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INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON PSYCHOLOGY & ALLIED PROFESSIONS - SRI LANKA 2011

ON PSYCHOLOGY & ALLIED PROFESSIONS - SRI LANKA 2011 INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON PSYCHOLOGY & ALLIED

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON PSYCHOLOGY &

ALLIED PROFESSIONS SRI LANKA 2011

I C P A P S L 2011

05 TH to 08 TH

DECEMBER 2011

“TOWARDS HIGHER ACHIEVEMENT AND SPIRITUALITY through

MENTAL

BRAIN

PROCESSES

and

CULTURE”

1

to 08 T H DECEMBER 2011 “TOWARDS HIGHER ACHIEVEMENT AND SPIRITUALITY through MENTAL BRAIN PROCESSES and

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON PSYCHOLOGY & ALLIED PROFESSIONS - SRI LANKA 2011

ON PSYCHOLOGY & ALLIED PROFESSIONS - SRI LANKA 2011 SLAPCAP Organizer SRI LANKAN ASSOCIATION FOR Co-organizer

SLAPCAP

Organizer

SRI LANKAN ASSOCIATION

FOR

SRI LANKA 2011 SLAPCAP Organizer SRI LANKAN ASSOCIATION FOR Co-organizer UNIVERSITY OF PSYCHOLOGY, KELANIYA

Co-organizer

UNIVERSITY

OF

PSYCHOLOGY,

KELANIYA

COUNSELING AND

SRI LANKA

PSYCHOTHERAPY

(S.L.A.P.C.A.P.)

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INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON PSYCHOLOGY & ALLIED PROFESSIONS - SRI LANKA 2011

THE

CONFERENCE LOGO

ALLIED PROFESSIONS - SRI LANKA 2011 THE CONFERENCE LOGO DEPICTION  Symbol Of ‘Psyche’ Depicts Mental

DEPICTION

Symbol Of ‘Psyche’ Depicts Mental Processes

Two Lobes Depict Brain’s Functional Processes (Brain Culture)

‘Globe’ Shape Depicts Universal Brotherhood And Future Hope For The Human Race

Light Blue And Light Green Colours Depict Unconditional AcceptanceNurtured Serenity Lasting Inner Healing With Higher Mental Realization

The International Conference on Psychology & Allied Professions Sri Lanka 2011

Website

E.mail

:

:

OR

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INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON PSYCHOLOGY & ALLIED PROFESSIONS - SRI LANKA 2011

CONTENTS

PAGE

His Excellency the President of Sri Lanka

05

Hon. Prime Minister of Sri Lanka

06

Vie Chancellor of the University of Kelaniya

07

Professor Emeritus Jitendra Mohan Panjab University India

08

Message from Organizers of ICPAPSL2011

09

Consultative Council (National and International)

11

Organizing Committee of The International Conference on Psychology and Allied

Professions Sri Lanka 2011

13

Services Profile

15

Keynote Speakers

21

THE PROGRAMME

25

The Programme at a glance

28

Index of Abstracts

30

The Programme in detail

32

Abstracts

40

Presenters / Speakers / Delegates

Final Declaration of the Colombo ICPAPSL2011

A word of thankfulness

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INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON PSYCHOLOGY & ALLIED PROFESSIONS - SRI LANKA 2011

MESSAGE FROM HIS EXCELLENCY

THE PRESIDENT OF THE DEMOCRATIC SOCIALIST REPUBLIC OF

SRI LANKA

- SRI LANKA 2011 MESSAGE FROM HIS EXCELLENCY THE PRESIDENT OF THE DEMOCRATIC SOCIALIST REPUBLIC OF

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INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON PSYCHOLOGY & ALLIED PROFESSIONS - SRI LANKA 2011

ON PSYCHOLOGY & ALLIED PROFESSIONS - SRI LANKA 2011 MESSAGE FROM THE HON. PRIME MINISTER OF

MESSAGE

FROM

THE HON. PRIME

MINISTER

OF

THE DEMOCRATIC

SOCIALIST REPUBLIC OF

SRI

LANKA

MINISTER OF THE DEMOCRATIC SOCIALIST REPUBLIC OF SRI LANKA Buddhism as a philosophy and Psychology as

Buddhism as a philosophy and Psychology as a positive science meet together where the mind is concerned. Both search and seek the reality. Realistically our Sri Lanka is just springing up after a bitter battle of war for the past nearly 30 years. No more war, no more destruction but we all want peace and construction.

Human suffering is caused not so much by external traumas per se, but by our responses to these traumas. These responses are conditioned by mental factors such as desires and fears which may be denied or repressed. If mental „suffering‟ is caused by an individual‟s reactions to life events rather than by the events themselves, then that suffering potentially can be relieved through a personal transformation in which life events are experienced from a different frame of reference.

Peace, happiness and serenity are abstracts that would be experienced by an individual through his inner forces thus motivating him to achieve higher and higher. Lasting peace, lasting happiness are to be achieved individually and socially today to be brought forward such experiences to next generations.

I am so happy to hear about this International Conference on Psychology and Allied Professions that is hosted in Sri Lanka for the first time. Sri Lanka is an ancient country with a written and evidence based history of more than 2500 years. Our countrymen has been flourished and nourished by the wisdom of Buddhist philosophy. Because of the tolerability today Sri Lanka is seen to be a multi-ethnic and multi-religious country setting up an example to our friendly nations.

I hope and wish that this International Conference be a very successful dialogue where your mighty knowledge and experience will be brought to one floor so that this may give a message to our societies.

04 th November

and experience will be brought to one floor so that this may give a message to

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INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON PSYCHOLOGY & ALLIED PROFESSIONS - SRI LANKA 2011

ON PSYCHOLOGY & ALLIED PROFESSIONS - SRI LANKA 2011 DESK OF THE VICE CHANCELLOR UNIVERSITY OF

DESK OF THE VICE CHANCELLOR

UNIVERSITY OF KELANIYA

SRI LANKA

PROFESSOR DR.SARATH AMUNUGAMA

OF KELANIYA SRI LANKA PROFESSOR DR.SARATH AMUNUGAMA It gives me great pleasure to write a message

It gives me great pleasure to write a message to the Souvenir Abstract Book of the first International Conference on Psychology & Allied Professions Sri Lanka 2011. As the Co- organizer of this great event I feel our University is privileged to share and expand broad spectrum of experience and knowledge with our Conference delegates.

Psychology is a positive science which gives us the true picture of behaviour of an individual or a society without being judgmental. All questions related to Why When Where How and in What way are well answered in this discipline. When we realize the real situation we can take measures to overcome, face or conquer day to day challenges of life. This alone proves that psychology is a scientific disciplines and not merely a ‘philosophy’. Scientific study is a constant search for truth and meaning.

It is imperative that Sri Lanka after having memories of bitter armed struggle for nearly thirty years initiates efforts to contextualize our professional experience with collaboration of our Overseas friends for the benefit of humanity.

Organizing such a great event is no an easy task. I take this opportunity to thank and congratulate all active organizers of this International Conference for their painful endeavours. I hope and wish that all concerned will grasp the maximum from this International Conference and continuity will be carried on to the future.

Conference and continuity will be carried on to the future. Professor Dr.Sarath Amunugama Vice Chancellor University

Professor Dr.Sarath Amunugama Vice Chancellor University of Kelaniya, Sri Lanka. 14 th November 2011

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INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON PSYCHOLOGY & ALLIED PROFESSIONS - SRI LANKA 2011

ON PSYCHOLOGY & ALLIED PROFESSIONS - SRI LANKA 2011 PROFESSOR EMERITUS JITENDRA MOHAN PANJAB UNIVERSITY INDIA

PROFESSOR EMERITUS JITENDRA MOHAN

PANJAB UNIVERSITY INDIA

" TOWARDS SPIRITUALITY THROUGH MENTAL PROCESSES AND BRAIN CULTURE"

The eternal spirit to communicate, cooperate and develop flow through confluence is evident in nature and some times humans also attempt to be together to gain, grow and glow. Spirituality has beckoned many a sages, saints and messiahs to weave a fabric giving solace and peace to all. Our limitations, in terms of, geopolitical, linguistic and visions prevent free flow of thoughts, ideas and beliefs. Many a time we tend to erect borders even on spiritual issues and common heritage of mankind. Modernization has provided us speed and reach but requires personal exchanges, conversation and above all togetherness to further joy

and harmony

It is believed that nothing move faster and more than an idea, probably, this thought has given us the mission and agenda for the coming International Conference of

Psychology and other Professions to move towards Spirituality through Mental Processes and

Brain Culture.

ASSOCIATION FOR PSYCHOLOGY, COUNSELING AND PSYCHOTHERAPY.

.While I heartily appreciate this endeavor on the part of SRI LANKAN

I feel fully involved in this positive effort to invite experts from different professions and lands

to deliberate and evolve specific recommendations and views to enhance the meaning of

psychological well being and spiritual union. I hope and pray for the success of all of us, including our leaders to develop a road map leading to love, enhancement and deeper purpose of

our living!

Praying with folded hands and inner trust for the success of our conference!

I HOPE

EMERGE AND THEY CAN CHANGE THE WORLD!

,BELIEVE

AND

VISUALIZE

THAT

WHEN

MINDS

MEET

,THOUGHTS

Professor Jitendra Mohan

PRESIDENT :INTERNATIONAL SOCIETY OF MENTAL TRAINING FOR EXCELLENCE

PROFESSOR EMERITUS OF PSYCHOLOGY

PRESIDENT: ASIAN ASSOCIATION OF APPLIED PSYCHOLOGY Department of Psychology, Panjab University Chandigarh-160014 INDIA Phone : 91 172 2534546 (O) (M) 0091 9876 491 321

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INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON PSYCHOLOGY & ALLIED PROFESSIONS - SRI LANKA 2011

WELCOME!

GREETINGS!

THE INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON PSYCHOLOGY & ALLIED PROFESSIONS SRI LANKA 2011 (ICPAPSL2011)

Sri Lanka - the ‘Pearl of the Indian Ocean’ is now a very peaceful country with its people’s hospitality and its nature’s blissful beauty. Throughout the year we enjoy the green foliage everywhere, and in the middle hilly site of the Island with ever soothing drifting fog. Sri Lanka flourishes with bluish seas with golden sandy beaches. While the peoples of Sri Lanka are enjoying the blessings of the Nature, they now long for Higher achievement towards Spirituality of Humanity. On behalf of the Council of Management of Sri Lankan Association for Psychology, Counselling, and Psychotherapy (S.L.A.P.C.A.P.) we very sincerely greet and welcome you to join the :

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON PSYCHOLOGY AND ALLIED PROFESSIONS SRI LANKA 2011 (ICPAPSL2011) DECEMBER 5 th to 8 th , 2011

at Hotel Galadari, Colombo, Sri Lanka

The Major Theme is:

“TOWARDS HIGHER ACHIEVEMENT AND SPIRITUALITY THROUGH MENTAL PROCESSES AND BRAIN CULTURE”

The Reason to select the Major Theme:

Today we find a Great Competition globally. The Economies Education Commerce and Trade Politics

- Information Technology Science Medicine Health Law Sports Professions - Academic fields

Infrastructure and Constructional developments - even Religious preaching are seen highly competitive. Through all these competitions, Human being is longing for Inner Happiness. It is not only the material ‘well-being’. The Human Being, with all his complex Biological functions, with all his cognitive, affective

and conative mental processes which are functioned by the amazing cultures (centers) of the brain, Individually as well as Socially, is striving to attain ‘Inner Happiness’. There is a huge gap between the ‘privileged’ and the ‘less privileged’, the ‘developed’ and the ‘under- developed’, the ‘high luxury lives’ and the ‘poorest of the poor’. A thought was emerged:

WITHER THE HUMAN RACE?

- WHERE DOES IT GO?

Let us all get together and have a dialogue - search re-search investigate to find out the underlying binding ‘UNIVERSALITY’ of Humanity?

‘HIGHER ACHIEVEMENT’ and ‘SPIRITUALITY’ are well accepted MAJOR THEMETIC TERMS that brings all of us together. Yes. all under one roof.

The Conference focuses on International, Inter-disciplinary, Inter-academic, Inter-professional approach to address across life span searching for ‘Inner Happiness’ ‘Inner Healing’ or Higher Mental Process called ‘Spirituality’ as Advancement of Humanity for sustainable global peace.

This Conference would give the Human Race a hope for the future. It would also serve as a ground-channel of meeting all fields of disciplines (viz: psychology medicine law Commerce & Trade Banking & Finance Construction and Development Political and Policy Making Information Technology & Media - different Academics - Professionals - Social Dignitaries etc.

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INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON PSYCHOLOGY & ALLIED PROFESSIONS - SRI LANKA 2011

We assure you that The Conference will be so Educative, Informative and enriching with Global Knowledge which enhances International understanding with ‘love’ and ‘kindness’.

Many scientific and practical sessions would give immense benefits to delegates of all corners of the world. This conference will be a Global Force to open eyes of all Nations towards experiencing ‘Inner Happiness’ for lasting global peace and the wellbeing of Human Family.

With Great Wishes !.

Sincerely,

ORGANIZER

- SRI LANKAN ASSOCIATION FOR PSYCHOLOGY, COUNSELING AND PSYCHOTHERAPY (S.L.A.P.C.A.P.)

CO-ORGANIZER - UNIVERSITY OF KELANIYA SRI LANKA

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INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON PSYCHOLOGY & ALLIED PROFESSIONS - SRI LANKA 2011

With best wishes for the International Conference on Psychology & Allied Professions Sri Lanka 2011

The Consultative Council

(ICPAPSL2011)

Ven. Dr. K. Pannindriya Thero

Dr.Micheal James Irland - Australia

Professor Jitendra Mohan - India

Dr.Aishath Ali Naaz - Consultant Clinical Psychologist - Maldives

Professor Harald Hochgraffe Germany

Consultant in Social Work Ms. Esther Abel - Germany

Dr.Hans Vischjager Consultant Psychotherapist - Netherlands

Prof.Dr.M. Kamal Uddin, Associate Professor of Psychology- Bangladesh

Senior Professor Daya Edirisinghe

Professor W.A.Gnanadasa Perera

Senior Consultant Psychiatrist Dr.G.S.Gnanasingham

Mr.S.W.Premaratne

Dr.Ruwan Ferdinando Consultant Community Physician

Dr. Ms.Anoma Kumarage

Dr .Viraj Ratnayake

Dr.Hakon Inge Stenmark - St.Olav University - Norway

Dr.Herbert Chiu - City University of Hong Kong

Dr.Lionel K Mandy USA

Ms.Vasantha Chandrasekera

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INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON PSYCHOLOGY & ALLIED PROFESSIONS - SRI LANKA 2011

Complements

& ALLIED PROFESSIONS - SRI LANKA 2011 Complements PARTNER ELECTRONIC PUBLISHER Rennie Georgieva| Assist. Mgr.
& ALLIED PROFESSIONS - SRI LANKA 2011 Complements PARTNER ELECTRONIC PUBLISHER Rennie Georgieva| Assist. Mgr.

