Sei sulla pagina 1di 10

Upfront

Sports
Obituaries 2
State/Local 3
Politics 4
Community 5
Sports 6-7
Business 7
Classifieds 8
Television 9
World briefs 10
Index
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 14, 2011
50 daily Delphos, Ohio
Forecast
DELPHOS HERALD
THE
Telling The Tri-Countys Story Since 1869
Wildcats split wrestling tri-meet,
p6
Huffman makes changes to school
voucher bill, p3
www.delphosherald.com
Legion sets
childrens party
Delphos American
Legion Post 268 will host
Christmas for the children
and grandchildren of Legion
members from 6-7:30
p.m. Friday at the post.
Children will be pro-
vided with snacks and candy
and a chance to have their
photo taken with Santa.
Relay team offers
Flowers for Year
St. Johns Relay
For Life team is selling
Flowers for a Year cards.
The cost is $60 and they
can be ordered from Melissa
Myers at 419-302-2205,
smyers@watchtv.net or
myers@delphosstjohns.org.
Boosters set New
Years Eve bash
The Big Green Athletic
Boosters will host its sec-
ond annual New Years
Eve celebration at the
Ottoville Parish Center.
Doors will open at 6:30
p.m. and a steak dinner
will be served at 7:30 p.m.
Entertainment will be pro-
vided by Ultra Sound.
Snacks, ice, water and
party favors are included,
as well as complimen-
tary taxi service at the
end of the evening.
The cost is $35 per
person and tables will be
reserved upon request.
For tickets or questions;
please contact Shannon
Schlagbaum at 419-453-3553.
Cloudy
Thursday with
50 percent
chance of
showers and
high in mid 50s. See page 2.
School board bids
farewell to 3 members
BY NANCY SPENCER
nspencer@delphosherald.com
DELPHOS The
Delphos City Schools
Board of Education is
accepting letters of intent
to fill the unexpired term
on the board. Members bid
farewell to 18-year veter-
an Deb Gallmeier, Malisa
Smith (one term) and Board
President Ron Ebbeskotte
(one term current, one term
in past) at Mondays meet-
ing.
Newcomers Joe Rode
and Michael Wulfhorst will
fill the seats left by Smith
and Ebbeskotte. Gallmeiers
unexpired seat is open for
two years.
Letters need to be sent
to the administrative build-
ing at 234 N. Jefferson St.
and postmarked by Jan. 1
for consideration. Candidates
need to also supply the reason
they would like to serve on
the board.
Gallmeier said her time
on the board has been fun,
interesting, challenging and
frustrating.
I hope I have been a pro-
ductive board member and
have given a positive contri-
bution, she said. The thing
I have enjoyed the most is
following a class through its
entire school years.
Smith has spent four years
on the board. She said she
had learned a lot.
There is a significant dif-
ference in how the school
board here is run and how
they are run in Tennessee.
There was a lot for me to
learn, she said. It has been
a worthwhile experience and
I met a lot of great people.
Ebbeskotte served a term
on the board in the past and
returned and finished a sec-
ond four-year term.
The past four years has
been challenging with the
economy, he said. I have
enjoyed being involved and
learned a lot about school
funding serving on the
Finance Committee.
Franklin and Landeck
Principal Mark Fuerst gave
the spotlight report. He said
he has adopted a schedule so
his presence is felt in both
school buildings.
Fuerst also reported
Landeck and Franklin have
received refurbished lap
tops for a computer lab from
generous supporters as well
as 25 new-to-the district
computers in classrooms at
Franklin.
With teachers taking turns
monitoring the cafeteria and
playground, collaboration
time has been reduced. Fuerst
solved this problem by occa-
sionally taking over the moni-
toring so grade-level teachers
can have lunch together and
work out lesson plans.
Classes will be dismissed
at the public and parochial
schools at 1:30 p.m. Dec.
21 for the Christmas break.
Classes resume on Jan. 3.
Board member John
Klausing will serve as presi-
dent pro tem beginning Jan.
1 and until a new board presi-
dent is elected at the 7 p.m.
Jan. 12 organizational meet-
ing. The regular meeting will
follow at 8 p.m.
Nancy Spencer photo
Outgoing Delphos City School Board members Ron Ebbeskotte, left, Deb Gallmeier
and Malisa Smith attended their final meeting Monday.
Silver Sneakers holiday party
Photo submitted
Penny stall benefits PC children
Sixteen children in Putnam County will have a bigger Christmas this year thanks
to the students and staff at Fort Jennings High School. Recently, the 185 students in
grades 7-12 stalled classes by dumping pennies on the teachers desks. The teach-
ers had to count the pennies before beginning class. Overall, students contributed
238,800 pennies to purchase Christmas gifts for the adopted children. The fresh-
men contributed the most ($571.14), followed closely by the juniors ($546.58.) In an
effort to make sure they did not have Sociology class 9th period, the juniors gave Mr.
Myerholtz 50,374 pennies. An afternoon of shopping proved to be challenging as five
representatives from the school purchased 218 gifts of clothing and toys.
Photo submitted
St. Johns
spelling bee
winners
St. Johns Elementary
School held its spelling
bee Friday. The win-
ner was eighth-grader
Lanna Klausing, left, and
runner-up was seventh-
grader Mackenzie Stose.
Evyn Pohlman was third.
Klausing won on the word
amethyst.
US urges ban on
texting, talking
while driving
By SHAYA TAYEFE
MOHAJER
The Associated Press
LOS ANGELES Ren
Bishop is one of many
American drivers who texts,
tweets and talks on her cell-
phone while shes behind the
wheel and thinks it should
be up to drivers to use their
discretion when it comes to
safety.
Though she admits thumb-
ing her phone while driving
is bad habit, the University of
Missouri student says drivers
are mature enough to under-
stand when it is appropriate
and when it is not.
The Nat i onal
Transportation Safety Board
disagrees, and it declared
Tuesday that texting, email-
ing or chatting while driving
is simply too dangerous to
be allowed anywhere in the
United States.
The board is urging all
states to impose total bans
except for emergencies fol-
lowing recent deadly crashes,
including one in Missouri after
a teenager sent or received
11 text messages within 11
minutes.
The unanimous recom-
mendation from the five-
member board would apply
even to hands-free devices,
a much stricter rule than any
current state law.
NTSB chairwoman
Deborah Hersman acknowl-
edged that complying would
involve changing what has
become ingrained behavior
for many Americans.
Were not here to win a
popularity contest, she said.
No email, no text, no update,
no call is worth a human
life.
Currently, 35 states and the
District of Columbia ban tex-
ting while driving, while nine
states and Washington, D.C.,
bar hand-held cellphone use.
Thirty states ban all cellphone
use for beginning drivers. But
enforcement is generally not
a high priority, and no states
ban the use of hands-free
devices for all drivers.
The immediate impetus
for the NTSBs recommenda-
tion was last years deadly
pileup near Gray Summit,
Mo., involving a 19-year-old
pickup driver.
The board said the ini-
tial collision was caused by
the teens inattention while
texting a friend about events
of the previous night. The
pickup, traveling 55 mph, hit
the back of a tractor truck
that had slowed for highway
construction. The pickup
was rear-ended by a school
bus, and a second school bus
rammed into the back of the
first bus.
The pickup driver and a
15-year-old student on one of
the buses were killed. Thirty-
Jays selling Minster cage
tickets
The St. Johns Athletic
Department is selling tickets
for its boys basketball road
game at Minster (6:30 p.m.
JV tip Friday) during school
hours in the high school
office until 1 p.m. Friday.
Ticket costs are $6
for adults and $4 for stu-
dents. All tickets will
be $6 at the door.
Jefferson site change
The Jefferson girls basket-
ball game vs. Ft. Recovery on
Dec. 27 will now be played
at the Jefferson Middle
School (6 p.m. JV start).
Thursdays slate
Girls Basketball (6 p.m.):
Jefferson at Crestview
(NWC); Minster at St. Johns
(MAC); Ottoville at Miller
City (PCL); Spencerville at
Ada (NWC); Lincolnview
at Bluffton (NWC); Elida
at Wapak (WBL); Lima
Central Catholic at Columbus
Grove (NWC); Van Wert
at Shawnee (WBL).
Wrestling: Bath and
Celina at Van Wert, 6 p.m.
Swimming and Diving:
Elida at Wapak, 5:30 p.m.
Members of the Silver Sneakers at Peak 24-Hour
Fitness held a Christmas party Tuesday. Above: Mary
Lou Krietemeyer tries to pull a candy cane from a line
while balancing a marshmallow on a spoon during the
games.
Nancy Spencer photos
Above: Barb
Wiechart, left,
Gertrude Mox and
Marie Spangler
pass candy canes
and gifts back
and forth during
The Right
game, where
participants
pass items left or
right when those
words are said in
a story.
Right:Barbara
Puma plays
paddle ball in a
relay race.
See BAN, page 2
2
STRESS FREE CHRISTMAS SHOPPING



712 N. Eastown Road, Lima
419-229-3646
STRESS FREE CHRISTMAS SHOPPING



712 N. Eastown Road, Lima
419-229-3646
STRESS FREE CHRISTMAS SHOPPING



712 N. Eastown Road, Lima
419-229-3646
STRESS FREE
CHRISTMAS SHOPPING
712 N. Eastown Road, Lima
419-229-3646
Jill Miller, DDS
Steven M. Jones, DDS
General Dentistry
experienced, gentle care
WELCOMING NEW PATIENTS
Located on S.R. 309 in Elida
419-331-0031
myddsoffice.com
daytime, evening and weekend hours available.
EVERY NIGHT
STEAK
FOR 2-$20
T-BONE OR STRIP
Includes Salad, Potato
Balyeats Coffee Shop
133 E. Main St. Van Wert
Closed Mondays
Two Great
Gifts...
Buy two $25
gift cards get
$10 FREE*
No Limit. Exp. 12/31/11
EL|0A R0A0 A6R088 FR0H ThE L|HA HALL 419-225-PA6K
*Buy two $25 gift cards and receive additional $10 in gift cards.
Look Gorgeous for your New Years Eve Party!!
Spray Tanning Special
ONE DAY ONLY: Friday, December 30th, 2011
$18 for all spray tanning (any level) SAVE up to $12
3 minute automatic spray tanning booth- always a
beautiful bronze, never orange!
Shear Brilliance Salon
Elida Ave., Delphos
(Located across from Rite Aid and the US Bank)
419-692-9517
Students can pick up their
awards in their school offices.
St. Johns Scholar of the
Day is Casey
Sanders.
Congratulations
Casey!
Jeffersons Scholar of the
Day is Zackary
Wannemacher.
Congratulations
Zackary!
Scholars of the Day
2 The Herald Wedneday, December 14, 2011
For The Record
www.delphosherald.com
OBITUARIES
BIRTHS
LOTTERY
LOCAL PRICES
WEATHER
The Delphos
Herald
Vol. 142 No. 141
Nancy Spencer, editor
Ray Geary, general manager
Delphos Herald Inc.
Don Hemple, advertising manager
Tiffany Brantley,
circulation manager
The Daily Herald (USPS 1525
8000) is published daily
except Sundays, Tuesdays and
Holidays.
By carrier in Delphos and
area towns, or by rural motor
route where available $1.48 per
week. By mail in Allen, Van
Wert, or Putnam County, $97
per year. Outside these counties
$110 per year.
Entered in the post office
in Delphos, Ohio 45833 as
Periodicals, postage paid at
Delphos, Ohio.
No mail subscriptions will be
accepted in towns or villages
where The Daily Herald paper
carriers or motor routes provide
daily home delivery for $1.48
per week.
405 North Main St.
TELEPHONE 695-0015
Office Hours
8 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Fri.
POSTMASTER:
Send address changes
to THE DAILY HERALD,
405 N. Main St.
Delphos, Ohio 45833
Irma G. Warnecke
June 26, 1925-Dec. 12, 2011
Irma G. Warnecke, 86, of
Fort Jennings died on Monday
at her daughters residence in
Columbus Grove.
She was born June 26,
1925, in Delphos to Leo and
Elvera (Kroger) Hotz, who
preceded her in death.
On Aug. 3, 1946, she mar-
ried Richard W. Warnecke,
who died Feb. 12, 1992.
Survivors include her chil-
dren: Phil (Karen) Warnecke
of Sidney, Kathie (Lee) Bogart
of Columbus Grove, Karen
(John) Bensman of Delphos
and Bob (Gaya) Warnecke
and Vera (Anthony) Miller
of Fort Jennings; 13 grand-
children and 22 great-grand-
children; two sisters, Connie
(Bob) Warniment of Delphos
and Darlene Dolly (Jerry)
Hoover of Roanoke, Va.; and
two brothers-in-law, Urban
Fuerst and Art Fischer of
Delphos.
Also preceding her in death
were three sisters, Ann Fuerst,
Gert Fischer and Marrietta
Hotz.
Mrs. Warnecke was retired
from the former Philips
Display Components of
Ottawa. She was a member of
St. Joseph Catholic Church,
Fort Jennings, and its Altar
Rosary Society and Catholic
Ladies of Columbia. She
loved to crochet.
Mass of Christian Burial
will begin at 10:30 a.m. Friday
at St. Joseph Catholic Church,
the Rev. Joseph Przybysz offi-
ciating. Burial will follow in
the church cemetery.
Visitation will be from
2-8 p.m. Thursday at Love-
Heitmeyer Funeral Home,
Jackson Township, corner of
St. Rts. 224 and 634, where a
scripture service will be held
at 2:30 p.m.; and one hour
prior to services at the church
on Friday.
Memorials may be given to
the American Cancer Society.
Condolences may be
expressed to: www.lovefu-
neralhome.com.
CLEVELAND (AP)
These Ohio lotteries were
drawn Tuesday:
Mega Millions
05-06-22-26-41, Mega
Ball: 6
Estimated jackpot: $116
million
Megaplier
4
Pick 3 Evening
4-4-6
Pick 4 Evening
8-9-6-1
Powerball
Estimated jackpot: $78
million
Rolling Cash 5
09-12-13-38-39
Estimated jackpot:
$100,000
Ten OH Evening
06-07-11-14-19-21-24-30-
41-44-48-51-59-63-66-68-72-
75-76-77
Corn: $5.95
Wheat: $5.71
Beans: $10.99
A boy, Parker William,
was born Dec. 4 at Blanchard
Valley Health System to
Whitney Best and Jacob
Wright of Findlay.
He weighed 7 pounds, 2
ounces and was 20 inches
long.
Grandparents are Larry
Best of Delphos and James
and Mary Wright of Toledo.
Great-grandparent is
Darlene Best of Delphos.
A girl, Magdalen Marie,
was born Dec. 11 at Mt.
Carmel East Hospital to
Ralph and Marie Mertz of
Pickerington.
She weighed 7 pounds, 13
ounces and was welcomed
by her big brothers, Vincent
and Oden.
Grandparents are Ed and
Carol Odenweller of Delphos
and Ralph and Darla Mertz
of Columbus.
Great-grandparents are Jim
and Margaret Schimmoeller
of Fort Jennings, Don
and Alice Fischbach of
Wapakoneta and Richard
Place of Buckland.
A boy, Luke Holden, was
born Dec. 5 to Matt and
Hayley Neumeier.
He weighed 10 pounds,
9 1/2 ounces and was wel-
comed home by a brother,
Jake, and a sister, Natalie.
Grandparents are Bryan
and Cathy Thompson.
Great-grandparents are
Bob and June Neumeier.
Bob and June also wel-
comed a great-granddaugh-
ter, Estella Faye, on Nov. 5
born to Kellie Runyan and
Andrew Siler. Grandmother
is Kristy Runyan and great-
grandmother is Sharon Siler.
ST. RITAS
A girl was born Dec. 12 to
Kayla Feathers of Delphos.
A boy was born Dec. 13
to Jamie and Noah Bryan of
Delphos.
WEATHER FORECAST
Tri-county
Associated Press
TONIGHT: Showers and
chance of thunderstorms.
Windy. Near steady tem-
perature in the upper 40s.
Southwest winds 15 to 25
mph. Chance of precipitation
90 percent.
THURSDAY: Cloudy.
Chance of showers in the
morning, then chance of rain
in the afternoon through early
evening. Windy. Highs in the
mid 50s. Southwest winds 20
to 30 mph becoming west 15
to 20 mph in the afternoon
through early evening. Chance
of measurable precipitation 50
percent.
THURSDAY NIGHT:
Partly cloudy. Colder. Lows in
the lower 30s. West winds 15
to 20 mph becoming northwest
5 to 10 mph after midnight.
FRIDAY: Mostly sunny.
Colder. Highs in the upper 30s.
North winds 5 to 10 mph.
FRIDAY NIGHT-
SATURDAY NIGHT: Partly
cloudy. Lows in the upper
20s. Highs in the mid 30s.
High temperature Tuesday
in Delphos was 43 degrees,
low was 26. Rainfall was
recorded at .51 inch. High a
year ago today was 19, low
was 6. Record high for today
is 66 set in 1975. Record low
is -5, set in 1914.
Delphos weather
Ed Gebert photo
Paramedics and a passersby help the occupants of an overturned Chrysler sedan in a
field along St. Rd. 116 Tuesday morning.
Crash sends two Delphos women to hospital
Two Delphos women
were injured Tuesday morn-
ing in a car rollover accident
southeast of Van Wert.
At approximately 10:45
a.m., the driver of a 1992
Chrysler sedan lost control
of the vehicle on the slip-
pery pavement of St. Rd.
116, traveled into a field
and flipped over onto its
roof.
Mary Mullen, 84, lost
control at the curve at the
intersection with Rogers
Road. She and her passen-
ger, Bettie Bohnlein, 89,
were each pulled from the
overturned car by paramed-
ics. They were transport-
ed to Van Wert Hospital
by Middle Point EMS.
Bohnlein was treated and
released. Mullen was later
taken by Samaritan helicop-
ter to Lutheran Hospital in
Fort Wayne.
Charles A.
Rohrbacher
Nov. 13, 1934
Dec. 13, 2011

