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RECOMMENDED GUIDELINES FOR MASTER'S MANUAL OPERATIONS MANUAL FOR OFFSHORE SERVICE VESSELS ON THE NORWEGIAN CONTINENTAL SHELF

Date of issue: 15.01.2010 Version No: 1 Page: 2 __________________________________________________________________________

CONTENTS: 1 2 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.4.1 2.4.2 3 3.1 4 4.1 4.2 4.2.1 4.2.2 4.3 5 5.1 5.2 5.3 5.4 5.5 6 6.1 6.1.1 6.1.2 6.2 6.3 6.4 6.4.1 6.4.2 6.4.3 6.4.4 6.4.5 6.4.6 6.5 7 7.1 7.2 Hierarchy of guidelines for vessel operations..............................................................4 Purpose, scope, publication and follow-up ..................................................................5 Purpose .............................................................................................................................5 Scope ................................................................................................................................5 Publication and follow-up ..................................................................................................5 Definitions and abbreviations used in an offshore connection ..........................................5 Definitions..........................................................................................................................5 Abbreviations.....................................................................................................................10 Responsibilities and roles ..............................................................................................12 The master's responsibility ................................................................................................12 Requirements related to vessel, crew and equipment.................................................12 Requirements related to vessel .........................................................................................12 Requirements related to crew - training and drills .............................................................13 Training .............................................................................................................................13 Drills ..................................................................................................................................13 Requirements related to ROV / Project vessel ..................................................................13 HSE ...................................................................................................................................14 General..............................................................................................................................14 Reporting of undesirable incidents ....................................................................................14 Notification and reporting of incidents subject to notification obligation ............................14 Observation and reporting of environmental aspects ........................................................14 Emissions, discharges and combustion within the safety zone.........................................14 Supply service .................................................................................................................15 Deck cargo cargo in cargo units....................................................................................15 Cargo plan and manifest ...................................................................................................15 Declaration of dangerous and/or polluting cargo (Inbound/outbound cargo) ....................16 Loading and unloading at supply bases, quay facilities, tank facilities, etc......................................................................................................................................16 When the weather is poor (marginal weather conditions) on the field...............................17 Operational requirements for operations within the safety zone .......................................18 General..............................................................................................................................18 Technical systems.............................................................................................................18 Radar system ....................................................................................................................18 Interaction..........................................................................................................................18 Radio silence.....................................................................................................................19 Transport of freshwater .....................................................................................................19 Personnel transfer using MOB boat ..................................................................................20 Emergency preparedness service .................................................................................20 General..............................................................................................................................20 Near-standby:....................................................................................................................21

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7.3 7.4 7.5 7.5.1 7.5.2 7.6 7.7 8

MOB boat/Daughter craft/Fast rescue craft w/equipment .................................................21 Tanker assistance .............................................................................................................22 Oil spill response ...............................................................................................................23 Primary line oil spill preparedness.....................................................................................23 Secondary line oil spill preparedness (NOFO) ..................................................................23 Guard duty.........................................................................................................................24 Vessel on collision course .................................................................................................24 Reporting routines (operations-related)........................................................................26

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Hierarchy of guidelines for vessel operations

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Purpose, scope, publication and follow-up

2.1

Purpose

The purpose of this manual is to provide the crews on board offshore service vessels operating on the Norwegian Continental Shelf with guidelines and information related to the functions the vessels shall perform. This manual must be read in the context of the NWEA guidelines, and complement and specify these. In case of deviations between the two, this manual takes precedence.

2.2

Scope

Applies to offshore service vessels working on the Norwegian Continental.

2.3

Publication and follow-up

OLF and NR are responsible for publishing and updating the document. Operator-specific requirements are included as separate appendices to this document. The document shall be updated at regular intervals, at least every other year. Note: If one of the parties responsible for the document, OLF or NR, deems it practical and/or necessary, the document may be subject to updates in addition to the regular updates.

2.4

Definitions and abbreviations used in an offshore connection

2.4.1

Definitions
Service which includes mooring of installations, replacement of anchors, presetting of anchors, work preceding or subsequent to mooring/anchoring operations.

Anchor handling service:

Base: Base company: Standby vessel:

Quay facilities with logistics support dedicated to petroleum activities. The owner or operator of a base. Vessels assigned tasks related to hazard and accident situations in the petroleum activities, as well as keeping guard around installations.

