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1

Course Title

:

Hong Kong Environment

 

Course Code

:

BC2111

Semester Offer

:

A

Semester Hours (SH) :

2

Level

:

2

Credit Units

:

2

Pre-cursors(s)

:

Nil

Pre-requisite(s)

:

Nil

Teaching Pattern

:

Lectures

14

hr(s)

(120)

(Group Size)

Tutorials

14

hr(s)

(20)

Laboratories

0

hr(s)

1. Aims & Objectives

To enable students to understand and comment, at a basic level, on:-

1.1 The forces and principles which determine the design and form of cities, particularly Hong Kong.

1.2 The important environmental issues in Hong Kong, their causes and effects.

1.3 The structure and function of the building industry and the governmental legislative and administrative structure which affect the industry.

1.4 The need for and scope of legislation and statutory control procedures affecting land use planning and the construction and use of buildings in Hong Kong.

2. Syllabus

2.1 The history of urban development and the major factors affecting the evolution and development of Hong Kong.

2.2 Environmental issues: their effect and demands on the built environment including water supply, waste management, noise and air pollution.

* : Studio ! : Dissertation Supervision

& : Demonstration/Site Visit/Field Work @: Direct learning time of students

@! : On-job/Workshop Training

2

2.3 Statutory controls on the built environment: planning controls, building regulations, fire regulations, etc.

2.4 The various sectors and groups which make up the building industry. Their roles, duties, ethics and responsibilities, with particular reference to professional building engineers, builders and surveyors.

2.5 Control and local government mechanisms affecting the industry.

3. Teaching Methods

One hour of large group lectures and one hour of group presentation and discussion each week.

4. Assessment

Coursework

Examination

: 100 % : N.A.

Coursework will consist of one piece of student-driven investigative work on an agreed topic. The work may comprise, for example, an essay, a report, a collection of photographs etc showing an element of the built environment of Hong Kong.

5. Booklist

5.1 Essential Reading

H.K. Government

H.K. Government

Rowlinson, S.M. & Walker, A.

Environment

Protection Dept.: Current Edition, Government Printer.

Environment

Hong

Kong,

Annual Digest of Statistics, Census & Statistics Dept., Current Edition, Government Printer.

The Construction Industry in Hong Kong, 1995, Longman.

* : Studio ! : Dissertation Supervision

& : Demonstration/Site Visit/Field Work @: Direct learning time of students

@! : On-job/Workshop Training

3

Course Title

:

Modern Architecture in Hong Kong

Course Code

:

BC2112

Semester Offer

:

B

Semester Hours (SH) :

2

Level

:

2

Credit Units

:

2

Pre-cursors(s)

:

Nil

Pre-requisite(s)

:

Nil

Teaching Pattern

:

Lectures

14

hr(s)

(40)

(Group Size)

Tutorials

14

hr(s)

(20)

Laboratories

0

hr(s)

1. Aims & Objectives

1.1 Aims

The overall aim of this course is to provide students with an opportunity to develop an appreciation of some of the architectural factors which have influenced and shaped the built environment in Hong Kong. The specific aims are:

To introduce students to the factors which have shaped modern architecture in Hong Kong.

To identify and explain the main attributes of modern architecture in Hong Kong.

1.2 Objectives

On completion of the course students should be able to:

a) understand how modern architecture has evolved in Hong Kong.

b) appraise modern buildings in Hong Kong based on an appreciation of the major architectural factors which have influenced their design.

* : Studio ! : Dissertation Supervision

& : Demonstration/Site Visit/Field Work @: Direct learning time of students

@! : On-job/Workshop Training

2. Syllabus

4

An international and historical architectural survey to provide a context for further study in the course.

The social, technological and aesthetic factors contributing to the evolution of architecture in the 19th and 20th Centuries.

Appraisals of important international buildings of the 19th and 20th Centuries which have significantly influenced the evolution of modern architecture.

The specific factors and influences contributing to the development of modern architecture in Hong Kong.

Case studies of significant examples of modern architecture in Hong Kong.

3. Assessment

Coursework

Examination

4. Booklist

: 100 % : N.A.

4.1 Supplmentary Reading

H. Kahn

V. M. Lampvgnani

V. M. Lampvgnani

Contemporary Asian

Koln; New York, 1995

Architects,

Taschen,

Encyclopaedia of 20th Century Architecture, Thames & Hudson, Latest edition.

Hong Kong Architecture : the aesthetics of density, Prestel Verlag, Munich, New York,

 

1993

N. Leung

Experiencing

Bond

Centre,

Studio

Publications, Hong Kong, 1990

K. Marsland

The Hong Kong and Shanghai Bank (Video recording), INSITE Video Communications, London 1990

Walker, A. & Rowlinson, S.

M.

The Building of Hong Kong : Constructing

Hong Kong through the ages, Hong Kong University Press, 1990

* : Studio ! : Dissertation Supervision

& : Demonstration/Site Visit/Field Work @: Direct learning time of students

@! : On-job/Workshop Training

5

Course Title

:

Measurement of Land and Buildings

Course Code

:

BC2121

Semester Offer

:

A+B

Semester Hours (SH) :

3+3

Level

:

2

Credit Units

:

3

Pre-cursors(s)

:

Nil

Pre-requisite(s)

:

Nil

Teaching Pattern

:

Lectures

14+14

hr(s)

(120)

(Group Size)

Tutorials

28+28

hr(s)

(15)

Laboratories

0

hr(s)

1. Aims & Objectives

1.1 Aims

To introduce basic principles relating to the measurement of construction works.

To understand basic concepts relating to the measurement of land including plane surveying using direct linear measurement methods, ordinary levelling, the use of angular measurements, and the use of maps and site plans.

To understand the general principles of measurement of simple building works and be able to demonstrate their application in practical problems.

To understand the general relationship which exists in construction work between measurement, cost and price.

1.2 Objectives

The student should be able to:

a) Understand and use national maps and site plans.

b) Use common linear measurement equipment to measure and set out linear horizontal distances.

* : Studio ! : Dissertation Supervision

& : Demonstration/Site Visit/Field Work @: Direct learning time of students

@! : On-job/Workshop Training

6

c) Understand the principles of ordinary levelling and its applications.

d) Compute areas and volumes from field and plan data.

e) Measure construction works of simple content using standard methods of measurement.

f) Describe the procedures commonly used for the production of Bills of Quantities.

g) Understand the relationship between the pre-contract measurement process and the valuation of works executed on site.

2.

Syllabus

2.1 Measurement of Land (42 hours: 14 lectures, 28 tutorials/fieldwork)

2.1.1 Survey Principles

Errors, accuracy and precision Use of maps and constructions site plans

2.1.2 Linear Measurement

Methods of measurement with tape and band Sources of errors

2.1.3 Ordinary Levelling

Levelling principles Datums and bench marks Applications of ordinary levelling

2.1.4 Angular Measurements

Introduction to basic components and types of the theodolite

2.1.5 Areas and Volumes

Areas direct from survey measurements and co-ordinates Volumes from spot heights, contours, and cross-sections

* : Studio ! : Dissertation Supervision

& : Demonstration/Site Visit/Field Work @: Direct learning time of students

@! : On-job/Workshop Training

7

2.2 Measurement of Buildings (42 hours: 14 lecture, 28 tutorials)

2.2.1 Taking-off

Rules of measurement and the principles which underline them, as defined in the current Standard Method of Measurement of Building Works. Measurement of building works of simple content which normally fall under the direct control of the quantity surveyor.

