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ENGLISH 11 Date: 12.14.

2011 Assignment: HAMLET NOVEL STUDY WORKBOOK

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Hamlet by William Shakespeare Objectives: *To appreciate a Shakespearean tragedy *To distinguish qualities that make a tragedy and a tragic hero *To recognize and analyze Shakespeares poetic use of language *to recognize blank verse *to recognize foreshadowing *To understand the mood created by a literary work *To recognize comic relief *To recognize motif *To recognize and understand the uses of soliloquy and aside *To explore the themes and big ideas Evaluation: Class participation (reading and discussion), quizzes/tests, homework, classwork, projects and/or essay. Project1: Practice and read lines. All students are responsible for reading. Parts will be assigned in advance so that students may practice before class. Grades are based on understanding the part/s, reading with fluency (which includes correct pronunciation), and showing enthusiasm. Quality is just as important as quantity. 50 pts. Act I December 16, 2011 Act I Scenes 1, 2, 4, and 5 Bernardo Francisco Horatio Marcellus Scenes 2, 3, 4, and 5 King Claudius Queen Gertrude Hamlet Polonius Laertes Voltimand* Cornelius* Scene 3 Ophelia Scene 5 Ghost Alternates:

*This is not a full reading credit.

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Project: Memorize and recite lines from the play. This may be done individually, with a partner, or in groups. Grading will be individual, taking into account the effect that other group members might have in such areas as cueing lines, setting mood, etc. Total points based on both quantity and quality. 50 pts. This project will be due at the conclusion of the play, about the first week in February. Do not procrastinate. 20 lines = A (45 - 50 pts.) You may do five extra lines for five points extra credit. 15 lines = B (40 - 44 pts.) 10 lines = C (35 - 39 pts.)

Hamlet Memorization of Lines 50 points Project #1: Memorize lines from Hamlet. These lines must be from one speech unless you decide to work with one or more others. (Choose carefully as individuals must rely on others in a group.) 20 lines = A 15 lines = B 10 lines = C Evaluation of lines will be based on the following criteria. Hand in this evaluation form before beginning your recitation. Fill-in only the double lines. Name __________________________________________Date_______________ Speech (page and lines) ____________________________ Number of lines attempted/performed__________/___________ Fluency (5 pts.) 1 (poor) Interpretation (5 pts.) (excellent) 2 (fair) 2 3 (average) (fair) 4 (good) 4 5 (excellent) (good) 5

1 (poor)

3 (average)

Number of lines (40 pts.) 40 - 35 (A - 20 lines) 34 - 30 (B - 15 lines) 29 - 25 (C - 10 lines) (Points vary based on pronunciation, completeness, etc.) Evaluation /50

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Directions:

The First and Second Globe Theaters


The Globe was built for in 1599 when the Chamberlain's Men could not renew their lease for their old theater in the north of London. Like many of London's more puritan minded citizens, their landlord Giles Allen considered playacting to the same as prostitution and other vile crimes and didn't want to have the company to continue to operate on his property. Simply known as "The Theatre", their company's old structure, was slyly taken down lock, stock and thatch when Giles Allen was out of town and moved across the Thames to a new sight in the section of Southwark. The new site also had the benefit of being in a territory that was beyond the control of London's city government. The areas known as "liberties" were sections that originally housed religious structures that were independent of mayor's office. The Globe opened in late 1599 to such plays as Julius Caesar and Hamlet. As You Like It may also have been on the first season's roster as some scholars think the famous line from Jaques "All the World's a Stage" is a jab at their old landlord. As he tried to stop their theatrical endeavors, the more the company showed that they could perform anywhere.