Emergency preparedness

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service:

Service which comprises tasks related to hazard and accident situations in the petroleum activities, as well as keeping guard around installations. Procedures which describes task allocation (responsibilities & roles) for navigators on the bridge when two or more navigators are on duty simultaneously.

Bridge procedure:

Bridge Resource Management (BRM):

Training in management and communication for masters and navigation officers in connection with the execution of duties on the bridge, during normal situations and emergencies. Automatic positioning of a vessel or installation by means of a dynamic positioning system, which maintains the chosen position within a defined movement pattern from a given centre position, carried out by a vessel or installation which meets the requirements in accordance with the IMO regulations (cf. IMO MSC/Circ. 645 Guidelines for vessels with dynamic positioning system). 3 nautical miles around an installation. Where the Operating Company has established a maritime control centre, all maritime activity and traffic in the area will be monitored from this control centre.

DP operation:

Entry zone:

Vessel on collision course:

Course which intersects the installations safety zone and generates a red alarm. Service which includes transport of goods incl. cargo in bulk to installations offshore. Review of the job and any risk aspects with involved personnel prior to starting work cf. NWEA Ch. 7.4 toolbox talk. Installation, plant and other equipment for petroleum activities, but not supply and utility vessels or ships which transport bulk petroleum. Facility also includes pipelines and cables unless otherwise stipulated. 10 nautical miles around the installation. Where the operating company has established a maritime control centre, the area around the installation(s) shall be monitored especially for vessels which may come to a collision course.

Supply service:

Toolbox talk:

Facility:

Approach zone:

Maximum wave

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height:

Maximum wave height equals the highest wave which can be expected from 1000 passing waves. Maximum wave height is usually not stated in weather forecasts, but can be assumed to be 1.5 to 2 times higher than significant wave height.

Loading/unloading operation:

Service which includes use of offshore crane or transfer of bulk cargo between vessel and installation, other vessel, quay installation/base. Short stays along an installation to fetch/deliver mail, documentation, maps, etc. are not considered a loading/unloading operation in this manual.

Necessary certificates:

Applies to navigators and engineers on board offshore service vessels. This means that navigators and engineers have the certificates necessary to operate the vessel / hold the position that they signed on to fill on board the vessel, and which are in accordance with NMD/STCW requirements for the relevant vessel/vessel type and size, output of main and/or generator engines.

Offshore service vessel:

Vessel engaged in the supply, anchor handling and/or emergency preparedness related to exploration, development, production and decommissioning offshore. Note: Vessels carrying out ROV operations or assignments in connection with sub-sea installations, with the exception of diving support vessels, are also covered by this guideline.

Area emergency preparedness service:

Standby vessel which is equipped to cover several installations within the same geographical area (for example Troll-Oseberg, Tampen (Statfjord, Gullfaks) (Sleipner, Volve), Haltenbanken (Draugen, Heidrun, sgard (A, B and C)). The manager of the daily petroleum activities on behalf of the licensees.

Operator:

Offshore installation manager: The person in charge on board an offshore facility. Platform time: The time the vessel is located within the safety zone. In reality, this means from the time the vessel enters the safety zone until the time the vessel leaves the safety zone.

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PSA:

(The Petroleum Safety Authority Norway) reports to the Ministry of Labour and Social Inclusion (AID) and is the responsible authority for safety, emergency preparedness and working environment in the petroleum activities on the Norwegian Continental Shelf. One or more natural persons or bodies corporate, which in accordance with the Petroleum Act or previous legislation hold a license to explore, produce, transport or exploit. If a license has been granted to several natural persons or bodies corporate, the term licensee can mean both the licensees jointly or the individual participant (NPD's def.) The hazard which undesirable incidents represent for people, the environment and financial assets. Risk can be quantitatively expressed in several ways, but usually as the frequency of (the probability of) and consequence of the undesirable incidents. Risk = f (probability x consequence)

Licensee:

Risk:

Risk elements:

All conditions which can cause harm or damage to persons, the environment or materials during all phases and activities which the work assignment /operation includes. A systematic analysis, study, mapping of risk. Risk assessment is generally used in connection with projects, new installations/vessels, major modifications of existing installations/vessels, significant changes to existing equipment (incl. vessel), but not limited to this.