2.2.2 Bill Production

The bill-production process. Alternative formats of Bills of Quantities: advantages and disadvantages.

3. Teaching Methods

3.1 Measurement of Land

Teaching will be based on theoretical lectures for general principles, extended by tutorial sessions including practical demonstrations and small group exercises in the field.

3.2 Measurement of Buildings

A lecture programme will introduce key concepts. Tutorial/studio sessions will be used to develop both the concepts delivered in lectures and students’ practical measurement skills. Tutorials may also include demonstration of appropriate computer based techniques in the automated drawing office.

4. Assessment

Coursework

Examination

: 50 % : 50 % (one 3-hour examination)

Coursework will require that students demonstrate competence in the basic skills. The examination will test student’s grasp of the underlying concepts.

5. Booklist

5.1 Measurement of Land

* : Studio ! : Dissertation Supervision

& : Demonstration/Site Visit/Field Work @: Direct learning time of students

@! : On-job/Workshop Training

8

5.1.1 Essential Reading

Bannister, A. & Raymond, S. & Baker,

R.

Uren, J & Price, W.F.

5.1.2 Supplementary Reading

Surveying,

Wesley Longman, 1998

(Seventh

Edition),

Addison

Surveying for Engineers, (Third Edition), Macmillan, 1994

 

Muskett, J

Site Surveying,

BSP Professional Books,

 

1988

 

Whyte,

W.S. & Paul,

Basic Surveying, (Forth edition), Laxton's,

R.E.

1997

5.2

Measurement of Buildings

5.2.1 Essential Reading

 

RICS

Hong

Kong

Standard

Method

of

 

Measurement

for

Building

Works

(3rd

Edition), 1979

 
 

Picken D.H. & Drew D.S.

Building Measurement in Hong Kong, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, 1991

5.2.2 Supplementary Reading

Seeley I.H.

Building Quantities Explained (4th Edition), Macmillan, 1988

Willis C.J. & Newman D.

Elements

of

Quantity

Surveying

 

(8th

Edition), BSP Professional Books, 1988

Aqua Group

Pre-contract

Practice

(8th

Edition),

BSP

Professional Books 1992

 

Willis C.J., Ashworth A. & Willis, J.A.

Practice

and

Procedure

for

the

Quantity

Surveyor, (10th Edition), BSP Professional Books, 1994

* : Studio ! : Dissertation Supervision

& : Demonstration/Site Visit/Field Work @: Direct learning time of students

@! : On-job/Workshop Training

9

Course Title

:

Construction Communication

 

Course Code

:

BC2151

Semester Offer

:

A+B

Semester Hours (SH) :

2+2

Level

:

2

Credit Units

:

3

Pre-cursors(s)

:

Nil

Pre-requisite(s)

:

Nil

Teaching Pattern

:

Lectures

14+14

hr(s)

(120)

(Group Size)

Tutorials

0

hr(s)

Laboratories

14+14

hr(s)

(30)

1. Aims & Objectives

1.1 Aims

To provide an understanding of the nature of building communications and the range of methods used.

To Develop the ability to locate, retrieve and apply technical information in building communications.

To introduce the basic manual drafting skills and conventions used in the communication of graphic information in the building industry.

1.2 Objectives

On completing this course, students should be able to:

a) understand the range and scope of technical communications in the building industry.

b) understand and make use of common information coordination systems including CiSFB.

c) locate technical and design information form a variety of sources, retrieve that information and reproduce it in technical communications.

* : Studio ! : Dissertation Supervision

& : Demonstration/Site Visit/Field Work @: Direct learning time of students

@! : On-job/Workshop Training

10

 

d)

read and interpret building production information and differentiate between the various forms of drawings.

e)

prepare basic building production information.

 

f)

make use of a basic CAD programme (such as AutoCAD). Appreciate the value of a fully integrated 3D CAD program in the presentation, analysis and orgainsation of information.

g)

understand the importance of layering, drawing element libraries, and database integration to the organisation of information in CAD.

h)

understand the importance of management in the effective use of computer systems, and appropriate techniques for achieving this.

i)

use coursework assignments.

relevant

research

techniques

in

the

development

of response to

2.

Syllabus

Nature of building communications and the range of methods used.

Graphical communication, techniques and methods. Design information and anthropometric data. Types of drawings. Design and production information.

The computer as a data processing tool: elementary concepts of files and processing strategies (batch, transaction); input and output methods.

Use of CiSFB and other systems as general coordinating systems for information. Location and retrieval of technical information.

Methods of organising and structuring the design process. Plans of work. Information production and communications in plans of work.

The use of computers in the construction industry - range of applications.

The use of a fully integrated 3D CAD system - design analysis - presentation - integration of information.

A simple CAD program - use of commands - integration of information - use of layering - use of drawing element libraries.

The potential for data-integration using computer systems.

Research Methodology

* : Studio ! : Dissertation Supervision

& : Demonstration/Site Visit/Field Work @: Direct learning time of students

@! : On-job/Workshop Training

3. Teaching Method

11

Teaching will take place in the design studio, CAD centre automated drawing office or classroom as appropriate, and will make use of instruction, demonstration and practical assignments.

4. Assessment

Coursework

Examination

5. Booklist

: 100 % : N.A.

5.1 Essential Reading

Long, L.E.

Introduction

to

Computers

and

Information

Processing, 3rd Edition, Prentice-Hall, 1991.

Hunt, R.

Computers and Common Sense, 4th Edition, Prentice-Hall, 1988.

Styles, K.

Working

Drawings

Handbook,

2nd

Edition,

Architectural Press, 1986.

 

A.J. Smith

Computers and Quantity Surveyors, MacMillan.

5.2 Supplementary Reading

Alder, A. (Ed.)

New

Metric

Handbook,

Architectural

Press,

1979.

Bell J.

Doing your research project, OU Press.

 

D. Raker & H. Rice

Inside AutoCAD, New Riders.

M. Crosley

The architects guide to CAD, Wiley.

Edward de Bono

Lateral Thinking, Pelican.

J. Hood

Easy AutoCAD, McGraw Hill.

Ray-Jones, A.

CI/SfB Construction Indexing Manual, RIBA Publications, 1976.

* : Studio ! : Dissertation Supervision

& : Demonstration/Site Visit/Field Work @: Direct learning time of students

@! : On-job/Workshop Training

12

W.J. Mitchell

Computer

aided

architecture & design, Van

Nostrand Reinhold.

 

Porter, T. et. all.

Manual of Graphic Techniques: for architects, graphic designers and artists, Vol. 1, 2, 3 & 4. Butterworth Architecture, 1988.

Reekie, F.

Draughtsmanship:

architectural

and

building

graphics, Edward Arnold Press, 1976.

 

Sanders, D.H.

Computers Today, 3rd Edition, McGraw Hill,

1988.

Allwood R.J. & Coopes C.N.

The

use

of

an

expert

system

in

selecting

schemes to protect structural steelwork, The Structural Engineer, V68, pp 133-136, 1988.

Wear, L.L., et. all.

Computers An Introduction To Hardware and Software Design, McGraw Hill, 1991.