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The Globe theater as it was rendered in a surveyor's engraving in 1647. The Globe was a roughly cylindricalprobably polygonalthree-storey timber building, unroofed over the stage in the centre. A rough description can be found in the opening prologue of Henry V as the chorus describes their unworthy scaffold as This wooden O. Each floor contained open galleries with seats. The galleries extended around much of the circle, and the stage was built out into the center from the remaining part of the building. In the building behind the stage were dressing roomsthe 'tiring house'perhaps galleries for musicians, and apparatus for scenery and props. Above the thatched roof rose a tower, or 'penthouse', from which flags were flown and trumpets sounded to announce a production. An 18thcentury account asserted that on its facade the Globe sported a painted sign depicting Hercules supporting the planet Earth (one of his legendary tasks was to stand in for Atlas). If this was soand scholars generally believe it wasthis sign may be alluded to in Hamlet, where the Childrens Companies, in a satirical passage on the War of the Theaters, are said to have triumphed over both the players and 'Hercules and his load too' (2.2.358). This war was a bitter feud between playwrights and companies they were associated with around 1600 when Hamlet was written. Ben Jonson, Shakespeares once protg and now friend and fierce rival, was one of the main

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generals in this volley of verbal and written attacks on playwrights. He considered his art to be the true way to do theater, based on the guidebook set by the Greek philosopher Artistole, his Poetics. Jonson wrote for companies of boy actors that were considered the crme of polite society and a major source of competition for Shakespeares company. Jonson would take satiric jabs at his fellow playwrights by lampooning their scripts, individual lines or the men themselves in each new play he wrote. In kind the playwrights responded back, but the war of words and putdowns only lasted a few years. Through their careers, Jonson always made his opinion known about his fellow writers, Shakespeare seemed mildly amused to indifferent.

Period drawing of the Swan theater, similar in structure to the Globe. This is the only drawing of the interior on an open air theater surviving from Shakespeare's time. On June 29, 1613, the Globe's thatched roof was set on fire by a cannon fired during a performance of Henry VIII, as called for in the stage direction at 1.4.49, and the building burned to the ground. It was open again within a year, rebuilt to much the same plan, but this time the roof was tiled. In 1644, two years after the theatres of England were closed by the revolutionary government, the Globe was torn down and tenements built on the lot. The appearance of the Globe can only roughly be determined, from several drawings of its exterior (in large-scale city scenes), from the specifications in the builder's contract for the Fortune Theatre

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(which was modeled on the Globe), and by extrapolating from the only sketch of the interior of an Elizabethan playhouse, the Swan Theatre.

The New Globe Theater


In the 1950's American actor Sam Wannamaker went looking for Shakespeare's Globe on the south side of London only to find a dirty plaque marking the spot where the building stood. After several unsuccessful years of lobbying the British government to rebuild the theater, Wannamaker decided to do it himself. Completed in 1997, Shakespeare's Globe theater is a close approximation of the famous theater, which stand 200 yards closer to the river than the original. The grounds of the original being paritally under an apartment complex. Since exact dimensions of the original structure had to be guessed, the theater has been slightly modified since its opening. Most modifications come from on going archeological digs at the Rose Theatre located a few blocks away. The theater holds the interesting distinction of being the first building in London in nearly 400 years to apply for a permit to build a roof with thatch. Not even the second Globe had that, they rebuilt with a tile roof. Today the theater sits a capacity of 1000 people, almost half of what the original held and holds both daytime and nighttime showings.

An exterior shot of the New Globe.

A performance at the Globe, shot from an upper gallery seat.

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DIRECTIONS:

Hamlet Study Questions Act I Famous quotes Frailty they name is woman. scene ii Neither a lender nor a borrower be. scene iii And this above all: to thine own self be true. scene iii Something is rotten in the state of Denmark. scene iv

Scene i 1. Write down the lines that indicate the time at the beginning and at the end of the scene. 2. How many times have Marcellus and Bernardo seen the apparition? 3. Quote the line that shows that Horatio does not believe that the two have seen a ghost. 4. Why does the ghost appear but not speak to the three men? 5. How does the ghost appear (look) to the men? 6. Horatio thinks that the ghost portends some strange eruption to our state (page 3). What things have been happening that seem a strange eruption? Why have they been going on? 7. What historical event does Horatio connect to the appearance of ghosts? What is this literary device called? 8. To whom do the three think the ghost will talk? Scene ii 1. The king talks of many things in his first speech. What personal event does he announce? What message is he sending to Norway, the uncle of Fortinbras? Why? 2. What does Laertes ask of the King? 3. What two things do the King and Queen ask of Hamlet? 4. In his soliloquy, what are Hamlets reasons for objecting to the remarriage of his mother? Define soliloquy.

