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Summer 2009

Summer 2009 Volume 9, Issue 6 “Local Common Sense Conservation” Inside this issue:  District Report

Volume 9, Issue 6

Summer 2009 Volume 9, Issue 6 “Local Common Sense Conservation” Inside this issue:  District Report
Summer 2009 Volume 9, Issue 6 “Local Common Sense Conservation” Inside this issue:  District Report
Summer 2009 Volume 9, Issue 6 “Local Common Sense Conservation” Inside this issue:  District Report

“Local

Common

Sense

Conservation”

2009 Volume 9, Issue 6 “Local Common Sense Conservation” Inside this issue:  District Report 

Inside this issue:

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District Report

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Tree Report

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BLD TMDL Planning

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Hazardous Fuels Reduction

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Flood Facts

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DRWA

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NRCS Report

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BLM– Plan Update



Montana Range Days

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Spotted, Diffuse and Russian

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Knapweed Rules of Thumb

DISTRICT QUARTERLY REPORT

-AMANDA HOM, DISTRICT ADMINISTRATOR

The district has been keeping quite busy this quarter especially with the tree orders for this spring. Also, the district has been keeping busy with the current grants such as the Watershed Assistance Grant, 223 Grant, National Fire Plan Grant, 319 Grant and the Irrigation Development Grant. The Watershed Assistance Grant is to continue water quality testing, and flow monitoring on the Musselshell River. Data obtained will be used by the local watershed group for future planning efforts. The 223 Grant is to continue and expand water quality testing on the Big and Little Creeks. Staff gages and water chemistry tests are done near Jordan on the Big Dry Creek to moni- tor flow nutrients. The National Fire Plan Grant was awarded $10,000.00 and an additional $40,000.00 to help the costs of mitigation, fuel and equipment that were purchased. In May of 2008 the district was awarded an additional $71,000.00 to help the fuels reduction projects in Gar- field County. The 319 Grant is to assist the Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) in the writing of the Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) assessment for the Big and Little Dry Creeks. The Irrigation Development Grant is to assist the Department of Natural Resources of Conserva- tion (DNRC) in the writing of a quarterly report for the Mosby Musselshell Watershed Group.

Remember to sign up NOW and send your $100 good intention fee in if you are plan- ning to hook up. If you decide in the end not to hook up this fee is refundable.

Tree Report The district sold and distributed 1,805 trees this year. A few different sizes and species failed to meet survival expectations, but as we all know that is the chance that is taken with the purchase of bare root trees and shrubs. It is never to early to start thinking about trees for spring plantings. Trees and shrubs can be or- dered from the conservation district through early spring 2010. Some common conservation trees can be seen at:

http://www.mt.nrcs.usda.gov/technical/ecs/forestry/conservationtrees.html

“I honestly think it is better to be a failure at something you love than to be a success at something you hate.”

Remember to order your trees early to ensure availability and quantity. Order forms are available from the conservation district office.

For more information contact the district at 557-2740 ext. 110 or stop by the office at 307 Main

Street.

the district at 557- 2740 ext. 110 or stop by the office at 307 Main Street.

Garfield County Conservation District News

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Big/Little Dry Creek TMDL Planning The Garfield County Conservation District (GCCD) entered into a Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) plan- ning grant with Montana Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) for the Big/Little Dry Creek TMDL. After the contract was executed, DEQ shifted project priorities and was unable to assist this contract completion in a timely fashion. While the GCCD did initiate some activities and expanded some funds, the balance of the funds remains and the funding source deadline for expending these funds is fast approaching. For this reason, the GCCD and DEQ have mutually agreed to modify the scope of work to allow GCCD to secure three auto- matic storm water samplers and install them at designated locations within the watershed. Additional supplies and equipment will be necessary to complete the tasks. The work is still being done in the original project area and the collection of data has non-point source program for the Big/Little Dry creek.