* : Studio ! : Dissertation Supervision

& : Demonstration/Site Visit/Field Work @: Direct learning time of students

@! : On-job/Workshop Training

13

Course Title

:

Construction Technology I

 

Course Code

:

BC2611

Semester Offer

:

A

Semester Hours (SH) :

9

Level

:

2

Credit Units

:

5

Pre-cursor(s)

:

Nil

Pre-requisite(s)

:

Nil

Teaching Pattern

:

Lectures

84

hr(s)

(120)

(Group Size)

Tutorials

28

hr(s)

(15)

Laboratories

14

hr(s)

(15)

1. Aims & Objectives

1.1 Aims

To construct a frame of reference for the understanding of technology within the built environment, and to provide a sound basis for the evaluation of performance requirements and the selection and design of appropriate constructional form for buildings of low rise/small span construction.

To develop an understanding of the principal properties of construction materials with particular reference to their performance in use, and the factors which lead to their deterioration

To provide a balanced programme of practical laboratory involvement designed to consolidate the topics studied.

1.2 Objectives

The student should be able to:-

a) recognise

the

environment.

relationship

between

user,

performance

and

the

built

b) identify alternative technical solutions and specify satisfactory forms to match performance requirements.

* : Studio ! : Dissertation Supervision

& : Demonstration/Site Visit/Field Work @: Direct learning time of students

@! : On-job/Workshop Training

14

c) understand the erection and assembly processes appropriate to building solutions for low rise/small span construction.

d) identify functional requirements, select appropriate constructional forms and materials, and prepare basic production information for low rise/small span construction.

e) apply scientific principles to the study of building materials and appreciate their performance in differing environments

f) interpret and apply appropriate aspects of building legislation.

g) describe the principles of construction, convection and radiation and how they affect building envelopes and thermal comfort.

h) determine the thermal resistance of a wall assembly, determine the temperature gradient therein and discuss the incorporation of appropriate insulation.

i) describe the impact of solar gain on various parts of a building and comment on the consequences for the stability of the building and the comfort of the occupants.

2.

Syllabus

2.1 Building Construction

2.1.1 Building Requirements

Building Performance : Introduction to basic concepts Enclosure and environment Strength and stability Dimensional stability Moisture protection Thermal and sound insulation Fire protection Durability Regulations and standards Buildability

2.1.2 Building Elements

Functional requirements; types, performance, selection; construction techniques, assembly, erection procedures.

Site preparation :

Basic site investigation and preparation : temporary works.

* : Studio ! : Dissertation Supervision

& : Demonstration/Site Visit/Field Work @: Direct learning time of students

@! : On-job/Workshop Training

15

Primary elements :

Substructure : Types of foundations and construction. Superstructure : Types of wall construction; openings; floors; ceiling; construction and covering of flat and pitched roofs; staircases.

Secondary elements :

Windows; doors; partitions.

2.2 Construction Materials

2.2.1 Aggregates

Sources and types, physical properties, shapes and surface texture, grading, British Standard (BS) tests, Hong Kong Construction Standard (CSI : 1990)

2.2.2 Cements

Chemical, composition, fineness, hydration, setting, hardening, BS tests, types.

2.2.3 Concrete

Properties of fresh concrete : workability, factors affecting workability. cohesion and segregation, bleeding and workability tests. Mixing, handling, placing and compacting concrete. Effects on mix properties of admixture and cement replacing agents.

Properties of hardened concrete : compressive and tensile strengths, factors affecting strength, influence of constituent materials, curing, test conditions, elastic behaviour, shrinkage, creep, chemical attack, sulphate attack, alkali-aggregate reaction, permeability and absorption carbonation, chloride effects.

Destructive and non-destructive testing.

Design of concrete mixes and quality control.

Lightweight concrete.

Reinforced concrete as a construction material.

2.2.4 Bricks and Blocks

Bricks and Blocks : manufacture, properties, factors affecting strength, defects and uses. Plaster mortar, infill concrete and grout.

* : Studio ! : Dissertation Supervision

& : Demonstration/Site Visit/Field Work @: Direct learning time of students

@! : On-job/Workshop Training

16

2.3 Environmental Analysis and Control

Energy consumption in Hong Kong and its implications for global and regional environmental pollution. Transmission of heat energy.

Conduction : thermal conductivity, thermal conductance, thermal resistivity, thermal resistance, heat transfer through a composite plane wall.

Convention : natural convection, forced convection.

Radiation

:

black

body radiation,

radiation, radiation exchange between

surfaces.

Thermal transmittance and calculation methods. Temperature distribution through a structure. Thermal insulation. Solar gain. Psychrometry, ventilation.

Thermal confort and its implications for energy conservation in buildings.

3. Teaching Method

Teaching will consist of lectures reinforced by seminar discussions, demonstrations, site visits and laboratory work.

Laboratory work will be carried out under the guidance of a member of staff, and will result in the production of formal reports in which the student will be expected to show evidence of further reading.

Specific laboratory assignments will remain flexible but suggested areas of study include the following:

a) Grading of aggregates and the determination of moisture content and bulk densities of aggregate samples.

b) Effects of constituents ratio and admixtures on workability and compressive strength of concrete.

c) Determination of ‘standard consistence’, ‘initial setting time’ and ‘final setting time’ of cement.

d) Calculation and subsequent preparation of trial mix for a specified concrete mix design.

e) Tests on fresh and hardened concrete conforming to standard specifications.

* : Studio ! : Dissertation Supervision

& : Demonstration/Site Visit/Field Work @: Direct learning time of students

@! : On-job/Workshop Training

17

f) Tests on masonry:

(i)

To illustrate the necessity of mortar in masonry;

(ii)

To illustrate the influence of strength of mortar on the masonry strength.

4. Assessment

Coursework

Examination

: 30 % : 70 % (one 3-hour examination)

5. Booklist

5.1 Essential Reading

Foster, J.S. & Harrington, R.

Hodgkinson, Allan

Structure and Fabric, Part 1. London, Mitchell's Building Construction, 1990.

AJ Handbook of Building Structure, 2nd ed., London, Architectural Press, 1980.

Everett, A.

Materials.

London: 1986 (Mitchell's Building

Series).

Greeno, R.

Constructional

Process

Level

1.

London:

Longman: 1983.

 

Neville, A.M.

Properties of Concrete. Pitman Publishing, 1981.

3rd Ed., ELBS and

Smith, B.J., Phillips, & Sweeney, M.

Teychenne, D.C.

5.2 Supplementary Reading

Hong Kong Government

Illston, J.M., Dinwoodie, J.M. & Smith

Environmental Science, Longman, 1983.

Design of normal concrete mixes. Department of the Environment, 1988.

London,

Buildings Ordinance (Cap.123) and the allied Regulations (current edition)

Concrete, Timber, and Metals: the nature and behaviour of structural materials, Van Nostrand Reinhold, New York, 1979.

* : Studio ! : Dissertation Supervision

& : Demonstration/Site Visit/Field Work @: Direct learning time of students

@! : On-job/Workshop Training

18

Reid, E.

Understanding

Buildings:

a

multidisciplinary

approach, London, Construction Press, 1984.

Taylor, G.D.

Materials of Construction.

Construction Press,

1983.

Ambrose, J.E.

Simplified

Design

of

Building

Foundations,

New York : Wiley, 2nd ed., 1981.

 

McEvoy, M.

External

Components,

Mitchell’s

Building

Series, Longman Scientific & Technical, 1994.

Blanc, A.

Internal

Components,

Mitchell’s

Building

* : Studio ! : Dissertation Supervision

Series, Longman Scientific & Technical, 1994.