5. What is the countenance of the ghost of Hamlets father? 6. Hamlet wants to see his fathers ghost. When will the meeting take place?

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7. What is Hamlet asking when he says, If you have hitherto conceald this sight,/Let it be tenable in your silence still (page 14)? scene iii 1. What advice does Laertes give Ophelia? 2. What advice does she give to him in return? 3. List at least three pieces of advice that does Polonius gives to Laertes. 4 What does Polonius tell Ophelia regarding Hamlet? 5. List the three themes introduced by these scenes. Scene iv 1. Write the lines that indicate the time. How much time has passed since the play began? 2. What is King Claudius doing? What does Hamlet think of this activity? Why? 3. What lines indicate the Hamlet is not sure whether the Ghost is good or evil? 4. Why dont Hamlets friends want him to follow the Ghost? Scene v 1. According to the Ghost, where will his finally resting spot be? Quote a line to show this. Why does he think this is his fate? 2. According to the Ghost, what is the story told about his death? 3. How did he really die? What happened to his skin and blood? 4. What does the Ghost want of Hamlet? 5. What does he say about Gertrude? 6. What oath does Hamlet extract from his companions following the encounter with the Ghost? 7. How does Hamlet plan to act in the future? 8. What do you think Hamlet means when he says O cursed spite,/that I was ever born to set it right. (page 28) 9. Hamlet is called the Melancholy Dane. Why do you think this is so? 10. What do the following lines mean? A. My fathers brother, but no more like my father /than I to Hercules. (page 11) B. For Lord Hamlet,/Believe so much in him, that he is young,/And with a larger tether may he walk/Than may be given you. (page 19)

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DIRECTIONS:

Act II Discussion Questions 1. Why does Polonius send Reynaldo after Leartes? Why do parents spy in this play? 2. How does Polonius explain Hamlets madness? Are Claudius and Gertrude persuaded? Do you agree with his reasoning? 3. Taking another look at Polonius, is he the same man that you initially thought he was? What changed your opinion? 4. Who are Rosencrantz and Guildenstern and what are they doing at court? How are we supposed to feel about them? 5. Why and how does Hamlet plan to catch the conscience of the King? 6. Looking at Hamlets friends and associates, does he seem to be surrounded by people he can trust? 7. What was Hamlets behavior like in scene one when he visits Ophelia? Do you think his actions provide evidence of his insanity or are his actions motivated by something else? Explain. 8. How does Shakespeare accomplish the escalation of the level of suspense in Act II? 9. How does the tone of Act II differ from that of Act I?

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DIRECTIONS:

Acts I and II Interpretation of Lines who said them to the play to whom or about whom they were said the significance

(11) Must I remember? Why, she would hang on him/As if increase of appetite had grown /By what it fed on; and yet, within a month--/Let me not think ontFrailty, thy name is woman Speaker: Hamlet About: Gertrude Significance: Hamlet is upset that his mother has married his uncle less than two months after his father has died. Even worse, she is showing desire for the uncle. He accuses her and, it seems, all women of being weak. 1. (17) This above all: to thine own self be true,/And it must follow, as the night the day,/thou canst not then be false to any man. 2. (18) Think yourself a baby,/That you have taen these tenders for true pay,/Which are not sterling. Tender yourself more dearly; (What literary term does this quotation represent?) 3. (21) Let me not burst in ignorance, but tell/Why thy canonized bones, hearsed in death,/ Have burst their cerements,why the sepulcher,/ Wherein we saw thee quietly inurnd/Hath oped his ponderous and marble jaws,/to cast thee up again. (What literary term does this represent?) 4. ( 22) Something is rotten in the state of Denmark. 5. (24) The serpent that did sting thy fathers life/Now wears his crown. 6. (44) O Jephthah, judge of Israel, what a treasure hadst thou! (What literary term does this represent?) 7. (50) The plays the thing/ wherein Ill catch the conscience of the king. 8. Read the following lines from Hamlet and Macbeth. Then answer the questions. Hamlet (probably written 1600-1601) ( 41) Guildenstern: the Which dreams indeed are ambition; for the very substance of ambitious is merely the shadow of a dream. Hamlet: A dream itself is but a shadow.