“Common Sense Conservation”

What is Hazardous Fuels Reduction? Hazardous fuels reduction is a major component of most wildfire protection strategies. It involves the removal of sufficient surface and ladder fuels (dead leaves, conifer needles, and logs, continuous brush, small trees, excess limbs, etc.) to prevent a ground fire from building to a crown fire with an intensity that will virtually kill everything it its path. Fuel reduction methods include controlled fire, livestock grazing, and mechanical removal. Thinning trees, removing underbrush, and limbing trees are done using hand crews or machines. Cut material that has no commercial value is ground into chips or pilled and burned during the winter.

The Garfield County Volunteer Fire Department is doing the fuels reduction work and being compensated with NFP grant funds. The funds are also being used to purchase equipment needed to do the work which the county will retain once these projects are complete.

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Important facts you should know Floods are the most common and most costly natural disaster in the United States. Before most forms of Federal disaster assistance can be offered, the President must declare a major disaster. Flood insurance claims are paid whether or not a disaster has been Presidentially declared. The most common form of Federal disaster assistance is a loan, which must be paid back with interest. There are about 4.7 million flood insurance policies in force in more than 20,000 communities across the US. Over the life of a 30-year mortgage, there is a 26 percent (or 1 in 4) chance that a building in a floodplain will experience a flood that will equal or exceed the 1 percent chance flood (100-year flood). Since 1969, the NFIP has paid over $14 billion in flood insurance claims that have helped hundreds of thou- sands of families recover from flood disaster. Approximately 25 percent of all claims paid by the NFIP are for policies outside of the mapped floodplain.

disaster. Approximately 25 percent of all claims paid by the NF IP are for policies outside
disaster. Approximately 25 percent of all claims paid by the NF IP are for policies outside
disaster. Approximately 25 percent of all claims paid by the NF IP are for policies outside
disaster. Approximately 25 percent of all claims paid by the NF IP are for policies outside
disaster. Approximately 25 percent of all claims paid by the NF IP are for policies outside
disaster. Approximately 25 percent of all claims paid by the NF IP are for policies outside
disaster. Approximately 25 percent of all claims paid by the NF IP are for policies outside

For more information visit:

http://www.fema.gov/business/nfip/

floodplain. For more information visit: http://www.fema.gov/business/nfip/ Garfield County Conservation District News
floodplain. For more information visit: http://www.fema.gov/business/nfip/ Garfield County Conservation District News
floodplain. For more information visit: http://www.fema.gov/business/nfip/ Garfield County Conservation District News
floodplain. For more information visit: http://www.fema.gov/business/nfip/ Garfield County Conservation District News
floodplain. For more information visit: http://www.fema.gov/business/nfip/ Garfield County Conservation District News

Garfield County Conservation District News

Page 3

“Local Common Sense Conservation”

Page 3 “Local Common Sense Conservation” Don’t forget to send in your inform ation and Good

Don’t forget to send in your information and Good Intention Fee for your Dry-Redwater Hook-Up!

Mail to:

DRWA PO Box 276 Circle, MT 59215

Hook-Up! Mail to: DRWA PO Box 276 Circle, MT 59215 Dry-Redwater Regional Water Authority $100.00 Good

Dry-Redwater Regional Water Authority $100.00 Good Intention Fee SIGN-UP

NAME:

PHONE NUMBER:

ADDRESS:

BEST ESTIMATE OF LOCATION OF HOOK-UP:

(1) SECTION

TOWNSHIP

RANGE

(2) SECTION

TOWNSHIP

RANGE

Update- - The Dry Redwater Water Authority—-the dry Redwater project continues to roll forward. Below are highlights of the progress that has been taken place)