Charles A. Rohrbacher,
77, of Delphos died at 12:15
p.m. Tuesday at Vancrest
Healthcare Center.
He was born Nov. 13, 1934,
in Lima to Albert and Chloe
Evick (Rison) Rohrbacher,
who preceded him in death.
He married Gwen
(Frericks) Fischer, who sur-
vives in Delphos.
Other survivors are son
Charles A. Rohrbacher of
Delphos; daughters Suzi (Jim)
Bechtel of Goshen, Ind., Sheryl
(Don) Quan of Canton, Mich.,
and Sharla (Brian) LaVelle of
Columbus, Ind.; sisters Joy
(Charley) Carr of Gautier,
Miss., and Josephine (Lewis)
Neff of Lima; brother Jay L.
Rohrbacher of Lauderhill,
Fla.; grandchildren Nikia,
Mikai and Kirei Quan and
Emma, Samual, Benjamin and
Chloe LaVelle; stepgrand-
children Jamie Bechtel and
Randy (Christina) Bechtel;
s t epgr eat - gr andchi l dr en
Ashley, Nicholas, Amy and
Jacob Bechtel; and first cousin
Sister Susan Morris of South
Boston, Mass.
He was also preceded in
death by a brother, Clifford
Rison; and a daughter, Sharyn
Rohrbacher.
Mr. Rohrbacher retired as
a design engineer from Ford
Motor Co. Lima Engine Plant
after 27 years. He was a Navy
veteran, avid antique collector
and dealer and loved to go
to auctions. He was a mem-
ber of St. John the Evangelist
Catholic Church, and a fan of
the St. Johns Blue Jays and
The Ohio State Buckeyes.
Mass of Christian Burial
will begin at 9:30 a.m.
Saturday at St. John the
Evangelist Catholic Church,
the Rev. Melvin Verhoff
officiating. Burial will be in
Resurrection Cemetery, with
military rites by the Delphos
Veterans Council.
Friends may call from 2-8
p.m. Friday at Harter and
Schier Funeral Home, where
a parish wake service will be
held at 7:30 p.m.
Memorial contributions
may be made to the St. Johns
Teacher Endowment Fund or
the American Cancer Society.
Ban
(Continued from page 1)
eight other people were injured.
In Missouri, texting is ille-
gal for drivers 21 and under,
which means the law would
have applied to the 19-year-
old. But the ban isnt aggres-
sively enforced, NTSB member
Robert Sumwalt said.
Without the enforcement,
the laws dont mean a whole
lot, he said.
The law didnt apply to
22-year-old Bishop when she
was pulled over Monday night
for swerving while texting on
the University of Missouri cam-
pus.
She blames a late night and
schoolwork. The officer who
stopped her told her to put her
phone in the back seat and sent
her home with a warning.
I definitely have the bad
habit of tweeting and driv-
ing, texting and driving, and
updating my Facebook sta-
tus, Bishop said. I probably
shouldnt but the technology
makes it too easy.
About two out of 10
American drivers overall
and half of drivers between 21
and 24 say theyve thumbed
messages or emailed from the
drivers seat, according to a sur-
vey of more than 6,000 driv-
ers by the National Highway
Traffic Safety Administration.
At any given moment last
year on Americas streets and
highways, nearly one in every
100 car drivers was texting,
emailing, surfing the Web or
otherwise using a hand-held
electronic device, the safety
administration said. Those
activities were up 50 percent
over the previous year.
NTSB investigators said
they are seeing increasing tex-
ting, cellphone calls and other
distracting behavior by drivers
in accidents involving all kinds
of transportation. It has become
routine to immediately request
the preservation of cellphone
and texting records when an
investigation begins.
In the past few years, the
board has investigated a train
collision in which the engi-
neer was texting that killed 25
people in Chatsworth, Calif., a
fatal accident near Philadelphia
in which a tugboat pilot was
talking on his cellphone and
using a laptop computer, and a
Northwest Airlines flight that
sped more than 100 miles past
its destination because both
pilots were working on their
laptops.
Last year, a driver was dial-
ing his cellphone when his truck
crossed a highway median near
Munfordville, Ky., and collided
with a 15-passenger van. Eleven
people were killed.
While the NTSB doesnt
have the power to impose restric-
tions, its recommendations carry
significant weight with federal
regulators, Congress and state
lawmakers. But the boards
decision to include hands-free
cellphone use in its recommen-
dation is likely to prove espe-
cially controversial.
TRASH TALK
Allen County Refuse pro-
vides garbage and recycle col-
lection in Delphos.
The Allen County portion of
Delphos is collected on Thurs-
days, with residents placing
garbage containers on the curb
Wednesday evening and recycle
every other Wednesday.
The Van Wert County por-
tion of Delphos is collected on
Friday, with residents placing
garbage containers at the curb
on Thursday evening and recy-
cle every other Thursday.
If a holiday falls during the
week, collection is pushed back
a day. For example, the week of
Memorial Day, collection in Al-
len County will be Friday and
in Van Wert County it will be
Saturday.
Big item collection is held
from 8 a.m.-noon the first Sat-
urday of each month in the
parking lot across from the city
building. Participants need to
show proof of residency like a
city utility bill.
See the full schedule at
cityofdelphos.com.
1
www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC
Laving a 4C(k) with a prvious mployr coulo man
laving it alon with no on to watch ovr it.
/t Eowaro Jons, w can xplain options or your 4C(k)
ano hlp you slct th on that's bst or you. l you'o
lik to roll it ovr to an Eowaro Jons lnoivioual Rtir-
mnt /ccount (lR/), w can hlp you oo it without
paying taxs or pnaltis. /no you can l connont
that somon is looking out or you ano your 4C(k).
To hnd out why it mukcs scnsc to tulk with Edwurd
Joncs ubout your oJ(k) otions, cull or visit your
locul hnunciul udvisor toduy.
If You Aren't at Your Iaet Job,
Why Ie Your o1(k]?
Andy North
Financial Advisor
.
1122 Elida Avenue
Delphos, OH 45833
419-695-0660
Hair Klinique
welcomes
Michael Wright
Joining the salon Dec. 1
st
Michael was former owner and
stylist of Ahead of Tyme Hair Salon
in Delphos, Ohio. Master stylist,
specializing in mens and womens
cuts, color and perms.
RECEIVE 10% OFF YOUR FIRST APPOINTMENT
WITH THIS AD
419-692-7777
209 S. Main Street, Delphos, Ohio
You Lost a Chunk of Change Last
Year...Billions in Fact
Report Medicare/Medicaid
Fraud in Ohio.
Call: 1-800-488-6070
You can stop Medicare fraud.
Its as easy as 1..2...3
* PROTECT your Medicare Number
* DETECT Read your Medicare
Summary Notice
* REPORT Your Concerns to 1-800-488-6070
ProSeniors.Org
Looking for a new OB/GYN provider?
If you are, let us obtain your necessary past
medical records at no cost to you.
Alliance for Womens Health Inc.
... Expect a Difference.
We Welcome NEW Patients
419-228-1000
3 Ofce Locations:
310 S. Cable Rd. - Lima
510 E. Spring St. - St. Marys
LMH Campus
We see patients at all stages
of life -
Pre-teen counseling
STD/HPV testing
Annual exams
Normal and High Risk
Pregnancy
Perimenopausal changes
Postmenopausal conditions
We specialize in treatment of:
Sexual Dysfunction
Abnormal Bleeding
Infertility
Endometriosis
Chronic Pelvic Pain
Bladder Control
Insulin Resistance
We offer in-ofce Procedures:
Hysteroscopy
Endometrial Ablation
Permanent Birth Control
We perform Minimally
Invasive Surgery:
Laparoscopy
Outpatient Hysterectomy
Robotic Surgery
For more information visit: www.alliance4womenshealth.com
419-222-7723
or 1-800-653-7723
HOME FOR THE HOLIDAYS ...
making wishes come true.
Give us a call ...
Wednesday, December 14, 2011 The Herald 3
STATE/LOCAL
www.delphosherald.com
BRIEFS
Marion Township Trustees
The Marion Township
Trustees held their regu-
lar scheduled meeting
on Monday at the Marion
Township Office with the
following members present:
Howard Violet, Jerry Gilden
and Joseph Youngpeter.
The purpose of the meet-
ing was to pay bills and con-
duct ongoing business. The
minutes of the previous meet-
ing were read and approved
as read. The trustees then
reviewed the bills and gave
approval for 17 checks total-
ing $23,652.71.
Road Foreman Elwer had
no report.
Fiscal Office Kimmet gave
the trustees the Fund Balance
and Bank Reconciliation
Reports for Nov. 30 for their
review and signature.
He also gave them the
revised Certificate of all
Sources Available for
Expenditures and after
review, Trustee Gilden
offered a resolution to accept
it which was seconded by
Trustee Youngpeter with all
votes YES.
Trustee Youngpeter
then offered a resolution to
decrease the appropriation
in the Gas Tax Fund and
the Fire District Fund due to
reduced revenue which was
seconded by Trustee Gilden
and upon roll call all votes
were YES.
He also passed out new
insurance booklet to those
covered.
Police Vermillion advised
trustees that there are no
fire arms available for the
DRMO.
Trustee Gilden advised
that he contacted Brad Blymer
from Farmers Equipment
regarding the charge for fend-
ers and Brad will see what
can be done.
He then brought up the
upcoming fire contract with the
City of Delphos. Washington
Township trustees and Zoning
Inspector and Delphos Fire
Chief McNeal were present
regarding this and after much
discussion, the trustees stated
they would attend the coun-
cil meeting on Dec. 19 and
give reasons why they feel an
increase on the contract that
the city has offered is not war-
ranted. Washington Township
expressed similar concerns
and will attend the meeting
also and pursue their contract
accordingly.
Trustee Youngpeter
brought in another quote
regarding purchasing tractors
and after much discussion he
made a motion to purchase
two John Deere Tractors
under the Ohio Heavy
Construction Contract buy-
ing one from Kennedy-Kuhn
and the other from Northwest
Tractor which was seconded
by Trustee Gilden and passed
unanimously.
There being no further
business, a motion to adjourn
by Trustee Gilden was sec-
onded by Trustee Youngpeter
and passed unanimously.
Patrol offers tips and warnings
about driving in winter weather
COLUMBUS The Ohio
State Highway Patrol is warn-
ing drivers about the dangers
of driving in winter weather
and is offering some tips on
what drivers should do in the
event of a vehicle break down
or a crash.
From December 2010
through March 2011, 37,429
crashes occurred on snow, ice
or slush covered roadways
killing 46 people and injuring
7,844. Speed was reported as
the main cause in 77 percent
of these crashes. To view a
breakdown of these crashes
visit http://www.statepa-
trol.ohio.gov/doc/Winter_
Driving.pdf.
In the event of inclement
weather, the Patrol is urg-
ing motorists to allow extra
time to get to their destina-
tion, maintain a safe distance
between their vehicle and the
traffic ahead, pay close atten-
tion to bridges and overpasses
as they are often the first
to freeze over and to drive
slowly, as everything includ-
ing accelerating, turning and
braking, take longer on snow-
covered roadways.
In case of a vehicle break-
down, motorists should turn
on their hazard warning lights,
safely position the vehicle as
far off the road as possible,
call 1-877-7-PATROL for
assistance and remain in the
vehicle until help arrives,
explained Colonel John Born,
Patrol superintendent.
Troopers further suggest
that if you get stuck in snow;
make sure that your tail pipe
is free of all snow and debris,
to decrease your chance of
carbon monoxide poisoning.
All motorists are encour-
aged to prepare their vehi-
cle for winter driving by
ensuring that the battery,
cooling system, tires, wipers
and defroster are all in
working order. Drivers are
also encouraged to carry the
following winter car kit items
in their vehicle in case of a
breakdown:
Cell phone with car char-
ger
Road flares or reflectors
Help or Call Police signs
First aid kit
Flashlight
Blanket/Sleeping bag
Small shovel
Bottled water and energy
foods
Candles and matches
Tow strap/chain
Up-to-the-minute road
conditions are always
available by logging onto
the Ohio Department of
Transportations website,
www.buckeyetraffic.org.
New limits added to
Ohio voucher bill
COLUMBUS (AP) A
lawmaker who wants to expand
private school vouchers in Ohio
is putting new restrictions on
his plan in response to public
schools concerns over losing
their tax money.
Schools in more than half
of Ohios 614 districts have
passed resolutions over the past
two months opposing state Rep.
Matt Huffmans bill to widen
the program that gives parents
tax dollars to pay their childs
private school tuition, The
Columbus Dispatch reported
Tuesday.
The Republican legisla-
tor from Lima said at a news
conference Monday that he
wants to protect public schools
and doesnt want to see any
doomsday scenarios. Huffman
said he hopes the revised plan
addresses those concerns, but
the changes are not likely to be
enough to win the support of
public school officials in Ohios
cash-strapped school districts,
the newspaper reported.
Its still transferring public
dollars to private schools, and
its not limited to schools hav-
ing difficulty. It makes vouch-
ers available to any child in any
district, said Damon Asbury,
legislative director for the Ohio
School Boards Association.
The changes would lower
income guidelines to restrict
eligibility, cap the number of
vouchers available in each
school district and reduce the
amount a student can receive.
Under Huffmans latest pro-
posal, vouchers would be avail-
able to families with household
incomes up to 300 percent of
the federal poverty level, or
$67,050 a year for a family of
four. That would limit private
school scholarships to not more
than 1 percent of students per
school district, or about 17,000
students statewide.
Huffmans original proposal
would have expanded the pro-
gram to families with incomes
up to $95,000 a year.
Voucher amounts would
vary by school district. A
voucher must be equal to
the cost of the private school
tuition up to $4,500 a year,
but no more than the amount
of per-pupil state aid received
by the district. Vouchers could
amount to only a few hundred
dollars in districts receiving
little state aid, while students
in schools receiving more state
money would be eligible for the
maximum.
Huffman said he wants to
make sure districts wouldnt
lose any local tax money. He
also is dropping a provision
that allowed parents to deposit
unused voucher money into a
college savings account.
School choice advocates
support the bill.
Jason Warner, legislative
director for School Choice
Ohio, said thousands of fami-
lies are waiting for the program
so their children can finally
have access to a high-quality
education that best meets their
learning needs.
Vouchers currently are
available to students in low-
performing schools regard-
less of income. Schools in
28 districts met the criteria
this year, with 15,219 students
receiving vouchers, according
to the Ohio Department of
Education
If YOU want to SEE your kids read
more, let them see YOU read more.
Call 419-695-0015 to subscribe.
COLUMBUS (AP)
Unionized teachers and retir-
ees, local government offi-
cials, and veterans are among
public workers running for
office in an effort by Ohio
Democrats to take control
of the state House after a
successful fall campaign to
repeal a collective bargain-
ing overhaul championed by
Gov. John Kasich and fellow
Republicans.
Without the option of a
gubernatorial recall like
Wisconsins, a 2012 takeover
of the Ohio House, where
Republicans hold a 19-seat
advantage, is Democrats best
next step for capitalizing on
voter anger over the union-
limiting law. A total of 21
House districts will be with-
out an incumbent next year
due to term limits and other
departures.
Taking control of the Ohio
Senate, which is about two-
thirds Republican and has
been GOP hands since 1985,
is a long shot for Democrats.
But House control would
give them the ability to block
bills supported by Senate
Republicans and Kasich.
The union-limiting bill
thats fueling the effort was
lauded by its backers as a
tool for local governments to
control costs, but it prompted
weeks of Statehouse protests,
rallies and parades drawing
thousands of opponents. The
measure would have affected
more than 350,000 teachers,
police, firefighters and other
government employees. After
a $30 million campaign, 60
percent of voters rejected it in
November.
Now, Democrats are field-
ing candidates in almost all
99 Ohio House districts
even the reliably Republican
ones a rarity not seen for
decades. The public workers
newly running as Democrats
number at least 20.
Dems hope
union victory
spurs takeover
COLUMBUS (AP) An
Ohio prison doctor criticized
by the state corrections sys-
tem after the suicide of an
inmate under his care faces
the suspension of his medical
license or worse at a hearing
today.
A state medical board
examiner alleges that Dr.
Myron Shank didnt follow
up on allegations that patients
were selling pain pills he
prescribed for them and that
he excessively prescribed
such pills. Hes also accused
of failing to recognize that
several patients were drug-
seeking individuals driving
suspiciously long distances to
see him for pills.
The examiners 77-page
report on Shank alleges that
care he provided to 11
patients between 2003 and
2008 was below the mini-
mum standard of care in sev-
eral ways.
Shank argues to the board
in a separate filing that the
doctor who reviewed his
cases wasnt qualified to
examine chronic pain treat-
ment and that his treatment
of patients met relevant care
standards.
The examiner recommend-
ed a minimum six-month sus-
pension of Shanks license.
The board could follow that,
throw the charges out or per-
manently revoke his license,
among other options.
The allegations dont
mention Shanks work at the
Allen Correctional Institution,
from which he resigned ear-
lier this year after the state
placed him on administrative
leave.
A prisons system review of
Shanks work found that he
failed to do proper follow-up
with patients and improperly
stopped medication and treat-
ment without first meeting
with patients.
Ex-prison doctor
faces suspension
East 105th Street and Euclid
Avenue in Cleveland was
the site of the first pedestrian
button for the control of a
traffic light. The boy chosen
for the 1948 newsreel to
demonstrate its operation was
Louis Spronze.
The trouble with our times is that the future is not what it used to be.
Paul Valery, French philosopher (1871-1945)
IT WAS NEWS THEN
LETTER TO THE EDITOR
4 The Herald Wednesday,December 14, 2011
POLITICS
www.delphosherald.com
KATHLEEN PARKER
Point
of View
DEAR EDITOR,
We will all have to wait at some point this holiday season.
We might wait in line to purchase the perfect gift, wait with
anticipation for Santas arrival on Christmas morning, wait
excitedly for our favorite cookies to come out of the oven or
anxiously await the chance to see family and friends.
When you find yourself waiting, I ask you to consider
those who are waiting for something that may never come.
Think about the 112,000 Americans who wait for the Gift of
Life through an organ transplant. Most will wait months or
years and every day 18 men, women and children will
die waiting.
They wait for a donors generosity to let life go on.
You dont have to wait to make a difference. All you have
to do is register as an organ and tissue donor. It wont cost
you money, but it will give hope to those waiting for a second
chance at life.
Dont wait. Sign up as an organ and tissue donor today
at www.lifelineofohio.org, at your local BMV or by calling
800-525-5667.
Kent Holloway,
CEO, Lifeline of Ohio
One Year Ago
Police Chief Kyle Fittro accepted a donation from
Associated Charities Monday in Van Wert. The group passed
out $14,650 to various organizations, including Delphos police
and fire departments. Donations were also made to Van Wert
and Ohio City police departments; Van Wert, Middle Point
and Ohio City police departments; Van Wert, Middle Point,
Ohio City, Wren, Willshire, Convoy and Scott fire depart-
ments; D.A.R.E., Toys for Tots, Venedocia Parks, Junior
Achievement, Boy Scouts, Van Wert Sheriffs Auxiliary
and food pantries at First United Methodist Church, Trinity
Friends Church and the Salvation Army.
25 Years Ago 1986
Landack Rosary Altar Society met recently for its
Christmas party. Amilda Mueller won the afghan and teddy
bear. Door prizes went to Stella Schwinnen, Margaret Lause,
Diane Horstman and Celeste Grothaus. Janet Pohlman and
Calista Miller and their committee were thanked for the eve-
ning.
The 1911 graduation class of St. Johns included:
Gertrude Schumaker, Catherine (Kleekamp) Mrs. Ed Hotz,
Irene ODonnel, Richard Stegeman, Rose (Weisgerber)
Nomina, Helen (Weisgerber) Mrs. Clarence Weger, Helen
(Weisgerber) Mrs. Ralph Weger, Clara (Hartlieb) Snow,
Alfred Ricker, Irene (Dolt Mericle), Florence Stallkamp, Paul
Stallkamp and Francis (Heitz) Mrs. Carl King.
A long journey to the home of the Antwerp Archers
left the Fort Jennings Musketeers with their first loss of the
season. They fell short 57-48. Mark Von Lehmden led his
team with 19 points and classmate Gary Menke chipped in
14.
50 Years Ago 1961
Officers for 1962 were elected at the regular monthly
meeting of the Delphos Throttle Twisters. Named to head the
organization for the coming year was Abie Vogt. Other offi-
cers elected included Gary John, president; Bill Martin, sec-
retary; Gary John, road captain; Roy Wright, points reporter;
Becky Martin, news reporter; Jerry Miller, three-year trustee;
Lowell Smith, two-year trustee; and Dick Miller, one-year
trustee.
Twenty-nine members of the Daughters of Ruth Class of
Trinity Methodist Church met Monday in the church parlors
for the class annual Christmas meeting and party. The class
presented a gift to Mrs. O. M. Arnold, in appreciation for her
services as teacher. A gift was also presented to Mrs. Jesse
Danner as substitute teacher.
The Rev. Warren J. Campbell, pastor of the First
Assembly of God Church here, will be the guest speaker at
a special home missionary service to be conducted in the
Assembly of Church in Kenton on Thursday. Rev. Campbell
has spent more than 10 years in establishing home mission-
ary churches in the Rocky Mountain District, which includes
Colorado, Wyoming and Utah.
75 Years Ago 1936
Fred J. Weisgerber of Defiance, son of Wendel Weisgerber,
of this city, has been named general manager of the new
Defiance Metal Products Company which expects to start
production about Jan. 1. Weisgerber is well known in Delphos
and his many friends here will be pleased to learn of his
appointment and will wish him success.
Announcement was made Monday that the Adolph M.
Mox garage has taken over the agency for the Willys line of
automobiles. These cars are manufactured in Toledo and the
line comprises a variety of models in a selection of seven col-
ors. One of the new DeLuxe sedans of this line is now being
shown at this garage at 432 N. Main St. and is attracting much
attention.
The Famous Olvera Street Marionettes of Los
Angeles, presenting Huck Finn and Tom Sawyer, will
play here on Jan. 11, sponsored by the Delphos Public
Schools. A novel feature of this production is the fact
that all the leads are played by portrait puppets of popular
movie stars.
WASHINGTON (AP)
The Obama administration
hit two senior Iranian military
officials with travel and finan-
cial sanctions Tuesday and
moved closer to a compromise
with Congress over tough
new sanctions against Irans
Central Bank that Washington
worries could have unintended
consequences.
Citing their roles in alleged
human rights abuses, the
Treasury Department added
the chairman of Irans joint
chiefs of staff, the countrys
most senior military officer,
and the deputy command-
er of the hardline Islamic
Revolutionary Guard Corps to
a U.S. blacklist. The move
freezes any assets they may
have in the U.S., although it
is unlikely they have any such
assets, and bars Americans
from doing business with
them. The State Department
also barred the two men from
entering the United States.
The Iranian people have
suffered tremendously at the
hands of senior officials, who
instead of protecting their
basic rights have ordered
and orchestrated widespread,
serious human rights abuses
aimed at silencing criticism
and punishing dissent, said
Adam J. Szubin, the Treasury
Departments director of for-
eign assets control.
Hassan Firouzabadi, the
joint chiefs chairman, and
Abdollah Araqi were accused
of wrongdoing in the crack-
down on protesters and mis-
treatment of detainees after
Irans disputed 2009 elections.
The sanctions may have little
direct effect since the U.S. and
Iran have no military ties and
few financial or commercial
ones.
But the administration
appeared to be moving closer
to endorsing legislation that
could hurt Iran far more.
By RICARDO ALONSO-
ZALDIVAR
Associated Press
WASHINGTON The
number of young adults lack-
ing medical coverage has
shrunk by 2.5 million since
the new health care overhaul
law took effect, according to
a new analysis the Obama
administration is to release
today.
That drop is 2 1/2 times
as large as the drop indicated
by previous government and
private estimates from earlier
this year, which showed about
1 million Americans ages
19-25 had gained coverage.
Administration officials
said they now have more data.
They say theyre also slicing
the numbers more precisely
than the government usually
does, trying to pinpoint the
impact of a popular provision
in an otherwise politically
divisive law.
Under the health overhaul,
children can remain on their
parents health insurance plans
until they turn 26, and fami-
lies have flocked to sign up
young adults making the tran-
sition to work in a challenging
economic environment. But
the fate of President Barack
Obamas signature domes-
tic accomplishment remains
uncertain, with the Supreme
Court scheduled to hear a
constitutional challenge next
year, and Republican presi-
dential candidates vowing to
repeal it.
The increase in coverage
among 19- to 25-year-olds
can be directly attributed to
the Affordable Care Acts
new dependent coverage pro-
vision, said a draft report
from the Health and Human
Services Department. Initial
gains from this policy have
continued to grow as ... stu-
dents graduate from high
school and college. A copy
of the report was obtained by
The Associated Press.
HHS Secretary Kathleen
Sebelius is scheduled to
release the findings today.
The health care laws main
push to cover the uninsured
doesnt come until 2014. But
the young adults provision
took effect last fall. Most
workplace health plans started
carrying it out Jan. 1.
Using unpublished quar-
terly statistics from the gov-
ernments ongoing National
Health Interview Survey, ana-
lysts in Sebelius policy office
determined that nearly 36 per-
cent of those age 19-25 were
uninsured in the third calendar
quarter of 2010, before the
laws provision took effect.
That translates to more
than 10.5 million people.
By the second calendar
quarter of 2011, the propor-
tion of uninsured young adults
had dropped to a little over 27
percent, or about 8 million
people.
The difference nearly
2.5 million getting coverage
can only be the result of
the health care law, adminis-
tration officials said, because
the number covered by public
programs like Medicaid went
down slightly.
Overall, nearly 30 million
Americans are between the
ages of 19 to 25. For those
who are little older, ages
26-35, the uninsured rate went
up during the same period.
From September 2010 to
June 2011, coverage rose only
among adults affect by the
policy, said the HHS report.
The National Center for
Health Statistics has docu-
mented a broadly similar
trend in its official publica-
tions, only its not nearly as
dramatic.
Administration officials
said those statistics do not
focus on the change from
calendar quarter to calendar
quarter, as does the report by
Sebelius staff. Instead, they
pool data over longer time
periods. That has the effect of
diluting the perceived impact
of the law, administration
officials said.
By MATTHEW DALY
Associated Press
WASHINGTON
Sensing a political open-
ing, House Republicans on
Tuesday approved a plan that
links speedy approval of an
oil pipeline from Canada to
a measure renewing a payroll
tax cut.
The vote sets up a show-
down with President Barack
Obama, who has threatened
to veto the bill. The White
House says the bill plays
politics with what should be
its main goal: cutting taxes for
the middle class.
Obamas veto threat seemed
to increase conservative sup-
port for the overall measure,
with Republicans hoping to
use Obamas opposition to
portray him as favoring envi-
ronmentalists over jobs.
Environmental groups,
who celebrated the admin-
istrations announcement
of a delay in the Keystone
project last month, accused
Republicans of forcing a pre-
mature judgment on the pipe-
line in order to curry favor
with the oil industry.
Leaders of both parties
say Americans need this tax
cut, said Scott Slesinger, leg-
islative director of the Natural
Resources Defense Council.
What we dont need is more
pollution, more health prob-
lems and more environmental
problems. And thats exactly
what House Republican lead-
ers just gave us, he added,
referring to the pipeline provi-
sion and amendments related
to the environment.
Republicans said the pro-
posed Keystone XL pipeline
from Canada to Texas would
help the president achieve his
top priority creating jobs
without costing a dime
of taxpayer money. Obamas
opposition shows he does
not mean what he says when
he calls jobs his top priority,
GOP lawmakers said.
Democrats said the pipe-
line provision did not belong
in the bill. Among other pro-
visions, the bill would extend
benefits for the long-term
unemployed.
To hold the American
people that are suffering hos-
tage is just plain wrong, said
Rep. Charles Rangel, D-N.Y.
House Minority Leader
Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif.,
acknowledged that some in
her party support the pipeline
but said the pipeline provision
should be separated from the
payroll tax cut and unemploy-
ment extension.
They are using the pipe-
line as a smokescreen and an
excuse, Pelosi said of House
Republicans.
The measure would require
approval of the $7 billion proj-
ect within two months unless
Obama declares it is not in the
national interest.
The Obama administration
said last month it was postpon-
ing a decision on the pipeline
until after next years elec-
tion. Officials said the delay
is needed to study routes that
avoid environmentally sensi-
tive areas of Nebraska.
The 1,700-mile pipeline
would carry oil from western
Canada to refineries in Texas,
passing through Montana,
South Dakota, Nebraska,
Kansas and Oklahoma.
The projects developer,
Calgary-based TransCanada,
says the pipeline could create
as many as 20,000 jobs, includ-
ing 13,000 during construction
and 7,000 manufacturing jobs.
Opponents call those fig-
ures wildly inflated and say
the project could create as few
as 2,500 construction jobs and
fewer than 1,000 permanent
jobs. The State Department, in
an analysis released this sum-
mer, said the pipeline would
create up to 6,000 jobs dur-
ing construction, including
Keystone employees, contrac-
tors and construction and envi-
ronmental inspection staff.
WASHINGTON Oh,
quelle gaffe.
Rarely has such a small,
innocuous, truth-based remark
garnered so much attention
from the chattering classes
as Mitt Romneys proposed
$10,000 bet with Rick Perry
during this past weekends
Republican primary debate.
The thundering herd wore
out their little hooves rac-
ing to pounce on this tiny
morsel of faux controversy.
The near-unanimous verdict:
Romney is out of touch.
Out of touch with what,
exactly? The Ordinary
American, as Beltway journ-
os refer to the rest of America?
Fellow politicians, who are,
of course, far more attuned to
the trials of everyday people?
Take current front-runner
Newt Gingrich, for example.
Hes been there, done that
blown as much as $500,000
at Tiffanys, racked up more
than a million in campaign
debt, offered advice to the
folks at Freddie Mac for $1.6
million about how to continue
driving the country into bank-
ruptcy. He gets it.
Americans with lives may
have missed the Saturday
night debate. To recap: Perry
accused Romney of support-
ing a national health care plan
like the one he helped create
as governor of Massachusetts
and claimed that Romney
changed his book, No
Apology, to conceal that
support.
This is demonstrably and
substantially false.
Romney did edit his book
between editions, as writers
often do, but he didnt change
the substance of what he
had written. And, given that
Romney, unlike most politi-
cians, actually wrote his own
book, he was familiar with its
contents.
As Glenn Kessler wrote
in his Washington Post fact-
check column in September:
Romney has long said he did
not view his plan as a model
for the nation, and he has
not wavered on that stance.
And, Perry is simply mak-
ing up the claim that Romney
advocated his health care plan
as a model for the rest of the
country. ... He chose to manu-
facture a phony issue.
Another fact-checking
entity, the St. Petersburg
Times PolitiFact.com, fur-
ther explained Romneys
edits: Among other things,
a line that advocated the
Massachusetts model as a
strong option for other states
was replaced by a shorter,
more generic sentence. But
Perry exaggerates by making
it sound as though Romney
had advocated his states plan
as national health care policy
a potentially damaging
position in a Republican pri-
mary.
In another recent clarifica-
tion, the PolitiFact fact-check-
ers also corrected Romneys
debate claim that only
one president has ever cut
Medicare for seniors in this
country ... Barack Obama.
Obama never has, and other
presidents have.
As to the wager itself, well,
what would critics have had
Romney do? Punch Perry in
the nose? Doubtless Romney
would have liked to, and
doubtless the feeling is mutu-
al. But Romney is not one to
lose his cool a trait one
might hope for in a president.
Because Perry had made this
accusation before, Romney
was prepared for it and prob-
ably figured a bet was a safe,
well, bet. If you know youre
right, you bet high and call
the challengers bluff.
Perry recovered reasonably
well, saying he doesnt bet.
But he does make stuff up,
and Romney called him on
it. Does the fact that Romney
chose $10,000 make him out
of touch?
Debating the dollar value
of Romneys bet as political
metaphor is intellectual Play-
Doh, but in the spirit of sea-
sonal gamesmanship, my two
cents: Ten thousand dollars
was the perfect number. A
dollar would have been silly;
$10 trite. A hundred would
have seemed amateurish; a
thousand, too studied. At the
higher end, $100,000 would
have been boastful, and a mil-
lion would have tied Romney
to the millionaires club to
which he does belong but
the man is not a braggart.
Ergo, $10,000 was an amount
he could afford to lose (the
first rule of betting), and it
was high enough to demon-
strate his certitude.
If Romney had really
wanted to punch out his only
credible opponent (not Perry),
he might have pointed out
that only one Republican
presidential candidate has
supported a federal individual
mandate Gingrich.
This is easily document-
ed, beginning in 1993, when
Gingrich said: I am for peo-
ple, individuals exactly
like automobile insurance
individuals having health
insurance and being required
to have health insurance.
As recently as May 2011,
he stated, Ive said consis-
tently we ought to have some
requirement that you either
have health insurance or you
post a bond or in some way
you indicate youre going to
be held accountable.
Gingrich may have
changed his mind. It happens.
But the claim that Romney
supports a federal mandate
is a fib. You can put money
on that.