MacBeth (probably written 1605)

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Lifes but a walking a shadow, a poor player,/ that struts and frets his hour upon the stage and then is heard no more. What is life begin compared to in each play? In what way/s are the comparisons similar? Are these appropriate comparisons? Why or why not?

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DIRECTIONS:

Act III scene I Hamlet To be or not to be, that is the question Get Thee to a nunnery Conscience does make cowards of us all. To Sleep; perchance to dream Ay, theres the rub. 1. 2. What do Guildenstern and Rosencrantz report to the King? Read Claudiuss words at the top of page 53. Is he sorry for his actions? What makes you think he is or is not?

Answer the following about Hamlets famous soliloquy on page 53-54. 1. What is Hamlet contemplating? To be or not to be, that is the question. 2. To what does hamlet compare death? 3. Hamlet sees death as an escape from life. What does he say that life is like? 4. What does tis a consummation/Devoutly to be wishd mean? 5. What keeps a person from seeking death? How might the following line from Act I scene ii relate to this thought? O, that his too too sullied flesh would melt,/Thaw and resolve itself into a dew,/ Or that the Everlasting had not fixd His canon gainst self-slaughter!

6.

Keeping in mind the discussion in question 5, what does Hamlet mean when he says, To Sleep; perchance to dream Ay, theres the rub.

7. Hamlet says, Thus conscience does make cowards of us all. How is Hamlet a coward? The remaining questions address the rest of the scene. 1. Why does Hamlet tell Ophelia, Get thee to a nunnery.

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2.

How do women fool men? What does Hamlet mean when he says, I have heard of your painting too, well enough. God hath given you one face, and you make yourselves another. Who is he referring to when he says, I say, we will have no more marriage. Those that are married already --- all but one --- shall live; the rest shall keep as they are. (He knows that the King is listening.) According to the Kings speech on page 56, does he think that Hamlet is lovesick? Explain. What metaphor is in the first ten lines of the Kings speech? What has the King decided to do with Hamlet. What does Polonius ask?

3.

4.

5. 6. 7.

Hamlet Act III scene iii 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Does the king think that Hamlet means to hurt him? How do you know? Why do Rosencrantz and Guildenstern agree to go with Hamlet? What does Polonius plan to do when Hamlet speaks with his mother? What shows that the king feels guilty? What cant he do? What does the king mean when he says, What if this cursed hand /Were thicker than itself with brothers blood,/Is there not rain enough in the sweet heavens/to wash it white as snow? (This idea is also part of Macbeth.) 6. What are the reasons that the King murdered his brother? 7. Why doesnt Hamlet kill the King when he has the chance? When will he kill him? Why is this ironic? Hamlet Act III scene iv (Climax) What happens to Polonius? Why? To what does Hamlet compare the marriage of Claudius and Gertrude? (73) How does Hamlet describe his father? How does he describe his uncle? What lines indicate that Gertrude sees herself as Hamlet does? Why does the ghost appear? Can Gertrude see the ghost? How do you know? What does Hamlet demand of Gertrude? Find a line that shows that Hamlet is sorry for what happened to Polonius. Find a line in which he seems unfeeling. 8. What does Hamlet say about Rosencrantz and Guildenstern? 9. What is the pun at the end of the scene? 10.What event is the climax? Scene v 1. What does Gertrude tell the King? What doesnt she tell him? 2. What is the Kings reaction? 3. What is Hamlets punishment for killing Polonius? 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

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4. What are Rosencrantz and Guildenstern commanded to do?