The DRWA water rural project was introduced July 31, 2008. Senator Baucus is the sponsor and Tester is the co-sponsor. Bill #S3415 can be viewed at www.Thomas.gov. To date we have over 3,079 users signed up for high quality drinking water. The DRWA has collected over $45,000.00 in good intention fees. The DRWA has completed a buy sell agreement with the landowner to purchase land for the treatment plan site. The DRWA board of Directors has hired Golder Associates to prepare environmental baseline studies of the intake site, treatment plant and 50 miles of pipeline to Circle. These baseline studies include Threatened & Endangered Species, Landownership/Use and Wetlands. You can check out the DRWA website at www.midrivers.com/~drwa.

and Wetlands. You can check out the DRWA website at www.midrivers.com/~drwa . Garfield County Conservation District

Garfield County Conservation District News

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Don’t Miss Montana Range Days

By Sue FitzGerald

Don’t miss this opportunity to participate in Montana Range Day! It’s as close as Miles City. If you remember, and many of us do, Montana Range Days originated in Garfield County in 1977 and 1978. The 24 th and 25 th anniversary was held here in 2000 and 2001. Didn’t we all have a great time hosting the event? What a community effort. I can see Jodi Pierson rolling her eyes at the mere mention of it being a great time. So maybe it was a lot of work for some people (okay, a lot of people).

What will be a great time, is attending Montana Range Days as a participant and not as a host. It is a very worth while educa- tional event. It is an opportunity for our youth to learn about the importance of Montana’s most abundant natural resource – rangeland.

Hey teachers – the Office of Public Instruction is offering continuing education credits for all K through 12 th -grade teachers attending. What a great way to earn your credits; close to home and less than three days .

Headquartered at Eastern Montana Fairgrounds, “FG” in this table

MONDAY - JUNE 15, 2009

12:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m.

12:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m.

Registration

Registration

FG: Homeshow Building

FG: Homeshow Building

1:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

1:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Guided Guided Practice Practice Site* Site*

Fort Keogh

Fort Keogh

1:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

1:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Ecology Tour

Ecology Tour

Bus Bus from from FG FG to to Pine Pine Hills Hills Area Area

1:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

1:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Instructors Prep Meeting

Instructors Prep Meeting

FG: Exhibit Hall, Workshop Site

FG: Exhibit Hall, Workshop Site

2:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

2:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

MRD Steering Committee

MRD Steering Committee

FG: FG: Exhibit Exhibit Hall Hall

5:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m.

5:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m.

Supper

Supper

FG: 4-H Building (or on your own)

FG: 4-H Building (or on your own)

6:00 6:00 p.m. p.m. – – 9:00 9:00 p.m. p.m.

Illustrated Illustrated Talks Talks

BLM BLM Conference Conference Room Room

TUESDAY - JUNE 16, 2009

6:00 a.m. – 7:30 a.m.

Breakfast

FG: 4-H Building

6:00 a.m. – 7:30 a.m.

Registration

FG: Homeshow Bldg.

7:30 a.m. – 8:30 a.m.

Assembly/Travel

FG: Homeshow Bldg., buses to Fort

8:30 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.

Tour of Fort Keogh

FG: Homeshow Bldg., buses to Fort

8:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.

Workshops**

Fort Keogh

11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

Lamb BBQ in the Field

Fort Keogh

12:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.

Workshops**

Fort Keogh

3:30 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.

Travel back to Fairgrounds

 

4:00 p.m. – 6:30 p.m.

Free time/study/practice site

 

4:30 p.m. – 6:30 p.m.

Curriculum Advisory Comm.

FG: Exhibit Hall

6:30 p.m. – 8:30 p.m.

Beef Banquet

FG: Homeshow Bldg.

8:30 p.m. – 9:30 p.m.

Parents & Advisors Meeting

FG: Exhibit Hall

8:30 p.m. – 10:30 p.m.

Dance

FG: 4-H Building or outside

WEDNESDAY - JUNE 17, 2009

6:00 a.m. – 7:30 a.m.

Breakfast

FG: 4-H Building

7:30 a.m. – 8:30 a.m.

Assembly/Travel

FG: Homeshow Bldg.

8:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.