Kathleen Parkers email
address is kathleenparker@
washpost.com.
Romneys wager
Obamacare helps 2.5M
young adults get coverage
GOP pushes for interest of Big Oil
US increases
Iran sanctions
1
Delphos
2 Col x 8
102 Water Street [ Kalida, OH 45S53
S00-676-3619
119.582.8699
www.knueve.com
K
nueve
&
S
ons
inc.
"Your Komfort Is Our Koncernl"
[All offers in this ad are not valid with any other offer. Cannot be combined with any other coupons or specials.}
Heating 8 Air Conditioning { Air Quality 8 Humidification {
Water Heaters { Water Treatment Systems { Home Standby Generators
Bathroom Remodeling
Plumbing Services
'$ee Knueve 8 $ons for comp|ete program e||g|b|||ty, dates, deta||s and restr|ct|ons. Spec|a| l|rarc|rg ollers va||d or qua||l]|rg s]slers
or|]. A|| sa|es rusl oe lo oreoWrers |r le ur|led Slales. Vo|d Were pro|o|led. Te lore Projecls V|sa card |s |ssued o] we||s Fargo
F|rarc|a| hal|ora| 8ar|. Spec|a| lerrs app|] lo qua||l]|rg purcases carged W|l approved cred|l al parl|c|pal|rg rercarls. Regu|ar r|r|rur
rorl|] pa]rerls are requ|red dur|rg le prorol|ora| per|od. lrleresl W||| oe carged lo ]our accourl lrorle purcase dale al le regu|ar APR |l
le purcase oa|arce |s rol pa|d |r lu|| W|l|r le prorol|ora| per|od or |l ]ou ra|e a |ale pa]rerl. For reW|] opered accourls, le regu|ar APR |s
27.99 Te APR ra] var]. Te APR |s g|ver as ol 1/1/2011. ll ]ou are carged |rleresl |r ar] o||||rg c]c|e, le r|r|rur|rleresl carge W||| oe
$1.00. ll ]ouuselecardlor casadvarces, lecasadvarcelee|s 4 ol learourl ol lecasadvarce, oul rol |ess lar$10.00.

Purcase a reW qua||l]|rg |g ell|c|erc] Trare eal|rg ard
coo||rg s]sler W|l a reW Terroslal ard Trare
A|r C|earer o] Varc 15, 2012 ard Krueve
ard Sors W||| g|ve ]ou Zero lrleresl F|rarc|rg |l pa|d
|r lu|| W|l|r TWe|ve Vorls or up lo a $00 reoale.
Krueve ard Sors W||| a|so g|ve ]ou a 10]ear
parls ard |aoor Peace ol V|rd Prolecl|or
P|ar or our |rsla||al|or.
Your reW s]sler W||| prooao|] save ]ou up lo
0 or ]our ul|||l] o|||s. Krueve & Sors W|||
core oul ard g|ve ]ou a lree ererg]
eva|ual|or W|l a quole or a reW Trare
|rsla||al|or soW|rg le ererg] sav|rgs ]ou
car expecl.
Ca|| Krueve & Sors loda] so ]our lar||] W||| oe sale ard
corlorlao|e lor ]ears lo core.
CleanEffects
k00z|||sIt00,k080t0|sIt00
k08z|0st0f00tsI
0z||I0tIt00l00tlz|0zl|00I
|M000ptz00f00t
80zl|08sl0MI
00l0p0$600800zl00t

12M00lksN0|0l0t0sl
0010f0zts0lN080pz|t8|||sI

1I'e HorJ To SIop A Trone.


TM
Ear, Nose, Throat &
Sinus Associates
Now within earshot of
St. Ritas Audiology.
Some things are better together. Conveniently
located next to St. Ritas Audiology, we now
offer a more comprehensive range of quality
services for you and your loved ones. So
whether you want ENT, sinus, audiology,
hearing aids or some combination of all four,
one location is all you need.
For an appointment, call Ear, Nose, Throat &
Sinus Associates at 419-226-4300 or St. Ritas
Audiology at 419-226-9341.
CHRISTMAS
PHOTO GALLERY!
The Delphos Herald will be publishing a special
page in its Christmas greeting tabloid with
your Christmas photos... past and present.
You can submit your photo to be included on this page
for a cost of only $12.00.
Any Christmas photo - family, friends,
children, adults..even pets....can be included .
Just clip out the coupon below with photo, payment
and information by Dec. 20.
Publication of the Greeting section
will be on December 23rd.
Susie Jones
Delphos, Ohio
Parents:
Bob and Pam Jones
Photo ID information:


Parents names (If Applicable)

Name of person submitting form: (only used in case of questions)