PARTNER ELECTRONIC PUBLISHER

Rennie Georgieva| Assist. Mgr. Content Initiatives PsycINFO American Psychological Association 750 First Street NE, Washington, DC 20002-4242

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INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON PSYCHOLOGY & ALLIED PROFESSIONS - SRI LANKA 2011

The Organizing Committee of The International Conference on Psychology & Allied Professions Sri Lanka 2011 (I C P A P S L 2011)

& Allied Professions Sri Lanka 2011 (I C P A P S L 2011) Registrar Senior
& Allied Professions Sri Lanka 2011 (I C P A P S L 2011) Registrar Senior
& Allied Professions Sri Lanka 2011 (I C P A P S L 2011) Registrar Senior
& Allied Professions Sri Lanka 2011 (I C P A P S L 2011) Registrar Senior
& Allied Professions Sri Lanka 2011 (I C P A P S L 2011) Registrar Senior

Registrar Senior Professor Daya Edirisinghe

Chair Committees Chair International Affairs Professor Lakshman Madurasinghe

Dr.G.S.Gnanasingham Chair Affairs Psychological Medicine Committee

Vice President Mr.Hugo Wisidagama

Vice President Dr.Ruwan Ferdinando Chair Acamedic Review Committee

Committee Coordinator Mr.H.Lalith Perera

Review Committee Committee Coordinator Mr.H.Lalith Perera General Secretary Professor W.A. Gnanadasa Perera
Review Committee Committee Coordinator Mr.H.Lalith Perera General Secretary Professor W.A. Gnanadasa Perera
Review Committee Committee Coordinator Mr.H.Lalith Perera General Secretary Professor W.A. Gnanadasa Perera
Review Committee Committee Coordinator Mr.H.Lalith Perera General Secretary Professor W.A. Gnanadasa Perera

General Secretary Professor W.A. Gnanadasa Perera

Perera General Secretary Professor W.A. Gnanadasa Perera Ms.Vasantha Chandrasekera Legal Consultant Ms.Priyangika VK

Ms.Vasantha Chandrasekera Legal Consultant

Gnanadasa Perera Ms.Vasantha Chandrasekera Legal Consultant Ms.Priyangika VK Silva Assistant Secretary to the President

Ms.Priyangika VK Silva

Assistant Secretary to the President ICPAPSL2011-Organizing Committee

President / Originator Dr.H.R.S.Keerthisinghe

Dr.A.Balasuriya Academic Review Committee

Vice President Dr.Hans Vischjager

Treasurer Mr.S.W.Premaratne Legal Consultant

Vischjager Treasurer Mr.S.W.Premaratne Legal Consultant CommitteConvener Mr.K.Senthival Ms.W.P.Fonseka Committee
Vischjager Treasurer Mr.S.W.Premaratne Legal Consultant CommitteConvener Mr.K.Senthival Ms.W.P.Fonseka Committee

CommitteConvener

Mr.K.Senthival

Ms.W.P.Fonseka Committee Assistant

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INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON PSYCHOLOGY & ALLIED PROFESSIONS - SRI LANKA 2011

Volunteers

Ms.K A M Nilendra Fernando

Ms.VH Samanmali Fonseka

Mr.Lalinda Buddhika

Ms. S Dushika Soundararjan

Ms.Devathusyanthini

Mr. Arumugam

Mr.R.Praveen

Ms. Usha Barathee Mylendran

Mr.WM Janaka K Wanasinghe

Mr.MSM Shiraz

Mr.MRM Rikas

Mr.Shenal John

Ms.Nilanka Rajani

Dr.Ms.Anuradha Subashini Wickramaratne

Ravichandran

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INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON PSYCHOLOGY & ALLIED PROFESSIONS - SRI LANKA 2011

Services Profile of SLAPCAP

Psychological Counselling & Psycho therapy for the benefit of :

· The Child - School Children

· Adolescents

· Pre-marital

· Family

· Adults

· Senior Citizens

· Conducting Mobile Counselling Clinics Disaster Victims

· Outreach Psychological Counselling Centres

. Research and Documentation Rehabilitation Services :

Mentally and

Physically Disabled Individuals and Psycho-social victims (Residentially and Non-residentially)

without any foreign aid. Lanka.

Sahana Sevana” Rehabilitation

Home is running since 18 years for the benefit of

This Rehabilitation home is incorporated with a Parliament Act in Sri

WELCOME TO "Sahana Sevana" Rehabilitation Home

(Incorporated with a Parliament Act of Sri Lanka)

No.8, Hekitta Lane, Wattala, Sri Lanka

Act of Sri Lanka) No.8, Hekitta Lane, Wattala, Sri Lanka AUBOWAN WITH BLESSINGS ! CHRISTIANS CONTEMPLATE

AUBOWAN WITH BLESSINGS !

CHRISTIANS CONTEMPLATE NURSING CARE DRAMA THERAPY
CHRISTIANS CONTEMPLATE
NURSING CARE
DRAMA THERAPY

15

! CHRISTIANS CONTEMPLATE NURSING CARE DRAMA THERAPY 15 'MAITHREE' MEDITATION BY BUDDHISTS SING SONG AND

'MAITHREE' MEDITATION BY BUDDHISTS

CARE DRAMA THERAPY 15 'MAITHREE' MEDITATION BY BUDDHISTS SING SONG AND HAPPY DANCE TRAINING ON MAKING
SING SONG AND HAPPY DANCE TRAINING ON MAKING SOFT TOYS
SING SONG AND HAPPY DANCE
TRAINING ON MAKING SOFT TOYS

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON PSYCHOLOGY & ALLIED PROFESSIONS - SRI LANKA 2011

Mental Relief and De-stress Work-shops for the benefit of :

· Schools

· University Students

· Children‟s Homes

· Prisons

· Commercial Organizations

· Government Institutions

· Nurses‟ Training Schools

· Disabled Personnel in Armed Forces

· Suicide Prevention etc.

Personnel in Armed Forces · Suicide Prevention etc. Emotional release therapeutic process Other workshops on

Emotional release therapeutic process

Other workshops on request:

·

·

.

.

·

·

·

·

·

·

.

Disaster Stress First Aid (DISFA)

Stress Inoculation and Healthy Management Work-shops

(DISFA) Stress Inoculation and Healthy Management Work-shops Leadership (Managerial )Training workshops Youth Leadership

Leadership (Managerial )Training workshops

Youth Leadership Workshops

Healthy Family Living Work-shops

Personality Higher Modification Work-shops

Anger - Healthy Management Work-shops

Productivity Enhancement Work-shops

Healthy Life Management Work-shops

Employer-Employee Healthy Relationship

Motivation for Higher Performance

Healthy Relationship Motivation for Higher Performance Relaxation for Tsunami survivors De-tramatization process

Relaxation for Tsunami survivors

Relationship Motivation for Higher Performance Relaxation for Tsunami survivors De-tramatization process for forces 16

De-tramatization process for forces

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INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON PSYCHOLOGY & ALLIED PROFESSIONS - SRI LANKA 2011

Training Programmes:

· Advanced Diploma in Psychological Counselling and Psychotherapy (A.D.Psycho.C.) for

Professionals-

40 months

· Advanced Diploma in Psychology

24 months

· Diploma in Psychology

12 months

· Certificate Programme in Psychology

06 months

· Advanced Diploma in HR Management & Development

24 months

· Diploma in Physiotherapy

20 months

· Diploma in Nutrition and Dietetics

20 months

· Nurse-aid Training Programme

06 months

· First-aiders Training Programme

03 months

· Care-givers for Disabled Training Programme

03 months

·

Also - DEGREE programmes on BSc. M.Sc. upto Ph.D. in Indian Universities while being -

Commonwealth Universities Codex and International Universities Index)

in Sri Lanka

very cost-effective .(Indian Universities are accredited by the UGC-SL and

FOR TRAINING PROGRAMMES PLEASE CONTACT TP: 011- 2942655

E.mail:

and FOR TRAINING PROGRAMMES PLEASE CONTACT TP: 011- 2942655 E.mail: relief@slt.lk Training psychological counsellors 17

Training psychological counsellors

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INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON PSYCHOLOGY & ALLIED PROFESSIONS - SRI LANKA 2011

ON PSYCHOLOGY & ALLIED PROFESSIONS - SRI LANKA 2011 40 months trained psychological Counsellors - Convocation

40 months trained psychological Counsellors - Convocation ceremony

trained psychological Counsellors - Convocation ceremony Great Oath of Counsellors Dr.Kashav Dev of India lighting

Great Oath of Counsellors

Counsellors - Convocation ceremony Great Oath of Counsellors Dr.Kashav Dev of India lighting the Blessed Oil

Dr.Kashav Dev of India lighting the Blessed Oil Lamp

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INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON PSYCHOLOGY & ALLIED PROFESSIONS - SRI LANKA 2011

WISHFUL SUCCESS FOR ICPAPSL2011

- SRI LANKA 2011 WISHFUL SUCCESS FOR ICPAPSL2011 Business School of the Americas (BSA) Business School

Business School of the Americas (BSA)

Business School of the Americas (BSA) offers on-line and partly on-campus learning programs, leading to an Associate of Science, Bachelor of Science, Master of Science, and Doctor of Philosophy degree in Business Management, and an Associate of Arts (AA), Bachelor of Arts (BA), Master of Business Administration (MBA) or Doctor of Business Administration (DBA) degree in Business Management or Personal Branding. In special cases certificates and diplomas are being issued for short courses and seminars to successful candidates. The University is approved by the Government of Suriname.

Cntact:

Voorlopig adres: Hanoverlaan 21, Paramaribo, Suriname

19

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON PSYCHOLOGY & ALLIED PROFESSIONS - SRI LANKA 2011

Complements for great success for ICPAPSL2011 from (ACA)

Academic Consortium of the Americas

ICPAPSL2011 from (ACA) Academic Consortium of the Americas Academic Consortium of the America (ACA) was established

Academic Consortium of the America (ACA) was established in the USA by a group of academicians who have a passion for international education through the setup of links between dedicated educators with a passion for excellence in higher internationally recognised education. The Consortium is composed of a group Institutions worldwide to provide intellectual dialog and academic excellence . It also has in its membership universities registered and accredited in the Republic of Suriname under the applicable laws.

in the Republic of Suriname under the applicable laws. CONTACT DETAILS USA ACA P.O. Box 601564,
in the Republic of Suriname under the applicable laws. CONTACT DETAILS USA ACA P.O. Box 601564,

CONTACT DETAILS

USA ACA P.O. Box 601564,

North Miami Beach, Florida 33160, USA

20

USA Phone: +1-786-537-7580 Fax: +1-714-464-4498 info.usa@aca-edu.or g Website: http://www.aca-edu.org 20

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON PSYCHOLOGY & ALLIED PROFESSIONS - SRI LANKA 2011

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON PSYCHOLOGY AND ALLIED PROFESSIONS

05 TH TO 08 TH DECEMBER 2011

Keynote Speakers

Professor Sarath Amunugama

DECEMBER 2011 Keynote Speakers Professor Sarath Amunugama Sarath Amunugama, Justice of the Peace, is a leading

Sarath Amunugama, Justice of the Peace, is a leading Sri Lankan Academic , who is a Professor of French and is currently the Vice Chancellor of the University of Kelaniya.

Amunugama received his secondary education at Kingswood College, Kandy and entered the University of Ceylon before attending University of Sorbonne III,Paris specializing in modern languages where he gained his Licentiate, Master's and PhD. He then gain a DESS from the University of Burgundy.

Dr.Maria Leventis

a DESS from the University of Burgundy . Dr.Maria Leventis Maria was born at Eleusis. After

Maria was born at Eleusis.

After finishing the studies in medicine she decided to specialize in psychiatry and indeed the Second University Clinic of the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, the most comprehensive curriculum. As Maria saya…” The roads opened through my education leads me even closer to Socrates' dictum "the one thing I know that I know nothing," one I know that I know nothing…….But I want to know! Along with psychiatry, studying the ancient Greek philosophers, history, literature, poetry and various religious approaches. All add information to my software, but there's always the feeling unfulfilled.

In 2002, she started her Master in Art Therapy. She continues t add….”Among other things, then started my relationship with art history. With enchants the world of symbols. Focusing on the decoding of the symbols used in art, religion, philosophy, the morals and customs in daily life. I feel that I have found many pieces of the puzzle but I still missing something”.

The lecture entitled "Breaking Inner Codes", Ms. Leventis and John will present the innovative method of Global Antiliptikotitas enlargement of human perception.

Dr.Maria Leventi - Psychiatrist, Psychotherapist, Inspirer and Founder of Global Perceptiveness, Greece

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INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON PSYCHOLOGY & ALLIED PROFESSIONS - SRI LANKA 2011

Dr.John Karlaouzos

John was born in Athens. In 1979, he began his studies at the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology, Australia. There, with the help of two teachers he continued his research on the Pythagorean geometric shapes and geometric solids of Plato, to decode the intelligence involving. He has travelled widely to all four (4) points of the horizon, Europe, Asia, Africa, America, aiming to discover the holy knowledge, codified in manners, in customs and art of peoples.

codified in manners, in customs and art of peoples. Dr.Guy Ale Dr.Guy Ale - President Lifespan

Dr.Guy Ale

in manners, in customs and art of peoples. Dr.Guy Ale Dr.Guy Ale - President Lifespan Seminars,

Dr.Guy Ale - President Lifespan Seminars, USA

President Lifespan Seminar, USA http://www.lifespanseminar.com/ Guy Ale was born into a Jewish family, lived in a Muslim country as a child, and in predominantly Christian societies as an adult. He a member of International High IQ Society, lived in four countries on three continents, and speak four languages.

He says that never felt a part of any one religion, and have always felt at one with God. He further says that he had known how long he would live for the past eighteen years. This insight first came as a feeling which he mistrusted and suspected, but as it wouldn‟t go away, he gradually have come to accept and rely on, to the point where it is now a fully articulated philosophy. This philosophy states that it is in our DNA to sense the amount of energy coursing through us, and that we also have the ability to regulate this life force.