Sage Grouse Tour

BLM Conference Rm, buses to Fort

8:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.

Contest

Test Site

8:30 p.m. – 1:30 p.m. (as contests conclude)

Raptors and Wild Things Presenta- tions

FG: Homeshow Bldg.

11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

Lunch

FG: 4-H Building

1:30 p.m. – 2:00 p.m.

Awards Program

FG: Homeshow Bldg.

*Practice Site will be available at all times

**Total of six 1-hour rotating workshops for Youth and Adult Divisions

See page 7 for registration information.

for Youth and Adult Divisions See page 7 for registration information. Garfield County Conservation District News

Garfield County Conservation District News

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Resource Management Plan Update– Miles City Field Office Overview– The BLM Miles City Field Office (MCFO) is preparing a Resource Management Plan or “RMP” which addresses resource use and management on BLM– administered lands within the field office area. The RMP represents a variety of management options. These alternative management schemes are analyzed in the RMP as part of an “Environmental Impact Statement” or EIS. Anticipated Timeline:

After the Draft RMP/EIS is prepared, it will be available for a 90-day public review, anticipated the winter of 2009. The BLM will consider all comments and issue a Proposed RMP/Final EIS for a 30-day public protest period anticipated the win- ter of 2010. After the protests are resolved, the BLM will issue a Record of Decision, approving the proposed actions, anticipated in the sum- mer of 2011. The following are issues and concerns the BLM has identified with your help. We’d like to hear from you if there are new subjects that should be addressed.

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Management Issues And Concerns:

Vegetation– How will vegetation on BLM-administered lands be managed to achieve healthy ecosystems while providing for a broad range of multiple users? How will vegetation management provide a range of commodity uses-such as oil and gas development, for- estry products and livestock grazing-while vegetative communities such as riparian and wetlands are maintained or restored? How does response to periodic fire disturbance fit in? Weeds– Management of noxious weeds and other undesirable species is a critical part of public land management. How will noxious weed management affect local economics with regard to recreation, grazing, forestry and mining activities? Wildlife– How will BLM-administered lands to be managed to provide wildlife habitat and to conserve and recover priority species such as sage grouse? How will the BLM protect habitat for native species while accommodating natural disturbances such as fire, wind, and insect outbreaks as well as providing vegetative community diversity and restore or enhance terrestrial and aquatic habitat? How will BLM manage habitat to help prevent federal listing under the Endangered Species Act? Recreation– How should recreation be managed to accommodate the full range of recreational uses enjoyed by the public on BLM- managed lands? How will the BLM manage demands for services, facilities, permitting, fair-value returns and increased use by local communities? Special Designation Areas– How will Areas of Critical Environmental Concern (ACECs), Natural Trails, Wild and Scenic Rivers and Wilderness Study Areas (WSAs) be addressed under the new RMP? Which areas, if any, should be managed under special designa- tions? How should they be managed to protect values that warrant their special designation status? The MCFO has 16 ACECs already designated. Do the values that made those places ACECs still exist? The public and the BLM nominated additional areas for ACEC designation. Do the nominated areas meet the criteria for designation as ACECs and require special management? Are there Wild and Scenic rivers in the MCFO? If Congress releases a WSA from wilderness consideration, how should this area be managed? Are there other areas in the MCFO that have wilderness characteristics? Climate Change– How does climate change affect BLM-managed resources? Will the BLM’s actions affect climate change? Wind and Solar– How will the BLM manage proposals for wind, solar and other renewable energy development in the MCFO area? What possible impacts could these industries present? Minerals– What are the opportunities for development of resources such as oil and gas, coal and bentonite; and where could develop- ment occur in an environmentally sensitive manner? Fire– How will the BLM manage fire? Will it be used as a tool for managing resources? Air Quality– What actions may affect air quality; including public health impacts from Wildland and prescribed fires? Lands and Realty– What are the conditions for disposal, retention or acquisition of land? Should utility corridors be designated where future facilities might be located? Soils– What are the impacts on soil productivity associated with various resource activities and uses? What are the possible and current impacts from off-highway vehicle use? Has historic cattle grazing caused localized soil erosion and compaction? Water Resources– How will the BLM minimize potential water quality degradation and improve watershed function o help support beneficial uses? Are water rights a concern? How will the State of Montana’s plans for the restoration of impaired streams affect BLM management? Will this result in new water quality goals intended to improve water quality?