Address of person submitting form

Phone Number:
Please mail drop off form with payment to:
The Delphos Herald
405 N. Main St., Delphos 45833
Photo may be emailed to sbohn@delphosherald.com
*No photos will be accepted
beyond 5:00 p.m. Dec. 20.
Payment must be included.
Wednesday, December 14, 2011 The Herald 5
COMMUNITY
Happy
Birthday
LANDMARK
www.delphosherald.com
Landeck School
CALENDAR OF
EVENTS
TODAY
4 p.m. Delphos Public
Library board members meet
at the library conference
room.
6 p.m. Shepherds of
Christ Associates meet in the
St. Johns Chapel.
7 p.m. Bingo at St.
Johns Little Theatre.
THURSDAY
9-11 a.m. The Delphos
Canal Commission Museum,
241 N. Main St., is open.
11:30 a.m. Mealsite
at Delphos Senior Citizen
Center, 301 Suthoff Street.
5:30 p.m. The Delphos
Canal Commission meets at
the museum, 241 N. Main St.
5-7 p.m. The Interfaith
Thrift Shop is open for shop-
ping.
7 p.m. Spencerville
Local Schools Board of
Education meets.
St. Johns Athletic Boosters
meet in the Little Theatre.
7:30 p.m. Delphos
Chapter 26 Order of the
Eastern Star meets at the
Masonic Temple on North
Main Street.
Delphos VFW Auxiliary
meets at the VFW Hall, 213
W. Fourth St.
FRIDAY
7:30 a.m. Delphos
Optimist Club, A&W Drive-
In, 924 E. Fifth St.
11:30 a.m. Mealsite
at Delphos Senior Citizen
Center, 301 Suthoff Street.
1-4 p.m. Interfaith Thrift
Store is open for shopping.
SATURDAY
9-11:30 a.m. Delphos
Project Recycle at Delphos
Fuel and Wash.
9 a.m. to noon Interfaith
Thrift Store is open for shop-
ping.
St. Vincent DePaul Society,
located at the east edge of the
St. Johns High School park-
ing lot, is open.
10 a.m to 2 p.m. Delphos
Postal Museum is open.
DEC. 15
Kim Grogg
Daniel Pohlman
Annie Lindeman
Luke Rushing
Family getting ready
for holidays, cleaning
BY LOVINA EICHER
Every morning son
Joseph, 9, reminds us of how
many more days it is until
Christmas. When he told
me this morning that there
were only 13 days it really
dawned on me just how close
the holiday season really is. I
think the children are getting a
little worried and keep asking
Joe and I when we
are going Christmas
shopping. We have
a few of their gifts,
but it just seems time
goes too fast. We
plan to go shopping
on Saturday.
(Editors Note:
Having visiting doz-
ens of Amish settle-
ments across the USA
over the past 20 years, my
observation is that Christmas
is celebrated in different ways
depending on the community.
Some Amish do incorporate
secular symbols like Santa
Claus and reindeer-shaped
Christmas cookies into their
celebration, others do not.
Gift-exchanges seem to be
common in most communities,
although it is often more low-
key and less commercial than
the non-Amish. Christmas
decorations rarely appear in
Amish homes and Ive never
seen a decorated tree. One
way in which many Amish do
expression their appreciate of
the season is through baked
goods and homemade candy -
Kevin Williams, Amish Cook
Editor)
Christmas morning is
exciting for the children to
see their gifts, but lets not
forget the true meaning of
Christmas. Jesus is the rea-
son for the season.
Joseph, Lovina, 7, and
Kevin, 6, are often practicing
their songs for their school
Christmas program. It will be
held next week on Dec. 20.
Joe will have off two weeks
from the factory over the hol-
idays. The children will also
have two weeks off school.
I know those weeks will go
fast with us having Joes fam-
ily over for Christmas on Jan.
7. Lots to do during that time
to prepare. Some of the time
will be spent cleaning the
house more than usual. Our
basement needs a good clean-
ing. Our coal stove is the
basement so it does not take
long for dust to collect. We
do laundry down there and
the children play down there
a lot, too.
Saturday, we celebrated
daughter Verenas 14th birth-
day with a fried chicken din-
ner. She baked a chocolate
cake and frosted it. We put
on candles and had her blow
them out. We also had vanilla
ice cream to go with
the chocolate cake.
For her birthday,
we gave her a dol-
phin anniversary
clock and an elec-
tronic money jar.
Verena collects any-
thing with dolphins
or dogs, so she really
liked the clock.
She doesnt
remember her 13th birthday
due to losing her memory for
a year because of her brain
concussion in June 2010. We
are so thankful she is doing
better. She has caught up with
her school grades again and
is excited to be back on the
honor roll list.
I took her to the doctors
for a 3-month check up since
her surgery. She still needs
to wear the ankle brace but
the doctors were very pleased
with how she is doing.
We thank God for all his
many blessings. May He help
us to remember to always
turn to Him when we feel bur-
dened with lifes problems.
He can make our load so
much more easier to carry.
Today is laundry day
again. We usually do laun-
dry 2-3 times a week. The
boys cleaned out the chicken
coop on Saturday. So now we
have some extra smelly coats
and pants to wash. When the
eggs start coming into the
house dirty, we know it is
time to remind the boys that
the chicken coop and nests
need to be cleaned again. Our
chickens have slowed down
in laying eggs since the cold
weather began.
I must get busy now and
hope all of you readers stay
healthy over these holidays.
Saturday morning our ther-
mometer showed 11 degrees.
Brrr. Today the temperature
is in the low 20s.
Here is a good peanut but-
ter fudge recipe for the holi-
days.
HOMEMADE PEANUT
BUTTER FUDGE
2 cups sugar
2/3 cup milk
1 cup chunky peanut but-
ter
1 teaspoon vanilla
1 6 ounce package choco-
late chips
1/2 of one pint jar marsh-
mallow crme
Butter a 2-quart saucepan.
Combine sugar and milk in
the saucepan and beat and
stir over medium heat until
mixture comes to a boil.
Cook to 235 degrees (use a
candy thermometer to mea-
sure temperature). Remove
from heat and add remaining
ingredients stirring until well-
blended. Pour into a buttered
9 X 9 X 2 pan. Cool and cut
when firm.
KICKSTARTER NOTE:
Thanks to the readers who
pledged to the Kickstarter
campaign and while we did
fall short of the goal, we got
33 percent of the way there.
The rest hopefully can made
up with strong sales of the
following:
THE AMISH RECIPE
PROJECT, VOL 1: This is
a brand new book, part cook-
book, part culinary anthro-
pology by the Amish Cooks
editor. Containing over 200
recipes from Amish and
Mennonite settlements across
the USA, this book offers a
culinary glimpse into chang-
ing plain culture and is an
attempt to catalogue and pre-
serve traditional Amish cook-
ing. To purchase the cook-
book and try some of the
recipes as part of the project,
call 1-800-224-3032 or visit
www.oasisnewsfeatures.com/
special. Cost is $14.99 plus
shipping. Order by Dec. 21 to
have by Christmas. Recipes
from the book include chap-
ters for brownies, bars, cakes,
cookies, entrees, salads, and
soups.
6 The Herald Wednesday, December 14, 2011
SPORTS
www.delphosherald.com
By CHARLIE
WARNIMONT
Delphos Herald Correspondent
OTTOVILLE Ottoville
and Bath went toe-to-toe
Tuesday night as two of the
areas top girls basketball pro-
grams squared off at the L.W.
Heckman Gymnasium.
In the end, the Big Green
turned to their
defense to defeat the
Wildkittens 63-54 in
non-league action.
The Big Green
moved to 6-0 on the
season with the win.
In a game that
was back and forth
all night, Bath threat-
ened to take control
with 5:35 left as they
went on a 5-0 run to
go up by four points at 53-49.
After an Ottoville timeout, the
Big Green turned the tables on
the Wildkittens as they scored
10 straight points to take a
commanding 59-53 lead with
54.7 seconds left.
We just tried to settle them
down, Ottoville coach Dave
Kleman said of the timeout.
We wanted to run a few plays
and get the ball where we
needed to. We knew it was
going to come down to a free-
throw shooting contest and we
did a good job hitting 24-of-29
(82.8%) for the game. They
were 18-of-21 (85.7%), so
thats some real good free-
throw shooting. I dont think
we settled down the whole
game but give them credit;
they are so quick and do such
a nice job at the guard position
as they have some length. But
we gave them some problems,
too.
Junior Rachel Beining
opened the run with an inside
basket before junior Abby
Siefker tied the game with a
layup. After a Bath turnover,
senior Lauren Kramer gave the
Big Green the lead for good
with two free throws. The key
play of the final quarter hap-
pened with 1:39 left after a
Bath timeout. On the inbounds
play, senior Lauren Koch stole
the ball from a Bath guard and
drove to the hoop for a basket.
Koch followed up the layup
40 seconds later with two free
throws after a Bath miss.
They were in a hurry once
we took the lead; they didnt
get anything to fall for them,
Kleman said. I thought Lauren
Kochs steal on that inbounds
pass and layup was so big, a
big-time play by a senior that
you expect from your seniors,
then she steps up and hits two
free throws. Kramer has four
points but she handles the ball
so well and makes two big free
throws at the end.
Katie Dackin scored the
Wildkittens only point in the
final five minutes as she hit
the first of two free throws.
Ottoville responded by hitting
4-of-6 free throws to seal the
win.
We had some untimely
possessions where we just
didnt handle things the way
we should have, Bath coach
Greg Mauk said. I give them
a lot of credit; we looked at
their shot chart in the locker
room and they took five shots
outside the paint. You get that
many shots around the basket
or at the rim, you are probably
going to win the game. Thats
what happened tonight.
The inside game was key for
the Big Green, especially in the
third quarter after Siefker went
to the bench three minutes into
the quarter with her third foul.
Despite her absence, Ottoville
actually was able to extend its
lead by two points before Bath
rallied to take a 1-point lead to
the final quarter.
When Siefker went out, the
Big Green was leading 36-33
after a 3-point play by
Megan Bendele. Bath
came back to take a
39-38 lead on a basket
by Jess Johns before
Ottoville went on a
6-0 run as Bendele
had two baskets, while
Koch and Beining both
scored.
I didnt know how
long I could ride that
third quarter when
Abby picked up her third foul,
Kleman said. They were key-
ing on Abby and Megan was
finding open spots and our
guards were finding her and
giving her opportunities to
score. Thats really big for us
because if Megan can keep
scoring like that and she
has thats going to free
things up for Abby more.
Bath rallied late in the quar-
ter as Dackin hit a 3-point-
er, pulling Bath within one,
before Taylor Dackin put the
Wildkittens up one with a
layup.
The first half was back and
forth as neither team could
pull away.
Behind their pressure, Bath
took a 10-5 lead as Kaitlin
Singhaus hit a 3-pointer and
Emily Ruhe had a basket. The
Big Green came right back as
Siefker had two baskets and
Beining one as the Big Green
went up 11-10. Four points by
Baths Singhaus and two free
throws by Nicole Vorst had
Bath leading 14-13 after eight
minutes.
The second quarter saw
each team go on a run to give
itself some breathing room.
With the game tied 16-16,
Ottoville scored six straight
points as Beining, Siefker and
Tonya Kaufman all scored. The
Big Greens defense helped
them get the lead as they start-
ed to force turnovers with their
defensive pressure. After a
Bath timeout, the Wildkittens
responded with eight straight
points as Katie Dackin had
three points, Ruhe a basket and
Taylor Dackin had three free
throws after being fouled on a
3-pointer. The two teams trad-
ed points the rest of the half as
they went into the locker room
tied 31-31.
All nine of the Big Greens
points in the final 3:12 came
at the line as they were 9-of-
10 at the charity stripe. Bath
was 11-of-13 at the line in the
opening half.
Siefker led the Big Green
with 18 points and Bendele
had 15 points. Ottoville visits
Miller City 6 p.m. Thursday.
Taylor Dackin led Bath with
11 points and Johns had 10.
Singhaus finished with nine
and Ruhe had eight points.
* * *
Bath 17-2-18/21-54: Johns 4-2-
10; Brandon 1-0-2; Hollar 0-0-0; K.
Dackin 2-2-7; Clark 2-3-7; Ruhe 3-2-8;
T. Dackin 3-5-11; Singhaus 2-4-9.
Ottoville 18-1-24/29-63: Turnwald
0-0-0; Bendele 5-5-15; Koch 2-2-6;
Vorst 0-4-4; Kaufman 1-5-7; Kramer
1-2-4; Beining 4-1-9; Siefker 6-5-18.
Score by Quarters:
Bath 14 17 15 8 - 54
Ottoville 13 18 14 18 - 63
Three-point goals: Bath 2 (K.
Dackin, Singhaus); Ottoville 1
(Siefker).
Lady Green stays perfect,
downs Wildkittens 63-54
Bendele
A quick shoot to the legs and a lift by Jefferson senior
Curtis Miller and Spencervilles Lucas Krouskop is on his
back in Tuesday nights 220-pound match at Jefferson
High School. The host Wildcats beat the Bearcats 42-18
but fell to Cory-Rawson 42-39, while the Hornets bested
the Bearcats 52-21.
Tom Morris photo
By JIM METCALFE
jmetcalfe@delphosherald.com
DELPHOS There are
still many unknowns regard-
ing many of the areas wres-
tling units.
From the pre-season Alpha
test to injuries to lack of num-
bers, teams like Jefferson
and Spencerville are working
through matters in the early
going.
That is why both head
coaches are taking Tuesdays
tri-meet (along with Cory-
Rawson) in stride.
The Hornets took advan-
tage of better numbers over
both teams to edge the host
Wildcats 42-39 and bash the
Bearcats 52-21.
Jefferson whipped their
back-yard rivals to the south
42-18.
The Wildcats had to void
five weight classes in both
matches, while the Bearcats
did so for seven of the 14
weight classes.
First-year head coach Mike
Wilson saw what he need-
ed to see from his Wildcats
after a fourth-place finish
at Saturdays Lincolnview
Invitational.
We competed a lot bet-
ter today. We never stopped
competing; we fought, wheth-
er we were up, down, losing,
winning, in whatever situa-
tion we found ourselves in
on the mat, he explained.
We do have some holes in
our lineup because we have
a number of wrestlers going
in the same category. For
example, I have three solid
heavyweights, which makes
me confident that whom-
ever we put out there will
do a great job. However, we
voided 106, 120, 126, 132
and 170. Tanner (Vermule)
will go 132 when he gets
back from injury. I just need
some others to move down
in weight in other classes to
have a more complete lineup.
That cost us the match against
Cory-Rawson.
At the same time, Wilson
acknowledges that he still has
a lot of unknowns.
I know what Curtis
(Miller) will bring to the table
but for most of my guys, I
am still trying to figure it out,
what I have and what they
can do. I found out a little bit
more today and well find out
even more Saturday at Allen
County, he added.
For Spencerville head man
Tom Wegesin, his issues are
lack of overall numbers.
Its awful hard when you
can only fill seven classes.
Were stacked up in those
weights and because of the
Alpha test, were locked in,
he said. Im not sure if other
coaches have slid their guys
up or down yet and if some of
our kids will be able to even-
tually. We just dont have the
kids out to fill up the other
weight classes, especially at
the lower weights.
With that in mind, Wegesin
has a specific objective in
mind.
Half of the lineup is fresh-
men. I want to see them gain
mat savvy each time out, he
added. We have things we
work on constantly and I want
to see how they apply them to
the matches. Some did today
and some didnt. Well see
these teams a couple of times
down the road; well go over
our mistakes and what we did
well today and when we face
them again, well see how
much weve improved.
He will get his chance in a
couple of days as Jefferson and
Spencerville are in Saturdays
Allen County Invitational at
St. Johns. Wrestling starts at
10 a.m.
JEFFERSON 42, SPENCERVILLE 18
106: Double void.
113: Gaige Rassman (DJ), void.
120: Double void.
126: Trevor Bockey (SV), void.
132: Double void.
138: Cole Bellows (SV) pin Austin
Lee, 3:37.6.
145: Aaron Parkins (DJ) pin Jimmy
Lunz, 2:25.
152: Reid Corzine (DJ), void.
160: Darren Edinger (DJ), void.
170: Double void.
182: Tyler Shumate (SV) pin Tyler
Foust, 4:57.
195: Colin McConnahea (DJ) pin Tyler
Dues, :59.
220: Curtis Miller (DJ) pin Lucas
Krouskop, 1:14.4.
285: Quentin Wessell (DJ) pin Logan
Vandemark, 2:22.
JV:
138: Cory Binkley (SV) pin Devin Van
Dyke, 1:45.5.
182: Jacob Yahl (SV) pin Dustin
McConnahea, 2:33
182: Jake Bellows (SV) pin Dustin
McConnahea.
285: Decoda Bellman (DJ) pin Chris
Adams, 2:23
285: Geoff Ketcham (DJ) pin Chris
Adams, 1:30.1.
CORY-RAWSON 42, JEFFERSON 39
106: Devin Meyer (CR), void.
113: Gaige Rassman (DJ), void.
120: Logan Osburn (CR), void.
126: Austin Swisher (CR), void.
132: Austin Brown (CR), void.
138: Austin Lee (DJ), void.
145: Dylan Hartman (CR) pin Aaron
Parkins, 3:12.1.
152: Justin Simpson (CR) pin Reid
Corzine, :30.
160: Darren Edinger (DJ) dec. Austin
Heath 18-17.
170: Trevor Miller (CR), void.
182: Tyler Foust (DJ), void.
195: Colin McConnahea (DJ) pin
Chase Oler, 1:08.6.
220: Curtis Miller (DJ) pin Nathan
Davis, 1:42.9.
285: Quentin Wessell (DJ) pin Mitch
Karhoff, 1:22.1.
JV:
285: Decoda Bellman (DJ) pin Dacoda
Gibson, 1:10.4.
CORY-RAWSON 52 SPENCERVILLE 21
106: Meyer (CR), void.
113: Double void.
120: Orburn (CR), void.
126: Swisher (CR) ma. dec. Trevor
Bockey 11-2.
132: Brown (CR), void.
138: Cole Bellows (SV), void.
145: Hartman (CR) pin Jimmy Lunz,
1:53.8.
152: Simpson (CR), void.
160: Heath (CR), void.
170: T. Miller (CR), void.
182: Tyler Shumate (SV), void.
195: Tyler Dues (SV) pin Oler, 2:42.
220: Lucas Krouskop (SV) dec. Davis
16-13.
285: Karhoff (CR) pin Logan
Vandemark, 1:41.3.
Wildcats split wrestling tri-match
By AUSTIN CLARKSON
The Delphos Herald
austinclarkson_24@
hotmail.com
FORT JENNINGS The
Fort Jennings Musketeers girls
basketball team played host to
Putnam County League foe
Leipsic Tuesday
night at The Fort.
The Lady
Musketeers made
a great run at the
end of the second
quarter to go into
the locker room
only trailing by six
points. However, the
Vikings took control
in the third quarter
of play to extend the
lead for good and took down
their conference foe by a final
score of 58-48.
There was no lack of scor-
ing in the contest Tuesday
night as both teams traded
baskets back and forth early
in the first quarter of play.
However, both had their
troubles of keeping the ball
in their possession, with 22
turnovers committed in the
first half alone, split down
the middle. Macy Schroeder
led the home team with nine
points in the first half, most of
them coming down the stretch
of the half as the Musketeers
made a great comeback to get
right back into the swing of
things and take the momen-
tum at halftime.
Jennings head coach Matt
Myerholtz thought that his
girls played with a lot of effort
and was proud of the way
they played overall:
We showed a lot of
improvement tonight,
especially on
the offensive
side of things
as weve been
struggling to
put the ball
in the hole.
Tonight, we
did a great
job of putting
points on the board.
The Lady Vikes
came out in the sec-
ond half and instantly
grabbed the momentum back
from the home team and went
on a 8-2 run out of the gate,
pushing the lead to 12 points
and putting pressure on the
Musketeers to answer. The
home team was up to the
challenge as they played their
hearts out to the last second of
the contest.
Kelsey Von Lehmden had
a great game in the post as she
showed her presence grabbing
boards and showing her skills
on the perimeter shooting
the ball. She ended up with
10 points on the night, while
teammate Morgan Schroeder
also added 10 points.
However, their efforts
were a little short on the night
as the Vikings had too much
talent to handle. Emily and
Haley Gerten combined for
29 of the 58 points for the vis-
itors and helped their
team pull through at
the end for the vic-
tory.
The Musketeers
showed a lot of prom-
ise overall in the con-
test as they proved
they could score
when they want and
have several differ-
ent options at doing
so. Their defensive
pressure constantly
caused Leipsic to have trouble
handling the ball and forced a
lot of turnovers up and down
the court. Despite their best
efforts, the Musketeers fall to
1-4 on the young season and
will be back into action this
Saturday when they travel to
Gods country to take on
the Kalida Wildcats in anoth-
er PCL showdown (1 p.m.
JV tip).
Our kids showed a lot
heart tonight not giving
up and playing all the way
through until the last second.
Im very excited to see where
this will lead us if we can
keep up this kind of play,
Myerholtz added.
Leipsic (58)
M. Steffan 0-0-0, Kreinbrink 0-0-0,
Ellerbrock 0-0-0, Scheckelhoff 0-0-0,
R. Rieman 4-2-10, C. Henry 0-1-1, A.
Gerdeman 3-1-7, Kelly Nadler 3-5-11,
E. Gerten 4-3-12, H. Gerten 7-1-17,
A. Schroeder 0-0-0, Kendra Gerten
0-0-0. Totals 18-3-13/22-58.
Fort Jennings (48)
Kaitlin Stechschulte 3-0-6, Kristen
Maag 0-0-0, Morgan Schroeder 4-0-
10, Macy Schroeder 4-0-9, Kelsey
Von Lehmden 4-2-10, Ashley Gable
0-0-0, Cassie Lindeman 3-0-6, Gabbi
German 3-1-7, Gina Stechschulte 0-0-
0. Totals 18-3-3/12-48.
Score By Quarters:
Leipsic 22 12 11 13 58
Ft. Jennings 15 13 5 15 48
Three-point goals: Leipsic, H.
Gerten 2, E, Gerten; Fort Jennings,
Morgan Schroeder 2, Macy
Schroeder.
----
JUNIOR VARSITY
Leipsic (35)
H. Kreinbrink 0-0-0, A. Whaley 2-3-
9, S. Morman 2-2-6, M. Steffan 2-4-
8, N. Kreinbrink 2-1-5, Scheckelhoff
1-0-2, Niese 1-0-2, Schroeder 1-1-3.
Totals 11-11-35.
Fort Jennings (18)
M. Metcalfe 0-0-0, N. Ricker 0-0-
0, K. Eickholt 0-0-0, Schimmoeller
0-0-0, H. Clay 1-0-2, M. Good 0-0-
0, E. Osting 2-0-6, Clippinger 2-2-6,
E. Kehres 1-0-2, J. Calvelage 1-0-2.
Totals 7-2-18.
Score By Quarters:
Leipsic 19 6 8 2 35
Ft. Jennings 0 4 5 9 18
Three-point goals: Leipsic, Whaley
2; Fort Jennings, Osting 2.
Jennings comes up short to Lady Vikes
VonLehmden
Morgan
Schroeder
Ricker leads Grove
past Patriots
COLUMBUS GROVE
Senior Anna Ricker poured in 20
points to pace hot-shooting host
Columbus Grove to a 49-47 non-
league girls hardwood victory over
invading Patrick Henry Tuesday
night.
The Lady Bulldogs used a
20-13 edge in the third period to
grab the victory.
Brooke Brubaker canned three
treys in adding 11 markers and
Sydney McCluer knocked down two
bombs in tacking on 10 counters.
Grove (2-2) connected on
16-of-28 shots (6-of-13 triples) for
a stellar 67 percent and 11-of-12
at the stripe (92%). They won the
battle off the glass 30-25 and had
12 miscues to 10 for the Lady
Patriots (3-2).
Patrick Henry downed 16-of-
51 attempts (1-of-5 treys) for
33 percent and 18-of-32 singles
(56%). Michaelis and Tietje netted
11 points each.
Grove hosts LCC Thursday.
PATRICK HENRY (47)
K. Bostleman 2-0-4, Meyer 1-5-7,
Michaelis 5-1-11, Hammer 1-3-6, Tietje 1-9-
11, Bower 4-0-8. Totals 13-1-18/32-47.
COLUMBUS GROVE (49)
Anna Ricker 5-9-19, Brooke Brubaker
4-0-11, Cece Utendorf 0-0-0, Nikki
Stechschulte 2-0-4, Renee Karhoff 1-0-2,
Breanne Halker 0-0-0, Sydney McCluer
3-2-10, Megan Verhoff 0-0-0, Katelyn
Scott 1-0-2, Rachel Schumacher 0-0-0,
Tessa Diller 0-0-0. Totals 10-6-11/12-49.
Score by Quarters:
Patrick Henry 10 10 13 14 - 47
Col. Grove 11 6 20 12 - 49
Three-point goals: Patrick Henry,
Hammer; Columbus Grove, Brubaker 3,
McCluer, Ricker.
JV: 32-29 OT (Columbus Grove).
----
(LATE MONDAY)
Grove matmen whomp Titans
OTTAWA Early-season
injuries have left the lower weight
classes for Ottawa-Glandorfs
wrestling team empty.
Columbus Grove took advan-
tage of the openings to build a
quick lead on the Titans Monday
night. The voids, along with a
strong showing by the Bulldogs in
the middle weight classes, allowed
Grove to defeat O-G 49-18.
The win allowed the Bulldogs
(4-2) to keep the Putnam County
traveling trophy, which is in its
second year of existence. O-G
dropped to 2-5 on the season.
Columbus Grove picked up 24
quick points Monday evening as
Tregg Keysor (106), Brett Sampson
(120), Christian Stechschulte (126)
and Jonah Shank (138) all won by
forfeit. That gave the Bulldogs a
24-0 lead before the two teams
squared off on the mats.
With a big lead after the voids,
the Bulldogs went to work on the
mats winning four straight matches,
three by decision. The Bulldogs
final points came at 195 pounds as
Gavin Windau recorded a pin.
Dylan Kleman gave the
Bulldogs their first contested win
as he pinned the Titans Jacob
Siebeneck in 1:34. At 195 pounds,
Windau pinned O-Gs Max Inniger
in 1:01. Ironically the wins were
the 89th for each wrestler.
At 152 pounds, the Bulldogs
Hunter Giesige defeated O-Gs
Ralph Recker in a decision, while
Alec Gladwell, 160 pounds, posted
a close 9-6 win over the Titans
Wayne Erford as the two grap-
plers battled back and forth before
Gladwell was able to finish the win
with a near fall. At 190 pounds,
Bulldogs Brandon Benroth had a
major decision 17-6 win over the
Titans Derek Ebbeskotte.
Ottawa-Glandorfs first win
came at 182 pounds as Jacob Wells
pinned the Bulldogs Marty Stever
20 seconds into the second period.
Wyatt Karhoff (220) won by forfeit
before O-Gs Jacob Otto beat the
buzzer to pin the Bulldogs Alex
Shaffer at 5:59 mark of their match.
Kalida boys punish Rockets
By DAVE BONINSEGNA
The Delphos Herald
zsportslive@yahoo.com