Risk assessment:

Significant wave height (Hs): Weather forecasts for sea areas usually contain a forecast for wave height. Expected significant wave height is then stated in metres. Wave height means vertical distance between wave crest and subsequent wave trough. Significant wave height is defined as the median of the third of the highest waves during a 20-minute period.

The safety zone:

A geographically delimited area where unauthorised vessels are forbidden to wait, pass through or conduct operations, i.e. vessels which play no part in the licensees' petroleum activities or which have not been given full or restricted access by authorities or licensees, also including aircraft. Unless otherwise stipulated by the King in Council the zone stretches from the seabed to maximum 500 metres above the highest vertical point of a facility. Horizontally, the zone stretches 500 metres from the extreme points of the facility, wherever they may be.

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The zone does not limit activities which are specifically permitted in accordance with the Act relating to petroleum activities or which constitutes exercising public authority. Note: For some offshore installations on the Norwegian Continental Shelf, the extreme points of the facility can be considered to be structures and/or offshore installations on the seabed. Such special conditions shall be described in the data sheet for the individual facility.

Safe Job Analysis (SJA):

The SJA is a systematic and gradual review of all risk factors prior to a specific work assignment or operation, so that measures can be implemented to remove or control the identified risk factors during the preparations for or performance of the work task or operation.

Technical redundancy:

The capacity/possibility of a component or a system maintaining or reestablishing its function when a fault occurs.

Undesirable incident: An undesirable situation which could have or did cause loss of resources. Guard vessel: Vessel which supervises/monitors ship traffic around unmanned installations and/or sub-sea installations/pipelines. Note: Guard vessels are not defined as "offshore service vessel" in this manual. Subject to obligation to notify Incident: Hazard and accident situations which have led to, or with negligibly changed circumstances, could have led to a) serious and acute injury or damage, b) acute life-threatening disease, c) serious impairment or discontinuance of safety functions or other barriers, so that the integrity of the facility is threatened, d) acute pollution.

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2.4.2
A/H AHTS AIS ATA ATD WP BRM CPA DFU DP DSL

Abbreviations
Anchor handling Anchor Handling, Tug and Supply Vessel Automatic Identification System Actual Time of Arrival Actual Time of Departure Work Permit Bridge Resource Management Closest Point of Approach Defined Hazard and Accident Situations Dynamic Positioning Direct Shuttle Loading System (loading system for direct loading into shuttle tankers using buoys /STL) which are pulled into a cone in the ship and connected to coupling inside the ship. Direct loading systems are in place on the Heidrun field on Haltenbanken) Estimated Time of Arrival Estimated Time of Departure Failure Mode Effect Analysis Health, Safety & the Environment Main Rescue Coordination Centre Main Rescue Coordination Centre, southern Norway (south of the 65th northern parallel, located at Sola) Main Rescue Coordination Centre, Northern Norway (north of the 65th northern parallel, west of 32 degrees longitude, located in Bod). International Marine Contractors Association International Maritime Dangerous Goods Code International Maritime Organisation International Safety Management Code International Ship and Port Facility Security Code Nautical mile (def. as 1 meridian minute ~ 1852 metres) Guidelines for the Safe Management of Offshore Supply and Rig Move Operations Norwegian Petroleum Directorate The Norwegian Oil Industry Association Offshore Loading System (submerged loading system, consisting of a swivel on the seabed, pipeline with a buoyancy device approximately in the middle). Connected to the bow connection of the shuttle tanker. Used on the Statfjord field, OLS A and OLS B. Power Management System Petroleum Safety Authority Norway Remotely Operated Tool Remotely Operated Vehicle Report on Undesirable Incident Norwegian Maritime Directorate Norwegian Pollution Control Authority

ETA ETD FMEA HSE MRCC MRCC SN MRCC NN IMCA IMGS IMO ISM ISPS n.m. NWEA NPD OLF OLS

PMS PSA ROT ROV RUH SD SFT

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SJA CCR SPM

STL TLP STCW TCPA SEPRA VTMIS WGS84 WOP WOW

Safe Job Analysis Central Control Room Single Point Mooring (surface loading buoy, loading pipeline hanging on a boom). Currently used on the Statfjord (SPM C), Gullfaks (SPM 1 and SPM 2) and Draugen fields. Submerged Turret Loading (submerged /subsea loading buoy, currently used on the Heidrun, Njord (Njord B) and sgaard (sgard C) fields. Tension Leg Platform International Convention on Standards of Training, Certification and Watchkeeping for Seafarers Time to Closest Point of Approach Specific Emergency Preparedness Requirements for an Activity Vessel Traffic Management & Information Service: Planning and information database for the supply chain: World Geodesic System 1984. All geographical coordinates in this document are stated in WGS84. Waiting On Platform Waiting on weather