“The critical thing in terms of creative impulse seems to be that when something aberrant or unusual happens either in your life or in your work – that you don‟t ignore it. The easiest thing is to ignore when something strange happens. The roots of innovation lie in taking seriously and developing something which nobody else has paid attention to and which you and the rest of the universe might be inclined to ignore. You need to have a lot of fortitude to do this because most other people aren‟t going to be giving you a lot of positive signals.” – Professor Howard Gardner of the Harvard Graduate School of Education.

He believes that the perception of our duration is a latent capacity in us, a genetic feature which is unknown at this point in our evolution, as the introduction of fire, the invention of flying, and the discovery of radio waves were before we revealed them.

Over the last eighteen years this awareness has been tested and fortified in reality. It is not a highfalutin theory but a practical approach to life which enables him to be in the best physical and mental conditions he had ever been, without the use of drugs, pills, or enhancements of any kind. In terms of behavior, it prevents anxieties and desperate actions and leads to a more graceful existence. When we are able to see the entire structure of our life, we are better able to deal with the everyday challenges we confront build our networks, enhance social capital and work together to make this planet a better place to live in.

Guy will speak on "Optimizing Lifespan Potential"

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INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON PSYCHOLOGY & ALLIED PROFESSIONS - SRI LANKA 2011

Dr. Ior Guglielmi

& ALLIED PROFESSIONS - SRI LANKA 2011 Dr. Ior Guglielmi Dr. Ior Guglielmi was born in

Dr. Ior Guglielmi was born in Verona, and graduated at the University of Padova, school of medicine, with a thesis on the Physiological and Clinical effects of Transendental Meditation. He did research studies on EEG coherence at MERU in Switzerland from 1978 to 1981. He has studied Maharishi Ayurveda in India with Dr. Brihaspati Dev Triguna, Dr. V. M. Dwivedi, Dr Kasture, Dr Raju and Dr Balaraj Maharshi in India in 1981, 1986, 2003 and in Holland, 1985, 1986,1987 and 1990. in USA 1994, Swisserland 1989, 1992. He has been chief of staff in health centers and pancha karma in Como,, Limone del Garda and Verona. He has been president of the Doctor Association for Perfect Health and he is professor of Maharishi Ayurveda at Maharishi Vedic University and Maharishi European Research University Holland. He has taught ayurveda to thousands of doctors and pharmacits since 1997. He has been lecturing on TM, Vedic Science, Maharishi Ayurveda and Maharishi Vedic Astrology all over Italy and abroad for many years. At the moment he is responsabile for Maharishi Ayurveda in Italy, Greece, Sri Lanka, Quwait, Barhain, Kazakhstan, Niger and Papua.

Professor Jitendra Mohan

Kazakhstan, Niger and Papua. Professor Jitendra Mohan Professor Emeritus of Psychology, Panjab University,

Professor Emeritus of Psychology, Panjab University, Chandigarh.

M.A. Psychology (1962) First Class First, Ph.D in 1966

Former Dean of Faculty of

Arts, University Fellow, Chairman (Professor)First Class First, Ph.D in 1966 Former Dean of Faculty of of Department of Psychology, Panjab

of Department of Psychology, Panjab University, Chandigarh

U.G.C Emeritus Fellow (2008-2010)

National Fellow : Indian Council of Social Science Research (2003 2005)

Visiting Professor in China, U.K., Malaysia, Iran, Serbia and Turkey.

Publications Twenty Five. 300 Research Papers & Chapters.

Editor-in-Chief Asian J. of Psychology and Education, on the Board of 15 Academic Journals.

Guided 76 Ph.D.

Completed 18 Sponsored Research Projects in the field of Applied Psychology.

Delivered 20 Keynote

in the field of Applied Psychology. Delivered 20 Keynote addresses and 100 invited lectures in various
in the field of Applied Psychology. Delivered 20 Keynote addresses and 100 invited lectures in various

addresses and 100 invited lectures in various International Conferences

and delivered more than 400 lectures in India.

He would love to be viewed as a Psychologist applying his knowledge & skills for excellence and peace in the world

He would love to be viewed as a Psychologist applying his knowledge & skills for excellence

23

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON PSYCHOLOGY & ALLIED PROFESSIONS - SRI LANKA 2011

ON PSYCHOLOGY & ALLIED PROFESSIONS - SRI LANKA 2011 MEDIA PARTNER For ICPAPSL2011 BEST COMPLIMENTS FROM

MEDIA PARTNER For

ICPAPSL2011

BEST COMPLIMENTS FROM INDEPENDENT TELEVISION NETWORK

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INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON PSYCHOLOGY & ALLIED PROFESSIONS - SRI LANKA 2011

PROGRAMME

& ALLIED PROFESSIONS - SRI LANKA 2011 PROGRAMME 04 t h December 2011 - 9:00 am

04 th December 2011 - 9:00 am to 05:00 pm SECRETARIAT is Opened at Galadari Hotel

05 th December 2011 - 9:00 am to 04.00 pm SECRETARIAT is Opened at Galadari Hotel Registrations

for

pm SECRETARIAT is Opened at Galadari Hotel Registrations for PROGRAMME ON 05 T H DECEMBER 2011

PROGRAMME ON 05 TH DECEMBER 2011

- 4:30 pm All Participants have to be in their seats in the Main Conference Hall

- Arrival of the Chief Guest

- 05:00 pm Light of Light Conventional Oil Lamp

- 05:15 pm Blessings from Religious Dignitaries

- 05:35 pm - Puja Dance

- 05:40 pm - Welcome Address Professor Lakshman Madurasinghe

- Objectives of the International Conference Dr.H.R.S.Keerthisinghe

President-ICPAPSL2011

- Keynote Speech Professor Dr.Sarath Amunugama Vice Chancellor University of Kelaniya

- 06:00 pm - Address Chief Guest

- 06:20 pm - Vote of Thanks Senior Professor Daya Edirisinghe

- 06:30 pm - Sri Lanka National Anthem with Mighty Respect for All International Delegates

*********************************

6:45 PM to 08:00 PM

-

Secretariat is opened for Registrations

**********************************

05 th December 2011

7.30 pm to 9.30pm <<<<<<<Meet and Greet with Dinner >>>>>>> Galadari Hotel Room Anthurium

25

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON PSYCHOLOGY & ALLIED PROFESSIONS - SRI LANKA 2011

Wish every success for ICPAPSL2011

Compliments from

Young Scientists University ,USA

Compliments from Young Scientists University ,USA The Young Scientists' University of USA is totally

The Young Scientists' University of USA is totally dedicated towards recognizing, encouraging, rewarding the talented youth who are motivated to pursue scientific research and innovative development of new products, service and concepts as career and serve the country as entrepreneurs as well as fellow citizens through their dedicated effort in their own field. We bring them up in scientific nature which they keen on and all they are equipped with world class Java technology as implementation tool. We strive to educate students towards reaching the highest levels of performance, effective talents, creativity, skill, and entrepreneurship development during their undergraduate career for them to reach the highest level as a scientist in their young age encouraging them for new inventions and market those using entrepreneurial skill they develop within the academic career.

We provide a wide variety of study options in diverse disciplines through our Affiliated Campuses at their locations or to the worldwide student body through a sophisticated state-of-the-art online learning portal. For the less privileged students who cannot afford to pay the standard fees, we have many scholarship options too since we are committed creating a world which is literate with affordable education to all. Please use our standard application and let us know of your interests and we will be able to guide you to the appropriate level of study.

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INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON PSYCHOLOGY & ALLIED PROFESSIONS - SRI LANKA 2011

ON PSYCHOLOGY & ALLIED PROFESSIONS - SRI LANKA 2011 Chamber of Chartered Java Professionals, USA Chamber

Chamber of Chartered Java Professionals, USA

Chamber of Chartered Java Professionals has been constituted as a

pioneering international organization in the field of Java technology to confer

"CHARTER" status to honor knowledge skill and experience of Java

Professionals who implement Java Technology for sustainable development

activities worldwide.

The mandate of the Chamber of Chartered Java Professionals International

encompasses eight major fields Such as Education, Livelihood, Food, Health,

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technology implementation.

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30

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200 Elefsina,

Attiki,

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Website:

27

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON PSYCHOLOGY & ALLIED PROFESSIONS - SRI LANKA 2011

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON PSYCHOLOGY & ALLIED PROFESSIONS SRI LANKA 2011

PROGRAMME AT A GLANCE Monday 05 th December 2011 : 08:00 AM to 04:00 PM
PROGRAMME AT A GLANCE
Monday
05 th December 2011 :
08:00 AM to 04:00 PM – Registration at the
Secretariat
05:00 PM to 06:30 PM – Inaugural Opening Ceremony
07:30 PM to 09:30 PM – MEET & GREET – DINNER – ROOM ANTHURIUM
Tuesday 06 th December 2011 :
07:00 AM to 09:00AM
Registration
SECRETARIAT
KEYNOTE SPEAKER (1)
09:00 AM to09:45 AM
MAIN BALLROOM
DR.GUY JOSEPH ALE
09:45 AM to 10:30 AM
KEYNOTE SPEAKER(2)
DR.IOR GUGLIELMI
MAIN BALLROOM
10:30 AM to 11:00 AM
MID-MORNING REFRESHMENTS
HALL (C)
11:00 AM to 01.:00 PM
ACADEMIC SESSIONS
HALL (A) and HALL (B)
01:00 PM to 02:00 PM
L U N C H
ROOM ANTHURIUM
02:00 PM to 02:30 PM
WORK SHOP – (4 GROUPS)
HALL (A) and HALL (B)
02:30 PM to 03:30 PM
ACADEMIC SESSIONS
HALL (A) and HALL (B)
03:30 PM to 04:00 PM
MID-EVENING REFRESHMENTS
HALL (C)
04:00 PM to 05:00 PM
ACADEMIC SESSIONS
HALL (A) and HALL (B)
05:00 PM to 05:30 PM
EVALUATION
HALL (A) and HALL (B)
RELAX
28

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON PSYCHOLOGY & ALLIED PROFESSIONS - SRI LANKA 2011

Wednesday 07 TH December 2011 : KEYNOTE SPEAKER (3) 09:00 AM to 09:45 AM MAIN
Wednesday 07 TH December 2011 :
KEYNOTE SPEAKER (3)
09:00 AM to
09:45 AM
MAIN BALLROOM
DR.MARIA LEVENTI
KEYNOTE SPEAKER (4)
09:45 AM to 10:30 AM
MAIN BALLROOM
DR.IOANNIS KARLAOUZOS
10:30 AM to 11:00 AM
MID-MORNING REFRESHMENTS
HALL (C)
11:00 AM to 01.00 PM
ACADEMIC SESSIONS
ROOM (A) and ROOM (B)
01:00 PM to 02:00 PM
LUNCH
ROOM ANTHURIUM
KEYNOTE SPEAKER (5)
02:00 PM to 02:45 PM
MAIN BALLROOM
PROFESSOR JITENDRA MOHAN
02:45 PM to 03:15 PM
VEDIC / YOGA DEMONSTRATION
MAIN BALLROOM
03:30 PM to 04:00 PM
MID-EVENING REFRESHMENTS
HALL (C)
04:00 PM to 05:00 PM
ACADEMIC SESSIONS
HALL (A) and HALL (B)
05:00 PM to 05:30 PM
WORKSHOP DRAFT OF THE
DECLARATION
HALL (A) and HALL (B)
07.30 PM to 09.30 PM
SOCIO-CULTURAL GET TOGETHER
MULTINATIONAL DINNER WITH ENTERTAINEMNTS
ROOM ANTHURIUM
Thursday 08 TH December 2011:
08.00 AM to 11.00 AM
BALLROOM
CLOSING / FAREWELL CEREMONY
MAIN

29

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON PSYCHOLOGY & ALLIED PROFESSIONS - SRI LANKA 2011

INDEX OF ACADEMIC THEMES

01.

OPTIMIZING YOUR LIFESPAN POTENTIAL Guy J Ale - KEYNOTE SPEAKER

02.

BREAKING INNER CODES - Leventi M., Karlaouzos Y. - Greece

03.

DEVELOPING ADOLESCENTS' ABILITIES, GOAL SETTING AND PROBLEM SOLVING THROUGH GLOBAL PERCEPTIVENESS‟ METHOD - Peppa A. - Greece

04.

INTERACTING WITH INFORMATION MODULES - Stavropoulos A. - Greece

05.

THE EFFECT OF LISTENING TO GAYATRI MANTRA ON EEG - Susan Thomas - India

06.

NEUROPSYCHOLOGICAL PROFILE IN ALCOHOL DEPENDENT INDIVIDUALS -Susan Thomas - India

07.

THE CONCEPT OF HYPNOSIS IN PATANJALI YOGA SUTRAS - Jini K Gopinath Chowdhary - India

and Shitika

08.

ELIMINATING EXCLUSIONARY PRACTICES IN EDUCATION TO MAKE WAY FOR INCLUSION Shalini Felicity Wickremesooriya - Sri Lanka

09.

MEDITATION PRACTICE IN THE COMMUNITY: PSYCHOLOGICAL OUTCOMES AND PROCESSES - Michael James Ireland - Australia

10.

A STUDY TO EVINCE THE IMPORTANCE OF SATVA PAREEKSHA (MENTAL STAMINA)

IN

AYURVEDA AND ITS INFLUENCE ON TREATMENT - Adiga Handady Shripathi - India

11.

“SCOPE OF AYURVEDIC PANCHAKARMA THERAPY IN TREATING PSYCHOLOGICAL DISORDERS” - Adiga Handady Shripathi and G.L.Ramya Narayan - India

12.

MUSIC AS THERAPY - Balambegai Rajaeshwaran Sri Lanka

13.

ORGANIZATIONAL CONFLICTS BY STRUCTURAL FACTORS AND EFFECT UPON MANAGERIAL DECISION MAKING ROLE IN SRI LANKAN UNIVERSITIES - Henegama H Prsangika Sri Lanka

14.

WORKING WITH EXPLOITED WOMEN AND ABUSED CHILDREN IN THE MALDIVES REFLECTIONS AND INSIGHTS OF A CLINICIAN - Aishath Ali Naaz - Maldives

15.

CHILD ABUSE IN THE MALDIVES: AN OVERVIEW Fathimath Sauda / Aishath Ali Naaz - Maldives

16.

ABUSE TOWARDS WOMEN IN THE MALDIVES: A LOOK AT THE CURRENT PATHWAYS TO ASSISTANCE - Aishath Jinanee Ibrahim - Maldives

17.