& : Demonstration/Site Visit/Field Work @: Direct learning time of students

@! : On-job/Workshop Training

19

Course Title

:

Construction Technology II

 

Course Code

:

BC2612

Semester Offer

:

B

Semester Hours (SH) :

9

Level

:

2

Credit Units

:

6

Pre-cursor(s)

:

BC2611

Pre-requisite(s)

:

Nil

Teaching Pattern

:

Lectures

84

hr(s)

(120)

(Group Size)

Tutorials

14

hr(s)

(15)

Laboratories

28

hr(s)

(15)

1. Aims & Objectives

1.1 Aims

To extend the student’s knowledge of construction technology in the areas of materials finishings and fittings, services, and environment analysis and control and the structural aspects of building design and construction.

1.2 Objectives

1.2.1 Building Construction

The students should be able to:

a) Understand the application of a range of internal and external finishes.

b) Solve technical problems related to the design and installation of simple drainage installations.

c) Understand some of the basic concepts of building maintenance.

1.2.2 Environmental Analysis and Control

The students should be able to :

* : Studio ! : Dissertation Supervision

& : Demonstration/Site Visit/Field Work @: Direct learning time of students

@! : On-job/Workshop Training

20

a) Discuss the relationship between illumination and glare in the context of the subjective sense of discomfort, and describe the factors affecting the design of artificial lighting.

b) Describe the human hearing mechanism and the relationship between annoyance, speech interference and perceived noisiness and understand the relevant codes of practice as they apply to aural safety.

c) the

Describe

manner

in

which

sound

is

transmitted

through

structures.

1.2.3 Structural Mechanics

The students should be able to :

a) Demonstrate an understanding of the behaviour of various forms of structures under various loading conditions.

b) Analyse simply supported beams subjected to different types of loads and calculate reaction, deflection, shearing froce and bending amount values, sketch shearing force and bending moment diagrams and calculate the necessary section properties for symmetrical and asymmetrical sections.

c) Determine the forces in statically determinate plane framework by graphical analysis.

d) Demonstrate an understanding of the concepts of “resolution of forces” and “methods of sections” and analyse frameworks.

e) Relate “effective” lengths of columns to fixity conditions and explain the concept of “slenderness ratio” for columns, classifying “short” and “long” columns for various materials.

f) Consider the problems associated with eccentric loads and the effects of combined stresses on wall and column sections.

1.2.4 Construction Materials

The students should be able to:

a) Apply scientific principles to the study of building materials and appreciate their performance in differing environments.

b) Adopt a reasoned approach to the solution of technical problems and be competent in the critical selection or rejection of a material or product.

* : Studio ! : Dissertation Supervision

& : Demonstration/Site Visit/Field Work @: Direct learning time of students

@! : On-job/Workshop Training

21

c) Show a comprehensive understanding of the durability of materials in the built environment.

2.

Syllabus

2.1 Building Construction

2.1.1 Building elements

Finishings and Fittings:

Types and properties, applied and integral finishes; built-in fittings.

Services:

Drainage, above and below ground; services integration and builder’s work in connection with service installations.

2.1.2 Building Maintenance

Introduction to the concepts of building maintenance.

2.2 Environmental Analysis and Control

2.2.1 Artificial Lighting

Lamp and Luminaire types - incandescent and discharge lamps:

industrial and decorative luminaries.

Illuminance calculations: direct component. Lumen design method - an understanding of the factors involved in the lumen design method; applications and restrictions, calculations and arrays. Construction site lighting - application of lumen design method of area floodlighting.

Lighting

management systems.

systems;

luminaries

and

switching

arrangements;

energy

Lighting and human comfort including:-

Basic outline physiology (adaptation, acuity and fatigue) Illuminance level Control of glare Colour Brightness ratios Flicker and Stroboscopic effects CIBSE Lighting Division Codes and Guides

* : Studio ! : Dissertation Supervision

& : Demonstration/Site Visit/Field Work @: Direct learning time of students

@! : On-job/Workshop Training

22

2.2.2 Acoustics & Noise Control

Characteristics of sound including:

Mean pressure, frequency, wavelength, amplitude, and velocity. Pure tones and broad band sound. Sound power, intensity, pressure, and their effects. Loudness, threshold levels, decibels, addition of sound levels.

Measurement of sound

Noise pollution in Hong Kong, standards and legislation. Transmission of sound including the selection and incorporation of appropriate insulation.

2.3 Structural Mechanics

Forces and force systems, conditions of equilibrium, with particular reference to coplanar force systems and structures.

Geometrical properties of common structural sections.

Bending moments and shearing forces in statically determinate beams including cantilevers under point and distributed static loads. Simple elastic theory of bending of beams. Relationships between shearing force, bending moment and distributed load.

Stress, strain and elasticity: internal resistance of a structural member. Direct tension, compression, shear and bending.

Struts: slender struts, effective lengths and slenderness ratio. standard formulae.

Application of

Combined stresses: combined bending and direct stresses; application to piers and foundations with eccentric load (large and small accentricities).

Determination of forces in statically determinate frameworks caused by direct loading and wind loading. Method of joints. Method of sections. Graphical analysis. Bow’s notation.

Deflection of beams: factors affecting deflection. Direct integration method. Macaulay’s method. Moment-area method. Deflection for standard cases.

2.4 Construction Materials

2.4.1 Metals

General properties: elastic and plastic deformation.

* : Studio ! : Dissertation Supervision

& : Demonstration/Site Visit/Field Work @: Direct learning time of students

@! : On-job/Workshop Training

23

Mechanical testing: tensile test, fatigue test, torsion test, creep test etc.

Ferrous metals: comparison of the composition and properties of cast iron, mild steel and high carbon steel related to their uses as structural, reinforcing and pre-stressing steels. Composition and uses of the stainless steel alloys commonly used in buildings.

Non-ferrous metals: comparison of composition, properties and uses of aluminium alloys, copper and brasses.

Corrosion and surface protection of metals in service.

2.4.2 Polymers

Structure, properties and uses of thermoplastics, thermosets and elastomers in construction, Uses of additives.

2.4.3 Timber

Differences between hardwoods and softwoods. Dimensional stability. durability and the preservative treatment of timber. Properties affecting the strength of timber. Structure, properties, and uses of timber/adhesive composites.

2.4.4 Fibre-reinforced Composite Materials

Glass, steel, and polymer fibres and their application in construction:

strength, properties etc.

2.4.5 Glass

Flat and special shapes: manufacture, properties, defects and uses.

2.4.6 Bitumen and Related Products

Manufacture, properties and uses.

2.4.7 Coatings

Types, Properties and uses of coatings in construction. Choice of coatings, appropriate surface preparation, application and maintenance.

3. Teaching Method

Teaching will be a mix of formal lectures, tutorials, laboratory sessions, site and factory visits as appropriate. The tutorials will provide the opportunity for elaboration, explanation and integration of the lecture subject-matter.

* : Studio ! : Dissertation Supervision

& : Demonstration/Site Visit/Field Work @: Direct learning time of students

@! : On-job/Workshop Training

24

Laboratory work will be carried out under the direction and guidance of staff members, and will result in the production of formal reports in which the students will be expected to show evidence of further reading. The laboratory work in all cases complements and reinforces the theories studied in lecture and tutorial sessions.

Specific laboratory assignments will remain flexible but suggested areas of study include the followings:

a) Light surveys of various types.

b) Noise measurements of various types.

c) Experimental investigation of thermal conduction, connection and radiation.

d) Tensile stress/strain relationship and modulus of elasticity of metals.

e) Examination of the degradation of wood by fungi.

f) Flexural and other tests on timber.

g) Thickness, adhesion and other tests on coatings and coated materials.