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Responsibilities and roles

3.1

The master's responsibility

The responsibilities of a master on an offshore service vessel in service on the Norwegian Continental Shelf include the following: Comply with the guidelines in NWEA, (master's manual) - Operations manual for offshore service vessels on the Norwegian Continental Shelf, and contractual requirements, and ensure that the crew on board has sufficient knowledge about the above. Be proactive and continuously consider improvements vis--vis the ongoing operations.

Note: Nothing in this operations manual limit the responsibilities of the master under national and/or international statutes, regulations and conventions, or the shipping company's instructions.

Requirements related to vessel, crew and equipment

4.1

Requirements related to vessel


Offshore Service Vessel (OSV) which is intended for use in connection with offshorerelated activities covered by this operations manual, must as a minimum comply with the technical requirements related to vessels and equipment described in NWEA.

The shipping company must prepare specific operational restrictions for vessels which do not comply with the minimum requirements as regards technical redundancy. The operational restrictions must be documented and supported by an FME analysis (cf. OLF document, Guidelines for acceptance criteria for offshore service vessels, Ch. 4.3 Failure mode effect analysis). It must be verified that the described operational restrictions are sufficient to achieve an acceptable risk level. This means reducing the risk of collisions with a facility, not causing injury to persons participating in the operations and reducing the probability of hazard and accident situations occurring. The shipping company shall present the operational restrictions to the charterer before the contract is entered into. The charterer is responsible for informing the facilities of any operational restrictions before the vessel enters service.

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4.2

Requirements related to crew - training and drills

4.2.1

Training

The master of each crew is responsible for ensuring that the crew is trained in the execution of all tasks the individual crew member may be required to perform in the course of service. This means that a review must take place of all tasks which may become necessary to perform, and that it must be verified that the necessary equipment is available and in order. Furthermore, it must be emphasised that the equipment shall be used correctly by the crew during training. All details shall be reviewed during training, and all hand motions shall be carried out to ensure that the service is performed in the best and safest possible manner. All training shall be logged with training elements, participants, weather, sea and wind data, and any information useful for further development of the emergency preparedness on board.

4.2.2

Drills

Supply, anchor handling, standby and standby relief vessels for the area standby vessels shall schedule time for carrying out necessary drills in agreement with the operating company. The master is responsible for ensuring that his/her crew carries out the drills for the DFUs mentioned in the emergency response plan for the relevant facility, and in addition carry out drills for the vessels own DFUs. Drills shall be held on own vessel and in combination with offshore installations and any other emergency preparedness units (SAR helicopters and standby vessels) in the area.

4.3

Requirements related to ROV / Project vessel

Vessels leased to carry out special ROV/subsea operations will normally have a representative of the principal on board. As regards crewing of the bridge and engine room during operations in the safety zone, see Item 6.4.1 When operations are under way, the vessels movements in connection with ROV (for example when the vessel moves from one field to another) shall always be reported as indicated by the principal. Own procedures/work specifications for each job must be in the master's hands before departure, and the master must request them if not. All risk aspects shall be reviewed before starting an operation. No operations shall be initiated before the risk level is acceptable. A safe job analysis (SJA) shall be prepared before starting an operation.

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Vessels on project assignments shall comply with the established guidelines as described by the operator

HSE

5.1

General

One of the objectives of the operation of offshore service vessels is that the activities shall not cause accidents, injuries or material losses. There shall be documented procedures on board the vessel which clearly express this objective.

5.2

Reporting of undesirable incidents

Vessels shall implement an efficient system for registration, follow-up and prevention of incidents and near incidents. The system shall cover all types of injury to personnel, emissions and discharges to the external environment, material assets and be documentable.

5.3

Notification and reporting of incidents subject to notification obligation

Vessels shall notify the operating company for the relevant area/field of all hazard and accident situations. When the vessel is within the safety zone of a facility, this facility must also be notified. The notification to the operating company can initially be verbal, but shall be confirmed in writing as soon the situation permits. Each operator shall prepare specific notification matrices. Note: The vessel shall contact MRCC in emergency situations pertaining to the vessel.