Will this result in new water quality goals intended to improve water quality? Garfield County Conservation

Garfield County Conservation District News

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Cultural and Paleontological Resources– How does the BLM comply with laws, guidelines and directives to ensure that significant cul- tural and paleontological resources are identified and evaluated prior to surface distributing activities? How does the BLM provide education and public outreach programs, mitigation of cultural sites, maintenance of historic buildings and mapping of fossil localities? Visual Resources– How are scenic areas being managed? What are the goals and objectives for managing such areas? Social and Economic– How does managing for a variety of resources on public lands affect economic growth, locally and nationally? How will BLM management affect residents and communities? How will BLM incorporate county plans? Environmental Justice– Environmental Justice refers to the fair treatment and meaningful involvement of people of all races, cultures and incomes with respect to the development, implementation and enforcement of environmental laws, regulations, programs and poli- cies. How will the BLM evaluate and disclose actions that would place a disproportionate share of negative environmental conse- quences on populations? Native American Issues– How will the BLM address concerns identified by Native American tribes, such as protecting air an d water quality? How will the BLM protect resources critical to the tribes, such as Traditional Cultural Properties and plant gathering areas? Summary– Are you aware of any other issues and management concerns? If so, we’d like to hear from you.

Send your new issues to:

BLM RMP/EIS New Issues c/o Mark Jacobsen, Public Affairs Specialist 111 Garryowen Road Miles City, MT 59301

Jacobsen, Public Affairs Specialist 111 Garryowen Road Miles City, MT 59301 Garfield County Conservation District News

Garfield County Conservation District News

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33rd Annual Montana Range Days

The 33rd Annual Montana Range Days will be held in Miles City June 15-17, 2009. This is event is open up to everyone ages four to adults. The Custer County Conservation District invites all of you to bring your families and join them for Range Days. Montana Range Days is an educational program designed to enhance knowledge of plant anatomy and identifi- cation, range sites/soil, inventory and monitoring, range planning, and stocking rates and utilization. Management Tours:

Range Ecology, Fort Keogh ARS, and Sage Grouse. Workshops & Competition:

Range Exhibits, Illustrated Talks, Range Plant Anatomy, Plant Identification, and Range Management. Awards will include:

Top Super Starter, Top Wrangler, Top Green Hand, Top Range Hand, and much more! Prizes include Cash, Belt Buckles, trophies, and gifts!

This event is sponsored by the Custer County Conservation District, Natural Resources Conservation Service, De- partment of Natural Resources and Conservation and Northern Ag Network. More information and registration forms are available at http://cartercd.org. The Garfield County Conservation District is sponsoring 5 scholarships for registration. It will be on a first come first serve basis.

For more information contact the conservation office at 557-2740 ext. 110 or contact Jan Pratt at 406-853-3388

Montana Envirothon How much do you know about Montana’s Natural Resources?

The Montana Envirothon will be held in Lewistown April 20-21, 2009 April 19-20, 2010 April 18-19, 2011 April 23-24, 2012

Nonpoint source pollution is caused by rainfall or snowmelt moving over and through the ground. As the runoff moves, it picks up and carries away natural and man-made pollutants and deposits them in lakes, rivers, wetlands, and underground sources of drinking water.