PANDORA The
Kalida Wildcats wasted no
time in jumping out to a big
lead in Tuesdays Putnam
County League
boys cage matchup
with the Pandora-
Gilboa Rockets at
the Launching Pad in
Pandora.
The Cats scored
12 of the first 14 points and
never trailed as they pum-
meled the Rockets 51-29.
Wildcats had two scor-
ers in double digits as Ben
Schroeder tallied 14 points
and Drew Stechschulte added
12.
The Kalida defense was
pretty solid as well as the
Rocket offense connected
for just 11 shots from the
field. Nathan Schutz con-
tributed the bulk of the scor-
ing for the hosts, knocking
in 12.
The guests led from the
get-go as Schroeder scored
the first eight points for the
Wildcats. Paul Utendorf (7
points) made it an 11-2 con-
test with 1:35 left in the first
quarter, draining two from
the foul line. Eventually, the
visitors took a 15-4
lead at the first stop.
The Rockets for-
tunes would not get
much better in the
second quarter as P-G
would hit just three
from the field, with the last
coming on a Schultz bank
shot with 46 seconds left
before the half to make it a
23-10 score.
In the second half of
action, Stechschulte picked
up where Schroeder left off.
The Rockets were able to
hold the first-half leading
scorer to just four points
in the second half but
werent as fortunate with
Stechschulte. The senior
rang up 10 of his 12 points
in the final two periods to
help the Wildcats in outscor-
ing their hosts 28-19.
Tyler Kortokrax was
4-of-4 from the line in
the fourth, while Austin
Horstman drained 4-of-6
attempts from the charity
stripe.
The Rockets had just six
attempts from the line all
night, connecting on three.
Kalida is back in action
Saturday at Jefferson.
In the junior varsity con-
test, Rockets went on a 10-0
run in the third period and
held on for a 25-20 victory.
Kalida (51)
Paul Utendorf 3-1-7, Kevan
Unverferth 0-2-2, Tyler Kortokrax 1-4-
6, Drew Stechschulte 6-0-12, Ben
Schroeder 7-0-14, Rich Langhals
1-0-2, Austin Horstman 2-4-8. Totals
20-11-51.
P-G (29)
Nathan Schutz 5-1-12, Eric
Fenstermaker 1-1-3, Abe Basinger
1-0-3, Josh Breece 3-0-6, Jared
Tousley 0-1-1, Owen Luginbihl 1-2-
4. Totals 11-5-29.
Score by Quarters:
Kalida 15 8 8 20 - 51
Pan.-G 4 6 10 9 - 29
Three-point goals: Kalida, none;
Pandora-Gilboa, Schutz, Basinger.
JV score: 25-20 (Pandora-
Gilboa).
LOCAL ROUNDUP
1
FREE
basic computer training for adults
Call 855-NOW-I-CAN (669-4226)
for local class information
Feel comfortable using a computer and
learn how to browse the Internet
Classes are FREE and forming
NOW at your local library or
community college.
EASYBATHINC.COM
Toll Free 1-866-425-5591
NEW WALK-IN
TUB OR SHOWER
LOCAL COMPANY
ONE DAY INSTALL
CLEARANCE SALE!
CALL FOR PRICES
TROUBLE BATHING?
|J|| |1|1m11J 11||1| |11 11||11|J
- WiIdIights at the CoIumbus 7oo
- Lifesize nativity exhibit at State Auto Ins.
- Iirst Night CoIumbus New Year's ve
- Nine more sights to see before Dec. 31
Request our HoIiday Guide and the CentraI Ohio
Shopping Guide by maiI or view onIine.
1""s11"1"s
www.visitgrovecityoh.com
ackages start at just $99 and |nc|ude:
lRLL kius tickets to vilulights at the ColumEus 2oo
lRLL kius meals at 6 DuElin restaurants
Discounteu rates at 6 DuElin Hotels
ook on||ne NOw at
www.Ir|sb|sanAtt|tude.com
800J245-8387
kids Go fRLL!
COLUMUS ZOO wILDLIGH!S GL!AwAY

Hurry!
Offer exp|res
12.31.11
Wildlights Getaway-11.17_Layout 1 11/17/11 11:09 AM Page 1
WEBB
INSURANCE
AGENCY, INC.
)0.&t"650t#64*/&44t-*'&t)&"-5)
1-800-727-1113
212 W. High - Lima, 419-228-3211
138 N. Main - Bluffton, 419-358-4015
www.delphosherald.com
Wednesday, December 14, 2011 The Herald 7
BUSINESS
Top officials from the Ford Motor Company in Detroit were at Raabe Ford Lincoln in
Delphos Thursday to honor Larry Smith for his 50 years working for Raabe Ford Lincoln
and Ford Motor Company. Smith is an ASE Master Technician in the service depart-
ment. From left are Marcia Ussack, sales representative for Ford; Barry Parker, zoned
fixed operations manager for Ford; Shane Nelson, parts and service operations manager
for Ford; Ron Nott, owner of Raabe Ford Lincoln; Smith; Randy Custer, general man-
ager at Raabe Ford Lincoln; and Joe Nott, manager at Raabe Ford.
Smith honored for 50 years at Raabe Ford Lincoln
Staff photo
DEAR BRUCE: I am
currently leasing a car under
a 36-month term, which will
end in 14 months. I enjoy
the ride and would consider
purchasing it sooner than
at the leases end. The
manufacturer currently
has a 0.9 percent financing
program, and I prefer that
the next 14 car payments go
toward the purchase instead
of the lease. Do you know
whether dealers allow this
to happen? Is this a wise
thing to do? Would I have
any negotiation room in
such a scenario? -- M.G., via
email
DEAR M.G.: There
is no easy, one-size-fits-
all answer. If the car has
seriously depreciated, the
leasing company is far more
likely to want to enter into a
negotiation for its purchase.
If, on the other hand, the
car has held its value and
you have cared for it well,
its very possible the leasing
company would prefer to
continue the lease rather than
negotiate a purchase.
You say you prefer the
next car payments to go
toward the car purchase
rather than the lease. That
requires some simple but
important math. After you
work the numbers, it may
prove less expensive for you
to continue the lease terms
and then negotiate a price at
the end of the lease. Or the
numbers may show it would
be to your advantage to try
and negotiate a purchase.
Of course, whether they
will be agreeable to financing
is yet another matter. You
will never know whether
you have negotiating room
until you try. If it doesnt
come out the way you
would like it to, the fact that
you negotiated in no way
obligates you or the leasing
company to enter into a new
agreement.
Distributed by Universal
UClick for UFS
Copyright 2011, United
Feature Syndicate
Revved up to buy leased car
BRUCE WILLIAMS
Smart
Money
Staff reports
VAN WERT Times
Bulletin Media announced
Kirk Dougal has been named
the publisher of the newspa-
per, online and periodicals
publishing company. Dougal
succeeds Stephen C. Johnson,
who joined the company as
group publisher in December
of 2010.
Johnson accepted the posi-
tion at Times Bulletin Media
to facilitate the transition of
the company after its pur-
chase last year by Delphos
Herald, Inc.
Over the past year, this
has been accomplished with
the help of all associates,
said Johnson. With this task
completed, we believed it
was important to have a pub-
lisher who lives in the Van
Wert community
and a daily news-
paper deserves
a leader who is
connected to and
lives in the com-
munity. At my
recommendation
and with the full
support of DHI,
Kirk Dougal
is that person.
Please join me
in congratulating
Kirk and his team
as they strive to
serve the commu-
nity through Times Bulletin
Media.
Before joining DHI,
Johnson was president and
CEO of stepjohn.inc. Media
Consulting. He formerly
served as pub-
lisher of The
Lima News from
2002-08 and
before that was
the director of
national sales for
USA TODAY
when it launched
its first 20 mar-
kets. In 1989,
Johnson began
serving the Los
Angeles Times
as its circulation-
marketing execu-
tive. He joined
Thomson Newspapers in
January 1995 as vice pres-
ident of circulation for its
North American operations,
which included 143 newspa-
per properties in the United
States and Canada.
Dougal most recent-
ly served as the editor-in-
chief of The Times Bulletin,
accepting that position in
January of 2008. He previ-
ously served as the business
manager for the company
and was the general man-
ager of the Ada Herald. He
joined the Bulletin in March
of 2005. He earned his bach-
elors degree at Huntington
University and is a graduate
of Lincolnview High School.
He is married to Anessia and
the couple have four chil-
dren: Breann, 13, Morgan,
13, Kegan, 9 and Lauren, 8.
With his acceptance of
the new position, Dougal and
DHI have named Ed Gebert
as the new editor for Times
Bulletin Media. Dougal said
he was happy to fill the posi-
tion with someone who is
very familiar with Van Wert
and its news.
Ed has been a fixture on
the news scene and in the
Van Wert community for
several years, said Dougal.
As we continue to move
forward with our online and
niche products, as well as
with The Times Bulletin, Ed
has shown the integrity and
impartiality needed to be that
leader in the newsroom.
Gebert joined Times
Bulletin Media in April of
2006. He holds a bachelor
of science from Ball State
University and a master of
Christian Ministries from
Huntington University. He
has three children, Devin, 19,
Noah, 17, and Aubrey, 10.
I am looking forward to
the challenge of maintaining
the high standards of The
Times Bulletin and keep-
ing the community informed
through both the print edi-
tion and timesbulletin.com,
Gebert said.
Delphos Herald, Inc.,
owns and operates 14 news-
paper markets in seven states.
In addition to The Times
Bulletin, DHI regionally owns
The Delphos Daily Herald,
the Paulding Progress, the
Putnam County Sentinel, the
Columbus Grove Vidette, the
Ada Herald and the Mercer
County Chronicle.
Johnson steps down as publisher of Times Bulletin
Stephen C. Johnson

Description Last Price Change
DJINDUAVERAGE 11,954.94 -66.45
NAS/NMS COMPSITE 2,579.27 -32.99
S&P 500 INDEX 1,225.73 -10.74
AUTOZONE INC. 326.10 -4.79
BUNGE LTD 58.67 -2.31
EATON CORP. 43.13 -0.28
BP PLC ADR 41.63 -0.20
DOMINION RES INC 50.48 +0.17
AMERICAN ELEC. PWR INC 39.46 +0.14
CVS CAREMARK CRP 37.69 -0.46
CITIGROUP INC 26.90 -0.32
FIRST DEFIANCE 13.48 -0.26
FST FIN BNCP 15.80 -0.37
FORD MOTOR CO 10.48 -0.37
GENERAL DYNAMICS 63.50 -0.51
GENERAL MOTORS 20.11 -0.69
GOODYEAR TIRE 13.42 -0.87
HEALTHCARE REIT 50.36 -0.05
HOME DEPOT INC. 39.51 -0.54
HONDA MOTOR CO 30.20 -0.99
HUNTGTN BKSHR 5.05 -0.09
JOHNSON&JOHNSON 63.36 -0.15
JPMORGAN CHASE 31.29 -0.75
KOHLS CORP. 50.36 -0.97
LOWES COMPANIES 24.18 -0.51
MCDONALDS CORP. 98.00 -0.48
MICROSOFT CP 25.76 +0.25
PEPSICO INC. 64.28 -0.38
PROCTER & GAMBLE 64.73 +0.42
RITE AID CORP. 1.20 -0.03
SPRINT NEXTEL 2.39 +0.02
TIME WARNER INC. 33.83 -0.41
US BANCORP 25.74 -0.30
UTD BANKSHARES 7.05 +0.05
VERIZON COMMS 38.26 0.09
WAL-MART STORES 57.60 -0.49
STOCKS
Quotes of local interest supplied by
EDWARD JONES INVESTMENTS
Close of business Dec. 13, 2011
By BRIAN MAHONEY
The Associated Press
The lockout ended and the
NBAs woes were just begin-
ning.
Dwight Howard asked to
be traded. Chris Paul was
dealt to the Lakers, it seemed,
until the league decided he
wasnt. So the Lakers made
another trade, which Kobe
Bryant hated.
Nobodys happy, Spurs
forward Tim Duncan said.
He was referring to feel-
ings about terms of the new
collective bargaining agree-
ment, which in some ways
are so similar to the old ones
that its fair to wonder exactly
what was the point of the
5-month lockout.
But he might as well
have been talking about the
superstars who want new
homes, the critics blistering
Commissioner David Stern
for forcing one to stay put, or
team officials charged with
having clubs ready to play
by Christmas under bizarre
circumstances.
Its just too bad; it really
is. Its not reflective right now
of the great product we had,
you know? former coach
and ABC/ESPN analyst Jeff
Van Gundy said. Its one
thing to have a summer and
fall of strife due to labor
negotiations. Its another to
be seen as an organization
thats in disarray once you
settle that.
Van Gundy blames money,
the natural place to start.
Owners will save plenty by
getting players to agree to a
12-percent reduction in salary
costs in the new deal. But in
doing so in time to salvage a
substantial season, they con-
ceded on many issues that
were necessary to create the
competitive balance they said
they craved.
So Paul and Howard are
trying to force their way from
small markets to big, just as
Carmelo Anthony did last
year, and theres no guar-
anteed mechanism to stop
them.
Just like the regular fan
out there, just like you guys,
you do wonder why stuff hap-
pened. You look at it and say,
Why did the lockout hap-
pen? Miami guard Dwyane
Wade said. I dont see it
helping right now. Maybe in a
few years well all look back
and see why this lockout hap-
pened. But right now its not
showing its face at all. ... The
competitive balance thing was
a pie-in-the-sky. We knew that
was impossible, in a sense,
especially when youve got
players willing to take less
money to be happy.
Thats what Wade, LeBron
James and Chris Bosh did
so they could team up last
summer. Owners could have
attempted to block future
superteam-building with a
hard salary cap or franchise
tag designations that exist
in the NFL but the players
fought those changes in an
effort to keep a system that
looked like the old one, giving
teams the ability to exceed the
cap by quite a bit if they were
willing to pay a luxury tax.
The tentative deal on the
main issues wasnt reached
until Nov. 26 and Stern said
the regular season would
begin on Christmas if the deal
was ratified in time. But it
meant free agency opened the
same day as training camps,
forcing some teams to report
with barely enough players
for a starting five while their
transactions awaited approval
by the league office.
Its an arbitrary date to
have to start on Christmas.
Theres no magical starting
time., Van Gundy said. Just
push it back. Let them have a
normal free-agent period of
a week, 10 days, then have
two to three weeks of train-
ing camp with a few exhibi-
tion games. Let them do what
they should do and then start
whenever that date is.
Still, fans would have for-
gotten about it easier with
a smoother start to the sea-
son. Instead, the news and
fallout from the NBA office,
as current owners of the
Hornets, killing the Paul trade
came the same night Stern
announced the new CBA
had been ratified. Then came
word that Howard had asked
the Orlando Magic to trade
him, in part because the team
hadnt acted on his personnel
recommendations though
he said Monday he could be
open to staying if the Magic
made the right moves.
At the same time, the Paul
and Howard situations have
created a tremendous amount
of interest.
The NFL settled its lock-
out early enough that its entire
schedule remained intact
minus one preseason game.
The NBA is giving teams only
16 days and two exhibition
games from the time business
reopened until the season tips
off with a whole new set of
rules to learn in between.
The NBA is shooting
from the hip. We didnt get
rules on the collective bar-
gaining our ability to sign
and trade players we didnt
get it until the day before we
opened up camp and we had
a conference call at 8 a.m. the
day of camp opening explain-
ing the rules, Lakers general
manager Mitch Kupchak said,
shaking his head. When you
have a season thats delayed
and starts on Dec. 1 and you
have a week to do your busi-
ness, then training camp starts
a week later, half the guys in
the NBA still arent signed,
its just a very unusual cir-
cumstance. Its unfortunate
that the players have to go
through it but theres a lot of
guys out there right now.
Kupchak went on to trade
Lamar Odom, to Bryants
disappointment, to the
Mavericks after the Hornets
deal fell through. But by the
time Odom took the floor in
Dallas, it left only 12 days
before the defending champi-
ons are scheduled to host the
Heat in a finals rematch.
Stern hasnt commented
since a statement last Friday
explaining his reasons for
vetoing the trade, without
influence from other owners.
Hell be at the game in Dallas,
as well as Oklahoma Citys
opener later that night.
Maybe by then things will
feel back to normal.
They sure arent now.
Rush for Christmas start leaves NBA in disarray
8 The Herald Wednesday, December 14, 2011 www.delphosherald.com
HERALD DELPHOS
THE
Telling The Tri-Countys Story Since 1869
Classifieds
Deadlines:
11:30 a.m. for the next days issue.
Saturdays paper is 11:00 a.m. Friday
Mondays paper is 1:00 p.m. Friday
Herald Extra is 11 a.m. Thursday
Minimum Charge: 15 words,
2 times - $9.00
Each word is $.30 2-5 days
$.25 6-9 days
$.20 10+ days
Each word is $.10 for 3 months
or more prepaid
THANKS TO ST. JUDE: Runs 1 day at the
price of $3.00.
GARAGE SALES: Each day is $.20 per
word. $8.00 minimum charge.
I WILL NOT BE RESPONSIBLE FOR
DEBTS: Ad must be placed in person by
the person whose name will appear in the ad.
Must show ID & pay when placing ad. Regu-
lar rates apply
FREE ADS: 5 days free if item is free
or less than $50. Only 1 item per ad, 1
ad per month.
BOX REPLIES: $8.00 if you come
and pick them up. $14.00 if we have to
send them to you.
CARD OF THANKS: $2.00 base
charge + $.10 for each word.
To place an ad phone 419-695-0015 ext. 122
We accept
www.delphosherald.com
950 Miscellaneous
COMMUNITY
SELF-STORAGE
GREAT RATES
NEWER FACILITY
419-692-0032
Across from Arbys
950 Car Care
Geise
Transmission, Inc.
419-453-3620
2 miles north of Ottoville
automatic transmission
standard transmission
differentials
transfer case
brakes & tune up
FLANAGANS
CAR CARE
816 E. FIFTH ST. DELPHOS
Ph. 419-692-5801
Mon.-Fri. 8-6, Sat. 8-2
OIL - LUBE FILTER
Only
$
22.95*
*up to 5 quarts oil
950 Construction
POHLMAN
POURED
CONCRETE WALLS
Residential
& Commercial
Agricultural Needs
All Concrete Work
Mark Pohlman
419-339-9084
cell 419-233-9460
POHLMAN
BUILDERS
FREE ESTIMATES
FULLY INSURED
Mark Pohlman
419-339-9084
cell 419-233-9460
ROOM ADDITIONS
GARAGES SIDING ROOFING
BACKHOE & DUMP TRUCK
SERVICE
950 Tree Service
TEMANS
OUR TREE SERVICE
Bill Teman 419-302-2981
Ernie Teman 419-230-4890
Since 1973
419-692-7261
SNOW REMOVAL
FIREWOOD
FOR SALE
AT YOUR
S
ervice
CNC MACHINING POSITIONS
AAP St. Marys Corp. is a leader in the design and manufacture of cast alumi-
num wheels for OEM automakers. As a subsidiary of Hitachi Metals America,
our reputation for high quality products and customer satisfaction has helped
us continue to grow and provide our associates with over 23 years of steady
employment. We now have unique opportunities for individuals in the following
positions:
MACHINING ENGINEER
Specifies and develops CNC machining processes, equipment and tooling,
work flow/layout, operating procedures, and work methods
Analyzes results and develops strategies to achieve continuous improvement
of quality, utilization, cycle time, and productivity
Conducts trials, testing, and time studies, and utilizes FMEA and problem-
solving tools to support effective launch of new products
Qualifications: Bachelor degree, or equivalent, and five plus years of related
process/manufacturing engineering experience with CNC lathes, mills, ro-
botic equipment is required.
MACHINING TECHNICIAN
Develops, implements, and adjusts CNC programs for high-volume produc-
tion as well as production trials
Monitors equipment/tooling, processes, and procedures and assists in imple-
menting actions to support safety, quality and productivity
May train others in set-up, operation, and maintenance of equipment
Qualifications: One year of related CNC machining experience-- including
programming, SPC, and blueprint reading-- is required; Formal CNC training
strongly preferred.
In return for your expertise, we offer a competitive starting salary, profit-sharing,
and excellent fringe benefits, including medical, dental, life, vision, and disabil-
ity insurance, 401(k) retirement savings plan with Company matching, paid va-
cation, paid holidays, and more. If youre looking for a career opportunity with a
growing company, please forward your qualifications and salary history to:
AAP ST. MARYS CORP.
1100 McKinley Road
St. Marys, OH 45885
Attention: Human Resources
MACHINING SUPERVISOR
AAP St. Marys Corp. is a leader in the design and manufacture of cast
aluminum wheels for OEM automakers. As a subsidiary of Hitachi Met-
als America, our reputation for high quality products and customer satisfac-
tion has helped us continue to grow and provide our associates with over 23
years of steady employment. We now have an opportunity for a Production
Supervisor to oversee the operation of a multi-shift production department.
Responsibilities of this position include:
Plan and direct the work of other supervisory, technical, and production
associates
Develop process and equipment specifications, operating procedures,
and safe and efficient work methods
Use standard production measurement and problem-solving tools to
analyze production results, prepare reports, and implement preventive
and corrective actions as needed
Collaborate with other production groups, and quality assurance,
purchasing, and maintenance functions to ensure product quality,
efficient use of resources, machine utilization, etc.
The successful candidate must have at least five years of supervisory ex-
perience--preferably in a multi-shift manufacturing function. Exposure to
programming and operation of high-volume CNC cutting operations, and
robotic parts handling is strongly preferred. Related four-year degree is also
preferred.
In return for your expertise, we offer a competitive starting salary, profit-
sharing, and excellent fringe benefits, including medical, dental, life, vi-
sion, and disability insurance, 401(k) retirement savings plan with Company
matching, paid vacation, paid holidays, and more. If youre looking for a
career opportunity with a growing company, please forward your qualifica-
tions and salary history to:
AAP ST. MARYS CORP.
1100 McKinley Road
St. Marys, OH 45885
Attention: Human Resources-DK
PROJECT ENGINEER
AAP St. Marys Corp. is a leader in the design and manufacture of cast alumi-
num wheels for OEM automakers. As a subsidiary of Hitachi Metals America,
our reputation for high quality products and customer satisfaction has helped us
continue to grow and provide our associates with over 23 years of steady em-
ployment. We now have a unique opportunity for a Project Engineer to perform
the following duties:
Creates detailed specifications and cost justifications for machinery and
equipment purchases and capital improvement projects
Prepares project budgets, schedules, and documentation and assists in sourc-
ing and negotiating contracts with suppliers
Ensures project compliance with relevant building codes, safety rules/regula-
tions, and Company policies/procedures
Monitors project from inception through production release; oversees testing,
run-off, installation, and advance planning for equipment operation, mainte-
nance, and repair
The successful candidate must have excellent organizational skills and at least
two years of relevant project engineering experience--preferable in a high-vol-
ume manufacturing operation. Proven experience in the use of project manage-
ment software, CAD tools, blueprints, and schematics is also required. Bachelor
degree in a related engineering field, or equivalent, is strongly preferred.
In return for your expertise, we offer a competitive starting salary, profit-sharing,
and excellent fringe benefits, including medical, dental, life, vision, and disabil-
ity insurance, 401(k) retirement savings plan with Company matching, paid va-
cation, paid holidays, and more. If youre looking for a career opportunity with a
growing company, please forward your qualifications and salary history to:
AAP ST. MARYS CORP.
1100 McKinley Road
St. Marys, OH 45885
Attention: Human Resources
BUYER
AAP St. Marys Corp. . is a leader in the design and manufacture of cast alumi-
num wheels for OEM automakers. As a subsidiary of Hitachi Metals America,
our reputation for high quality products and customer satisfaction has helped
us continue to grow and provide our associates with over 23 years of steady
employment. We now have an opportunity for an individual to perform the fol-
lowing duties:
Selects vendors and negotiates specifications, price, and delivery for wide
variety of purchased commodities
Maintains supplier performance rating system, working with vendors to
achieve quality, price and delivery objectives
Compiles various reports, files, and records for expenditures, stock item in-
ventories, and for regulatory compliance
The successful candidate must have excellent organizational skills and at least
two years of relevant project engineering experience--preferable in a high-vol-
ume manufacturing operation. Proven experience in the use of project manage-
ment software, CAD tools, blueprints, and schematics is also required. Bachelor
degree in a related engineering field, or equivalent, is strongly preferred.
In return for your expertise, we offer a competitive starting salary, profit-sharing,
and excellent fringe benefits, including medical, dental, life, vision, and disabil-
ity insurance, 401(k) retirement savings plan with Company matching, paid va-
cation, paid holidays, and more. If youre looking for a career opportunity with a
growing company, please forward your qualifications and salary history to:
AAP ST. MARYS CORP.
1100 McKinley Road
St. Marys, OH 45885
Attention: Human Resources
005