GENDER BASED ROOT CAUSE ANALYSIS IN IT INDUSTRY - Ritu Soni - India

18.

REDUCING STRESS THROUGH THEATRE A CASE STUDY FOR CHILDREN -Yogesh Chand Gambhir - India

19.

THE MORE THERE IS CLARITY IN APPLICATION THE MORE THE CONFIDENCE IS

A

NEW INTERPRETATION OF BUDDHIST PRACTICE OF MEDITATION Ven. Miriswaththe

Wimalagnana Sri Lanka

20.

HELP IN THE AFTERMATHOF TERROR PSYCHOSOCIALSTRATEGIES FOR SURVIVORS OF THE UTOYA MASSACRE IN OSLO 22.07.11. - Hakon Stenmark - Norway

21.

NEUROPSYCHOLOGICAL REHABILITATION- HOLISTIC APPROACH - Jamuna Rajeswaran - India

22.

USE OF MOTION PICTURE IN THE CLINICAL PRACTICE - Prashanth Mahendrarjah Sri Lanka

23.

PILOT STUDY ON STUDENT INVOLVEMENT IN RELIGIOUS CULTS THROUGH MENTAL PROCESS - Padma Sriyani Yatapana Sri Lanka

30

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON PSYCHOLOGY & ALLIED PROFESSIONS - SRI LANKA 2011

24.

SPIRITUAL PSYCHOLOGY AND WELL BEING - Jitendra Mohan - KEYNOTE SPEECH - India

25.

Role of Spirituality and Positive Emotions in Healthy Ageing - Meena Sehgal - India

 

26.

TAOIST MIND-TRAINING, SPIRITUALITY AND MORAL DEVELOPMENT Dr Herbert Chiu Hong Kong

 

27.

THE PATTERN OF PATIENTS ATTENDING FOR PSYCHOSOCIAL COUNSELING (BY THE GENERAL PRACTITIONER) IN GENERAL PRACTICE CONSULTATION - Fernando M.G.T. Sri Lanka

28.

ASSOCIATION OF CEREBRAL CORTICAL GREY MATTER DEFICITS, COGNITIVE NEUROLOGICAL MEASURES AND SYMPTOM RATINGS IN SCHIZOPHRENIA - Nishantha Kumarasinghe Sri Lanka

29.

EXTENSION OF HUMAN LIFE SPAN - Anura Sirimanna Sri Lanka

 

30.

THE PARADIGM OF “INSIDE-OUT”:

A PSYCHOLOGICAL, PHILOSOPHICAL AND SPIRITUAL

ART

OF LIVING - Rev. Fr. Jeevantha Peiris - Sri Lanka

 

31.

THE

RELEVANCE

OF

CLASSIFICATION

IN

INTELLECTUAL

DISABILITY

AND

ITS

IMPLICATION ON

 

INTERVENTION - Madhusoodana Sunnambala - India

 

32.

HUMAN DEVELOPMENT- A PSYCHODYNAMIC PERSPECTIVE - NIRMALAN DHAS Sri Lanka

 

33.

PSYCHOTHERAPY AND SPIRITUALITY - Hans Vischjager - Netherland

 

34.

AN ENLIVENED CONSCIOUSNESS ( E-CONSCIOUSNESS) PAVING THE WAY FOR ENHANCED SOCIAL CAPITAL TOWARDS SUSTAINABLE GROWTH - Lakshman Madurasinghe Sri Lanka

35.

ASSESSMENT OF ANXIETY AMONG HIGHER EDUCATION STUDENTS AND ITS RELATIONSHIP WITH SPIRITUALITY - Lancy D‘Souza – Sri Lanka

 

36.

VEDIC SPIRITUAL HYPNOSIS FOR UNIVERSAL PEACE Shri Ravisankar Ramanathan - India

37.

CULTURAL NOTION OF DEPRESSION IN NEPAL - Usha Kiran - Nepal

 

38.

HIGHER ACHIEVEMENT THROUGH CONSCIOUSNESS BASED RECOVERY (AN APPROACH TOWARD LASTING HEALING THROUGH UNCONDITIONAL ACCEPTANCE)

H.R.S.Keerthisinghe Sri Lanka

 

39.

WOMEN RIGHTS PROTECTION IN SRI LANKA; CASE STUDIES ANALYSIS - Samarakoon.W.M.S.A. And Jayasena.C. Sri Lanka

 

40.

EASTERN AND WESTERN TRADITIONAL FORMS OF HEALING Lionel K Mandy - USA

 

41.

AWARENESS FROM PARTICULAR TO GENERAL: SEARCH FOR THE SPIRIT FROM NUCLEUS, BODY AND PSYCHE AN EPISTEMOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVE Mathew John Kokkatta - India

42.

MUSIC THERAPY AS A RELAXATION INSTRUMENT W A Gnanadasa Perera Sri Lanka

 

43.

CHIPS VERSUS OFFENCES Vasantha Chandrasekera Sri Lanka

 

44.

EXPERIENCES IN CONDUCTING THE EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY MODULE FOR PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING TUTORS - Ferdinando R.

31

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON PSYCHOLOGY & ALLIED PROFESSIONS - SRI LANKA 2011

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON PSYCHOLOGY & ALLIED PROFESSIONS

 

SRI LANKA 2011

 

DETAILED PROGRAMME FOR KEYNOTE SPEECHES AND ACADEMIC SESSIONS

 

TUESDAY 6TH DECEMBER 2011

 
 

MAIN BALLROOM

 

KEYNOTE SPEAKER (1): Dr. Guy Joseph Ale

   

KEYNOTE SPEAKER (2): Dr.Ior Guglielmi

09.00 AM TO 09.45 AM

09.45 AM TO 10.30 AM

Chair

:Professor Jitendra Mohan India

Chair

: Dr.Hakon Inge Stenmark Norway

Co-Chair :Dr.H.R.S.Keerthisinghe Sri Lanka Co- Chair: Dr.Maria Leventi - Greece

 

Co-Chair : Dr.Aspasia Peppa Greece Co- Chair: Dr.Ruwan Ferdinando Sri Lanka

 

10.30 AM TO 11.00 AM REFRESHMENTS

 

11:00 AM to 12:00 NOON

 
 

HALL (A)

 

HALL B

ACADEMIC SESSION 01

   

ACADEMIC SESSION 02

 

Chair

: Prof.Madhusoodana sunnambala-

Chair

: Mrs. Teresa Eve Mishler-USA

India Co-Chair : Dr. Susan Thomas-India Co- Chair: Dr.Prabha Gunawardena-NZ

Co-Chair : Dr. Aishath Naaz - Maldives Co- Chair: Dr. Champika Dilrukshi De Silva-NZ

 

01

 

04

The effect of listening to gayatri mantra on EEG (Index 05)

 

A study to evince the importance of satva pareeksha (mental stamina) in ayurveda and its influence on treatment (Index 10)

02

 

05

Eliminating exclusionary practices in education to make

 

The more there is clarity in application the more the

way for inclusion (Index 08)

 

confidence is

(Index 19)

03

 

06

The concept of hypnosis in patanjali yoga sutras

 

Working with exploited women and abused children

(Index 07)

in the maldives:

(Index 14)

32

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON PSYCHOLOGY & ALLIED PROFESSIONS - SRI LANKA 2011

Contd

 

TUESDAY 06 TH DECEMBER 2011

12.00 NOON TO 01.00 PM

 
 

HALL (A)

 

HALL (B)

ACADEMIC SESSION 03

   

ACADEMIC SESSION 04

Chair

: Professor Harald Helmut Hochgraffe

 

Chair

: Professor M.H.M. Tissera

Co-Chair : Mr. Mahendrarajah Prashanth

 

Co-Chair : Dr. Chiu Kou Tai Herbert Co- Chair: Rev.Fr. M.P.A.Jeevantha Peiris - Sri Lanka

Co- Chair: Ms. P.S.Yatapana-Sri Lanka

07

 

10

Women rights protection in sri lanka; case studies analysis (Index 39)

 

Use of motion picture in the clinical practice (Index 22)

08

 

11

Neuropsychological rehabilitation- holistic approach (Index 21)

 

The pattern of patients attending for psychosocial counseling (by the general practitioner) in general practice consultation (Index 27)

09

 

12

Pilot study on student involvement in religious cults through mental process (Index 23)

 

Child abuse in the Maldives: an overview (Index 15)

 

01.00 PM TO 02.00 PM

-

L U N C H

-

ROOM ANTHURIUM

Contd…

TUESDAY 06TH DECEMBER 2011 AFTERNOON

02:00 PM to 02:30 PM

GROUP WORK FOUR GROUPS - HALL (A) AND HALL (B)

HALL (A)

02.30 PM to 03.30 PM

HALL (B)

ACADEMIC SESSION 06

ACADEMIC SESSION 05

Chair: Professor G. Dayalatha Lekamge Co-Chair : Dr. Sinniah Thevananthan Co- Chair: Dr. K.M. Nishantha Kumarasinghe

Chair:

Thero Co-Chair : Professor Sehgal Meena Kumari Co- Chair: Professor Shripathi Adigah

Ven. Professor Ittademaliye Indrasara

13

Human development- a psychodynamic perspective (Index 32)

16

The paradigm of ―inside-out‖: a psychological, philosophical and spiritual art (Index 30)

33

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON PSYCHOLOGY & ALLIED PROFESSIONS - SRI LANKA 2011

14

 

17.

Extension of human life span

 

The relevance of classification in intellectual disability

(Index 29)

and its implication on intervention (Index 31)

15

 

18

Psychotherapy and spirituality

 

Assessment of anxiety among higher education students and its relationship with spirituality (Index 35)

(Index 33)

 

MID-EVENING REFRESHMENTS - 03.30 PM TO 04.00 PM

 

04:00 PM to 05:00 PM

 

HALL (A)

   

HALL (B)

     

ACADEMIC SESSION 08

ACADEMIC SESSION 07 Chair: Dr.Guy J Ale USA

Co-chair: Professor Jini K Gopinath -India

 

Chair: Dr.Rajeswaran Balambegai-SL Co-chair: Mr.Andreas Stavropoulos-Greece Co-chair: Ms. Shalini Wickremesooriya-SL

Co-chair: Ven.Miriswaththe Wimalagnana Thero-SL

19

 

22

Eastern and Western Traditional Forms of Healing

 

Cultural notion of depression in Nepal

(Index 40)

(Index 37)

20

 

23

Scope of ayurvedic panchakarma therapy in treating

 

Awareness from particular to general: search for the

psychological disorders (Index 11)

 

spirit from nucleus, body and psyche an epistemological perspective (Index 41)

21

 

24

Neuropsychological

profile

in

alcohol

dependent

Association of cerebral cortical grey matter deficits, cognitive neurological measures and symptom ratings in schizophrenia (Index 28)

individuals

(Index 6)

 

WEDNESDAY 07 TH DECEMBER 2011

 

MAIN BALLROOM

 

KEYNOTE SPEAKER (3): Dr.Maria Leventi

   

KEYNOTE SPEAKER(4):Dr.Ioannis Karlaouzos

09.00 AM TO 09.45 AM

 

09.45 AM TO 10.30 AM

Chair

: Professor Lakshman Madurasinghe-SL

 

Chair : Professor Lakshman Madurasinghe-SL

Co-chair: Mr. Mr.S.W.Premaratne

 

Co-chair: Mr. Mr.S.W.Premaratne-SL

Co-chair: Professor Dr.Ritu Soni

Co-chair: Professor Dr.Ritu Soni-India

 

10.30 AM TO 11.30 AM

 

HALL (A)

   

HALL (B)

34

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON PSYCHOLOGY & ALLIED PROFESSIONS - SRI LANKA 2011

ACADEMIC SESSION 09

 

ACADEMIC SESSION 10

 

Chair: Dr. Lionel K Mandy USA Co-Chair : Mrs.Micha Artemis-Greece Co- Chair: Dr.Mathew John Kokkatta

Chair: Dr. Michael J. Ireland Australia Co-Chair : Dr.Jamuna Rajeswaran-India Co- Chair: Rev.Fr.M.P.A.JeevanthaPeiris-SL

25

 

28

Music as therapy

Abuse towards women in the Maldives: a look at the

(Index 12)

current pathways to assistance (Index 16)

 

26

 

29

Role of Spirituality and Positive Emotions in Healthy

Help in the aftermath of terror psychosocial strategies for survivors of the Utoya massacre in Oslo (Index 20)

Ageing

(Index 25)

27

 

30

Gender based root cause analysis in it industry

Organizational conflicts by structural factors and

(Index 17)

effect upon managerial decision making role in Sri Lankan universities (Index 13)

 

11.30 AM TO 01.00 PM

 

HALL (A)

 

HALL (B)

ACADEMIC SESSION 11

 

ACADEMIC SESSION 12

 

Chair: Senior Prof.Daya Edirisinghe - SL

Chair: Professor Jitendra Mohan - India Co-Chair : Dr.G.S.Gnanasingham - SL

Co- Chair: Ms.Vasantha Chandrasekera-SL

 

Co-chair : Dr.Guy J Ale - USA Co-chair: Prof. Dr. Shripathi Adiga H -India

31

 

36

Reducing stress through theatre a case study for

Taoist

mind-training,

spirituality

and

moral

children

development

 

(Index 18)

(Index 26)

 

32

 

37

Higher achievement through consciousness based recovery (an approach toward lasting healing through unconditional acceptance) (Index 38)

 

Interacting with information modules

 

(Index 4)

 

33

 

38

Meditation practice in the community: psychological

An enlivened consciousness ( e-consciousness) paving the way for enhanced social capital towards sustainable growth (Index 34)

outcomes and processes (Index 09 )

01.00 PM TO 02.00 PM

L U N C H

-

ROOM ANTHURIUM

 
 

MAIN BALLROOM

 

35

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON PSYCHOLOGY & ALLIED PROFESSIONS - SRI LANKA 2011

KEYNOTE SPEAKER (5):

 

VEDIC / YOGA DEMONSTRATION Shri Ravisankar 02.45 PM to 03.30 PM

Professor Emeritus Jitendra Mohan 02:00 PM to 02:45 PM

Chair: Senior Professor Daya Edirisinghe-Sl Co-chair: Dr. Michael J. Ireland Australia

Chair: Senior Prof.Daya Edirisinghe-SL Co-chair: Dr. Michael J. Ireland Australia

Co-chair: Professor Ritu Soni - India

Co-chair: Professor Ritu Soni - India

03.30 PM TO 04.00 PM

MID-EVENING REFRESHMENTS

04.00 PM TO 04.30 PM

HALL (A)

 

HALL (B)

ACADEMIC SESSION 13

 

ACADEMIC SESSION 14

Chair: Professor Harald Helmut Hochgraffe- Germany Co-Chair : Dr.H.R.S.Keerthisinghe-SL Co- Chair: Dr.Hakon Stenmark - Norway

Chair: Prof.Lakshman Madurasinghe Co-Chair : Dr.Michael J Ireland Co- Chair: Prof.