For more information contact:

Montana Envirothon Shonny Nordlund 211 McKinely, Suite 3 Lewistown, MT 59457 (406) 538-7401 ext. 101

Suite 3 Lewistown, MT 59457 (406) 538-7401 ext. 101 Garfield County Conservation District News Or visit

Garfield County Conservation District News

Or visit the website at:

www.montanaenvirothon.org or email fcd@midrivers.com

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Montana Youth Range Camp July 27-31

Applications are now available for the 2009 Montana Youth Range Camp. This year’s camp will be held the week of July27-31 at Cane West Ridge near the town of Lincoln, Mont., and is open to all youth ages 12-18. “Range Camp is a great experience for students with 4-H or FFA backgrounds, and for young people inter- ested in native plants, geology and other natural resource topics,” said Heidi Olbert, Rangeland Program Coordi- nator with the Montana Department of Natural Resources and Conservation (DNRC). Students will attend outdoor classes covering four major subjects; water and riparian areas; soils and geology; rangeland monitoring; and wildlife and livestock grazing management. Students also receive instruction in plant identification and anatomy, and work in teams to solve a natural resource or range management problem, pre- senting their solutions to a panel of judges at the end of the week. Along with coursework, Youth Range Camp offers opportunities for fun and recreation. Students this year will have the change to visit the Gates of the Mountains. A dance takes place on the last night. Scholarships are available by contacting your local conservation district for more information. Additional assistance and help to run the camp is being provided by Montana DNRC, Natural Resources Conservation Service, and Montana State University Extension. Cost for the camp is $125.00 and includes meals, lodging, and all scheduled activities. The 2009 Montana Youth Range Camp is hosted by the Lewis & Clark Conservation District. For more infor- mation, contact Heidi Olbert, DNRC Rangeland Program Coordinator at (406) 444-6619 or Chris Evans with the Lewis & Clark Conservation District at (406) 449-5000, ext. 112. For more information, including an appli- cation form, visit the DNRC website at http://dnrc.mt.gov/cardd/camps/rangecamp/default.asp.

Montana Natural Resources Youth Camp

The Montana Natural Resources Youth Camp will be held in Missoula July 12-17. This event is open up to children ages

14-18.

Spend a week in the rustic setting of The University of Montana Lubrecht Experimental Forest east of Missoula, learning about Montana’s natural resources. The accommodations are comfortable, the food is great, and the instruction and friendships are the best! Have an adventure and learn about wildlife, streams, forestry, range management, soils, geology and minerals and land-use game.

Registration Information:

Download application forms from www.mnryc.org or contact:

Martin Twer MSU Extension Forestry 32 Campus Drive MS 0606 Missoula, MT 59812-0606 Phone: (406) 243-2775 Fax: (406) 243-4715 Email: martin.twer@cfc.umt.edu

Apply by June 26, 2009– First come first serve basis. *** $75.00 is due with your application. Remaining $100.00 is due by start of camp. Please contact the MSU Extension Agency if you need help finding a sponsor.

Please contact the MSU Extension Agency if you need help finding a sponsor. Garfield County Conservation

Garfield County Conservation District News

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Spotted, Diffuse and Russian knapweed (Centaurea maculosa, C. diffusa, Acroptilon repens)