5.4

Observation and reporting of environmental aspects

When vessels sail to/from installations on the Norwegian Continental Shelf, the vessel has a duty to report if oil or gas is discovered on the surface of the sea. Observations of oil and/or gas on the surface of the sea shall be logged, and the position taken. The observation shall be reported to the operator who has chartered the vessel. If the position for oil/gas on the sea lies near oil and gas pipelines, the operator of the pipeline shall also be notified.

5.5

Emissions, discharges and combustion within the safety zone

Emissions and discharges: Vessels within the safety zone are normally not subject to the petroleum regulations as regards discharge of oily water. MARPOL's regulations and discharge limits for slop water apply to those vessels. Only moored drilling rigs/drill ships/vessels engaged in well

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operations are subject to the petroleum regulations Combustion: Within the safety zone, the focus shall be on operations and safe operations, and uncertainty factors should not be introduced. There are no restrictions within the safety zone for normal combustion such as propulsion, auxiliary engines and pyro boilers (given that the surface temperature is less than 400 degrees and that the spark arresters are intact). However, incinerator use shall be planned to avoid use within the safety zone.

Supply service

6.1

Deck cargo cargo in cargo units


Before cargo units are lifted on board a vessel, the cargo unit must be checked for loose objects, the cargo in open load carriers must be secured and it must be verified that the lifting equipment is in satisfactory condition. The above items shall be checked by the personnel who load the vessel. Note: The vessel shall have crew members on deck (preferably the loading officer) to monitor the loading and to check that the cargo is correctly placed and that dangerous cargo is located in designated areas. Before the vessel leaves port, the crew shall visually inspect cargo units. Visual inspection shall as a minimum include inspection of lifting yokes, securing cargo in open cargo units/basket, securing container doors, loose objects on top cargo units and in cavities. Before unloading offshore, personnel working on the cargo deck must check the cargo units before attaching them to the crane. Note: To the extent possible, the vessel's crew must visually check cargo units and other materials carried by the vessel. This inspection must take place when the cargo is loaded on board the vessel. Upon discovery of faults, the base personnel or those who handle the loading must be informed immediately. If necessary, the loading shall be halted. Cargo with defects shall be rejected if the deficiencies cannot be rectified immediately.

6.1.1

Cargo plan and manifest


A cargo plan shall be prepared before cargo can be placed on board the vessel. The vessel's master, or his/her deputy, shall participate in the planning meeting where the loading plan is prepared and grant acceptance before cargo is lifted or pumped on board (cf. Guidelines for Safe Management of Offshore Supply and Rig Move Operations (NWEA), Ch. 3.2.3.2 Cargo Plan). Note: It is important that the master or his/her deputy, on their own initiative, contact base personnel if the loading meeting has not been announced or held.

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6.1.2

Declaration of dangerous and/or polluting cargo (Outbound/inbound cargo)


All cargo put on board the vessel, in port and offshore, shall be entered in the vessel's manifest. All dangerous and/or polluting cargo shall have a declaration in accordance with international (IMDG / IBC Code) or national requirements. The declaration shall be submitted to the master (in hard copy or electronic version) before the cargo is put on board the vessel (cf. Guidelines for Safe Management of Offshore Supply and Rig Move Operations (NWEA), Ch. 4.1 General Requirements). Note : If the documentation cannot be produced when the cargo is ready to be put on board the vessel, the cargo shall remain where it is until the documentation has been produced and the master has familiarised himself/herself with the contents and accepted the cargo. The master or chief officer shall take the time to inform the crew about relevant health, safety and environmental aspects before putting the cargo on board.

6.2

Loading and unloading at supply bases, quay facilities, tank facilities, etc.
The guidelines for loading and unloading at bases are described in the Guidelines for the Safe Management of Offshore Supply and Rig Move Operations (NWEA). There are, however, some items unique to the Norwegian Continental Shelf. They are as follows: There must always be a crew member, preferably a loading officer, on deck for as long as the loading of deck cargo from the base, at land facilities or other quay facilities, takes place. Note: If others than a loading officer supervise the loading/unloading operation, the crew member in question must have the necessary training and introduction to loading handling of dangerous and polluting cargo.

