies and Standards

Principal Department Heads Faculty

S.I. Prep Content Standards XHS Curriculum Guides

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ACTION PLAN #2: Increase Achievement on Standardized Test Scores


Rationale: Analyses of Standardized Tests that Xavier Students currently take, such as PSAT, SAT, and ACT, indicate that they fall below the average of all takers of the exams. Although all students at Xavier are technically speaking ELL students, Xavier believes that its students can and should achieve, minimally, the average. Growth Target: Xavier students will increase their scores on Standardized Tests by 5% a year until, as a group, they rank in the Average range for all takers. Task
Ensure that Goals #1, 2a, and #2b are implemented

Person(s) Responsible
Leadership Team Math teachers ELA Teachers

Resources

Assessment of Progress
Check with teachers regarding tests, quizzes,

Timeline
SY 201213 and ongoing

Methods of Reporting Progress


PSAT Scores SAT Scores TOEFL Scores ACT Scores SAT 10 (or other appropriate standardized test Scores) PSAT scores SAT scores

SAT course for Juniors

College counselors

SAT material SAT Booklets

SAT, PSAT Practice test results

SY 201112 and ongoing SY 201011 and ongoing

PSAT, SAT, TOEFL, and ACT practice sessions

Appropriate faculty College counselors Principal ELA teachers

PSAT, SAT, TOEFL, ACT materials

College Counselors Reports

Standardized test scores

Instruction targeting writing skills

Textbooks Speech Documents Lesson Plans

Teachers Reports Homeowrk

SY 201213 and ongoing

Standardized test scores Teachers Reports

Track standardized test results to identify critical areas of improvement

Principal Departments

Curriculum and textbooks XHS Entrance Exam SAT, PSAT, ACT, TOEFL Exams

Department Meetings Staff Meetings

On-going

Minutes and report to the Staff

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ACTION PLAN #2a: Develop effective programs to address the need for improvement of basic math operations and numbers.
Rationale: While Xavier students have made some progress in the area of math, Xavier students continue to struggle with math. Analysis of the data collected and reviewed, indicate that a critical reason for this struggle is a weakness with basic operations and numbers. Without a strong foundation in understanding basic operations and numbers, Xavier students will continue to underperform in math A strong foundation and understanding of basic operations and numbers is critical to performing well in upper level math. Reporting back to elementary schools will help to address and correct weaknesses at the Elementary School level, before students get to Xavier.

Growth Target: Xavier students will increase their proficiency level in math by 5% each year, until we rank with U..S National average (for lack of any other national average).

Task
Xavier will review & reassess the current Math curriculums, in accordance with Content Standards from Action Plan #1. Introduce SAT 10 Math to Freshman and Sophomore Classes

Person(s) Responsible
Principal and & Math teachers

Resources
Math curriculum standards, Math textbooks, quizzes, tests, SAT scores

Assessment of Progress

Timeline
Summer, 2012 SY 2012-13

Methods of Reporting Progress


Principals Report to the Board Principals Report to Faculty Mid-quarter grades Report cards Directors Reports to FOX Communities Report out SAT 10 Results

Principal and math teachers math Teachers & Principal

SAT 10 Tests

Results of SAT 10 tests

SY 201213 and ongoing SY 201112 and ongoing

Math Review for Sophomores & Seniors Math Review for Freshmen & Juniors

Textbooks, quizzes, Xavier Entrance Exam, Bob Scavulo math videos and math games Textbooks, handouts Bob Scavulo math videos and math games

Math exams and finals Sophomores re-taking the Xavier Entrance Exam

Results on Report Cards Reported out at End of School Year Faculty Evaluation Days

math teachers & principal

Results of tests, quizzes PSAT practice, and PSAT, and SAT and SAT 10 results

SY 201213 and ongoing

Advisor/advisee, report cards, Reported out at End of School Year Faculty Evaluation Days.

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Math Tutoring

Share an Analysis of the Results of Xaviers Math Entrance Exam with Elementary Schools

math teachers, Australian GAP volunteers, student peer tutors Principal, director, Australian GAP year volunteers

Textbooks, handouts, Scavulo math games and videos

Homework results, Practice results, math grade results, SAT 10 results Xavier Entrance Test math results

SY 201112 and ongoing

Mid-quarter reports, report cards

Xavier Entrance Exams, Xavier Entrance Exam results for each school, Spreadsheet

SY -201112 and ongoing

Letters to Principals of elementary schools whose students took the Xavier Entrance Exam

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ACTION PLAN #2b: Improve the Academic Success of all Students in Reading, Especially for Underperforming Students.
Rationale: While Xavier students have made some progress in Reading proficiency, they continue to struggle in the critical thinking process, especially in reasoning and inference. Growth Target: Xavier students will increase their reasoning and inference skills by 5% each year. Task
Xavier will review & reassess the current English & Literature curriculums, in accordance with Content Standards from Action Plan #1. Xavier will look at a variety of standardized tests and Choose one that is appropriate for Xavier. Xavier will introduce an appropriate standardized test in Reading for 9th and 10th grades. Required SSR in English & Literature classes

Person(s) Responsible
Principal & English Language Arts teachers

Resources
English Skills textbooks, Novels, poetry books, handouts

Assessment of Progress
Results of assignments, quizzes and tests

Timeline
SY 201213 and ongoing SY 201112

Methods of Reporting Progress


Principals Report to the Board Principals Report to Faculty Mid-quarter grades Report cards Directors Reports to FOX Communities Reported to the Board at its June, 2012Board meeting Will be reported at End of School Year Faculty Evaluation Days Test results will be recorded in the report card