Noxious weeds are the single greatest threat to rangeland health and stability and continued cattle production and wildlife habitat in eastern Montana. Weeds are spreading across the state up to 20 percent each year, seriously threatening the eco- logic and economic value of healthy rangelands. Weed Prevention Areas (WPAs) aim to protect valued rangelands from rapid and chronic weeds spreading and challenging weed problems through early intervention efforts of unified stake- holders with common goals to preserve native plant resources. Spotted and diffuse knapweeds are tap rooted perennial forbs while Russian knapweed is rhizomatous (all contained in the Sunflower Family). These knapweeds are native to Eurasia and seem to have been introduced to North America in con- taminated crop seed. They have solitary (spotted and Russian) or clusters of two to three (diffuse) urn-shaped flowers at the end of branches. Flowers range from whitish-pink with spines on the bracts the bracts (diffuse) to pinkish-purple with spots on bracts (spotted) to purple with paper-like bracts (Russian). Rosette leaves of each are lobed and leaves are altered on mater stems. Mature plants can reach 2 to 4 feet tall with one or more stems. Knapweeds are not restricted to any par- ticular soil but Russian prefers clayey soil and diffuse and spotted prefer light of coarse-textured soils. The knapweeds typi- cally invade disturbed areas, such as roadsides, waste areas, and pastures. A colony is established and plant invaded adja- cent undisturbed areas through dominant resource capture and allelopathic chemicals that inhibit neighboring plant growth. Russian knapweed reproduction though rhizomes allow rapid spreading into closed grasslands, covering a 40- square-feet area within two years. The knapweeds greatly reduce the productivity and diversity of rangeland by displacing native plants. Diffuse and spotted knapweed reproduce solely by seed producing up to 40,000 and 140,000 seeds per square meter, re- spectively. Seeds can remain viable in the soil for up to eight years. Spotted knapweed can live up to nine years while dif- fuse is a semelparous perennial; it grows as a rosette until it reaches critical size, then bolts, flowers, and usually dies. The involucres remain closed until the plant dries up, breaks off at ground level and effectively becomes tumbleweed, allowing seeds to be dispersed over long distances. A Russian knapweed plant can produce up to 1,200 seeds is primary vegetative through rhizomes. Depending on side elevation, knapweeds usually flower mid-summer with mature seeds formed by early fall. Young, individual Russian knapweeds seedlings may be hand-pulled before the root system becomes developed and exten- sive. Small patches will not respond to hand pulling and should be eradicated with an appropriate herbicide with follow-up applications to affect the root system. Diffuse and spotted knapweed can be hand pulled at any growth stage especially when the soil is moist or contains an adequate sand portion to ensure removal of root crown. Small patches can be eradi- cated through hand pulling, but it must be repeated frequently. The first pulling should be during late spring, the second during summer focusing on bolted plants, and the third just before seed dispersal. Small patches can be eradicated with herbicide treatments. Proper herbicide selection should be advised by your local extension agent or weed coordinator and the herbicide label strictly followed. Clopyralid +2,4-D (curtail) applied at a rate of 2 quarts per acre during the rosette or bud stage is effective. Picloram (Tordon) applied at a rate of 1 pint per acre during spring or fall is effective. 2,4-D amine applied a rate of 2 quarts per acre during active growth can be moderately effective. Clopyralid+triclopyr (redeem) applied at a rate of 1 quart per acre with a surfactant during active growth can also be effective. Drought stress reduces the effective- ness of most herbicides. WPA actions for knapweeds: Prevent establishment by locating new plants early and eradicate small patches while still pos- sible. Maintain healthy and competitive native plant communities. They keys to eradication are entirely preventing repro- duction and persistent management. Revegetate small patches or disturbed areas with native grasses, if necessary.

-K. Goodwin and R. Sheley 406-994-6749 If you see knapweed, contact your local extension or weed coordinator

knapweed, contact your lo cal extension or weed coordinator Spotted Knapweed Garfield County Conservation District News
knapweed, contact your lo cal extension or weed coordinator Spotted Knapweed Garfield County Conservation District News

Spotted Knapweed

Garfield County Conservation District News

Diffuse Knapweed

Russian Knapweed

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Woods Rose (Rosa Woodsii) By: Kayla Higgins

The Woods Rose is a creeping type of shrub. It is more tolerant to the cool season. The shrub is fast growing and long lived perennial. The Woods Rose ranges from two to six feet tall. The growth of this shrub starts in the early spring. It is intermediately tolerant of seasonal flooding. Roots produce new roots or will dominate during the

Roots produce new roots or will dominate during the Rules of thumb for watering shrubs and