Communication between vessel and shipper/recipient in connection with loading and unloading operations shall take place via radio (UHF/VHF). Everyone participating in loading and unloading operations shall be equipped with a radio providing communication access. Note: Alternative means of communication must always be agreed to handle interruptions or an emergency if the radio fails.

The master, or whoever supervises the loading in the master's absence, shall ensure that dangerous and/or polluting cargo is placed in accordance with national and/or international requirements for shipping of such cargo.

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Before a vessel engages in loading or unloading operations at a base, the operation must be cleared with the marine coordinator at the individual base. When loading/unloading liquid bulk goods from land, it must be possible to drain the loading line/hose to a tank, to avoid spills when disconnecting. If the loading or unloading operation is not covered by established procedures, or involves external players, a Safe Job Analysis (SJA) must be prepared prior to the operation. Maintenance work including hot work on board the vessel, which may interfere with or in any other way impact loading and/or unloading or the vessel's ability to be warped, this must be communicated and clarified with the base before such work can be initiated.

6.3

When the weather is poor (marginal weather conditions) on the field


If the weather on the field makes it impossible to carry out operations at the time the vessel is scheduled to arrive on the field, an assessment should be made as to whether the vessel should be sent to the field. Assessment of the weather window for operations is made in cooperation between the master, the base, facility(ies) and, if relevant, the traffic control centre. The master's assessment of weather conditions and the possibility of starting the voyage / carrying out loading / unloading activities offshore shall be emphasised when a decision is made.

Note: When conditions improve, the time it will take the vessel to sail to the installation(s) should be taken into account. This means that the vessel should leave port early enough to arrive at the installation(s) when the weather is expected to be acceptable for loading and unloading operations.

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6.4

Operational requirements for operations within the safety zone

6.4.1

General
Guidelines for loading and unloading, deck and bulk cargo, are described in Guidelines for Safe Management of Offshore Supply and Rig Move Operations (NWEA), Ch. 3 Operations and Ch. 4 Bulk Cargo Operations. Upon entering a safety zone, the bridge should be crewed by minimum two navigators. One of them shall be assigned dedicated responsibility for navigation. The interaction between the two navigators shall be clarified. Relevant checklists shall be completed. (See NWEA Appendix D) The engine room shall be crewed

Weather restrictions for the Norwegian Continental Shelf: see NWEA NO8

6.4.2

Technical systems
All systems for manoeuvring, positioning and propulsion shall be in good technical condition and in operation. In DP mode: See NWEA

6.4.3

Radar system
Radar system(s) should be on standby, if practically possible, when the vessel is in position alongside the installation. This is to prevent unnecessary radiation of personnel on the offshore installations.

6.4.4

Interaction
If two or more vessels are within the same safety zone, the offshore installation is responsible for ensuring that the activities of the vessels do not conflict with each other. All movements shall be approved by the offshore installation, which shall have the overall authority over the activities within its own safety zone. For operations involving interaction between the vessel and the offshore installation, the NWEA guidelines and NORSOK R-003 (Safe use of lifting equipment) must be complied with.

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6.4.5

Radio silence
If the facility announced a need to establish radio silence, the vessel shall immediately implement measures necessary to handle such a situation (see Guidelines for Safe Management of Offshore Supply and Rig Move Operations (NWEA), Ch. 3.3.3.3 radio silence). If radio silence is established during loading/unloading operations, this type of operation must be interrupted until radio communication can be re-established. Note: The vessel shall have procedures for situations where it is necessary to maintain radio silence. If it becomes necessary to end an ongoing operation or postpone a planned operation, the facility shall be informed of this.

6.4.6

Transport of freshwater
Vessels transporting potable water to offshore installations shall establish and implement routines and barriers which secure that the quality of the delivered potable water does not deteriorate on board the vessel, from bunkering at the base or quay facility and until reaching the facility. Vessels which deliver potable water must have established and implemented a "quality plan for potable water" which describes and documents how water quality is maintained. The quality plan shall as a minimum include the following: Current quality parameters and requirements Scope and frequency of controls and sampling a) For the purpose of achieving identical practice for all vessels transporting potable water, sampling from potable water tanks shall take place at least twice every year for analysis at an approved laboratory. b) Water should not be stored on board the vessel for more than 10 days. After 10 days, the water should be jettisoned and the tanks filled with new water. Where and when sampling should take place Requirements related to flushing of piping system upon bunkering and delivery Inspection, disinfection and cleaning of potable water tanks and systems. Cleaning shall take place at least twice annually. Logging and documentation (traceability)