Lost & Found
LOST: BLACK Lab mix,
silver collar. Answers to
Rascal. Last seen Dec. 10
in the S. Cass area. Call
419-679-0274.
010

Announcements
ADVERTISERS: YOU can
place a 25 word classified
ad in more than 100 news-
papers with over one and
a half million total circula-
tion across Ohio for $295.
It's easy...you place one
order and pay with one
check t hrough Ohi o
Scan-Ohi o St at ewi de
Classified Advertising Net-
work. The Delphos Herald
advertising dept. can set
this up for you. No other
classified ad buy is sim-
pler or more cost effective.
Call 419-695-0015, ext
138.
040

Services
ALTERATI ONS BY
Donna. Over 40 years ex-
perience. 737 Jennings
Street. PH. 419-605-8136.
LAMP REPAIR
Table or floor.
Come to our store.
Hohenbrink TV.
419-695-1229
080

Help Wanted
OTR SEMI DRIVER
NEEDED
Benefits: Vacation,
Holiday pay, 401k. Home
weekends & most nights.
Call Ulm!s Inc.
419-692-3951
095

Child Care
A VERY caring and de-
pendable babysitter with
many years of experience
has openings. Infants wel-
come. Call 419-230-0154.
120

Financial
IS IT A SCAM? The Del-
phos Herald urges our
readers to contact The
Better Business Bureau,
( 419) 223- 7010 or
1-800-462-0468, before
entering into any agree-
ment involving financing,
business opportunities, or
work at home opportuni-
ties. The BBB will assist
in the investigation of
these businesses. (This
notice provided as a cus-
tomer service by The Del-
phos Herald.)
290

Wanted to Buy
Raines
Jewelry
Cash for Gold
Scrap Gold, Gold Jewelry,
Silver coins, Silverware,
Pocket Watches, Diamonds.
2330 Shawnee Rd.
Lima
(419) 229-2899
300

Household Goods
BED: NEW QUEEN
pillow-top mattress set,
can deliver $125. Call
(260)267-9079.
FOR SALE: Solid oak
China Cabinet. 74 T, 59
W, 17 Deep. Great condi-
ti on! Must see! Ph.
419-453-2934.
501

Misc. for Sale
GUN CABINET. 10-Gun,
solid oak, locking double
glass doors, two locking
storage compartments,
$400. 419-692-1491.
PAPASON CHAIR from
Pier One, $75. Childs oak
r ocki ng chai r f r om
Westrich, $35. Both in ex-
c el l ent c ondi t i on.
419-692-7224.
550

Pets & Supplies
GOING FAST!! But we
have more. Mal tese,
Dachshunds, Morki es,
Malti-Pon before they are
gone. Garwicks the Pet
People. 419-795-5711.
590

House For Rent
2 OR 3 BR House
with attached garage.
Available immediately!
Call 419-692-3951.
590

House For Rent
3 BDRM, 1-1/2 bath, elec-
tric heat. $525/month in-
cludes stove, refrigerator.
426 W. Clime, Delphos.
419-235-3572.
3 BR, 1 BA, W/D hook-up,
1 car attached garage.
$425/mo. + Deposit. No
pets. Call (419)695-6412.
600

Apts. for Rent
1BR APT for rent, appli-
ances, electric heat, laun-
dry room, No pets.
$400/month, plus deposit,
water included. 320 N.
Jefferson. 419-852-0833.
ONE BDRM Apt., 537 W.
Thi rd St . , Del phos.
$ 3 2 5 / m o . C a l l
4 1 9 - 6 9 2 - 2 1 8 4 o r
419-204-5924
620

Duplex For Rent
104 E. 7th. 2 BR, stove &
refrigerator included, w/d
hook-up. No pets. Call
419-236-2722.
3 BDRM, 1-1/2 bath,
washer/dryer hook-up, ga-
rage. $450/mo. + $450 se-
curity deposit. Available
Jan. 1. Ph.419-233-0083.
810

Auto Repairs/
Parts/Acc.
Midwest Ohio
Auto Parts
Specialist
Windshields Installed, New
Lights, Grills, Fenders,Mirrors,
Hoods, Radiators
4893 Dixie Hwy, Lima
1-800-589-6830
840

Mobile Homes
RENT OR Rent to Own. 2
bedroom, 1 bath mobile
home. 419-692-3951.
890

Autos for Sale
COMPLETE
BRAKE
SERVICE
Motorcraft Brake Pads or
Shoes, machining rotors or
drums. Labor included. Per
axle price on most cars and
light trucks. Front or rear axle.
Taxes extra. See Service
Advisor for vehicle exclusions
and details.
$
179
95
Over 85
years
serving
you!
www.raabeford.com
RAABE
FORD-LINCOLN
11260 Elida Rd., Delphos
M 7:30-8 ; T.-F. 7:30-6:00; Sat. 9-2
419-692-0055
2009 MERCURY Mariner
Premier, 32,000 miles.
Light Blue, 4-cyl., FWD,
26 mpg. avg. Asking
$17,500. (419)303-6347
Delphos.
999

Legals
NOTICE OF PUBLIC
HEARINGS
NOTICE is hereby given
that pursuant to O.R.C.
Section 4928.20 (C) that
the City of Delphos, Ohio
will hold three separate
public hearings on the City
of Delphos Electric Power
Aggregation Plan of Op-
eration and Governance
on December 19, 2011 at
10:00 a.m. and 6:30 p.m.
and again on December
27, 2011 at 6:30 p.m. at
the City of Delphos Coun-
cil chambers at 608 N. Ca-
nal St., Delphos, OH .
The City of Delphos Elec-
tric Power Aggregation
Plan of Operation and
Governance describes the
policies and procedures
by which the City of Del-
phos will carry out its mu-
nicipal electric aggregation
program. Including those
policies and procedures,
which relate to rates and
customer service.
If you have any questions,
you may call the municipal
bui l di ng between the
hours of 8:00 a.m. and
4:00 p.m. at 419-695-4010
and speak with the Safety
Service Director.
By order of the Safety
Service Director,
Gregory C. Berquist
12/7, 12/14
Place A Help
Wanted Ad
In the Classifieds
Call
The Daily Herald
419 695-0015
Classifieds
Sell
Newsboys.
Newsstands.
Home delivery.
On-line access.
The Delphos
Herald
419-695-0015
www.delphosherald.com
YOUR NEWSPAPER ...
STILL THE BEST
MEDIUM IN TODAYS
INFORMATION AGE.
Answer to Puzzle
Todays Crossword
Puzzle
ACROSS
1 Copier brand
6 Vonnegut and Wald-
heim
11 Pleasant
12 More gaunt
13 Bullion
14 Slow trains
15 Singer -- Brooks
16 Farfetched
17 Hewn
19 Online auction site
23 Berry product
26 Quay
28 Feel remorse
29 Latched
31 -- board
33 Street lingo
34 Paper in chem lab
35 Early space station
36 Libras stone
39 Double curve
40 Part-timer
42 Recedes
44 -- vera
46 Oceans motions
51 Arthurs sorcerer
54 Kind of folder
55 In fact
56 Kind of basket
57 -- -turvy
58 Persona non --
DOWN
1 TV Warrior Princess
2 MIT grad
3 Wardens fear
4 Solemn promises
5 Big sizes
6 -- -Aid
7 Cousins dad
8 Estuary
9 Util. bill
10 Almost grads
11 Musicians stint
12 Alps Mont --
16 Tango number
18 Extend
20 Hat features
21 Prime rib -- --
22 Afrmative votes
23 Pretty in Paris
24 Bedside noise
25 Atlas abbr.
27 Colorful carp
29 Cellar, briey
30 Id companion
32 Salt Lake City player
34 Attorneys deg.
37 Many-petaled blos-
som
38 Honest prez
41 Gets boring
43 Ladder cousin
45 Floating ower
47 Quechua speaker
48 Force
49 Lambs alias
50 Kangaroo pouch
51 A-Team member (2
wds.)
52 Help-wanted abbr.
53 Jay-Zs genre
54 Car sticker info
Q: I have
c h r o n i c
sinusitis and
nasal polyps.
I recently
s w i t c h e d
d o c t o r s ,
and the new
s p e c i a l i s t
s u g g e s t e d
trying oral
s t e r o i d s ,
something that
my previous doctor never mentioned. Could steroids
help relieve pressure in my sinuses?
A. Its true that a short course of five to seven days
of oral steroids may be worth a try, particularly if your
sinusitis isnt getting any better.
Sinusitis is inflammation of the mucous membranes
that line the sinuses. Your sinuses are like little caves in
the bones around your eyes and nose. Theyre lined with
membranes that produce thin, watery mucus that drains
into the nose through tiny openings. If those openings get
blocked, fluid and mucus build up, creating a cozy place
for naturally present bacteria to multiply.
The body responds to the increased numbers of
bacteria with inflammation and swelling. This produces
a painful feeling of pressure in the face. Like a cold,
sinusitis causes nasal congestion because of excess
mucus production and swollen nasal membranes.
Indeed, sinusitis often feels like a cold that just wont go
away. Some people get feverish and fatigued as their
bodies mount an immune response.
Nasal polyps are fleshy growths inside the nasal
passageways. Large nasal polyps can make breathing
difficult and may diminish a persons sense of smell.
But even if theyre quite large, polyps may not be visible
to the patient because they tend to develop high up in
the nose.
Not all cases of chronic sinusitis result in polyps, but
many do. Polyps are a common consequence of the
continual nasal inflammation that occurs with chronic
sinusitis, but they can also develop from allergies and
other triggers
Youve probably tried the usual techniques for
dealing with sinusitis, including inhaling steam, taking
long, hot showers, drinking lots of water and sleeping
with your head elevated. Doctors are discouraged from
prescribing antibiotics for sinusitis too freely, primarily
due to worries about increased bacterial resistance
to antibiotics. But if sinusitis does not respond to
decongestant and steam, or is unusually severe or
persistent, a course of antibiotics is often a good idea.
Once sinusitis becomes a chronic condition, the
inflammation can take on a life of its own. At this point,
steroids become an important treatment option. These
are not the anabolic steroids that athletes use to build
muscle. Rather, they are corticosteroids that have anti-
inflammatory effects. (Corticosteroids are often called
steroids for simplicity.)
Topical steroids can be applied directly to the nose
with drops or sprays. In the United States, nasal steroid
thats used most often, fluticasone propionate (the
brand name is Flonase), is available only as a spray.
However, polyps can block topical steroids from
reaching the inflamed tissue. Taking an oral steroid like
prednisone for a week or so reduces the size of the
polyps a little bit, and may also have an overall effect
on the inflamed tissue in the nose. Shrinking polyps
and reducing inflammation seem to allow the topical
steroid to reach its target and be more effective.
Taking a steroid orally exposes the whole body
to the medication, not just the nose and sinuses, as
occurs with the topical version. Side effects can be a
problem. They may include elevated pressure in the
eyes (glaucoma), increased blood pressure and mood
swings.
Long-term use of oral steroids can lead to more
serious side effects, such as weakened bones and
increased susceptibility to infection. But most patients
tolerate a short course well.
Chronic sinusitis patients who dont have polyps
dont seem to respond so well to oral or topical
steroids. Some doctors think that sinusitis with polyps
and sinusitis without polyps are two distinct diseases.
These doctors recommend steroid therapy only for
patients with polyps.
If steroids dont help your sinusitis, there are other
options you can explore. These include the mucus-
thinning agent guaifenesin (Mucinex). Minimally invasive
surgery to remove polyps may help. Removing polyps
can reduce the number and severity of sinus infections
and sometimes restore normal sinus function.
Surgery isnt a cure-all, though. Polyps may grow back.
Every situation is different, so its important to discuss all
options with your ear, nose and throat specialist.
(Submit questions to harvard_adviser@hms.harvard.edu.)
Distributed by Universal UClick for UFS
Sinusitis and nasal polyps
Dr. Anthony L. Komaroff, M.D.
Ask
Doctor K
8 The Herald Wednesday, December 14, 2011 www.delphosherald.com
HERALD DELPHOS
THE
Telling The Tri-Countys Story Since 1869
Classifieds
Deadlines:
11:30 a.m. for the next days issue.
Saturdays paper is 11:00 a.m. Friday
Mondays paper is 1:00 p.m. Friday
Herald Extra is 11 a.m. Thursday
Minimum Charge: 15 words,
2 times - $9.00
Each word is $.30 2-5 days
$.25 6-9 days
$.20 10+ days
Each word is $.10 for 3 months
or more prepaid
THANKS TO ST. JUDE: Runs 1 day at the
price of $3.00.
GARAGE SALES: Each day is $.20 per
word. $8.00 minimum charge.
I WILL NOT BE RESPONSIBLE FOR
DEBTS: Ad must be placed in person by
the person whose name will appear in the ad.
Must show ID & pay when placing ad. Regu-
lar rates apply
FREE ADS: 5 days free if item is free
or less than $50. Only 1 item per ad, 1
ad per month.
BOX REPLIES: $8.00 if you come
and pick them up. $14.00 if we have to
send them to you.
CARD OF THANKS: $2.00 base
charge + $.10 for each word.
To place an ad phone 419-695-0015 ext. 122
We accept
www.delphosherald.com
950 Miscellaneous
COMMUNITY
SELF-STORAGE
GREAT RATES
NEWER FACILITY
419-692-0032
Across from Arbys
950 Car Care
Geise
Transmission, Inc.
419-453-3620
2 miles north of Ottoville
automatic transmission
standard transmission
differentials
transfer case
brakes & tune up
FLANAGANS
CAR CARE
816 E. FIFTH ST. DELPHOS
Ph. 419-692-5801
Mon.-Fri. 8-6, Sat. 8-2
OIL - LUBE FILTER
Only
$
22.95*
*up to 5 quarts oil
950 Construction
POHLMAN
POURED
CONCRETE WALLS
Residential
& Commercial
Agricultural Needs
All Concrete Work
Mark Pohlman
419-339-9084
cell 419-233-9460
POHLMAN
BUILDERS
FREE ESTIMATES
FULLY INSURED
Mark Pohlman
419-339-9084
cell 419-233-9460
ROOM ADDITIONS
GARAGES SIDING ROOFING
BACKHOE & DUMP TRUCK
SERVICE
950 Tree Service
TEMANS
OUR TREE SERVICE
Bill Teman 419-302-2981
Ernie Teman 419-230-4890
Since 1973
419-692-7261
SNOW REMOVAL
FIREWOOD
FOR SALE
AT YOUR
S
ervice
CNC MACHINING POSITIONS
AAP St. Marys Corp. is a leader in the design and manufacture of cast alumi-
num wheels for OEM automakers. As a subsidiary of Hitachi Metals America,
our reputation for high quality products and customer satisfaction has helped
us continue to grow and provide our associates with over 23 years of steady
employment. We now have unique opportunities for individuals in the following
positions:
MACHINING ENGINEER
Specifies and develops CNC machining processes, equipment and tooling,
work flow/layout, operating procedures, and work methods
Analyzes results and develops strategies to achieve continuous improvement
of quality, utilization, cycle time, and productivity
Conducts trials, testing, and time studies, and utilizes FMEA and problem-
solving tools to support effective launch of new products
Qualifications: Bachelor degree, or equivalent, and five plus years of related
process/manufacturing engineering experience with CNC lathes, mills, ro-
botic equipment is required.
MACHINING TECHNICIAN
Develops, implements, and adjusts CNC programs for high-volume produc-
tion as well as production trials
Monitors equipment/tooling, processes, and procedures and assists in imple-
menting actions to support safety, quality and productivity
May train others in set-up, operation, and maintenance of equipment
Qualifications: One year of related CNC machining experience-- including
programming, SPC, and blueprint reading-- is required; Formal CNC training
strongly preferred.
In return for your expertise, we offer a competitive starting salary, profit-sharing,
and excellent fringe benefits, including medical, dental, life, vision, and disabil-
ity insurance, 401(k) retirement savings plan with Company matching, paid va-
cation, paid holidays, and more. If youre looking for a career opportunity with a
growing company, please forward your qualifications and salary history to:
AAP ST. MARYS CORP.
1100 McKinley Road
St. Marys, OH 45885
Attention: Human Resources
MACHINING SUPERVISOR
AAP St. Marys Corp. is a leader in the design and manufacture of cast
aluminum wheels for OEM automakers. As a subsidiary of Hitachi Met-
als America, our reputation for high quality products and customer satisfac-
tion has helped us continue to grow and provide our associates with over 23
years of steady employment. We now have an opportunity for a Production
Supervisor to oversee the operation of a multi-shift production department.
Responsibilities of this position include:
Plan and direct the work of other supervisory, technical, and production
associates
Develop process and equipment specifications, operating procedures,
and safe and efficient work methods
Use standard production measurement and problem-solving tools to
analyze production results, prepare reports, and implement preventive
and corrective actions as needed
Collaborate with other production groups, and quality assurance,
purchasing, and maintenance functions to ensure product quality,
efficient use of resources, machine utilization, etc.
The successful candidate must have at least five years of supervisory ex-
perience--preferably in a multi-shift manufacturing function. Exposure to
programming and operation of high-volume CNC cutting operations, and
robotic parts handling is strongly preferred. Related four-year degree is also
preferred.
In return for your expertise, we offer a competitive starting salary, profit-
sharing, and excellent fringe benefits, including medical, dental, life, vi-
sion, and disability insurance, 401(k) retirement savings plan with Company
matching, paid vacation, paid holidays, and more. If youre looking for a
career opportunity with a growing company, please forward your qualifica-
tions and salary history to:
AAP ST. MARYS CORP.
1100 McKinley Road
St. Marys, OH 45885
Attention: Human Resources-DK
PROJECT ENGINEER
AAP St. Marys Corp. is a leader in the design and manufacture of cast alumi-
num wheels for OEM automakers. As a subsidiary of Hitachi Metals America,
our reputation for high quality products and customer satisfaction has helped us
continue to grow and provide our associates with over 23 years of steady em-
ployment. We now have a unique opportunity for a Project Engineer to perform
the following duties:
Creates detailed specifications and cost justifications for machinery and
equipment purchases and capital improvement projects
Prepares project budgets, schedules, and documentation and assists in sourc-
ing and negotiating contracts with suppliers
Ensures project compliance with relevant building codes, safety rules/regula-
tions, and Company policies/procedures
Monitors project from inception through production release; oversees testing,
run-off, installation, and advance planning for equipment operation, mainte-
nance, and repair
The successful candidate must have excellent organizational skills and at least
two years of relevant project engineering experience--preferable in a high-vol-
ume manufacturing operation. Proven experience in the use of project manage-
ment software, CAD tools, blueprints, and schematics is also required. Bachelor
degree in a related engineering field, or equivalent, is strongly preferred.
In return for your expertise, we offer a competitive starting salary, profit-sharing,
and excellent fringe benefits, including medical, dental, life, vision, and disabil-
ity insurance, 401(k) retirement savings plan with Company matching, paid va-
cation, paid holidays, and more. If youre looking for a career opportunity with a
growing company, please forward your qualifications and salary history to:
AAP ST. MARYS CORP.
1100 McKinley Road
St. Marys, OH 45885
Attention: Human Resources
BUYER
AAP St. Marys Corp. . is a leader in the design and manufacture of cast alumi-
num wheels for OEM automakers. As a subsidiary of Hitachi Metals America,
our reputation for high quality products and customer satisfaction has helped
us continue to grow and provide our associates with over 23 years of steady
employment. We now have an opportunity for an individual to perform the fol-
lowing duties:
Selects vendors and negotiates specifications, price, and delivery for wide
variety of purchased commodities
Maintains supplier performance rating system, working with vendors to
achieve quality, price and delivery objectives
Compiles various reports, files, and records for expenditures, stock item in-
ventories, and for regulatory compliance
The successful candidate must have excellent organizational skills and at least
two years of relevant project engineering experience--preferable in a high-vol-
ume manufacturing operation. Proven experience in the use of project manage-
ment software, CAD tools, blueprints, and schematics is also required. Bachelor
degree in a related engineering field, or equivalent, is strongly preferred.
In return for your expertise, we offer a competitive starting salary, profit-sharing,
and excellent fringe benefits, including medical, dental, life, vision, and disabil-
ity insurance, 401(k) retirement savings plan with Company matching, paid va-
cation, paid holidays, and more. If youre looking for a career opportunity with a
growing company, please forward your qualifications and salary history to:
AAP ST. MARYS CORP.
1100 McKinley Road
St. Marys, OH 45885
Attention: Human Resources
005