39

 

41

Developing adolescents' abilities, goal setting and problem solving through global perceptiveness‘ method (Index 03)

Interacting with information modules (Index 04)

40

 

42

Chips versus offences (Index 43)

Music therapy as a relaxation instrument (Index 42)

43

Experiences in training the educational psychology module to public health nursing tutors (Index 44)

PANEL FINAL DECLARATION 04.30PM TO 05.30 PM

CONSULTATIVE COUNCIL PRESENT

MAIN BALLROOM

 

36

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON PSYCHOLOGY & ALLIED PROFESSIONS - SRI LANKA 2011

07 th December 2011

06:30 PM to 09:00 PM

GRAND SOCIO-CULTURAL GET TOGETHER

MULTINATIONAL DINNER - ENTERTAINMENTS

ROOM ANTHURIUM

8 th December 2011 09.00 AM to 11.30 AM

FAREWELL and CLOSING

CEREMONY

08:30 AM

- All are seated in the main Conference Hall

08.45

AM

- Arrival of the Chief Guest

09.00AM

- Traditional Oil Lamp

09.15

AM

- Briefing the Hon. Prime Minister of the Event

09.30

AM

- Symbolic Certification by the Hon. Prime Minister

09.40

AM

- Offering Dance

09.50

AM

- Reading the Great Convention

10.00

AM

- Future Events

10.10

AM

- Address by the Hon. Prime Minister

10.20AM

- Vote of Thanks

10.30

AM

- Official Closing of the I C P A P 2011 declared

International Delegates‟ Flags will be folded with Great Respect and handed over to them.

Refreshments Tea / Coffee

Delegates could obtain their Certificates from the Secretariat

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INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON PSYCHOLOGY & ALLIED PROFESSIONS - SRI LANKA 2011

ON PSYCHOLOGY & ALLIED PROFESSIONS - SRI LANKA 2011 GLOBAL PERCEPTIVENESS Ltd Global Perceptiveness is the

GLOBAL PERCEPTIVENESS Ltd

Global Perceptiveness is the implementation of a significant vision. After years of research and studies we managed to “unlock” new paths to perception by discovering keys all but forgotten or well concealed.

Through the Method of Global Perceptiveness, a method unique worldwide, people have now the chance to see their self and their life from a global perspective as opposed to seeing them one-sidedly or linearly.

It was during this long and fascinating journey that we envisaged the method‟s three (3) keys: the eight (8) dimensions of self perception, visualization, and inspired geometry, all of which help perception to scale given stereotypes, to delve into the level of issues and potentially rise to the level of ideas.

All of that information we provide with love to all who truly wish to make their life more functional, more effective, and, undoubtedly, more inspired.

88 Ermou Str., 19200, Elefsina, Greece Τ: +30 210 5561961 F: +30 210 5547667 Ε: info@sferiki.gr W: www.sferiki.gr

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INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON PSYCHOLOGY & ALLIED PROFESSIONS - SRI LANKA 2011

Institute of Java and Technological Studies, Sri Lanka

Sri Lanka's largest and pioneering Institute, which is completely dedicated to develop the skills and

knowledge of its students in the field of Java Technology. IJTS was incorporated under the government act

17 of 1982 , in 2005 with the intention of providing highly advanced cutting edge Java technology to the

youth of Sri Lanka.

IJTS reached its climax in 2009 after receiving the authority from Chamber of Chartered Java Professionals

International (www.ccjpint.org) to honor professional graduations for its highly skilled large population of

students as BSc in Java Technology.

Today IJTS operates in three main cities of Sri Lanka with its branching network and with a student base of over 4000 is preparing for their graduations within next three years.

The specialty of IJTS undergraduates is that they are skilled enough to develop business software solutions

for a real business client just after completion of their first semester. It is compulsory for them to develop and

host an eCommerce application to earn some amount of money before their final presentation of 3rd

semester, to prove that they are qualified enough for the eCommerce solution development arena. Also it is

compulsory to develop 10-15 practical mobile technology solutions in their fifth semester for them to qualify

for their graduation.

IJTS is the only place in Sri Lanka for any prospective candidate to qualify with professional and trade

certifications in the field of Java programming. IJTS trains candidates for trade certifications offered by

Oracle Corporation, USA such as OCPJP, OCPMAD, OCPWCD, OCPBCD, etc.

by Oracle Corporation, USA such as OCPJP, OCPMAD, OCPWCD, OCPBCD, etc. 3B 1/4, Havelock Rd, Colombo

3B 1/4,

Havelock Rd,

Colombo 05

Sri Lanka

by Oracle Corporation, USA such as OCPJP, OCPMAD, OCPWCD, OCPBCD, etc. 3B 1/4, Havelock Rd, Colombo

39

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON PSYCHOLOGY & ALLIED PROFESSIONS - SRI LANKA 2011

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON PSYCHOLOGY & ALLIED PROFESSIONS

SRI LANKA 2011 (ICPAPSL2011)

ABSTRACTS

01

OPTIMIZING YOUR LIFESPAN POTENTIAL Ale, G. J. Lifespan Seminar LLC - USA ale@lifespanseminar.com

The past century has given us more scientific discoveries than the entire preceding human history before it. Emerging scientific fields present a view of humankind as the eyes and the mind of the universe in its developmental process of waking to higher consciousness. We are the result of 13.7 billion years of evolution since the big bang, and we‘re programmed for ongoing quest to further understand what it means to be alive. This article explains that it‘s inherent in our genes to sense how long we can live, and looks at the scientific, spiritual and practical applications of this skill. Science: Every living organism has an Optimal Duration of Existence. This is the amount of years that they are expected to live under optimal conditions. Whales who live 80 years and Shrews who live 2, both have approximately one billion and a half heartbeats in a lifetime. Unlike creatures in the wild, we humans have an innate capacity to manage and distribute our given amount of energy given the amount of heartbeats over a lifetime. Consciousness in the universe has been unfolding for the past 14 billion years since the big bang. Humankind, the primary known conveyor of consciousness in the cosmos, is at the present stage of evolution, and has not reached its final form. The perception of our duration is a natural step in our future progress.Human life expectancy is increasing at a rate of approximately two years per decade. The longest verified human life on record is 122 years. Within these known boundaries, any number we can reasonably conceive in accordance with our physical, emotional, and mental states is valid. Practice: Body-consciousness techniques breathing, meditation, and mental-imagery routines to (which will help) help individuals locate the perception of their optimal duration in themselves; and self-management skills good nutrition, rest, dealing with stress, and active lifestyle to (in order to help) individuals to realize this potential. Benefits: When we are able to see the entire structure of our life we are better able to deal with the everyday challenges we confront. This holistic system helps individuals gain higher self-awareness and deeper appreciation of life.

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INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON PSYCHOLOGY & ALLIED PROFESSIONS - SRI LANKA 2011

02

BREAKING INNER CODES Leventi M., Karlaouzos Y. Global Perceptiveness - Greece, ym@sferiki.gr

INTRODUCTION

Global Perceptiveness is a genuinely unique method for widening human perception. Our inspiration was born out of the need to find plausible answers to the principal questions concerning the function of the ―human apparatus‖. Most of the approaches available, whether academic, philosophical or spiritual, have anticipated human existence in terms of its properties. We alternatively propose an integral approach to consciousness upgraded by our own discovery, ―Inspired Geometry‖.

OBJECTIVES

More specifically, the psychoanalytic approach recognizes the importance of the unconscious but provides no means to consciously access that state and draw valuable information. Jungian theory indeed highlights ‗archetypes‘ significance; nonetheless, one cannot disregard that there is a multitude of archetypes, some known, many others yet to be discovered. Spiritual approaches embrace the notion of love and cosmic truth but provide limited information on how to overpower one‘s personal ―shadows‖.

On the other hand, Pythagoras and Plato stressed their belief in the geometric underpinnings of the cosmos and therefore of the human nature itself; whilst History of Art offers an indisputable testament to the deep and abiding connections of symbols expressed across different cultures and eras.

Having successfully incorporated major but conflicting schools of consciousness theory and research into a genuinely integral approach, we consequently introduce the three inspired keys of Global Perceptiveness:

RESULTS

the eight dimensions of self * visualization and * inspired geometry exercises

By applying these keys, an individual may consciously access the unconscious and extract invaluable information. Geometrical shapes serve as entry-points to the unconscious.

Ethically speaking, our method is solely based upon ―loving love‖ which functions on a tripartite level (spiritual, emotional, behavioural) as the primordial force that gives rise to every new emergence in the evolutionary process.

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INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON PSYCHOLOGY & ALLIED PROFESSIONS - SRI LANKA 2011

03

DEVELOPING ADOLESCENTS' ABILITIES, GOAL SETTING AND PROBLEM SOLVING THROUGH GLOBAL PERCEPTIVENESS‟ METHOD Peppa A. Global Perceptiveness - Greece, apeppa@sferiki.gr

INTRODUCTION

Adolescents differ greatly from adults in their physiological, emotional development and cognitive abilities. The aim of this paper is to present the ways in which Global Perceptiveness' method can assist adolescents in exploring themes of self, connection with others, goal setting, communication and their journeys ahead.

Unlike other approaches, which put emphasis mostly on ―behavioural modification,‖ GP is an authentic, holistic method of transforming adolescents‘ perceptions and mindset. GP encourages self discovery and true empowerment for adolescents.

OBJECITVES

Through the worldwide unique system of "eight-dimensional' analysis and the inspired-geometry visualization training, adolescents can acquire the skills, know-how, and materials they need to be successful in leading lives of positive character, set goals and achieve them, strengthen their sense of self and foster the development of critical thinking and effective communication.

GP's approach to change, goal setting and problem solving, involves progress through a series of eight key- stages, the so called eight dimensions of self. By applying the eight dimensions, adolescents learn interactively the importance of breaking down goals into small steps so as to maximize the probability of achievement.

Global Perceptiveness respects young people's need for freedom and creativity. We believe adolescents have the power to change their lives for the better and that ultimately, any lasting positive change and life-skill development must come from within it cannot be forced upon or granted to an individual from the outside. Therefore GP's method and all of its practices are being applied within the context of ‗‘loving love‘‘.

BENEFITS

Effective change initiatives require vision and a comprehensive change management approach which is concrete, easily taught, easily learned, and transferable. Adolescents who learn and practice GP's approach not only internalize the process, but also articulate the logic behind their choices.

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INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON PSYCHOLOGY & ALLIED PROFESSIONS - SRI LANKA 2011

04

INTERACTING WITH INFORMATION MODULES Stavropoulos A. Global Perceptiveness - Greece, asta@sferiki.gr

INTRODUCTION

Communication is all about exchanging information. Every person willing to transform his/her present state of being to an ideal, requires information.

OBJECITVES

This paper reveals how Global Perceptiveness' (GP) method can be applied to communicate information within us, between us and around us. We constantly function as transmitter and receiver simultaneously. By examining the context of the exchanged information, one may trace the presence of viruses "travelling" either way. The enclosed message is therefore being compromised. Our personal decoding system is flawed. GP argues that the info-signal's flows or contamination originate from our established learning experiences and our idiosyncratic conscious, subconscious and unconscious parts of self.

Verbal and non-verbal communication constitutes only a small fraction of the entire 'body of information' being communicated. The remaining and most significant part lies beyond the limits of our sensory system and is performed by our extrasensory perception system (ESP). To make the inexplicit information-signal clearly understood and defined, GP introduced the 8-symbolic dimensions of self, which serve as 8 keys for unlocking one's self-knowledge.

The way to access one's innate information is through GP's "inspired geometry" method of visualization. The later evolved from Pythagoras findings that geometric symbols as such, actually entail eternal knowledge and intelligence. By applying the method, an individual's ESP-communication is directed towards forming a safe path from the conscious to the unconscious and back.

RESULTS

Such information transforms one's established method of learning, helps identify and delete his/her viruses, as well as uncover the unmolested core of his/herself. Consequently, any individual can then be in a position to fully appreciate the Apollo-temple's inscription in Delphi ―KNOWING THY SELF‖ and go far beyond.

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INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON PSYCHOLOGY & ALLIED PROFESSIONS - SRI LANKA 2011

5

THE EFFECT OF LISTENING TO GAYATRI MANTRA ON EEG Susan Thomas National Institute of Mental Health and Neuro Sciencies - INDIA susansusmi@gmail.com

INTRODUCTION

The word meditation is used to describe practices that self-regulate the body and mind, thereby affecting mental events by engaging a specific attentional set and is believed to influence brain wave patterns (Vaitl et al., 2005).

OBJECTIVES

The aim was to study the effect of listening to gayatri mantra on Electroencephalograph (EEG) in meditation- naive individuals.

Method: The sample included 11 subjects who had never practiced meditation. The subjects were in the age range 20-35 years and did not have any significant medical, psychiatric, neurological or neurosurgical disorders. Informed consent was obtained from all participants. A 32 channel EEG recording was done which includes a 3 minute eyes closed phase, 15 minutes mantra listening phase and another 3 minute eyes closed phase. The subjects listened to gayatri mantra during the meditative phase. The EEG thus obtained was analysed using the (Fast Fourier Transform) FFT method, and a spectrum analysis was done. The pre meditation EEG and the post meditation EEG were compared.

RESULTS

The results show that the percentage of gamma and beta waves increased in the post meditation EEG with respect to the pre meditation EEG.

Discussion: Buddhist monks have a predominance of gamma waves in their brain as a result of long term meditation and increase the feelings of blissfulness (Lutz et al, 2004). Gamma waves relate to neural consciousness via the mechanism for conscious attention and beta waves is active concentration.

CONCLUSION

The present study shows that a 15 minute listening to Gayatri mantra can increase the percentage of gamma and beta waves in meditation naive individuals.