References:

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FOR 1978-10-23 nr 9938: Supplementary regulations relating to potable water plant requirements at offshore installations for production etc. of subsea petroleum deposits, with guidelines for disinfection Norwegian Board of Health Supervision, FOR 2001 - 12-04 nr. 1372: Regulations relating to water supply and potable water - "The Potable Water Regulations" Note: These are minimum requirements for vessels delivering potable water offshore. Each individual operator can implement requirements related to follow-up and processing beyond that which is described here.

6.5

Personnel transfer using MOB boat

6.5.1

Crew change Crew change should preferably take place when the vessel is at port. For vessels with a helicopter deck, the crew change may take place using a helicopter. This assumes that the crew has the necessary training, cf. applicable OLF guidelines. Any crew change with MOB boat shall be accepted by the shipping company, vessel and operator. Risk assessments shall have been reviewed, and weather conditions shall be acceptable for safe operation.

6.5.2

Other Conditions Regardless of scheduled crew changes, the MOB boat can, for important or personal reasons, be used to change individual crew members in open sea. This is conditional upon the following: The operating company shall be informed and give its approval. The person/persons involved shall be regular crew members, and shall have undergone safety training, cf. OLF/NR guidelines. Safe job analyses shall be prepared and the masters of both involved vessels must accept the procedure, including the weather conditions.

Emergency preparedness service

7.1

General
The primary tasks of the standby vessels are in connection with hazard and accident situations in the petroleum activities, as well as security around offshore installations. The shipping company must ensure that the vessel and its equipment are always operative and that the crew's training is up-to-date for as long as the vessel is in service. The shipping company is also responsible for ensuring that an overall plan

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for operations on board and the various emergency services the vessel and its equipment can provide has been prepared (cf. rules for mobile offshore installations, regulations relating to standby vessels). The operator of the field(s) included in the standby vessel's area shall prepare the necessary procedure for the services the standby vessel shall provide. The master shall ensure that the necessary emergency preparedness procedures are in place on board the vessel before it arrives on the field. If no emergency preparedness procedures have been received, the master must contact the field operator/offshore installation manager immediately.

7.2

Near-standby:
In near-standby operations, the vessel's tasks will be in connection with rescue of persons in the water. Monitoring of personnel at work on the facility shall be handled by the facility itself. The vessel shall be positioned so that it does not pose a risk to the facility if propulsion is lost, preferably at the 500-metre zone boundary, while at the same time complying with response requirements stipulated by the relevant DFU. . Regardless of which vessels are used for near-standby, they must be able to operate in 30 knots of wind / 3-metre significant wave height. If there are weather criteria beyond this, it must be clarified between the vessel and facility which restrictions apply under the prevailing weather conditions, taking into account the capabilities of the relevant vessel.

7.3

MOB boat/Daughter craft/Fast rescue craft w/equipment


The shipping company shall ensure that all personnel participating or involved in the operation of MOB boats/high-speed vessels for rescue of personnel in the water, have the necessary training and competence for the tasks they have been assigned to. MOB boats/high-speed vessels with associated deployment systems shall be tested and maintained in accordance with the manufacturer's guidelines. Test results, nonconformities and maintenance shall be documented. Checklists shall be prepared for the operation of MOB boats/high-speed vessels, which include the following: Before deployment: Visual check of boat before launch Visual checks of davit including winch and warp for the MOB boat before the crew enters the MOB boat. Visual check that the MOB boat crew wears prescribed clothing and that it is worn and closed in accordance with requirements/guidelines before the crew enters the MOB boat.

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Check of communications equipment and that communication with the mother ship functions before the MOB boat is launched.

After recovering on board the MOB boat (after drill or concluded operation): Visual check of MOB boat Check that electricity to engine heater and battery charger is connected Refill fuel as needed Ensure that the MOB boat is sufficiently secured for the prevailing weather conditions, while at the same time ensuring that the MOB boat is ready for action as regards response time.

On fields where area emergency preparedness has been established, the activities and the area may vary from what is commonly considered emergency preparedness service. Special requirements have been prepared for vessels, equipment and crew competence in this type of service. Here, the applicable guidelines prepared by the operating company apply.