Principal, director, and ELA teachers

Internet, Appropriate Friends of Xavier

Principal and ELA teachers

Appropriate standardized test Novels

A standardized test will have been chosen by the end of SY 2011-12 for introduction in SY 2012-13 results from standardized test

SY 201213 and ongoing SY 201213 and ongoing SY 201112 and ongoing SY -201112 and ongoing

Principal & ELA teachers

Book Report Reflection Paper Reflection papers book reports

SSR for juniors 1st semester; SAT Practice 2nd semester Share an Analysis of the Results of Xaviers Math Entrance Exam with Elementary Schools

Principal ELA teachers

Iliad

Mid Quarter Reports, Report Cards, Advisor/advisee meetings Mid quarter Reports Report Cards Letters to Principals of elementary schools whose students took the Xavier Entrance Exam

Principal, director, Australian GAP year volunteers

Xavier Entrance Exams, Xavier Entrance Exam results for each school, Spreadsheet

Xavier Entrance Test math results

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Action Plan #3: Develop a Strategic Master Plan for Xavier High School that will guide Xavier to its 70th anniversary.
Rationale: Xavier High School has a proud, perhaps unique history, and a 60 year tradition of setting academic standards and serving the educational needs of the people of Micronesia. Using the Philosophy, Mission and ESLRs of Xavier High School as its guide, Xavier needs to develop a Strategic Master Plan. A strategic master plan, for which the board, with the administration will have oversight and insure its implementation, will provide continuity for living out Xaviers Philosophy, Mission, and ESLRs, in spite of the high turnover rate of faculty and staff at Xavier. A strategic master plan will help Xavier focus its limited resources to areas that are identified as critical areas for Improvement and for living out its Philosophy, Mission, ESLRs, and the other components of the School-wide Action Plans. Growth Target: While the Master Plan will focus particularly on the next five years, the Strategic Plan will extend the Xavier tradition into its 70th anniversary. Task
Create general goals and objectives for Master Plan, that will include the following general areas: Mission and Identity; Education program (both academic and nonacademic); technology; facilities; staffing; finances; leadership and governance.

Person(s) Responsible
Leadership Team

Resources
WASC Self-Study Report WASC Visiting Team Report

Assessment of Progress
Working drafts of individual Master Plans

Timeline

Methods of Reporting Progress


Reported out to Board of Directors

August November, 2012

Faculty Orientation Days Director Reports to FOX District Meetings Posted on Website

Conduct a Mission Review to determine whether the current Philosophy, Mission, and ESLRs are appropriate for the next 5-10 years, and revise, if necessary.

Leadership Team

XHS Philosophy, Mission & ESLRs JSEA Re-visioning the Grad at Graduation Input from the Society of Jesus in Micronesia, Members of the Board, Board of Directors Input from Stakeholders

Board Approval of Mission Review

From June, 2012 Board Meeting to following Board meeting

Reported to Board meetings Faculty Orientation Days Director Reports to FOX District Meetings

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Elicit input from Stakeholders in each district Incorporating both input from stakeholders and Action Plans 1, 2,2a, and 2b, create a master plan in each of the areas listed below

Director

FOX District Meetings Powerpoint presentations

Reported back to Leadership Team

SY 201213

Reported out to Leadership Team Meetings

Leadership Team

Results from FOX Meetings Progress from Action Plans #1, 2, 2a, and 2b

In light of our Mission Review, 6 master plans with goals and objectives, will be presented to the Leadership team for final review Principal and Department heads will monitor the work of individual teachers and their courses

Reported out at Leadership Team Meetings SY 201214

Principal & Departmen t heads Educational Program Master Plan

Mission Review Results Revised Curriculum Guides with Benchmarks and Course Competencies(Results of Action Plan #1) textbooks XHS Entrance Exam SAT, PSAT, ACT, TOEFL Exams U.S. Jesuit High Schools Internet suggestions

SY 201314

Reported out to Board Reported to Faculty & Staff Reported out to FOX Communities Reported on Website

Leadership Team Technology Resources Master Plan

Leadership team Facilities Master Plan

Mission Review Document Educational Master Plan Technology Master Plan

Number of students who have computer access when needed Number of students who have access to the internet for student projects Assess the improvement to campus facilities, in light of other Master Plans

SY 201213

Reported out to Board Reported to Faculty & Staff Reported out to FOX Communities Reported on Website

SY 201213

Reported out to Board Reported to Faculty & Staff Reported out to FOX Communities Reported on Website

200

Leadership Team Staffing & Staff Development Master Plan

Educational Master Plan Results of Action Plans #2,2a,and 2b Financial Master Plan

Number of qualified teachers at Xavier Number of long-term faculty at Xavier Number of local faculty at Xavier Facilities Master Plan Technology Master Plan Staff/Staff Development Master Plan Education Master Plan Monitor Agendas Monitor Minutes of Board Meetings 6 final Master Plan copies

SY 201213

Reported out to Board Reported to Faculty & Staff Reported out to FOX Communities Reported on Website Reported out to Board Reported to Faculty & Staff Reported out to FOX Communities Reported on Website

Director and Board Financial Resources Master Plan

Financial Reports FOX Communities N.Y. Province Development Office Funding Guides Database of donors

SY 201213

Leadership & Governance Master Plan

Director and Board

Do you Speak Ignatian JSEA Publications Published materials on How to Be a Board

SY 201213

Reported out to Board

Leadership Team Final Strategic Master Plan

Summer 2014

Reported out to Board and all Stakeholders

201