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DIRECTIONS:

Act IV begins with four relatively short scenes. Shakespeare is speeding up the action as the King moves to protect himself from Hamlet even as Hamlet baits him by playing hide-and-seek with Poloniuss body. Scene i 1. How does Gertrude keep her word to Hamlet? 2. Quote the line in which the King says that if he had been in the Queens room, Hamlet would have killed him. 3. What does the King send Rosencrantz and Guildenstern to do? Scene ii 1. How does Hamlet compare Rosencrantz to a sponge? Scene iii 1. In what three places does Hamlet say he has placed the body of Polonius? 2. The King is sending Rosencrantz and Guildenstern to England with Hamlet. He is also sending with them a letter to the King of England. What message is in the letter? Scene iv 1. Why is Fortinbras in Denmark? 2. According to the Captain, how much is the land in Poland worth that the Danes mean to attack? 3. According to Hamlet, what is a man who just sleeps and feeds? What has God given man to make him more that this?

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4. Hamlet contrasts his own inaction with the willingness of Fortinbras and his men to fight for a trick of fame. Quote the line that shows what should be making Hamlet act more decisively. Scene v 1. What has happened to Ophelia? 2. According to Claudius, what is the bad news from court? 3. In this scene, Laertes acts as a foil to Hamlet. Explain. Scene vi 1. This scene introduces a somewhat implausible reason for Hamlet to return to Denmark rather than continue to England. What is it? 2. What does Hamlet ask Horatio to do? 3. Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are supposed to accompany Hamlet to England. What has happened to them? Scene vii 1. The King reveals to Laertes that Hamlet is the murderer of Polonius. He tells Laertes that he has two reasons why he has not punished Hamlet for a crime so capital in nature. What are his reasons? 2. The King enlists Laertes in a plot to kill Hamlet. How is Laertes to kill Hamlet so that even Gertrude will think it an accident? 3. What will the King do to ensure Hamlets death? 4. What happens to Ophelia? How did it happen? 5. What does Laertes call the tears that he sheds for Ophelia?

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DIRECTIONS:

Act V study questions Hamlet Alas, poor Yorick. I knew him, Horatio Scene 1 1. The clowns (gravediggers) discuss Ophelias death and burial. They think she will be given a Christian burial even though they also feel she has committed suicide. What reason do they give for this? 2. What is the answer to the riddle: what is he that builds stronger than either the mason, the shipwright, or the carpenter? 3. The gravedigger throws skulls around as Hamlet and Horatio comment on them. What are some of the people that they attribute to the skulls? 4. What is the pun on page 104? 5. Who was Yorick? 6. How long has the first clown been a gravedigger? About how old is Hamlet? 7. What is the joking insult to the English on page 105? 8. Hamlet and Horatio discuss life and death. Hamlet continues the idea that death is a great equalizer. (Polonius is eaten by worms, that feed fish, that the common man eats.) What does he say about Alexander and Caesar? 9. What does the priest say about Ophelias death and burial? 10.What line shows that Ophelia was meant to be Hamlets wife? 11.Do you think that Hamlet loved Ophelia? Why or why not. Scene 2 1. What happens to Rosencrantz and Guildenstern? How does Hamlet justify this act? 2. Osric enters to tell Hamlet of a wager between the King and Laertes. What is the wager? 3. Think about the plan to kill Hamlet. What goes wrong? 4. How does the King die? What is ironic about his death? What does this say about Hamlet and his decision/indecision? 5. What is Hamlet and Laertes relationship at the end of the play? 6. Who is to be the new king? 7. Horatio also tries to drink the poison, but Hamlet wont let him. Why?