7.4

Tanker assistance
Tanker assistance is relevant on fields where loading of oil to shuttle tankers takes place. This is relevant for the following fields: Glitne Statfjord A, B, C Gullfaks A, B, C Njord B Draugen Heidrun gard A, C Norne Volve / Navion Saga Balder Jotun

The task of the standby vessels is to assist the shuttle tanker in connection with connecting to the offshore loading buoy and being on standby for situations where the shuttle tanker requires assistance. Standby vessels shall comply with the emergency preparedness manual for the individual field and act in accordance with the instructions in the manual. Emergency towing All shuttle tankers have an aft system enabling emergency towing. This system shall be tested twice annually, once with ballast and once with full load capacity. When carrying out the emergency towing test, it is the standby vessel which performs the

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test. How emergency towing is carried out on the Norwegian Continental Shelf is described in a separate emergency towing procedure which vessels assigned to standby duty must be familiar with. The operator is responsible for vessels assigned to standby service and tanker assistance having access to and knowledge of relevant procedures and emergency preparedness plans.

7.5

Oil spill response


Oil spill response is divided into two levels; Primary line and secondary line. Primary-line equipment is intended for use as the initial response force to combat acute oil spills. It is operated by the standby vessel's own crew and with its own equipment (boom, skimmer and tugboat). Primary-line equipment on board offshore service vessels shall be ready for mobilisation at all times. Secondary-line equipment is heavier oil spill response equipment located on dedicated (area emergency preparedness) vessels or on dedicated bases along the coast. The latter equipment is operated by NOFO personnel who muster on board NOFO vessels upon mobilisation of equipment. Larger tugboats are used for this equipment , these are leased by NOFO.

7.5.1

Primary line oil spill preparedness


The master on board standby vessels takes action when ordered by the OIM or the OIM's deputy in the event of an oil spill at sea. For preparations and operation, see the vessel's operations manual. At least one training session per shift shall be held for fields with primary line oil spill response equipment. Such drills shall be agreed with the offshore installation manager. A verification drill shall be held in connection with crew change per shift per year. Reports from the drill shall be sent to the operating company. The report shall contain the drill agenda and a conclusion stating experience transferred.

7.5.2

Secondary line oil spill preparedness (NOFO)


The following applies to vessels dedicated to NOFO service: The vessel must be OIL REC classified and be approved as a NOFO vessel in accordance with the latest valid NOFO standard (NOFO issues certificates/approval documents)

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The vessel must have NOFO equipment on board and use it for drills at least twice annually (at least once with each shift). In a given situation, the vessel will be taken to land to mobilise NOFO equipment. The master of an OR vessel is responsible for handling the vessel's systems (own vessel with NOFO equipment and allocated tugboat). The NOFO damage control leader will indicate the position for deployment of booms. Standby vessels. The masters of these vessels will in a given situation act as NOFO damage control leaders until the NOFO damage control leader has been mobilised. The crew shall operate the NOFO equipment on their own. In such situations, the nearest available vessel will be used as a tugboat.

Exception:

For more info, see the NOFO manual on board (NOFO regional plans operational plan) and www.NOFO.no

7.6

Guard duty
Guard duty is often carried out with vessels with other crewing and equipment requirements than vessels allocated to standby service. The service period is normally limited to a limited period. Each assignment shall be described in instructions to the master. Guard duty can include the following: a) Monitoring ship traffic around unmanned installations, installations on the seabed, as well as more specifically indicated guard duty above/along pipelines. b) Marking positions above subsea installations. c) Information to ship traffic to keep their distance to the monitored position and information concerning restrictions when using tools in an area. Reporting routines for vessels in supervision service follow established guidelines given by the operating company responsible for the service.

7.7

Vessel on collision course


If unidentified vessels are on a collision course with offshore installations, the standby/guard vessel shall hail the unidentified vessel on the radio. If the vessel does not respond to hailing, all possible means to identify the vessel shall be employed. Measures/actions to be coordinated with the traffic centre or the relevant installation. If a standby vessel must carry out tasks related to intercepting or attracting the attention of a vessel on a collision course, this must be reported to the operating company which has chartered the standby vessel. .

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Reporting routines (operations-related)


All vessels must report their movements in accordance with the operating company's guidelines (see appendix). Reporting of operations-related issues is described in the guidelines prepared by the individual operating companies.