4.

Assessment

Coursework

: 50 %

Examination

: 50 % (one 3-hour examination)

Coursework consists of a series of assignments including laboratory reports prepared by groups of students. The overall pattern of coursework assessment permits a rich mix of individual and team working covering calculations, laboratory investigations and problems solving construction exercises with a single module.

Coursework components of the four syllabus elements are as follows:

(i)

the Building Construction coursework consists of a series of assignments emphasising building finishes and external works.

(ii)

The

Environmental

Analysis

and

Control,

Construction

Materials

and

Structural Mechanics coursework consists of laboratory reports derived

from

closely supervised experiments conducted by laboratory.

groups of students in the

(iii)

The coursework of each of the above four syllabus element is weighted as follows:

* : Studio ! : Dissertation Supervision

& : Demonstration/Site Visit/Field Work @: Direct learning time of students

@! : On-job/Workshop Training

25

Building Construction

25%

Environmental Analysis and Control

25%

Structural Mechanics

25%

Construction Materials

25%

5.

Booklist

5.1 Essential Reading

Dean, Y.

Finishes. London: Mitchell’s Building Series.

Handisyde, C.C.

Everyday Details. London: Architectural

Press:

1981.

Illston, J.M.

Concrete,

Timber

and

Metals,

Chapmann

&

Hall, 1994

King, H. & Osbourn, D.

Components.

London:

Mitchell:

1989:

(Mitchell’s Building Construction).

Morgan W., Williams, D.T. & Durka

Structural Mechanics. 4th Edition, Longman Scientific & Technical, 1989.

Prtichard, D.C.

Lighting. 3rd Edition, Longman, 1985.

Ryder, G.H.

Strength of Materials, 3rd Edition, ELBS and McMillan, 1980.

Smith, B.J., Phillips, & Sweeney, M.

Environmental Science, Longman, 1983.

5.2 Supplementary Reading

British Standards Specifications as relevant.

ASHRAE

Handbook of Fundamentals, Atlanta: ASHRAE,

1989.

Boylan, B.R.

The Lighting Primer, Iowa University Press,

1987.

Burberry, P.

Environment

and Services, London, Mitchell’s

Cayless, M.A. & Marsden, A.M.

Building Construction, 1983.

Lamps & Lighting: a manual of lamps and Lighting. 3rd Edition, Edward Arnold: 1983.

* : Studio ! : Dissertation Supervision

& : Demonstration/Site Visit/Field Work @: Direct learning time of students

@! : On-job/Workshop Training

26

Everett, A.

Materials. (Mitchell’s Building Series), London,

1986.

CIBSE

Lighting Guide(s)

Irwin, J.D. & Graf, E.R.

Industrial Noise and Vibration Control, Prentice- Hall, 1979.

Markus, T.A. & Morris E.N.

Buildings, Climate and Energy, London, Pitman,

1980.

Marshall, W.T.

Solution of Problems in Structures, Pitman,

 

1978.

Marshall, W.T.

Structures, 3rd Edition, Pitman, 1990.

 

Szokolay, S.V.

Environmental

Science

Handbook:

for

the

architects

and

builders,

Lancaster,

The

Construction Press, 1980.

 

Eldridge, H.J.

Common

Defects

in

Building,

H.M.S.O.

London, 1976.

 

Taylor, G.D.

Materials of Construction, Construction Press,

* : Studio ! : Dissertation Supervision

1983.

& : Demonstration/Site Visit/Field Work @: Direct learning time of students

@! : On-job/Workshop Training

27

Course Title

:

Quantity Surveying Practice I

 

Course Code

:

BC3131

Semester Offer

:

A+B

Semester Hours (SH) :

4+2

Level

:

3

Credit Units

:

6

Pre-cursors(s)

:

BC2151

 

BC2121

BC2612

Pre-requisite(s)

:

Nil

Teaching Pattern

:

Lectures

14+0

hr(s) (50)

(Group Size)

Tutorials

0

hr(s)

Laboratories

42*+28* hr(s)

(15)

1. Aims & Objectives

To develop the measurement skills obtained in the first year course of Measurement of land and buildings and to understand the inter-relationships between the various subject areas in actual quantity surveying practices.

To develop students’ communication and presentation skills in a professional context.

Students should in particular be able to apply their knowledge acquired from the courses of construction technology, building services, information technology, development economics, and construction economics in solving the studio coursework being set in this course.

The student should be able to :

a) recognise the nature of the relationship between people and the built environment.

b) understand the principal factors which influence the design process.

c) organise project documentation from tender to final account stages.

d) identify subject areas where in-depth quantity surveying techniques are required.

* : Studio ! : Dissertation Supervision

& : Demonstration/Site Visit/Field Work @: Direct learning time of students

@! : On-job/Workshop Training

28

e) recognize the opportunities for the use of computer systems and apply appropriate software packages in quantity surveying.

2. Syllabus

2.1 The interaction between the design team, the QS and the contractor.

2.2 The preparation of tender documents when detailed drawings have been developed and approved.

2.3 Tender analysis and the preparation of contract documents.

2.4 Cost control during the progress of work.

2.5 Computer systems for quantity surveyors.

3. Teaching Method

Teaching will take place in the quantity surveying studio and automated design office and will include instruction, demonstration and discussion sessions.

4. Assessment

Coursework

Examination

: 50 % : 50 % (one 3-hour examination)

One to two Integrated Exercises will be set, with other related assignments of smaller scale running side by side.

The examination will test students grasp of theoretical principles rather than practical skills.

5. Booklist

5.1 Essential Reading

Picken, D.H. & Drew, D.S.

The Royal Institution Chartered Surveyors

# Seeley, I.H.

Building Measurement in Hong Kong, Hong Kong Polytechnic, 1991.

Hong Kong Standard Method of Measurement of Building Works, (3rd Edition), 1979.

Building

MacMillan, 1988.

Quantities

Explained,

(4th

Ed.),

* : Studio ! : Dissertation Supervision

& : Demonstration/Site Visit/Field Work @: Direct learning time of students

@! : On-job/Workshop Training

# Wills, C.J. & Newman, D.

29

Elements of Quantity Surveying, 8th Edition, BSP Professional Books, 1988.

# Alternatives. Students will require one or the other.

5.2 Supplementary Reading

The Aqua Group

Architectural Services Dept., HK Government

Architectural Services Dept., HK Government

Bowyer J.

Brandon, P.S. (Ed.)

Pre-contract

Practice

for

Architects

and

Quantity Surveyors, (7th Ed.), 1986.

Model

Bills

of

Quantities,

Government Printer, 1988.

(1988

Edition),

Standard Phraseology for Bills of Quantities, (1988 Edition), Government Printer, 1988.

Practical Specification Writing: for Architects and Surveyors, (2nd Ed.), Hutchison, 1985.

Surveying

Directions, BSP Professional, 1992.

Quantity

Techniques,

New

Goodacre P. & CrosbieHill W.

Worked Examples in Quantity Surveying, E & F N Spon, 1982.

Willis, C.J. & Ashworth, A.

Practice

and

Procedure

for

the

Quantity

Surveying,

9th

Edition,

BSP

Professional

 

Books, 1992.