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INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON PSYCHOLOGY & ALLIED PROFESSIONS - SRI LANKA 2011

6

NEUROPSYCHOLOGICAL PROFILE IN ALCOHOL DEPENDENT INDIVIDUALS Susan Thomas National Institute of Mental Health and Neuro Sciences - INDIA susansusmi@gmail.com

INTRODUCTION

Alcohol dependence can lead to deficits in cognitive functions. The most consistent evidence of behavioural impairment in chronic alcohol dependent individuals has been found in visuospatial and visuomotor skills, executive functions, abstract reasoning, new learning, attention and memory (Bates and Convit, 1999).

AIM

To determine neuropsychological deficits in alcohol dependent individuals.

METHOD

The sample included 44 patients, who fulfilled the criteria for ICD 10 (F 10.2) diagnosis of Alcohol Dependence Syndrome. Informed consent was obtained from all participants. A neuropsychological assessment of the cognitive functions including attention, mental speed, working memory, response inhibition and verbal and visual learning and memory was carried out. The patients were assessed after one day after admission to the hospital. The results were compared with the norms for the same gender, age and education.

RESULTS

Descriptive Statistics such as mean, standard deviations and percentages were used to describe the demographic and clinical details of the patients. The profile of deficits in alcohol dependent individuals showed significant impairments in verbal working memory and delayed visual memory. Impairments were also seen in focused attention, mental speed, visuospatial working memory, response inhibition, verbal learning and memory and immediate visual memory.

Discussion: The deficits in neuropsychological deficits imply that there is predominant involvement of the frontal and temporal lobes. The existence of significant cognitive deficits in alcohol dependent individuals could affect the capacity to maintain abstinence. Moderate cognitive impairment compromises the learning of treatment content (Zinn, Stein, and Swartzwelder, 2004).

CONCLUSIONS

Alcohol Dependent individuals have significant cognitive deficits, which may affect their treatment and relapse.

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INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON PSYCHOLOGY & ALLIED PROFESSIONS - SRI LANKA 2011

7

THE CONCEPT OF HYPNOSIS IN PATANJALI YOGA SUTRAS

Jini K Gopinath

and Shitika Chowdhary

INTRODUCTION

THE CONCEPTUAL PARALLELS BETWEEN YOGA AND HYPNOSIS

The trance states in yoga and hypnosis are associated with similar phenomena like relaxation, disinclination to talk, unreality, misrepresentation, alterations in perception, increased concentration, suspension of normal reality testing, and the temporary nature of the phenomena (Erickson, Hershman, & Secter, 1961).

AIM

The aim of the study was to find parallels between the trance states of hypnosis and Patanjali‘s Yoga Sutras

METHOD

The sample included a text on Patanjali‘s Yoga Sutras (Four Chapters on Freedom by Swami Satyananda Saraswati). The study was conducted in two phases. In the first phase a thematic analysis of the text was conducted to understand the concept of trance in the yoga sutras. In the second phase of the study, the concept of trance in the yoga sutras was compared to the concept of trance in hypnosis. The concepts on hypnosis were obtained through the review of literature

RESULTS

The findings of the study show that there are parallels between the trance in hypnosis and the trance in Patajali‘s yoga sutras.

DISCUSSION

The parallels between hypnosis and the yoga sutras exist in the deepening and induction of trance, the phenomena experienced during trance, and in the therapeutic gain, techniques and process.

CONCLUSION

The present study shows there are similarities in the two states and the concepts of yoga need to be incorporated in modern therapeutic domain.

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INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON PSYCHOLOGY & ALLIED PROFESSIONS - SRI LANKA 2011

8

ELIMINATING EXCLUSIONARY PRACTICES IN EDUCATION TO MAKE WAY FOR INCLUSION Shalini Felicity Wickremesooriya Sri Lanka

shafel02@yahoo.com

INTRODUCTION

The research is set in Sri Lanka, where official policy and legislation advocates‘ inclusive education but, schools are not obligated to implement inclusive educational practices. Inclusive education, targets at advancing democratic principles and values and beliefs concerned with equality and social justice 1 and is considered a precursor to inclusive societies.

THE AIM

The aim of the research is to identify and eliminate exclusionary practices in adult-child communication that prevent disabled students from receiving quality education along with their peers. The research question;

―How do I as a consultant, inspire teachers to be genuinely interested in employing adult-child communication practices which promote active learning, enhance self-esteem and improve social relationships of students with the label of Speech, Language and Communication Needs?‖

METHODOLOGY

I selected the action research methodology, to blend research and practice and bridge the gap between the academic world of research and actual practice 2 . Through action research I sought to engage the research participants, in a collaborative, democratic research process to empower and liberate them 3 .

FINDINGS

indicate that by targeting a single exclusionary practice and attempting to eradicate negative practices it is possible to make school environments more inclusive. However, changing teacher attitudes and pedagogical practices requires commitment from school management.

The research is of specific significance in Sri Lanka, where exclusionary practices are rampant and disabled students do not receive quality education because they are viewed from a deficit lens. In addition this thesis supplements global literature on inclusive education in developing countries.

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INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON PSYCHOLOGY & ALLIED PROFESSIONS - SRI LANKA 2011

9

MEDITATION PRACTICE IN THE COMMUNITY: PSYCHOLOGICAL OUTCOMES AND PROCESSES Michael James Ireland University of Queensland - Australia m.ireland@psy.uq.edu.au

AIMS

This research aimed to overcome this deficit in the knowledge base by:

Indexing fundamental dimensions of variation in meditation practice,aimed to overcome this deficit in the knowledge base by: Directly measure the strength and direction

Directly measure the strength and direction of the relationship between these dimensions and multiple psychological health outcomes, andfundamental dimensions of variation in meditation practice, Explore possible mediators underlying these relationships.

Explore possible mediators underlying these relationships.dimensions and multiple psychological health outcomes, and Methodology Cross-sectional, naturalistic field research was

Methodology

Cross-sectional, naturalistic field research was conducted utilizing online and paper/pencil survey methodology. Constructs were operationalised using established, reliable, and validated instruments. A large (N > 900) international sample completed measures. Theoretical modeling was conducted using AMOS 18.

Findings and Analysis

Among community members across multiple cultural, national, and ethnic boundaries, increased meditation practice related to increased happiness, wellbeing, health, life satisfaction, and resilience, and reduced depression, anxiety, and stress. These effects were mediated by mindfulness and meditative insight.

These results indicate that among members of the community who practice meditation, the degree of practice relates to better health and functioning and this is likely the product of greater mindfulness and insight.

Contribution

This is the first attempt to collect data from a large international non-clinical sample, to operationalise meditation practice according to key dimensions of practice (intensity, duration and frequency), and to test a multiple-outcome, multiple-mediator theoretical model which systematically and simultaneously tests hypothesized effects.

Bio-ethical boundaries

This study was cleared in accordance with the ethical review processes of the University of Queensland and within the guidelines of the National Statement on Ethical Conduct in Human Research.

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10

A STUDY TO EVINCE THE IMPORTANCE OF SATVA PAREEKSHA (MENTAL STAMINA) IN AYURVEDA AND ITS INFLUENCE ON TREATMENT Adiga Handady Shripathi Manipal University Medical College - INDIA. adigayur@gmail.com

INTRODUCTION

The doctrine of comprehensive, holistic avenues of health in Ayurveda upholds its 10 point interrogation/examination methods, of which examination of Satva(mind & its attributes) in terms of bala(strength/stamina) possesses imperative significance. Charaka Samhitha elaborately, exceptionally explains psychopathology, pertaining to 8 essential psychological factors (1) and 22 psychological characters (2) perturbed varyingly in different diseases. Apprehension of Satva in relation to strength - Pravara(excellent), Madhyama(moderate) and Avara(poor) influences planning, proper implementation of therapeutic procedures. This retrospective study tries to evince the same.

METHODOLOGY

Out of the 14 cases satisfying inclusion - exclusion criteria, 2 were of Pravara, 6 Madhyama and 6 Avara Satva. Analysing those with Avara Satva, 83.34% were male, 66.67% between 21- 30 years, 83.34% with Vata predominant constitution. 66.67% of them discontinued scheduled treatments, in a day/two abruptly while there were no dropouts in other two categories.

BENEFITS

Ayurvedic classics often associate Vata dosha with vacillations. (3)They annotate exclusion of weak, angry, grief struck… persons from engaging in Panchakarma therapy (4).This continually changing, competitive era affects human psychological traits, with or without allusions. So, thorough examination of Manasika bhavas(psychological traits, with positive - negative components) and assessment of Satva(mental stamina) play a pivotal role in planning therapeutics. And also, patients with Avara satva demand additional assurance, regulation of thoughts, counselling, care… virtues of Satvavajaya chikitsa(psychotherapy) along with other therapeutic modalities.

CONCLUSION

However, simple, standardised grading scale to measure these psychological traits; larger sample size with longer duration of treatment and follow up are essential. The study establishes the realisms of classics and demands further savvy.

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11

SCOPE OF AYURVEDIC PANCHAKARMA THERAPY IN TREATING PSYCHOLOGICAL DISORDERS

Adiga Handady Shripathi adigayur@gmail.com

G.L.Ramya Narayan adigayur@yahoo.com

INTRODUCTION Ayurveda, the Indian art of holistic medicine incorporates three fold therapeutic modalities, Daiva vyapashraya(divine/spiritual), Yukti vyapashraya(rational/biological) and Satvavajaya(psychological) treatment.

AIM

Panchakarma, the inimitable, integral component of rational/biological therapeutic modality refers to the five purificatory procedures which expel out the vitiated doshas(humors), accumulated metabolic waste/toxins and bring about bio-cleansing of internal channels/pathways. This comprises of Vamana(therapeutic emesis), Virechana(therapeutic purgation), Niruha Vasti(decoction enema), Anuvasana Vasti(oil enema) and Nasya(nasal administration of medicaments). (2) Ayurvedic classics explicate psychological disorders under

psychosomatic(psychosis,

etc.,

Panchakarma therapy possesses both preventive and curative esteem with respect to these diseases. Acharya Charaka cites that shodhana karma relishes the mind, senses, body and thereby bestows sound memory and intelligence. (3) While elucidating the effects of vamana and virechana Acharya Vagbhata has referred to bestowment of mental, intellectual exponents. (4) Depending upon the predominance of the tridoshas Vata, Pitta and Kapha, suitable panchakarma procedures are to be carried out in psychological disorders. Example: Snehapana(internal oleation) in anxiety disorders; Vasti(enema) in Vata ,Virechana(purgation) in Pitta predominant convulsive disorders, Vamana(emesis) in depressive

disorders

convulsive diseases, obsession

the lemma of humoral diseases(manasa dosha vikaras- anxiety,fear,pride

),

),

personality disorders, mental retardation, geriatric related disorders

(5) Various researches and clinical trials have established the efficacy of specific formulations

utilised in these therapeutic procedures and shewed the scope of Panchakarma in the same.

BENEFIT

As such, with advancement in science and technology, increased episodes of psychological disturbances and fast changing life styles, there is immense scope for utilising Ayurvedic approach and therapeutics in par with contemporary psychiatry to afford complete treatment.

etc.,

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INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON PSYCHOLOGY & ALLIED PROFESSIONS - SRI LANKA 2011

12

MUSIC AS THERAPY Balambegai Rajaeshwaran Eastern University, Sri Lanka. rajanbega@yahoo.com.

INTRODUCTION

Music plays an important role in the lives of human beings. In addition to its role in entertainment, its use in clinical management has been accepted all over the world. Music is widely accepted as extremely therapeutic and various views have been expressed both by researchers as well as medical professionals on its healing qualities and soothing effects, particularly with regard to ailments connected to the mind such as ―dementia‖.

METHODOLOGY

The view that music originated from various sounds of nature and animals also contribute to this idea. Several universities have included the subject of Music as Therapy‖ as an essential component of the curriculum in their Departments of Music, particularly as a subject of specialization at the postgraduate level. Further researches on Music therapy by post-graduate students supported by Government Agencies and Universities can significantly lead to achieving new dimensions in the field of ―music as therapy‖ as well as widening the role of musicians in this aspect.

BENEFIT

This paper deals with Music as a therapy. It traces the background of the ―Ragas‖ and attempts to identify their influence in the healing process. This paper also attempts to identify the various aspects of music as a therapy. Finally the paper attempts to focus on modern trends in music therapy in addition to its role in music education.

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13

ORGANIZATIONAL CONFLICTS BY STRUCTURAL FACTORS AND EFFECT UPON MANAGERIAL DECISION MAKING ROLE IN SRI LANKAN UNIVERSITIES

Henegama H Prsangika

Herath HMA

Wayamba University of Sri Lanka

INTRODUCTION

Causes of organizational conflicts have been widely researched and among them organizational structural factors play a major role.

METHODOLOGY

A study in Sri Lankan university found that organizational structure, leadership interpersonal differences,

professional differences, policies, resource availability, and unresolved conflicts are major causes of organizational conflicts (Henegama and Ranawaka, 2011). Organizational conflicts by structural factors could affect upon managerial decision making role.

OBJECTIVE

The main objective of this study is to analyze the organizational structural factors as a cause of organizational

conflicts and effect upon managerial decision making role in Sri Lankan universities. A survey was conducted for managers in universities selected under the stratified random sampling method. The study hypothesized that organizational conflicts by organizational structural factors significantly affect managerial decision making role. The study resulted that structural factors of departmentalization has highest significant effect while specialization and bureaucracy have less significant effects in creating organizational conflicts. Also there is significant effect of organizational structural factors on managerial decision making role. It is concluded as organizational structural factors of departmentalization, specialization, bureaucracy cause organizational conflicts and such conflicts negatively affect while structural factors significantly affect overall managerial decision making role in universities. It is recommended restructuring and proper conflict management process

to enhance managerial decision making role, which will improve harmonious environment in Sri Lankan

universities facilitating the higher education.

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14

WORKING WITH EXPLOITED WOMEN AND ABUSED CHILDREN IN THE MALDIVES:

REFLECTIONS AND INSIGHTS OF A CLINICIAN Aishath Ali Naaz MIPSTAR PVT. LTD - Maldives

CONTEXT Women exploitation and child abuse is perhaps as prevalent in the Maldives as in most of the South Asian countries. However, in the absence of comprehensive research it is difficult to provide the extent, types and patterns of abuse and exploitation which is prevalent in the country. Furthermore, there is little documentation of the understanding and experiential accounts of clinicians who has worked with these issues in the Maldives.

OBJECTIVE

The present paper is an experiential account of the work carried out with exploited women and abused children by a clinician in a private practice in Male‘, Maldives.

METHOD

Retrospective data gathered from the clinical case records and session notes maintained by the clinician for the past one year will be screened for cases of women exploitation and child abuse. The nature of psychological assessments, type of interventions carried out, observations and experiences of the clinician will be analyzed using both qualitative and quantitative methods.