Lost & Found
LOST: BLACK Lab mix,
silver collar. Answers to
Rascal. Last seen Dec. 10
in the S. Cass area. Call
419-679-0274.
010

Announcements
ADVERTISERS: YOU can
place a 25 word classified
ad in more than 100 news-
papers with over one and
a half million total circula-
tion across Ohio for $295.
It's easy...you place one
order and pay with one
check t hrough Ohi o
Scan-Ohi o St at ewi de
Classified Advertising Net-
work. The Delphos Herald
advertising dept. can set
this up for you. No other
classified ad buy is sim-
pler or more cost effective.
Call 419-695-0015, ext
138.
040

Services
ALTERATI ONS BY
Donna. Over 40 years ex-
perience. 737 Jennings
Street. PH. 419-605-8136.
LAMP REPAIR
Table or floor.
Come to our store.
Hohenbrink TV.
419-695-1229
080

Help Wanted
OTR SEMI DRIVER
NEEDED
Benefits: Vacation,
Holiday pay, 401k. Home
weekends & most nights.
Call Ulm!s Inc.
419-692-3951
095

Child Care
A VERY caring and de-
pendable babysitter with
many years of experience
has openings. Infants wel-
come. Call 419-230-0154.
120

Financial
IS IT A SCAM? The Del-
phos Herald urges our
readers to contact The
Better Business Bureau,
( 419) 223- 7010 or
1-800-462-0468, before
entering into any agree-
ment involving financing,
business opportunities, or
work at home opportuni-
ties. The BBB will assist
in the investigation of
these businesses. (This
notice provided as a cus-
tomer service by The Del-
phos Herald.)
290

Wanted to Buy
Raines
Jewelry
Cash for Gold
Scrap Gold, Gold Jewelry,
Silver coins, Silverware,
Pocket Watches, Diamonds.
2330 Shawnee Rd.
Lima
(419) 229-2899
300

Household Goods
BED: NEW QUEEN
pillow-top mattress set,
can deliver $125. Call
(260)267-9079.
FOR SALE: Solid oak
China Cabinet. 74 T, 59
W, 17 Deep. Great condi-
ti on! Must see! Ph.
419-453-2934.
501

Misc. for Sale
GUN CABINET. 10-Gun,
solid oak, locking double
glass doors, two locking
storage compartments,
$400. 419-692-1491.
PAPASON CHAIR from
Pier One, $75. Childs oak
r ocki ng chai r f r om
Westrich, $35. Both in ex-
c el l ent c ondi t i on.
419-692-7224.
550

Pets & Supplies
GOING FAST!! But we
have more. Mal tese,
Dachshunds, Morki es,
Malti-Pon before they are
gone. Garwicks the Pet
People. 419-795-5711.
590

House For Rent
2 OR 3 BR House
with attached garage.
Available immediately!
Call 419-692-3951.
590

House For Rent
3 BDRM, 1-1/2 bath, elec-
tric heat. $525/month in-
cludes stove, refrigerator.
426 W. Clime, Delphos.
419-235-3572.
3 BR, 1 BA, W/D hook-up,
1 car attached garage.
$425/mo. + Deposit. No
pets. Call (419)695-6412.
600

Apts. for Rent
1BR APT for rent, appli-
ances, electric heat, laun-
dry room, No pets.
$400/month, plus deposit,
water included. 320 N.
Jefferson. 419-852-0833.
ONE BDRM Apt., 537 W.
Thi rd St . , Del phos.
$ 3 2 5 / m o . C a l l
4 1 9 - 6 9 2 - 2 1 8 4 o r
419-204-5924
620

Duplex For Rent
104 E. 7th. 2 BR, stove &
refrigerator included, w/d
hook-up. No pets. Call
419-236-2722.
3 BDRM, 1-1/2 bath,
washer/dryer hook-up, ga-
rage. $450/mo. + $450 se-
curity deposit. Available
Jan. 1. Ph.419-233-0083.
810

Auto Repairs/
Parts/Acc.
Midwest Ohio
Auto Parts
Specialist
Windshields Installed, New
Lights, Grills, Fenders,Mirrors,
Hoods, Radiators
4893 Dixie Hwy, Lima
1-800-589-6830
840

Mobile Homes
RENT OR Rent to Own. 2
bedroom, 1 bath mobile
home. 419-692-3951.
890

Autos for Sale
COMPLETE
BRAKE
SERVICE
Motorcraft Brake Pads or
Shoes, machining rotors or
drums. Labor included. Per
axle price on most cars and
light trucks. Front or rear axle.
Taxes extra. See Service
Advisor for vehicle exclusions
and details.
$
179
95
Over 85
years
serving
you!
www.raabeford.com
RAABE
FORD-LINCOLN
11260 Elida Rd., Delphos
M 7:30-8 ; T.-F. 7:30-6:00; Sat. 9-2
419-692-0055
2009 MERCURY Mariner
Premier, 32,000 miles.
Light Blue, 4-cyl., FWD,
26 mpg. avg. Asking
$17,500. (419)303-6347
Delphos.
999