* : Studio ! : Dissertation Supervision

& : Demonstration/Site Visit/Field Work @: Direct learning time of students

@! : On-job/Workshop Training

30

Course Title

:

Site Surveying

Course Code

:

BC3141

Semester Offer

:

A

Semester Hours (SH) :

4

Level

:

3

Credit Units

:

3

Pre-cursors(s)

:

BC2121

Pre-requisite(s)

:

Nil

Teaching Pattern

:

Lectures

21

hr(s)

(50)

(Group Size)

Tutorials

35

hr(s)

(15)

Laboratories

0

hr(s)

1. Aims & Objectives

1.1 Aims

To extend the students’ knowledge of surveying principles, the techniques applicable to building works, and the methods used for survey control both before and during construction.

To introduce the use of electronic distance measurement and similar more advanced equipment.

1.2 Objectives

The student should be able to:

a) prepare and use building setting-out drawings and data with confidence.

b) use modern electromagnetic distance measurement (EDM) equipment to measure and set out horizontal distances.

c) use a theodolite or total station to carry out and compute a small traverse survey and plot the results.

d) use appropriate methods and equipment for control of plan dimensions, height, gradient, and verticality in building projects.

* : Studio ! : Dissertation Supervision

& : Demonstration/Site Visit/Field Work @: Direct learning time of students

@! : On-job/Workshop Training

e)

2. Syllabus

use

observations.

appropriate

software

31

for

the

2.1 Angular Measurements

reduction

and

plotting

of

survey

Testings, adjustment and maintenance of theodolites. Measurement, booking, reduction, and setting out of angles.

2.2 Indirect Linear Measurement

Introduction to optical distance measurement (ODM). Introduction to and use of electromagnetic distance measurement (EDM) systems.

2.3 Traverse survey

Traverse control Rectangular co-ordinates, calculation and plotting. Surveying the positions of features relative to rectilinear control.

2.4 Setting Out and Works Control

Contractual responsibilities. Tolerances and procedures for setting out construction by linear measurements and theodolite. Referencing, checking and setting out plans. Levelling and gradient control. Control of verticality. Use of lasers.

3. Teaching Methods

Teaching will be based on theoretical lectures, extended by practical work in the drawing office and small group exercises in the field.

4. Assessment

Coursework

Examination

: 100 % : N.A.

Assessment will be by a programme of individual practical field assignments.

* : Studio ! : Dissertation Supervision

& : Demonstration/Site Visit/Field Work @: Direct learning time of students

@! : On-job/Workshop Training

5.

Booklist

32

5.1 Essential Reading

Bannister, A, & Raymond, S. & Baker, R.

Uren, J. & Price, W.F.

5.2 Supplementary Reading

Surveying,

Wesley Longman , 1998

(Seventh

Edition),

Addison

Surveying for Engineers, (Third Edition), Macmillan, 1994.

Brighty, S.G.

Setting

Out,

BSP

Professional

Books,

1989.

Muskett, J.

Site Surveying, BSP Professional Books,

1988.

Sadgrove, B.M.

Setting-out Procedures, Ciria/Butterworth,

 

1988.

Wolf, P. R. & Brinker R. C.

Elementary

Surveying

(Ninth

Edition),

* : Studio ! : Dissertation Supervision

HarperCollins, 1994.

& : Demonstration/Site Visit/Field Work @: Direct learning time of students

@! : On-job/Workshop Training

33

Course Title

:

Development and Construction Economics I

Course Code

:

BC3211

Semester Offer

:

B

Semester Hours (SH) :

5

Level

:

3

Credit Units

:

3

Pre-cursors(s)

:

EF2103

Pre-requisite(s)

:

Nil

Teaching Pattern

:

Lectures

42

hr(s)

(150)

(Group Size)

Tutorials

28

hr(s)

(15)

Laboratories

0

hr(s)

1. Aims & Objectives

1.1 Aims

To relate the first year economics principles to the land conversion process.

To provide an understanding of the calculation of building cost, the synthesis of unit rates and an introduction to bidding and tendering.

1.2 Objectives

The student should be able to:

a) understand the relationship of economics to the development process.

b) analyse data generated by appraisal techniques.

c) estimate the cost of the building and the different elements of the building at the design stage.

d) compile unit rates for typical items included in a Bill of Quantities.

2. Syllabus

* : Studio ! : Dissertation Supervision

& : Demonstration/Site Visit/Field Work @: Direct learning time of students

@! : On-job/Workshop Training

34

2.1 The Development Process

The role of valuations in the development process. techniques.

Valuation and appraisal

The developer’s budget and sensitivity testing. Sources of funds, and funding arrangement.

2.2 Estimating

Organization and administration of the estimating and quantity surveying functions.

Forecasting costs of construction, preliminaries and temporary works; components of costs, development of costs for those units of measured work which normally make an important contribution to building costs.

An introduction to the factors affecting bidding strategy and the adjudication of costs by management.

Alternative competitive tendering systems; advantages and disadvantages.

Management of the estimate-to-tender process.

2.3 Cost and Financial Studies

Use of historical price data and recognition of price trends as an aid to the forecasting of future prices.

Methods of calculating a price range for a proposed project prior to full design.

Cost implication of design variables, effect of planning and physical site constraints, client and owner/user consideration, and methodologies to achieve cost control during design process.

Preparation and analysis of a price or budget limit prepared from a scheme design.

Cash flow forecasting techniques.

Application and use of computer hardware and commercial software for estimating and quantity surveying functions.

3. Teaching Methods

Teaching will consist of lectures and tutorials based on practical application in coursework assignments. Guest lecturers will be invited where appropriate.

* : Studio ! : Dissertation Supervision

& : Demonstration/Site Visit/Field Work @: Direct learning time of students

@! : On-job/Workshop Training

4. Assessment

Coursework

Examination

35

: 30 % : 70 % (one 3-hour examination)

5. Booklist

5.1 Essential Reading

Brandon P S & Ferry D J

Chartered Institute of Building

Darlow, C. Gazette,

5.2 Supplementary Reading

Buchan R.D, Fleming F W & Kelly J.R

Cost Planning of Buildings, 6th Ed., BSP Professional, 1991.

Code of Estimating Practice, CIOB, 1983.

Valuation and Development Appraisal, (2nd Ed.), Estate, 1988.

Estimating for Builders and Quantity Surveyors, Butterworth-Heinemann,

1991.

Cadman D. & Austin-Crowe L.

Property Development (3rd Ed.), E & F N Spon, 1991.

Enever, N.

Valuation of Property Investments (4th Ed.), Estates Gazette, 1989.

Fraser, W.

Principles of Property Investment and Pricing, MacMillan, 1984.

Millington, A.F.

Introduction to Property valuation (3rd Ed.), Estates Gazette, 1988.

National Joint Consultative Committee for Building

Code of Procedures for Single Stage Selective tendering, RIBA, 1977.

National Joint Consultative Committee for Building

Code of Procedure for Two Stage Selective Tendering, NJCC, 1983.

Raftery, J.

Principles of Building Economics, BSP Professional, 1991.

Stebbing, L.

Quality Assurance - the route of efficiency and competitiveness, 3rd Edition, Ellis Horwood, 1993.

* : Studio ! : Dissertation Supervision

& : Demonstration/Site Visit/Field Work @: Direct learning time of students

@! : On-job/Workshop Training

36

Course Title

:

Construction Management I

 

Course Code

:

BC3411

Semester Offer

:

A

Semester Hours (SH) :

6

Level

:

3

Credit Units

:

4

Pre-cursors(s)

:

MS2514

Pre-requisite(s)

:

Nil

Teaching Pattern

:

Lectures

56

hr(s)

(150)

(Group Size)

Tutorials

14

hr(s)

(15)

Laboratories

14

hr(s)

(15)

1. Aims & Objectives

To introduce students to the general management principles and theories. To enable students to understand features of an organization and the environment in which it operates. To develop students’ awareness of the nature of organization and managerial processes. To allow students to explore the roles of managers.