RESULTS/CONCLUSION

Women with history of exploitation, mainly presents with symptoms of depression. Sexual abuse, child molestation, physical abuse is common. Child abuse and exploitation is frequently caused by a significant other person. Themes which commonly emerge in the sessions include, emotions linked with victimization, the alteration of the attitude to life, the perceived injustices caused due to gaps in the legal system, fear of further victimization, and the challenges linked to seeking psychological and legal support.

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15

CHILD ABUSE IN THE MALDIVES: AN OVERVIEW

Fathimath Sauda

Aishath Ali Naaz

Mipstar Pvt. Ltd - Maldives

INTRODUCTION

Recent media report suggests that there is a considerable increase in the number of child abuse cases in the Maldives. However, in the absence of comprehensive research in the area, the incident rate, types and patterns of child abuse is still not clear.

The current study will, therefore explore the available secondary data to examine the incidence, type and patterns of child abuse in the Maldives. The components of various intervention and preventive programs that are carried out in the country will also be explored.

OBJECTIVE

To examine the incidence, type and patterns of child abuse in the Maldives.

To explore the type and nature of various programs which are currently available in Maldives

The present study will involve a resource and situation assessment of the child abuse scenario in the Maldives.

DESIGN AND SETTING

Secondary Data on the number and type of child abuse cases reported to the Maldives Police Service, Ministry of Gender and Family, UNICEF-Maldives, Human Rights Commission of the Maldives, Prosecutor General‘s Office, Criminal Court, Kudakudhinge Hiyaa,, Society for Health Education (SHE), Child Abuse Prevention Society (CAPS), Advocating Rights of Children (ARC), over the past 5 years will be gathered. Furthermore, key informant interviews and focus group sessions will be held with stakeholders. Both qualitative and quantitative data analysis will be carried out.

RESULTS AND CONCLUSION

Findings and limitations of the study will be discussed in detail.

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16

ABUSE TOWARDS WOMEN IN THE MALDIVES: A LOOK AT THE CURRENT PATHWAYS TO ASSISTANCE

Aishath Jinanee Ibrahim

Aishath Ali Naaz

MIPSTAR Pvt. ltd, Maldives

INTRODUCTION The abuse of women is becoming a major concern in the Maldivian society. In recent years there has been a significant increase in number of women coming forward to seek assistance for both protection and treatment. This may be attributed to raise in educational standards, increase in general awareness and greater access to formal avenues of assistance to help seekers.

A number of NGOs and government agencies in the Maldives are working to support victims of abuse. However, most of the work these agencies do is limited to creating awareness. Often the victims of abuse do not get the necessary help and support they need. This lack of specific clinical / therapeutic support for the victims of abuse is an issue that needs to be addressed urgently, especially in light of increasing number of victims coming forward seeking assistance.

OBJECTIVE

This research explores the existing pathways the victims of abuse currently go through in the Maldives with the intention of ensuring that each phase of the pathway leads to addressing the victims‘ psychological and mental health issues.

METHOD

The research uses quantitative as well as qualitative methods to study the existing pathways victims of abuse go through. Qualitative data would be gathered from government agencies, NGOs and from key informants. Quantitative data would be limited to published secondary data from concerned agencies.

RESULTS / CONCLUSIONS

The study proposes a model which would ensure that victims of abuse receive the appropriate psychological, social and spiritual support they require at each phase of the pathway. Based on the findings recommendations would be made to the necessary agencies.

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GENDER BASED ROOT CAUSE ANALYSIS IN IT INDUSTRY

Dr.Ritu Soni

Ms Aspinderpreet Kaur

Guru Nanak Girls School - INDIA

INTRODUCTION

In today era of tough competition in terms of time and quality, testing has to be supplemented with the root cause analysis (RAC).

THE GOAL

The goal of RCA is to identify the root cause of defects and initiate actions so that the source of defects can be eliminated.

METHODOLOGY

The qualitative analysis provides feedback to the quality managers that eventually improve both the quality and the productivity of the software organization. It is easy to do prevention during the developing the application rather than to fix it after completion.

CONCLUSION

Since during the development of the project, human beings play a vital role so, we can‘t ignore the human reliability and the human error occurs during the software development. Human reliability depends not only on technological knowledge but also on gender, personnel behavior or even office environment. This paper deals with effect of gender on root cause for occurrence of defects.

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18

REDUCING STRESS THROUGH THEATRE A CASE STUDY FOR CHILDREN

Yogesh Chand Gambhir Punjabi University-India,

y.gambhir@yahoo.co.in ritusoniynr@yahoo.com

Ritu Soni GNG College - India

INTRODUCTION Stress is a part and parcel of everyday life of all human beings, whether adults or children. But in today's time with competition, parental academic and social pressures stress has assumed a new dimension and stress among children.

AIM

Stress may be external or internal; whose persistency causes many mental or physical diseases. So it has to be reduced by any means. The best way to manage stress is to learn how to relax yourself. Hence a recreational activity like theatre can be extremely useful for relaxation and further fighting the reasons of stress.

METHODOLOGY

Theatre Therapy is the use of theatre techniques like theatre games, theatre exercises, performances etc, to facilitate personal growth and promote mental health. This paper aims at the quantification of stress reduction among children through theatre.

BENEFITS

A comparative study is done among residential, non-residential schools having different levels of achievement goals.

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THE MORE THERE IS CLARITY IN APPLICATION THE MORE THE CONFIDENCE IS A NEW INTERPRETATION OF BUDDHIST PRACTICE OF MEDITATION Rev. Miriswaththe Wimalagnana Buddhasravaka Bhiksu University, Sri Lanka miriswatta@gmail.com

INTRODUCTION

Buddhist meditation in present contexts is not merely intended for gaining spiritual goals but it also is practiced by many considering its healing potentialities. The inner concentration created by the contemplation on different subjects of meditations has varieties of such healthy potentialities for physique and psyche. So the practice of different meditations signifies its own method to be followed. Early Buddhist discourses and post canonical literature has a bulk of information of instructions, methods and benefits of different meditations.

AIM

At a time when hundreds of books and articles have been composed on the subject one may feel that it is understood in its entirety. But a question 'What is the nature of application of vipassana at the initial level of the practice' very hardly one can find an unambiguous answer from the bulk of secondary literature. For the interested beginner this makes it very difficult to progress the meditation. Whatever the purpose is spiritual or secular, the theoretical understanding is very important for the confidence of the practitioner. This does not mean that the traditions of meditations lack proper methods or techniques to master meditation. Instead, it implies that for the scholar of the subject, still there are aspects to theoretically study carefully.

BENEFITS

This research is an attempt to explain the nature of how samatha (Concentration meditation) and vipassana (insight meditation) interplay for the progress of Buddhist meditation in both initial and transcendental levels. The research is done based totally on Primary texts of Pali literature. It shows the errors of some of the interpretations of Samatha and vipassana.

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20

HELP IN THE AFTERMATHOF TERROR PSYCHOSOCIALSTRATEGIES FOR SURVIVORS OF THE UTOYA MASSACRE IN OSLO 22.07.11. Dr. Hakon Stenmark, St. Olavs University Hospital, Norway hakon.stenmark@ntnu.no

On the 22.07.2011 a bomb went off at the government building in Oslo, and then a shooting massacre took place at the Utoya Island, where 720 youths participated at a youth gathering. The youths were chased around the island for over an hour by a single terrorist before he was captured. All together 75 people died from both incidents, and most of the survivors experienced severe traumatic exposure. After the terrorist attack an extensive psychosocial program was employed to help the survivors of the attack, the family members of deceased and families of survivors.

The psychosocial program involved active support from the royal family and from leading politicians of the country as well as extensive efforts of help from health professionals throughout the country. One month after the massacre an organized return to Utoya was set up for survivors and for family members of the deceased. The health services gave each survivor and family of deceased a contact person to follow them for one year ahead with psychosocial support. Proactive help was offered in which the contact persons actively make regular contact with the affected persons throughout the year. People with severe posttraumatic reactions were referred for treatment of trauma related disorders. The presentation will give details of the help offered and accounts of how the help was perceived from the survivors and families.

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21

NEUROPSYCHOLOGICAL REHABILITATION- HOLISTIC APPROACH

Jamuna Rajeswaran

Raja kumara.K

National Institute of Mental Health & Neuro Sciences, INDIA

INTRODUCTION

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is A silent epidemic of modern times. In India 30,000 people die and 1, 25,000 become disabled due traumatic brain injury (TBI).

OBJECTIVES

The highest risk group includes children, adolescent and young adult men in the age range of 15-25 years. The majority of TBI cases (61.1%) are a result of road traffic injuries, followed by falls (22.5%), violence (10.6%), others (4.3%) and unknown (1.1%) (Gururaj, 1993). In comparison to all other global regions, Asia has the highest percentage of TBI-related outcomes as a result of falls (77%) It is a complex injury with a broad spectrum of symptoms and disabilities. The impact on a person and his or her family can be devastating. When traumatic brain injury occurs, the lives of the person who sustains the injury and his or her family may be changed forever.

METHODOLOGY

Cognitive difficulties are very common in people with TBI. Cognition includes an awareness of one's surroundings, attention to tasks, memory, reasoning, problem solving, and executive functioning (e.g., goal setting, planning, initiating, self-awareness, self-monitoring and evaluation). Problems vary depending on the location and severity of the injury to the brain. A study was carried out on 100 mild to moderate TBI individuals.

RESULTS

They were assessed using the NIMHANS Neuropsychology Battery 2004. Results showed deficits in attention, executive functions and learning and memory. Studies have shown Neuropsychological rehabilitation to be usefulness in improving the cognitive functions and day to day functioning. Cognitive rehabilitation is defined as a systematic, functionally oriented service of therapeutic cognitive activities, based on an assessment and understanding of the person‘s brain-behavior deficits. We have developed home based, Hospital based, cognitive retraining for TBI. Neuro-feedback training is also offered to individuals with TBI. Details will be presented.

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22

USE OF MOTION PICTURE IN THE CLINICAL PRACTICE Prashanth Mahendrarjah Sri Lanka

mspl304@gmail.com

INTRODUCTION

From its very beginning, the cinema provided romance and escapism for millions of people all over the globe.

It was the magic carpet that took people instantly away from the harsh realities of life. In the beginning, the movies offered a panacea in the depression years in the Unites States, was the opium of the people through World War II, and continued to waft the public away from reality throughout the following decades.

OBJECTIVES

What makes film the most international of the arts is the vast range of films that come from more than 50 countries films that are as multifarious as the cultures that produce them. However, not only does cinema provide pure entertainment worldwide, it is also known as ―The Seventh Art‖. Certainly, over the past century, creative cinema has dominated the film industry worldwide since 1920s and gradually spread from the US and Europe to Central and Eastern Asia and also to the developing world.

Writing about film as early as 1926, the Italian-born French critic discussed that ―cinema must go beyond the realism and express the film makers‘ emotions as well as the character psychology, an even their unconscious.‖ On this basis, we should not devaluate films as a cradle of entertainment and education and as

a significant influence on people's attitudes to psychological behaviors (Gabbard&Gabbard, 1999). As we

know it today, cinema played a pivotal part in the social, political and cultural psyche of our world (Bhugra D,

2009).

According to ZUR Institute (2010), "Movies affect many of us powerfully because the combined impact of images, music, dialogue, lighting, sound and special effects can elicit deep feelings and help us reflect on our lives. They can help us to better understand our own lives, the lives of those around us and even how our society and culture operate. They can shed light on political and spiritual matters too and can provide catharsis and perspective and may open our eyes to new ways of thinking, feeling and pursuing our lives. There are many ways to harness the power of movies to heal, grow and change. Movies have been used as an adjunct to psychotherapy and counseling as well as by themselves."

Films can offer realistic depictions of character styles and psychopathologic disorders, as well as personal and family dynamics, with subtexts alluding to the prevailing social norms. An advantage of using films for teaching is that they are well produced, interesting and lively, and there are no concerns over confidentiality. Characters experience their symptoms in the context of their lives, not in an isolated clinical encounter (Bhugra D, 2009).

In the medical history, using fiction as a methodical tool in not actually new, since the 1930s, when doctor named William C. Menninger first assigned fiction to psychiatric patients, therapists have introduced literature, novels, short stories and poetry into the therapeutic process.

Movies are simply the latest, most accessible and time saving addition to what has become known as biblio- therapy (Hesley J, 2007).

According to film literature, this is generally known as media psychology, but, if you using only films as a clinical tool that comes under the name of movie therapy or cinema therapy or film therapy or reel therapy. The idea behind this is ―that patients learn to watch movies constructively so that they can reflect and pay attention to both the story and to themselves. In doing so, they can to learn to understand themselves and

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others much more objectively. On the other hand, movies connect a patient‘s world to the characters and plots – furnishing role models, providing inspiration and hope, and offering new solutions to old problems. They assure patients that they are not alone, the others have experienced hardship and triumphed‖ (Hesley J,

2007).

Motion pictures can be used in educating different subjects, including psychology (Fleming et al, 1990), developmental psychopathology (Nissim &Sabat, 1979), and individual and couple therapy (Hesley & Hesley, 2001). As a result, nowadays, ―an increasing number of therapists are relying on movies to move people toward breakthroughs faster. In this age of managed care, time has become precious: using movies allows patients to grow in their own ―free‖ time. At the same time, clinicians have found movies predominantly effective in ‗couples‘ therapy‘‖(Hesley J, 2007).

RESULTS

Finally, I would like to point out that psychology has always been a popular topic within the movies, on the other hand, currently, movies become as a clinical tool for therapists to treat their clients in many ways shapes and forms. However, there has been concern raised within the discipline that its portrayal in general along with that of psychologists and psychological disorders has been far from accurate on the whole. Indeed, such was the concern that back in 1998 members of the media psychology division of the American Psychological Society established a Media Watch Committee (known as Division 46) to examine the way psychologists, particularly therapists were portrayed in movies, television shows and other media contexts (APA, 1998).

In this following study, I have drawn upon a variety of approaches and real life examples. In my efforts to provide both a breadth and depth of analysis, this study makes fee use of range of popular texts and reviews, as well as previous academic work in the area. I also apply pertinent academic history in scrutinizing the principles and aesthetic conventions of the films, as set within the medical and psychological context from they emerged. As a growing academic film person, I would like to say ―don‘t take movies too literally. Take them carefully and thoughtfully‖ as Don Delillo noted "Film is more than the twentieth-century art. It‘s another part of the twentieth-century mind".