Rules of thumb for watering shrubs and trees Reprint from MSU Extension

Trees and shrubs need moist soil in order to grow, produce and remain robust against pests, injury, drought or disease. All woody plants need water from early spring through August, and newly planted trees and shrubs

require water more often than established plants. Soak the soil approximately 30 inches deep and wet the entire root area – this can spread out as much as three times the spread of the limbs. In the fall, allow plants to “harden off” by gradually withholding water from September to mid-November. Prior to ground freezing (mid November), apply enough water to reach and saturate the root area; this helps prevent winter kill. Know the water requirements of your trees and shrubs and water accordingly; some species such as poplar, aspen, willow maple and mountain ash need more water than lilac, cotoneaster, Douglas fir and pines, all of which are sensitive to excess water. To promote deep root establishment in new transplants or for deep rooted trees, a root feeder/irrigator may be used for deep watering. Berms to create basins around trees or shrubs can be filled with water for slow infiltration and percolation. CAUTION: Berms should be removed in the fall to prevent water collection and freezing during the winter. Freezing water can girdle or cause collaring.

• Reduce water loss through surface evaporation and prevent sunburn by wrapping young tree trunks.

• Do not water the foliage of fruit or deciduous trees; it encourages blight, rust and mildews. Evergreens, however, can take advantage of watering as needles absorb water more readily than leaves of deciduous trees.

• 2 ½ to 3 gallons of water a week will keep a 6-8 foot tree alive during droughts.

to 3 gallons of water a week will k eep a 6-8 foot tree alive during
to 3 gallons of water a week will k eep a 6-8 foot tree alive during

Garfield County Conservation District News

to 3 gallons of water a week will k eep a 6-8 foot tree alive during
to 3 gallons of water a week will k eep a 6-8 foot tree alive during
Garfield County Conservation District 307 Main (PO Box 369) Jordan, MT 59337 PRSRT STD US

Garfield County Conservation District 307 Main (PO Box 369) Jordan, MT 59337

District 307 Main (PO Box 369) Jordan, MT 59337 PRSRT STD US POSTAGE PAID Billings, MT
District 307 Main (PO Box 369) Jordan, MT 59337 PRSRT STD US POSTAGE PAID Billings, MT

PRSRT STD US POSTAGE PAID Billings, MT PERMIT NO. 11

Box Holder Jordan, MT 59337

All Garfield County Conservation District and Natural Resources Conservation Service programs are offered on a nondiscriminatory basis without regard to race, color, gender, political beliefs, national origin, religion, sex, age, marital status or handicap.

 

Board of Supervisors

 

Field Office Staff:

 
 

Monte Billing…………… ……………………………………Chairman Dean Rogge,…………………………………………….Vice Chairman Travis Browning…………………….………………………Supervisor Mike McKeever………………… ……………….…………Supervisor Alan Pluhar………………………………………… ………Supervisor

 

Garfield County Conservation District Amanda Hom, District Administrator Kayla Higgins, Administrative Assistant

 

Nathan Saylor

……………………………………

Urban

Supervisor

Nicole Downs

………………………………………Urban

Supervisor

The public is welcome to attend the meetings of the Conservation District Board of Supervisors. Please call for meeting date and time.

Natural Resource Conservation Service Sue FitzGerald, District Conservationist John Monahan, Soil Conservationist

Views expressed by individual columnists in this newsletter do not necessar- ily reflect the official policy of the Garfield County Conservation District.

 

B.G. FitzGerald, Soil Conservation Technician

310 Permits A 310 permit is required if you are planning any project including the construction of new facilities or the modification, operation, and maintenance of an existing facility that may affect the natural existing shape and form of any stream, its banks, or its tributaries. Any private entity or non-governmental individual that proposes to work in or near a stream on public or private land must obtain a 310 Permit prior to any activity in or near a perennially flowing stream.

 

Contact the Garfield County Conservation District for Permit Applications.

 
the Garfield County Conservation District for Permit Applications.   Garfield County Conservation District News

Garfield County Conservation District News