To systematically introduce scheduling, planning, resource allocation, resource levelling, and cost control in managing construction projects. A computer package (Primavera) will be applied to substantiate the learning process.

To develop an understanding of the financial decision making practice of corporations in different circumstances, and a knowledge of techniques required by managers.

2. Syllabus

2.1 Principles of Construction Management

2.1.1 The Basis of Management

Definitions of management and the roles of managers. An overview of major management thoughts. An overview of the management process, via., planning, organizing, leading and controlling. The evolution of theories of management.

* : Studio ! : Dissertation Supervision

& : Demonstration/Site Visit/Field Work @: Direct learning time of students

@! : On-job/Workshop Training

37

2.1.2 Organization structure

Concepts of formal and informal organization, authority, delegation and co-ordination, communication. Principles of organization structure. Strategic and operational planning. Concepts of control, centralization and decentralization, authority and responsibility.

2.1.3 Managerial Qualities

Models of decision making, rational and intuitive decision making. Theories of leadership, creating and communicating vision. Team building, group dynamics, role sets, interpersonal skills. Theories of motivations.

2.1.4 Construction Management

Definition and scope of construction management. Significance and role of management in the construction industry. Differences between management in the construction industry and management in other industries.

2.1.5 Construction Supervision

The role of supervision in construction work. Aspects involved in construction supervision. Characteristics required for the effective supervision of construction work.

2.1.6 Human Resource Management

Human resource planning. Training and development. Performance appraisal. Industrial relations in the construction industry. Requirements for effective recruitment and selection of personnel. Terms and conditions of employment. Health and welfare requirements applicable to the construction industry.

2.2 Project Scheduling, Planning, and Control

2.2.1 Traditional Planning techniques

Definition of construction scheduling and planning. Traditional planning techniques including bar chart, linear scheduling method, and line-of-balance technique.

* : Studio ! : Dissertation Supervision

& : Demonstration/Site Visit/Field Work @: Direct learning time of students

@! : On-job/Workshop Training

38

2.2.2 CPM network-based Planning

The concept and construction of the precedence network and the arrow diagram network. Critical path method (CPM) analysis techniques. Constrained project planning. Difference between precedence diagram and arrow diagram.

2.2.3 Resource Allocation and Levelling

Resource allocation techniques. Plot of resource profile. Balance of resource requirements and limitations. Various techniques for resource levelling.

2.2.4 Project Control

Significance and objectives of cost control and project progress control. Updating of a plan based on real construction progress. Comparison analysis between the original schedule and the real schedule, as well as between the real costs and the original budget. Project progress report and cost analysis in materials, labour and equipment.

2.2.5 Computers Applications for Planning Construction Projects

Primavera will be introduced to assist network-based project scheduling, planning, and control analysis.

2.3 Finance & Accounting

2.3.1 Basic Techniques of Financial Analysis

Purpose and scope of financial analysis. The Firm’s financial statements and financial ratio analysis.

2.3.2 The Business Enterprise from a Flow of Funds and Standpoint

Nature of flow of funds. Principal elements of flow of funds analysis. Presentation of flow of funds analysis.

2.3.3 The Capital Structure Decision

Does dividend policy affect a company’s share price? Selecting an appropriate dividend policy. Repurchasing shares versus increasing the dividend.

* : Studio ! : Dissertation Supervision

& : Demonstration/Site Visit/Field Work @: Direct learning time of students

@! : On-job/Workshop Training

39

2.3.4 The Dividend Decision

Does dividend policy affect a company’s share price? Selecting an appropriate dividend policy. Repurchasing shares versus increasing the dividend.

2.3.5 Analysing Capital Investment Projects

Discounted cash flow approaches. Evaluating risky capital investment projects. Measuring a company’s cost of capital.

2.3.6 Long-term Financing

Sources of long-term funds. Raising additional common equity. Issuing long-term debt and preferred stock.

2.3.7 Project Financing

Feasibility study, project rate of return, project investment outlays, cash flow analysis, accept/reject criteria.

2.3.8 Financing Strategy

Planning for the future of the business. The impact of financial and strategic factors on the value of the firm. Financial and strategic planning. Developing financial and strategic plans.

3. Teaching Methods

Teaching will be based upon lectures supported by tutorial exercise, student consultations, and using computers in the departmental Automated Drawing Office (ADO). Cases and management exercises will be used to illustrate the theories and principles.

The tutorial exercises will provide the opportunity for the appropriate emphasis and applications to be placed on the subject matter relative to each discipline, and the use of the Automated Drawing Office in providing students with hands-on experience of appropriate computer software. This will permit more extensive exploration of construction management problems and solutions than would otherwise be possible. Group discussions are encouraged in doing tutorial exercises.

Tutorial exercises will be largely based upon analysing and resolving planning and management problems with extensive use of appropriate computer programs.

Assignments will be based upon the theoretical content of the course and its extension and application to simulated construction management problems.

* : Studio ! : Dissertation Supervision

& : Demonstration/Site Visit/Field Work @: Direct learning time of students

@! : On-job/Workshop Training

4. Assessment

Coursework

Examination

40

: 30 % : 70 % (one 3-hour examination)

5. Booklist

5.1 Essential Reading

Harris, F. & McCaffer, R.

Stoner, J.A.F. & Freeman, R.E.

Modern Construction Management, 4th Edition, Blackwell Science.

Management, 5th Edition 1992, Prentice Hall.

Mawdesley, M., Askew, W. & O’Reilly, M.

Planning

and

Controlling

Construction

Projects, 1997, Longman.

 

5.2 Supplementary Reading

Ballie, D.S. & Paulson, B.C.

Professional

Construction

Management,

McGraw Hill, 1992.

 

Callahan, M.T., Quackenbush, P.G. & Rowings, J.E.

Construction

Project

Scheduling,

McGraw Hill, 1992.

 

C.I.O.B.

The

Practice

of

Site

Management

-

Volumes 1-3, 1980.

 

Dawson, S.

"The Financial Effects of New Share Issue Prices" Hong Kong Manager, December

1984.

Fryer, B.

The

Practice

of

Construction

Management,

3rd

Edition,

BSP

Professional Books, 1997.

Leung, R.K.L.

"Capital Practices in Hong Kong" Hong Kong Baptist College Academic Journal,

 

1986.

Murdoch, J. & Hughes, W.

Construction

Contracts

Law

and

* : Studio ! : Dissertation Supervision

Management, 1st Edition, E & F N Spon,

1992.

& : Demonstration/Site Visit/Field Work @: Direct learning time of students

@! : On-job/Workshop Training

Oxley, R & Poskitt, J.

41

Management Techniques Applied to the Construction Industry, 5th ed, Blackwell Science, 1996.

Pinches, G.E.

Essential of Financial Management, 2nd Edition, Harper & Row, 1987.

Tsui, J.

"Corporate Dividend Policy" Hong Kong

Society

of

Accountants

Newsletter,

January 1988.

 

Upson, Alan

Financial

Management

for Contractors,

* : Studio ! : Dissertation Supervision

1987, B.S.P. Professional Books, Oxford.