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PILOT STUDY ON STUDENT INVOLVEMENT IN RELIGIOUS CULTS THROUGH MENTAL PROCESS Padma Sriyani Yatapana Institute of Technology University of Moratuwa, Sri Lanka padmayatapana@gmail.com

INTRODUCTION

It is pathetic to observe a trend of some of the university students leaving their studies to enter the priesthood in various religions. We find many of these students are educated, intelligent and with strong family background. When browsing the internet, it could be seen that this problem exists all over the world. Weeping mothers, desperate fathers and family members are looking for help to save their victims from this destructive culture. Many researcher and non profitable organizations are actively involved to address this problem. If there is a radical change in the behavior pattern of a student indicating negative attitudes in their life style, then we can reasonably believe that the group he is involved is a cult.

OBJECTIVES

Cults recruit members through deception and coercive mind control. Because of the mind controlling aspects in these cult procedures, students can become victims of mental illnesses like depression, schizophrenia and may tend to lose sensitivity and correct perception. Ultimately, their families become desperate and will be crippled economically and socially.

RESULTS

This is a case study aiming to extend it for the island. Using a designed questionnaire, the students‘ behavior patterns and the characteristics of the group were compared with the established norms by the well-known researchers in the world. As the cults hide their actual affairs, it is very difficult to obtain information. It could be seen from this study that the abnormal behaviors developed with these students or groups are related to characteristics of destructive cults.

The only way to prevent from getting involved in cults and rescue them from cults is to create awareness of existence of these destructive cults and mind control techniques they indulge in.

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SPIRITUAL PSYCHOLOGY AND WELL BEING Jitendra Mohan, Panjab University - India mohanjitendra@hotmail.com

INTRODUCTION

WHEN

(ISHOPANISHAD)

TRUE WAS THE CONSCIOUS ENERGY IN THE PRIME TRUE WAS HE IN THE BEGINNING OF AGES TRUE HE IS

INFINITY‖

THE

INFINITY

IS

SUBTRACTED

FROM

INFINITY

THE

REMAINDER

IS

STILL

EVEN NOW, AND TRUE HE VERILY SHALL BE FOR EVER

(GURU NANAK DEV)

HE WHO KNOWS HIMSELF KNOWS THE LORD (PROPHET MOHAMMED)

THE KINGDOM OF HEAVEN IS WITHIN YOU (JESUS CHRIST)

LOOK WITHIN, THOU ART THE BUDHA

(LORD BUDHA)

THE GREAT SAGES, SEERS AND PROPHETS SHOWED THE PATH OF SPIRITUALITY TO BEGIN FROM WITHIN.

― The perennial personal journey, spanning centuries and continents, beyond traditions, beliefs, and styles towards the innermost recesses of existence opens the way to enlightenment, awakening, peace, healing, and spiritual evolution engulfing the entire cosmic consciousness

JITENDRA MOHAN (2007)

OBJECTIVES

SPIRITUAL PSYCHOLOGY AND SUBJECTIVE WELL-BEING

Through most of the history of modern psychology, the term religion has been both an individual and an institutional construct. William James (1902) distinguished a ―firsthand‖ experiential religion that is direct and immediate from a secondhand institutional religion that is an inherited tradition.

One is witnessing, a polarization of religiousness and spirituality, with the former representing an institutional, formal, outward, doctrinal, authoritarian, inhibiting expression and the latter representing an individual, subjective, emotional, inward, unsystematic, freeing expression (Koenig et al., 2001).

According to Rao (2005), Spirituality and religion have gained a measure of respectability in recent years in academic discussions, thanks to the substantial literature that appears to connect them to health (George et al. 2002; Koenig et aI., 2001).

There are distinguishing characteristics of religion and spirituality. These include, first, religion is community focused, observable, measurable, and objective, whereas spirituality is individualistic, less visible and measurable and more subjective.

Second, religion is organized, behavior oriented, and involves outward practices. Spirituality, however, is less formal and systematic and more inward directed.

Spirituality refers to the experience of a personal relationship with the transcendent (Mora, 1994). Transcendence refers to an individual's need to feel what he or she is in a timeless context, i.e., beyond what he or she experiences right now at a particular place (Sarason, 1974). Also, Spirituality implies that the individual is part of a greater whole, which in turn influences how the individual acts (Ericsson 1982).

Recently, Spirituality has been considered by the World Health Organization an important aspect of health, in

addition to Physical,

Psychological,

and

Social

Health

(Yogesh

et

aI.,

2004).

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Spirituality is said to involve a search for meaning and purpose in life, unfolding mysteries of the universe, harmony, peace, wholeness, and transcendence (Tanyi, 2002). According to Harris and Moran (1998), Spirituality is: (a) experience of the sacred other which is accompanied by feelings of wonder, joy, love, trust and hope (b) connectedness with and responsibility for the self, other people and the non-human world (c) the illumination of lived experience with meaning and value (d) the need for naming and expression in either traditional or nontraditional ways.

BENEFITS

WHAT IS SPIRITUAL PSYCHOLOGY?

Exploring the spiritual component in beliefs and behavior is the business of spiritual psychology (Rao, 2005).

Indian psychology has much to offer for a foundational base to build the edifice of spiritual psychology. The following twelve points provide the outline of the model based on classical Indian psychological thought (Rao,

2005).

Psychology is the study of the person (jiva). The person is consciousness embodied. The person is not an isolated and disconnected entity in that the jiva is transpersonal, unbounded by transcognitive states. Consciousness-as-such is irreducibly distinct from the material objects, including the brain and the mind. Mind is different from consciousness as well as the body/brain machine. Unlike consciousness, the mind is material, albeit subtle. Unlike the brain, the mind has non-local characteristics, i.e., it is not constrained by time and space variables, as gross material objects are. The mind may also be seen as the facilitating principle and function that interfaces consciousness at one end and the brain processes at the other. Consciousness in the human context, i.e., consciousness embodied, is circumscribed, conditioned, and clouded by a vortex of forces generated by the mind-body connection. Consequently, the conditioned person becomes an instrument of individualized thought, passion and action, an isolated person. From individuation arise, on the one hand, subjectivity, rational thinking and relativity of truth and values. On the other hand, there arises the ego as the organizing principle. With the ego, come attachment and craving which lead the person in turn to experience anxiety, insecurity, stress, distress, disease and suffering. Situated in such an existential predicament of ignorance and suffering, the goal of human kind is liberation (moksha) by a process of reconditioning training and consequent transformation of the person to achieve higher states of awareness and achievement. This is accomplished by accessing consciousness as-such and attaining Transcognitive states. Endowed with consciousness, mind, and body, the person is capable of brain-processed learning (sravana), mind-generated understanding (manana) and consciousness-accessed realization (nididhyasana). Yoga is a method of liberation via realization of transcognitive states. Realization takes different forms relative to the different dispositions of the seekers. These include knowledge focused jnana yoga to meet the thought needs, devotion filled bhakti yoga to deal with one's passionate nature, and action oriented karma yoga for those dominated by the impulse to act. In Indian psychology, there is no clear-cut incompatibility or conflict between science and spirituality. Transcendence is the goal of spirituality. Transcendence is achieved through a process of transformation. Transformation takes place in the physical plane by gaining control over normal psychological processes

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transformation. Transformation takes place in the physical plane by gaining control over normal psychological processes 65
transformation. Transformation takes place in the physical plane by gaining control over normal psychological processes 65
transformation. Transformation takes place in the physical plane by gaining control over normal psychological processes 65
transformation. Transformation takes place in the physical plane by gaining control over normal psychological processes 65
transformation. Transformation takes place in the physical plane by gaining control over normal psychological processes 65
transformation. Transformation takes place in the physical plane by gaining control over normal psychological processes 65
transformation. Transformation takes place in the physical plane by gaining control over normal psychological processes 65

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON PSYCHOLOGY & ALLIED PROFESSIONS - SRI LANKA 2011

Role of Spiritual Psychology in Promoting Well Being

One of the most enduring pursuits throughout history of mankind has been the search for happiness, well being and a good life.

Even Csikszentmihalyi (1990) opined that the pursuit of happi-ness has been, and remains, the most central motivator of human thought and action: ―Twenty-three hundred years ago Aristotle concluded that, more than anything else, men and women seek happiness. While happiness itself is sought for its own sake, every other goalhealth, beauty, money, or poweris valued only be-cause we expect that it will make us happy.

WHAT IS WELL BEING

The concept of Well-Being refers to optimal psychological functioning and experience. Well-being may be defined according to global question about overall life satisfaction and domain specific questions about work, income, social relationship and neighborhood (Andrews, 1991). Subjective Well-Being (SWB), refers to people's emotional and cognitive evaluations of their lives, includes what lay people call happiness, peace, fulfillment, and life satisfaction.

THE HEDONIC VIEW

Equating well-being with hedonic pleasure or happiness has a long history, Aristippus, a Greek philosopher from the fourth century B,C. taught that the goal of life is to experience the maximum amount of pleasure and that happiness is the totality of one's hedonic moments.

THE EUDAIMONIC VIEW

Aristotle considered hedonic happiness to be a vulgar ideal, making humans slavish followers of desires. He posited, instead, that true happiness is found in the expression of virtue-that is, in doing what is worth doing. Fromm (1981), drawing on this Aristotelian view, argued that optimal well-being (vivere bene) requires distinguishing.

“Between those needs (desires) that are only subjectively felt and whose satisfaction leads to momentary pleasure, and those needs that are rooted in human nature and whose realization is conducive to human growth and produces eudaimonia, i.e. "well-being." In other words the distinction between purely subjectively felt needs and objectively valid needs-part of the former being harmful to human growth and the latter being in accordance with the requirements of human nature.”

Self-determination theory: (Ryan & Deci 2000) is another perspective that has both embraced the concept of eudaimonia, or self-realization, as a central definitional aspect of well-being and attempted to specify both what it means to actualize the self and how that can be accomplished.

SPIRITUAL WELL BEING

Spiritual Well Being may be viewed as an expression of spiritual maturity (Ellison 1983) may also be seen as integral experience of a person who is functioning as God intended. Spirituality as a dimension of well being describes the experience of being in harmony, the integration of inner and other.

―Psychology of Religion and Spirituality‖ (Pargament, 1999)

Historically, psychologists have been called the least religious of all academicians (Leuba, 1934).

Spirituality and religion with respect to health

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According to Reed (1987), Spiritual well-being in patients with cancer has been found to positively correlate with subjective well-being, lower pain levels, a faster recovery time from intercurrent illness, fighting spirit, hope and positive mood states, high self-esteem, social competence, purpose in life and overall quality of life. Religion and spirituality have been found to have on overall beneficial effect on health (Plante and Sherman,

2001).

George et al. (2000) proposed three mechanisms whereby religion could be related to health: the promotion of health behaviors, the provision of social support and the coherence hypothesis. Membership in several denominations actively encourages moderation in eating and exercise, while discouraging such potentially harmful behaviors as smoking, drug use, excessive alcohol consumption and premarital sex (Pargament, 1997; Musick et al., 2000). Similarly, several studies have documented the relationship between social support, a known predictor of health (House et al., 1988), and religion. The third proposed mechanism suggests that religion ―provides a sense of coherence and meaning so that people understand their role in the universe, the purpose of life, and develop the courage to endure suffering‖ (George et al., 2000). A fourth mechanism linking religion and health may be the physiological response to stress.

SPIRITUALITY AND HEALTHY AGING

As regards association between healthy aging and spiritual well being, Campbell (1981) suggested that well being depends on the satisfaction of three basic kinds of need: The need for having, the need for relating, and the need for being.

A fourth set of need which was acknowledged later was termed as the need for transcendence. According to Sehgal (2005), the postmodern age is the age of stress and anxiety. Relationships that were sacrosanct have been sacrificed at the altar of hedonistic, fast-paced life. Greed, for everything that money can buy, is all-pervasive. However, most people express a vacuum in their lives and are still looking for happiness or, at least, the way to become happy.

TOWARDS DEVELOPING PARADIGMS OF HEALTH AND WELL-BEING

The behavioral medicine paradigm of health posits that health is multi-dimensional; disease is what makes you ill at ease. The disease models vary from biomedical models to biopsychosocial models. The biopsychosocial model considers emotional problems and stress as the root for most physical problems.

The Western and Indian models of health, as advocated by spiritual leaders, share many commonalities:

health is multidimensional; disease has multifactor etiology; disease is rooted in emotional conflicts; stress- related illnesses can be treated and prevented by focusing on lifestyle, emotions, personality, social network, coping, and stress-reduction techniques.

According to Mohan (2005) Spirituality is a universal human experience, crossing cultural and geographical boundaries, although its substance and form may differ. Religion of one kind or another existed, and continues to exist, in all societies; and it has profound effects on the lives of those who practice it. Prayer is central to all religious practices. It encompasses all religions, even those that do not specifically acknowledge an entity like God as in Buddhism.

Physical Health and Spirituality

In a review of 250 epidemiological studies on religion and nine areas of clinical disease, Levin and Vanderpool (1987) found 27 studies that included attendance at services as predictor variables, of which 22 revealed significant associations with beter health.

Chronic Pain

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Evidence points towards the efficacy of the technologies of spirituality in decreasing chronic pain of the body.

AS TO HOW SPIRITUALITY MAY ENHANCE WELL BEING THROUGH POSITIVE EMOTIONS VIZ FORGIVENESS GRATITUDE & HOPE.

Mohan et al (2007) studied dispositional forgiveness in relation to Personality and Spiritual Well Being among Indian Adolescents. Results clearly revealed positive correlations between dispositional Forgiveness, Spiritual well and Personality dimensions of Extraversion and social desirability. Results also revealed a negative between dispositional forgiveness and personality dimensions of neuroticism as well as Psychoticism.

EVIDENCE THAT ADOLESCENTS‘ SPIRITUALITY AND THE SENSE OF MEANING THAT IT GENERATES IS PROTECTIVE COMES FROM SEVERAL STUDIES.

The advent of spiritual psychology may be appreciated so that behavior scientists, educators, managers, and HRD experts could understand, analyze and employ appropriate strategies and interventions for coping, healing, optimizing and enhancing human creativity, tolerance and happiness.

WAYS TO RAISE YOUR CONSCIOUSNESS

1. Forgive yourself and others: Life is too short to hold on to regrets, grudges, miscommunications, or disappointments.

2. Practice gratitude and appreciation: Whatever you focus on grows. So, when you focus on everything in your life, you feel grateful for all and the wonderful people you appreciate, the universe hands you more to feel grateful about.

3. Live each day as though it were your last.

4.