Legals
NOTICE OF PUBLIC
HEARINGS
NOTICE is hereby given
that pursuant to O.R.C.
Section 4928.20 (C) that
the City of Delphos, Ohio
will hold three separate
public hearings on the City
of Delphos Electric Power
Aggregation Plan of Op-
eration and Governance
on December 19, 2011 at
10:00 a.m. and 6:30 p.m.
and again on December
27, 2011 at 6:30 p.m. at
the City of Delphos Coun-
cil chambers at 608 N. Ca-
nal St., Delphos, OH .
The City of Delphos Elec-
tric Power Aggregation
Plan of Operation and
Governance describes the
policies and procedures
by which the City of Del-
phos will carry out its mu-
nicipal electric aggregation
program. Including those
policies and procedures,
which relate to rates and
customer service.
If you have any questions,
you may call the municipal
bui l di ng between the
hours of 8:00 a.m. and
4:00 p.m. at 419-695-4010
and speak with the Safety
Service Director.
By order of the Safety
Service Director,
Gregory C. Berquist
12/7, 12/14
Place A Help
Wanted Ad
In the Classifieds
Call
The Daily Herald
419 695-0015
Classifieds
Sell
Newsboys.
Newsstands.
Home delivery.
On-line access.
The Delphos
Herald
419-695-0015
www.delphosherald.com
YOUR NEWSPAPER ...
STILL THE BEST
MEDIUM IN TODAYS
INFORMATION AGE.
Answer to Puzzle
Todays Crossword
Puzzle
ACROSS
1 Copier brand
6 Vonnegut and Wald-
heim
11 Pleasant
12 More gaunt
13 Bullion
14 Slow trains
15 Singer -- Brooks
16 Farfetched
17 Hewn
19 Online auction site
23 Berry product
26 Quay
28 Feel remorse
29 Latched
31 -- board
33 Street lingo
34 Paper in chem lab
35 Early space station
36 Libras stone
39 Double curve
40 Part-timer
42 Recedes
44 -- vera
46 Oceans motions
51 Arthurs sorcerer
54 Kind of folder
55 In fact
56 Kind of basket
57 -- -turvy
58 Persona non --
DOWN
1 TV Warrior Princess
2 MIT grad
3 Wardens fear
4 Solemn promises
5 Big sizes
6 -- -Aid
7 Cousins dad
8 Estuary
9 Util. bill
10 Almost grads
11 Musicians stint
12 Alps Mont --
16 Tango number
18 Extend
20 Hat features
21 Prime rib -- --
22 Afrmative votes
23 Pretty in Paris
24 Bedside noise
25 Atlas abbr.
27 Colorful carp
29 Cellar, briey
30 Id companion
32 Salt Lake City player
34 Attorneys deg.
37 Many-petaled blos-
som
38 Honest prez
41 Gets boring
43 Ladder cousin
45 Floating ower
47 Quechua speaker
48 Force
49 Lambs alias
50 Kangaroo pouch
51 A-Team member (2
wds.)
52 Help-wanted abbr.
53 Jay-Zs genre
54 Car sticker info
Q: I have
c h r o n i c
sinusitis and
nasal polyps.
I recently
s w i t c h e d
d o c t o r s ,
and the new
s p e c i a l i s t
s u g g e s t e d
trying oral
s t e r o i d s ,
something that
my previous doctor never mentioned. Could steroids
help relieve pressure in my sinuses?
A. Its true that a short course of five to seven days
of oral steroids may be worth a try, particularly if your
sinusitis isnt getting any better.
Sinusitis is inflammation of the mucous membranes
that line the sinuses. Your sinuses are like little caves in
the bones around your eyes and nose. Theyre lined with
membranes that produce thin, watery mucus that drains
into the nose through tiny openings. If those openings get
blocked, fluid and mucus build up, creating a cozy place
for naturally present bacteria to multiply.
The body responds to the increased numbers of
bacteria with inflammation and swelling. This produces
a painful feeling of pressure in the face. Like a cold,
sinusitis causes nasal congestion because of excess
mucus production and swollen nasal membranes.
Indeed, sinusitis often feels like a cold that just wont go
away. Some people get feverish and fatigued as their
bodies mount an immune response.
Nasal polyps are fleshy growths inside the nasal
passageways. Large nasal polyps can make breathing
difficult and may diminish a persons sense of smell.
But even if theyre quite large, polyps may not be visible
to the patient because they tend to develop high up in
the nose.
Not all cases of chronic sinusitis result in polyps, but
many do. Polyps are a common consequence of the
continual nasal inflammation that occurs with chronic
sinusitis, but they can also develop from allergies and
other triggers
Youve probably tried the usual techniques for
dealing with sinusitis, including inhaling steam, taking
long, hot showers, drinking lots of water and sleeping
with your head elevated. Doctors are discouraged from
prescribing antibiotics for sinusitis too freely, primarily
due to worries about increased bacterial resistance
to antibiotics. But if sinusitis does not respond to
decongestant and steam, or is unusually severe or
persistent, a course of antibiotics is often a good idea.
Once sinusitis becomes a chronic condition, the
inflammation can take on a life of its own. At this point,
steroids become an important treatment option. These
are not the anabolic steroids that athletes use to build
muscle. Rather, they are corticosteroids that have anti-
inflammatory effects. (Corticosteroids are often called
steroids for simplicity.)
Topical steroids can be applied directly to the nose
with drops or sprays. In the United States, nasal steroid
thats used most often, fluticasone propionate (the
brand name is Flonase), is available only as a spray.
However, polyps can block topical steroids from
reaching the inflamed tissue. Taking an oral steroid like
prednisone for a week or so reduces the size of the
polyps a little bit, and may also have an overall effect
on the inflamed tissue in the nose. Shrinking polyps
and reducing inflammation seem to allow the topical
steroid to reach its target and be more effective.
Taking a steroid orally exposes the whole body
to the medication, not just the nose and sinuses, as
occurs with the topical version. Side effects can be a
problem. They may include elevated pressure in the
eyes (glaucoma), increased blood pressure and mood
swings.
Long-term use of oral steroids can lead to more
serious side effects, such as weakened bones and
increased susceptibility to infection. But most patients
tolerate a short course well.
Chronic sinusitis patients who dont have polyps
dont seem to respond so well to oral or topical
steroids. Some doctors think that sinusitis with polyps
and sinusitis without polyps are two distinct diseases.
These doctors recommend steroid therapy only for
patients with polyps.
If steroids dont help your sinusitis, there are other
options you can explore. These include the mucus-
thinning agent guaifenesin (Mucinex). Minimally invasive
surgery to remove polyps may help. Removing polyps
can reduce the number and severity of sinus infections
and sometimes restore normal sinus function.
Surgery isnt a cure-all, though. Polyps may grow back.
Every situation is different, so its important to discuss all
options with your ear, nose and throat specialist.
(Submit questions to harvard_adviser@hms.harvard.edu.)
Distributed by Universal UClick for UFS
Sinusitis and nasal polyps
Dr. Anthony L. Komaroff, M.D.
Ask
Doctor K
BEETLE BAILEY
SNUFFY SMITH
BORN LOSER
HAGAR THE HORRIBLE
BIG NATE
FRANK & ERNEST
GRIZZWELLS
PICKLES
BLONDIE
HI AND LOIS
Wednesday Evening December 14, 2011
8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30 12:00 12:30
WPTA/ABC Middle Suburg. Family Fascinating People Local Nightline Jimmy Kimmel Live
WHIO/CBS Survivor-Pacific Criminal Minds CSI: Crime Scene Local Late Show Letterman Late
WLIO/NBC All Night Whitney Harry's Law Law & Order: SVU Local Tonight Show w/Leno Late
WOHL/FOX The X Factor Daughter Local
ION Top Gun Criminal Minds Criminal Minds Without a Trace
Cable Channels
A & E Storage Storage Storage Storage Hoggers Hoggers Hoggers Hoggers Storage Storage
AMC White Christmas White Christmas
ANIM River Monsters River Monsters River Monsters River Monsters River Monsters
BET Motives-Behind The Rich Man's Wife Wendy Williams Show
BRAVO Top Chef: Texas Work of Art Top Chef: Texas Top Chef: Texas Top Chef: Texas
CMT Blue Collar Larry, Cable Guy's, Christmas Fried
CNN Anderson Cooper 360 Piers Morgan Tonight Anderson Cooper 360 E. B. OutFront Piers Morgan Tonight
COMEDY Chappelle Chappelle South Pk South Pk South Pk South Pk Daily Colbert South Pk Futurama
DISC Sons of Guns Sons of Guns Moonshiners Sons of Guns Moonshiners
DISN Pixie Beauty and the Beast Wizards Shake It Shake It Good Luck Wizards Wizards
E! Evan Almighty The Soup After Lat Chelsea E! News Chelsea
ESPN College Basketball SportsCenter Special SportsCenter SportsCenter
ESPN2 College Basketball College Basketball SportsNation NFL Live
FAM Pixar Finding Nemo The 700 Club Whose? Whose?
FOOD Restaurant: Im. Restaurant: Im. Mystery D Diners Next Iron Chef Restaurant: Im.
FX X-Men Origins Horror Story Horror Story Horror Story
HGTV House Hunters Income Kitchen Property Brothers Property Brothers Income Kitchen
HIST Brad Meltzer's Dec. Brad Meltzer's Dec. Brad Meltzer's Dec. Brad Meltzer's Dec. Brad Meltzer's Dec.
LIFE Nanny-Christ Boyfriend for Nanny-Christ
MTV The Real World The Real World The Real World The Real World Teen Mom 2
NICK My Wife My Wife '70s Show '70s Show George George Friends Friends Friends Friends
SCI Ghost Hunters Ghost Hunters Ghost Hunters Ghost Hunters Ghost Hunters
SPIKE UFC Unleashed Unleashed
TBS Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Funniest Commercials Conan Office Office
TCM Fear and Desire Huckleberry Finn Pandora-Flying
TLC Virgin Diaries Toddlers & Tiaras Toddlers & Tiaras Toddlers & Tiaras Toddlers & Tiaras
TNT The Mentalist The Mentalist Leverage Southland CSI: NY
TOON MAD Ed, Edd King/Hill King/Hill Amer. Dad Amer. Dad Fam. Guy Fam. Guy Chicken Aqua Teen
TRAV Man, Food Man, Food Hot & Spicy Paradise Cght-Cmra Cght-Cmra Man, Food Man, Food Hot & Spicy Paradise
TV LAND Home Imp. Home Imp. Raymond Raymond Cleveland The Exes King King King King
USA NCIS NCIS Psych Burn Notice NCIS
VH1 Top 40 of 2011 Baseball Wives Tough Love: Miami Baseball Wives Legally Blonde
WGN Funniest Home Videos Funniest Home Videos WGN News at Nine 30 Rock Scrubs Scrubs Sunny
Premium Channels
HBO The Losers Boardwalk Empire 24/7 Flyers 24/7 Flyers Enlighten Due Date
MAX S.W.A.T. Happy Gilmore Little Fockers Lingerie
SHOW Homeland Inside the NFL Debra DiGiovanni Inside the NFL Dexter
2009 Hometown Content, listings by Zap2it
Wednesday, December 14, 2011 The Herald 9
Tomorrows
Horoscope
By Bernice Bede Osol
Woman bothered
by family strife
Dear Annie: My husband
and I have noticed that his
sisters husband has been
rather cool to us for quite
some time. We can barely
get a civil hello from him at
family events, yet he is warm
and friendly to others. To the
best of our knowledge, we
have not done or said any-
thing that would warrant the
cold shoulder.
My husband and I have
many friends and are well
respected in our community.
We have tried not to let his
attitude bother us,
but it hurts. We
live in the same
community and
attend the same
church, so avoid-
ing him is not an
option. He recent-
ly was a no-show
at a family gather-
ing at our home.
My husband
mentioned this to
another relative
and was told that
it was because of me.
I was dumbfounded. I
have no clue why he dis-
likes me. We have never
argued or had an unpleasant
incident. I would apologize
in a minute if I only knew
what for. What can I do? --
Clueless
Dear Clueless: Its pos-
sible that your brother-in-
law misinterpreted some-
thing that happened involv-
ing you, and the only way to
clear it up is to find out what
occurred. Your husband can
speak to his brother-in-law
(or his sister) privately, say
you are mortified that you
may have done something
to offend him and ask how
the situation can be rem-
edied so all of you can have
a warmer relationship. We
hope it helps.
Dear Annie: I am a
recently divorced 40-year-
old woman and have start-
ed seeing someone I really
enjoy being with.
My problem is, four years
ago, I had to have four of
my front teeth pulled due to
a gum disease. I am wonder-
ing when and how to tell
this man my teeth are fake. I
want him to know, but I am
embarrassed and scared of
his reaction. Please help. --
Toothless in Pennsylvania
Dear Toothless: Unless
you are afraid your teeth will
come loose with vigorous
kissing, this is one of those
things that dont require rev-
elation until the relationship
has progressed to physical
intimacy. Hopefully, he will
care enough about you that
it wont bother him when
you say, Theres something
you should know about
my teeth. (By the way, if
you can afford them, dental
implants can take care of this
issue permanently.)
Dear Annie: I am Spell
Check Is Your Friend. I
wrote about a college friend
who is a special-ed teacher
with poor English skills. I
was stunned at the respons-
es. It seems most people feel
that as long as a teacher is a
nice person, it doesnt matter
whether she is qualified to
do the job.
I am not spiteful or jealous.
I am simply concerned about
the children who are learning
improperly. And although
they are special-ed kids, they
are not babies. They are 5th
and 6th graders. Trust me, Im
not talking about a typo here
and there. Im talking about
endless run-on sentences, no
knowledge of homonyms or
punctuation, and
repeat misspell-
ings of basic com-
mon words. Yes,
she is a very nice
person, but would
you want your kids
in her classroom? I
wouldnt.
Today my friend
posted on Facebook
that she is worried
about the upcom-
ing evaluations.
I didnt call the
Board of Ed about her, but
I still wonder whether I
should. My intent is not to
get her fired. Rather, it is
to get her into an English
refresher course. It would
only benefit her students
education, and I think thats
the most important thing. --
Spell Check in New York
Dear New York:
Unfortunately, despite your
best intentions, chances are
your complaints could get
her fired. We still think this
is something best handled
by the school and the par-
ents, and we are certain they
either know about her inad-
equate English skills or find
them to be less important
than her other attributes.
Annies Mailbox is writ-
ten by Kathy Mitchell and
Marcy Sugar, longtime edi-
tors of the Ann Landers
column. Please e-mail your
questions to anniesmail-
box@comcast.net, or write
to: Annies Mailbox, c/o
Creators Syndicate, 5777 W.
Century Blvd., Ste. 700, Los
Angeles, CA 90045.
Annies Mailbox
www.delphosherald.com
THURSDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2011
In the year ahead, you might find
yourself involved in many projects
that could have a larger-than-usual
impact on others. Doing things on a
grander scale than normal might be
scary, but it also will be rewarding.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-
Dec. 21) -- Try to focus on personal
objectives if you can, because for
some reason youll be luckier than
usual with anything that serves your
interests over that of others.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)
-- Although something beneficial for
you is stirring, it may momentarily be
screened from your view. Even some
associates might know of it before
you do. Just go with the flow and reap
the benefits.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19)
-- In the final analysis of things, our
real wealth lies in our relationships
with others. Youre likely to be amply
blessed with dear friends who esteem
you.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) -- It
behooves you to do what you can to
please others, even if it means going
out of your way. Its one of those
days when genuine kindness will be
rewarded.
ARIES (March 21-April 19)
-- If you keep your attitude positive
and philosophical, you can guarantee
yourself a good day. That old saying:
Smile and the world smiles with
you, will be in fine working order.
TAURUS (April 20-May
20) -- There are always financial
opportunities surrounding you, albeit
not necessarily from previous sources.
Once you find a new stream, it can be
nurtured to productivity with relative
ease.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) --
Because youre shrewd yet fair with
your counterparts when cutting a new
deal, even what needs to be negotiated
on a one-on-one basis can work out
quite well.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) --
Something you have for sale that is
very attractive to another might be
more valuable than both you and your
prospect know it to be. Before selling
anything, get it appraised by experts.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) --
Your behavior is likely to enhance
your popularity. When friends and
associates see the real you, they cant
help but be impressed by your warmth
and compassion for others.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
-- If and when you choose to assert
yourself, an unfinished endeavor can
be concluded to your and everybody
elses satisfaction. It behooves you
to make that choice instead of lying
idle.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) --
This can be an extremely productive
day for you if you choose to assert
yourself and work on a new project.
Your enthusiasm and interests will be
transmitted to the endeavor at hand.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) --
This could be a gangbusters day for
amassing personal gain. Youll be
adequately rewarded for anything you
produce that appeals to the masses,
with a little extra thrown in.
COPYRIGHT 2011 United Feature Syndicate,
Inc.
10 The Herald Wednesday, December 14, 2011 www.delphosherald.com
2
Answers to Mondays questions:
Caffeine included in most diets
is represented by the molecular formula
C
8
H
10
N
4
O
2
?
British colonel T.E. Lawrence the
legendary Lawrence of Arabia, led a fleet of
armored Rolls-Royces into battle in Turkey
during World War I, capturing an entire
Kurdish regiment in its desert garrison.
Todays questions:
What popular childrens book was writ-
ten in 1957 in hopes of replacing the Dick
and Jane elementary school primers?
Which planet occasionally experiences
triple eclipses with three of its largest
moons simultaneously casting shadows on
its surface?
Answers in Thursdays Herald.
Todays words:
Intersilient: suddenly emerging in the
midst of something
Nieve: a hand or fist
Todays joke:
Emmitt Smith died and went to heaven.
When he got to the pearly gates, St. Peter
was waiting for him and issued Emmitt an
invitation to play for the HFL- the heaven
football league. Emmitt thought about it
for a minute and said, Sure!
As they walked out to the field, there
was a game in progress. Emmitt was
stunned. There were a lot of ex-NFL play-
ers out on that field. What he found to be
strange was that the jerseys didnt have
any numbers. Instead they had letters on
them. So he turned around and questioned
St. Peter about the numbers.
St. Peter chuckled and told him, Up
here, we dont need numbers. The letters
stand for the position they are playing, QB
is for quarterback, WR is for wide receiver
and so on.
Emmitt smiled and nodded his head.
As he gazed around the sidelines, he got
a perplexed look on his face. On the other
side of the field, there was a man wearing
a jersey that had the letters TL. St. Peter,
as you know, I played football many years
with the Dallas Cowboys and I am familiar
with all the positions. But in all my years I
have never seen the position of TL.
St. Peter laughed and said, Oh yeah, I
forgot. Thats just God. He likes to pretend
that he is Tom Landry.
Iraq unable to defend borders as US exits
By ROBERT H. REID and
REBECCA SANTANA
Associated Press
BAGHDAD After billions of dollars
and nearly nine years of training, American
troops are leaving behind an Iraqi security
force arguably capable of providing internal
security but unprepared to defend the nation
against foreign threats at a time of rising ten-
sions throughout the Middle East.
Building up an Iraqi military and police
able to protect the country became a key goal
of the United States and its allies after they
defeated and then disbanded the Saddam
Hussein-era force in 2003. As Americas
role in Iraq fades, the results appear at best
incomplete.
Iraqi forces currently about 700,000
strong have been largely responsible for
security in Baghdad and other cities since
2009, carrying out their own raids and other
combat operations against insurgents.
More than 10,000 Iraqi soldiers and police
have been killed since the new force was
established more than double the number
of American military deaths. Few if any mili-
tary forces in the Arab world have as much
combat experience within the ranks.
They can kick a door in and knock out a
networks leadership as good as anybody Ive
seen, said U.S. Lt. Gen. Robert Caslen, com-
mander of the NATO training mission, which
will soon be disbanded. I would say that they
have the discipline and the tenacity to fight as
well as anybody Ive ever seen.
Nevertheless, Iraqi forces have their work
cut out for them. They will be operating in a
country which, although quieter than a few
years ago, saw more people killed, wounded
and kidnapped last year than in Afghanistan,
according to U.S. figures.
The departure of American forces this
month also leaves Iraq vulnerable to threats
from its neighbors Iran to the east, Turkey
to the north and Syria to the west. A major
Arab country of about 30 million people with
some of the worlds largest proven petro-
leum reserves is incapable of defending its
borders in one of the most unstable parts of
the world.
The Iraqi military chief of staff, Lt. Gen.
Babaker Zebari, has said it would take until
at least 2020 for Iraq to defend its airspace.
Without a well-trained and equipped air force,
Iraqi ground forces would be hard-pressed
to defend against incursions across borders
with few natural barriers and little cover from
vegetation.
An army without an air force is exposed,
Zebari was quoted as saying in a report last
October by the U.S. agency responsible for
overseeing Iraqi reconstruction.
Even though a full-scale ground invasion
from its neighbors may seem remote, the
possibility of incursions from Turkey against
Kurdish rebels, or Iranians along disputed
border stretches or even from a Syria facing
an internal revolt cannot be ruled out, espe-
cially at a time when the Arab Spring and
the looming showdown between the West
and Iran are raising tensions throughout the
region.
External defense seemed a low priority in
the early years of the Iraq war, when tens of
thousands of American troops, tanks, planes
and artillery served as a deterrent.
During those years, the main threat was
posed by Shiite and Sunni extremists, includ-
ing al-Qaida in Iraq, who were battling the
Americans and their allies in the streets of
Baghdad and other major cities. Iraqi forces
were organized and trained primarily to aug-
ment the U.S.-led force, using the American
military as a rough model.
Soon, Iraqi commanders were giving pow-
er-point briefings, and their generals were
handing out specially made coins emblazoned
with their names and units as souvenirs. Iraqi
soldiers at street checkpoints were wearing
kneepads slouched down around their ankles,
again just like their American counterparts.
But there wasnt enough time to develop
the full package logistics, intelligence,
medical services and a fully integrated com-
mand structure for the Iraqis to operate as
effectively without U.S. support. A budget
crisis in 2009 and a lengthy political stale-
mate the following year crippled both the
qualitative development of Iraqs forces and
its ability to implement its own development
plan, wrote analyst Anthony Cordesman
of the Center for Strategic and International
Studies.
The head of Iraqi military intelligence,
Hatem al-Magsousi, said it takes the Iraqis a
week to plan and carry out a military opera-
tion that they could execute in a day with
American help.
Such delays could be costly if al-Qaida
as expected takes advantage of a security
vacuum to reconstitute itself following major
defeats on the battlefield in the final years of
the war.
Unless the Iraqi security forces continue
to put pressure on al-Qaida, they could regen-
erate capability and come back in an even
worse way than they have in the past, said
a U.S. military spokesman, Maj. Gen. Jeffrey
Buchanan.
Occupy Baltimore protesters
removed from plaza by police
Snoopy Christmas display saved from foreclosure
Civil rights protections to be enforced in elections
By SARAH BRUMFIELD
Associated Press
BALTIMORE Occupy Baltimore demonstrators who
spent 10 weeks protesting economic disparity were removed
peacefully from a downtown plaza near the Inner Harbor tour-
ist district during a pre-dawn raid Tuesday.
Baltimore City police in full riot gear moved into McKeldin
Square about 3:30 a.m. to remove the protesters, who had
been camped out at the site since Oct. 4. City police spokes-
man Anthony Guglielmi said there was no resistance from the
people staying at the site.
The whole event was orchestrated well, which speaks to
our relationship with Occupy, Guglielmi said. Everything
was done very peacefully.
Demonstrators said about 30 people were camped out in
the plaza at the time. A spokesman for the citys mayor, Ryan
ODoherty, said 23 people were taken to a city shelter and that
no arrests were made. ODoherty said the city made it very
clear that they were allowed to protest all day and into the
night, but that camping is prohibited.
Protester Mike Gibb, a 21-year-old from Bel Air who par-
ticipated in a march with Occupy Wall Street protesters from
New York to Washington, said the eviction from the square
marks Phase 2 for the movement. Gibb said demonstrators
will begin squatting in vacant housing all over the city.
Occupy Baltimore will be coming to a neighborhood near
you, Gibb said. He added that the mayor had opened a can
of worms.
Twenty-three-year-old protester Leo Zimmerman, a free-
lance copywriter, said he awoke to find the area encircled by
a group of officers in face masks, helmets and batons. He said
the group had dealt with the same officers in the past and that
they seemed apologetic during the raid.
Zimmerman said demonstrators were given about 15 minutes
to leave the plaza and that it appeared police chose to raid the
square at a time when there were fewer people there. The group
said it was given a free speech notice that the said the city
is committed to protecting individuals right to protest and
advised them of where they could collect their belongings.
Late Tuesday, McKeldin Square was still cordoned off with
police stationed there. Several blocks away, nearly 100 Occupy
Baltimore members gathered at the plaza in front of City Hall
for their nightly general assembly meeting, recapping the
eviction and discussing the movements accomplishments and
future. Some of those evicted from the plaza expressed frustra-
tion with the groups dwindling numbers recently and others
spoke of ways the group could now rekindle its mission.
City officials recently denied Occupy Baltimores request
for a permit to continue their protest in the plaza and cut off
their power supply. Demonstrators have been at the site since
Oct. 4 and had hoped to extend their protest into April. The
number of people at the site had fluctuated depending on the
time of day and the weather, but participants had said more
than 20 people slept there most nights.
Authorities reported a handful of disturbances, including assaults,
at the site, but said the encampment was generally peaceful.
The eviction comes a week before an annual menorah
lighting, an event that already had a permit to use the plaza.
Organizers had said they expected to share the space with
Occupy Baltimore.
The move by Baltimore officials comes as Occupy Wall
Street protesters on the West Coast, heady with their successful
attempts to block trucks and curb business at busy ports, said
they plan to continue their blockades and keep staging similar
protests. Thousands of demonstrators forced shipping termi-
nals in Oakland, Calif.; Portland, Ore.; and Longview, Wash.;
to halt parts of their operations Monday and some intended to
keep their blockade attempts ramped up overnight.
COSTA MESA, Calif. (AP) James Jordan created
a heart-warming Christmas display of Charles Schulzs
Peanuts characters more than 40 years ago at his Southern
California home, and it became a holiday tradition as tens of
thousands of people showed up each year to see the sparkling
extravaganza.
Families trekked to the Orange County suburb of Costa
Mesa to sip hot apple cider and share the wonder as seen
through their childrens eyes amid twinkling Christmas lights,
artificial snow and a Santa Claus that whisked through the air
and down a chimney for spectators. It became so popular that
busloads of visitors and school groups visited Jordans child-
hood home each year.
When he lost the house to foreclosure, it looked like
the death of a tradition until the city stepped in to save
Christmas.
A week ago, Costa Mesa officials offered to host the dis-
play on the lawn outside City Hall. They turned on the lights
Tuesday evening in a song-filled ceremony attended by a
large crowd of families toting toddlers and cameras. Santa
was expected to arrive later Tuesday and then make nightly
appearances Dec. 18 to Dec. 23.
The move saved a Christmas display that Jordan says
draws 80,000 people each year to see Santa and the nearly
200-foot stretch of characters, colorful cottages and other
creations.
This has been absolutely a Frank Capra movie, where I
feel like Im in the middle of Its a Wonderful Life, Jordan
told scores of people who huddled outside City Hall in the
chilly night air, recalling the 1946 classic that is an enduring
Christmas favorite.
In some Orange County homes, the tradition has been
passed on through generations as those who grew up visiting
the so-called Snoopy House now take their own children
there.
Jordan, 59, said he started the project as a teenager in the
yellow, single-story house where he was raised. Little by little,
he expanded the display until it reached mammoth propor-
tions, featuring an ice skating Charlie Brown and Schroeder
playing piano to an adoring Lucy.
My wife says I am a frustrated Walt Disney, he said,
chuckling.
Several years ago, Jordans business as a remodeling con-
tractor slumped along with the economy. He sought a loan
modification but said he was denied because he was still keep-
ing up with his payments.
Following what he now knows is poor legal advice, Jordan
said he stopped paying the mortgage, hoping to qualify for
relief.
Instead he lost his familys home, which was foreclosed
in November 2010. A tenant who rented from Jordan was
allowed to stay until her lease ran out but the house will soon
be sold, said Jason Menke, a spokesman for Wells Fargo
Home Mortgage.
We worked with Mr. Jordan for some time to try to find
an alternative to foreclosure but we were unable to do so,
Menke said.
Though he no longer lived in the house, Jordan was
crushed to think about the families that counted on him at
Christmas. When neighbors learned the display was in jeop-
ardy, they called news reporters, posted signs and collected
donations to try to help Jordans fight to recover the house,
Jordan said.
Neighbor Tara Talbott heaved a sigh of relief when she
learned the Christmas tradition would carry on, albeit at a
new location.
She remembers how her now-grown son helped out as an
elf, taking childrens requests as they waited in line to see
Santa and relaying them via a headset so St. Nick knew what
they wanted when their turn came to meet him.
Its so special to us, Talbott said. Its so special to the
whole neighborhood.
AUSTIN, Texas (AP) Attorney General Eric Holder
vowed Tuesday to fully enforce civil rights protections in
next years elections amid a flurry of activity by states to
redraw political boundaries and impose requirements that
could reduce voting by minorities who enthusiastically
supported Barack Obama in the 2008 election.
Giving his most expansive speech on civil rights since
taking office, the nations chief law enforcement officer
declared that we need election systems that are free
from fraud, discrimination and partisan influence and
that are more, not less, accessible to the citizens of this
country.
He urged the country to call on our political parties to
resist the temptation to suppress certain votes in the hope
of attaining electoral success.
Instead, encourage and work with the parties to
achieve this success by appealing to more voters, Holder
said during an appearance in Austin, Texas.
Currently, the Justice Department is reviewing new
requirements in Texas and South Carolina requiring vot-
ers to produce a photo ID before casting ballots. The
department also is examining changes that Florida has
made to its electoral process imposing financial penal-
ties on third-party voter registration organizations like the
League of Women Voters when they miss deadlines and
shortening the number of days in the early voting period
before elections.
Most of the changes have been promoted and approved
by Republicans, who argue they are needed to avert voter
fraud. Democrats, citing studies suggesting there is little
voter fraud, say the measures are actually aimed at reduc-
ing minority votes for their candidates.
Where a state cant meet its legal burden in showing an
absence of discriminatory impact, we will object, the
attorney general said in his speech at the Lyndon Baines
Johnson Presidential Library and Museum. As president
in 1965, Johnson was instrumental in passing the land-
mark law the Justice Department now uses to ensure vot-
ing rights in Texas, South Carolina and all or parts of 14
other states. Most of the 16 states are in the South and all
of them with a history of discrimination against blacks,
American Indians, Asian-Americans, Alaska Natives or
Hispanics.
Besides Texas and South Carolina, Alabama, Kansas,
Mississippi, Rhode Island, Tennessee and Wisconsin have
enacted more stringent voter ID laws this year.
Over the years, weve seen all sorts of attempts to
gain partisan advantage by keeping people away from the
polls from literacy tests and poll taxes, to misinforma-
tion campaigns telling people that Election Day has been
moved, or that only one adult per household can cast a
ballot, said Holder.
In light of that history, the attorney general announced
he supports Democratic-sponsored legislation that would
require stiff criminal penalties for distributing false com-
munications such as the wrong date or time for elections,
giving inaccurate information about voter eligibility or
promoting false endorsements of candidates. The bill was
to be introduced today by Sens. Ben Cardin of Maryland
and Chuck Schumer of New York.
Facebook to help prevent suicide
By BROOKE DONALD
Associated Press
MENLO PARK, Calif. Help is just a few
clicks away on Facebook for people expressing
suicidal thoughts.
The social networking site launched a new fea-
ture Tuesday that enables users to connect with a
counselor through a confidential chat session trig-
gered after a friend reports distressing content.
The new tool has several benefits, experts say,
in the quest to reduce the number of nearly 100
Americans who commit suicide every day.
First, it brings quick intervention at times
when it can be of most help. Second, it enables
troubled people to start a chat over an instant mes-
saging system that many find more comfortable
than speaking on the phone with a counselor.
Weve heard from many people who say
they want to talk to someone but dont want to
call. Instant message is perfect for that, said
Lidia Bernik, associate project director of the
National Suicide Prevention Lifeline.
The service is the latest tool from Facebook
aimed at improving safety on its site, which
has more than 800 million users. This year, it
announced changes to how users report bullying,
offensive content and fake profiles.
One of the big goals here is to get the person
in distress into the right help as soon as possible,
said Fred Wolens, Facebooks public policy
manager.
In recent years, distressed people have posted
their final words on Facebook.
In one high-profile case in September 2010,
Rutgers University freshman Tyler Clementi
jumped to his death from the George Washington
Bridge after his roommate allegedly used a web-
cam to spy on his intimate encounter with another
man.
Clementi had posted on his Facebook account:
Jumping off the gw bridge sorry.
Last month, authorities in Pittsburg, Calif., said
a man posted a suicide note on Facebook before
he killed his wife and in-laws, then himself.
In July, police in Pennsylvania said they
believed they were able to help prevent a mans
suicide after his friend in California alerted police
about a distraught Facebook posting. Police met
with the man, who was admitted to a hospital.
Google and Yahoo have long provided
Lifelines phone number as the first result when
someone searches for suicide. Through email,
Facebook directed users to the hotline or encour-
aged friends to call police if they perceived some-
one was about to do harm.
The new service goes a step further. Heres
how it works:
A user spots a suicidal comment on a friends
page. He then clicks on a report button next
to the posting that leads to a series of questions
about the nature of the post, including whether
it is violent, harassing, hate speech or harmful
behavior.