& : Demonstration/Site Visit/Field Work @: Direct learning time of students

@! : On-job/Workshop Training

42

Course Title

:

Decision Making and Operational Techniques for Engineering Management

Course Code

:

BC3421

Semester Offer

:

A+B

Semester Hours (SH) :

2+2

Level

:

3

Credit Units

:

3

Pre-cursors(s)

:

MS2514

 

or

MA2176

Pre-requisite(s)

:

Nil

Teaching Pattern

:

Lectures

28+28

hr(s)

(50)

(Group Size)

Tutorials

0

hr(s)

(50)

Laboratories

0

hr(s)

1. Aims & Objectives

1.1 Aims

To provide an understanding of the advanced decision making theories, and operational research techniques in the management of construction.

To develop the ability to apply advanced mathematical techniques in research studies.

1.2 Objectives

The student should be able to:

a) understand the different kinds of decision making theories.

b) choose

an

appropriate

managerial problems

operational

research

technique

for

particular

c) apply advanced mathematical techniques to solve managerial problems.

* : Studio ! : Dissertation Supervision

& : Demonstration/Site Visit/Field Work @: Direct learning time of students

@! : On-job/Workshop Training

2. Syllabus

2.1 Optimisation

43

Application of linear, non-linear programming and hill climbing technique in construction project management and process control.

2.2 Advanced statistics

Covariance and correlation.

Multiple linear regression and discriminant analysis and their applications in construction management.

2.3 Decision theories

Games theories, decision trees and utility theories.

2.4 Advanced mathematical and operational research tools

Queuing theories and transportation theories.

Fuzzy set, fuzzy logic and fuzzy expert system and the application.

Monte-carlo simulation and applications. The use of computer packages in simulation such as MICROCYCLONE, SLAM, etc. The applications of simulation in construction management.

Introduction to artificial neural networks and its application in construction management.

3. Teaching Methods

Teaching will be in the form of lectures supported by discussion in class and exercises and based heavily on the practical application of the mathematical techniques in problem solving. The use of appropriate computer package, such as SPSS, MICROCYCLONE, SLAM, etc., is required and some classes will be conducted in the computer room.

4. Assessment

Coursework

Examination

* : Studio ! : Dissertation Supervision

: 20 % : 80 % (one 2-hour examination)

& : Demonstration/Site Visit/Field Work @: Direct learning time of students

@! : On-job/Workshop Training

5.

Booklist

5.1 Recommended Reading

Hahn, G.H. & Shapiro, S.S.

44

Statistical

Models

in

Engineering,

John

 

Wiley, 1967.

Pritsker, A.A.

Introduction

to

Simulation

&

SLAM-II,

John Wiley, 1985.

 

Hand, D.J.

Statistical Method of Discrimination and

Classification:

Advances

in

Theory

and

Applications, New York: Pergamon, 1986.

Pidd, M

Computer

Simulation

in

Management

Kaufmann, A. & Gupta, M.M.

Science, John Wiley, 1987.

Fuzzy Mathematical Models in Engineering

 

&

Management

Science,

North-Holland,

1988.

Adeli, H.

Expert

Systems

in

Construction

&

Structural Engineering, Chapman & Hall Ltd., 1988.

Ciarlet, P.G.

Introduction

to

Numerical

Algebra

and

Zimmermann, H.J.

Optimisation, Cambridge, 1989.

Fuzzy Set

Boston, Kluwer Academic, 1991.

Theory and

Its

Applications,

Taha, H.A.

Operations Research : An Introduction, 5 th Edition, Macmillan, 1992.

Halpin, D.W.

Planning

&

Analysis

of

Construction

Operations, John Wiley, 1992.

 

Zadeh, L.A.

An

Introduction

to

Fuzzy

Logic

Applications in Intelligent Systems, Kluwer Academic, 1992.

Mehar, P.

Artificial

Neural

Networks:

Concepts

&

Theories, IEEE Computer Society Press,

1992.

Haung, F.J.

Methods

of

Engineering

Mathematics,

* : Studio ! : Dissertation Supervision

Englewood Cliffs, N.J. Prentice Hall, 1993.

& : Demonstration/Site Visit/Field Work @: Direct learning time of students

@! : On-job/Workshop Training

45

Expert System and Optimisation, Aldershot, Hants, England, Avebury Technical, 1994.

Harvey, R.L.

Neural

Network

Principles,

Englewood

Cliffs, Prentice Hall, 1994.

 

Computer

Simulation

and

Computer

Algebra:

Lectures

for

Beginners,

3rd

* : Studio ! : Dissertation Supervision

Edition, Berlin, Springer-Verlag, 1993.

& : Demonstration/Site Visit/Field Work @: Direct learning time of students

@! : On-job/Workshop Training

46

Course Title

:

Construction Technology III

 

Course Code

:

BC3613

Semester Offer

:

A

Semester Hours (SH) :

6

Level

:

3

Credit Units

:

4

Pre-cursors(s)

:

BC2151

 

BC2612

Pre-requisite(s)

:

Nil

Teaching Pattern

:

Lectures

56

hr(s)

(120)

(Group Size)

Tutorials

28

hr(s)

(15)

Laboratories

0

hr(s)

1. Aims & Objectives

1.1 Aims

To provide a basis for the evaluation of performance requirements and the selection of appropriate constructional form and methods for multi-storey construction .

1.2 Objectives

The student should be able to :

a) evaluate the performance requirements of buildings and their elements

b) to develop an understanding of fire in buildings and the principles and practice of passive fire protection.

c) identify alternative technical solutions and design satisfactory forms to match performance requirements.

d) understand construction and assembly processes of high rise structures, and prepare production information.

e) act safely on sites and appreciate site safety problems and solutions.

* : Studio ! : Dissertation Supervision

& : Demonstration/Site Visit/Field Work @: Direct learning time of students

@! : On-job/Workshop Training

2. Syllabus

Site Safety

47

Basic geotechnical investigations, earth works, slope stability, foundations methods of excavation, ground water control, structural forms and their functions.

Types

prestressing; connections.

of

construction

:

steel,

reinforced

concrete

Cladding; and curtain walling systems.

Staircases.

Movement control.

construction,

precasting,

Advanced windows and doors; rooflights; partitioning systems; finishings product certification systems.

Dimensional and modular co-ordination.

Trench supports, scaffolding, shoring, formwork and falsework.

Ignition and development of fire, materials in fire; means of escape; access for fire fighting; special fire protection problems for high rise buildings; compartmentation.

Road geometrics and construction; footpaths, hard and soft landscape; plant.

3. Teaching Methods

Teaching will consist of lectures and tutorials reinforced by videos and site visits. Safety teaching should normally precede site visits.

4. Assessment

Coursework

Examination

: 30 % : 70 % (one 3-hour examination)

5. Selected Reference Material

5.1 Essential Reading

As advised by teaching staff.

* : Studio ! : Dissertation Supervision

& : Demonstration/Site Visit/Field Work @: Direct learning time of students

@! : On-job/Workshop Training

48

5.2 Supplementary Reading

-

Aspects of Cladding, London Institution of Structural Engineers, 1995.

Barry, R.

Construction

of

Buildings,

Vol.

2-5,

Oxford, Blackwell Science Inc, 1996 & -.

BS5588

Code of Practice for Fire Precautions in the Design of Buildings, London, BSI Standards. (Current Ed.)

BS5950

Structural Use of Steelwork in Building. Pt. 4 Code of Practice for Design of