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POETRY UNIT PLAN

by L. Alicia Monroe

EDEN G4913 The Teaching of English Dr. Mark Letcher

Spring 2006

INTRODUCTION
CONTEXT
Students I designed this poetry unit for four eighth-grade language arts classes. Each class consists of 2025 students and meets for 50 minutes every day. Many of the students fall within the realm of average, and several have various special needs, two of which include IEPs. Unit Aimed at bridging the gap between students and poetry, this unit follows the reading of Love That Dog by Sharon Creech and Shakespeare Bats Cleanup by Ron Koertge, during which students glimpsed the value of poetry in the lives of the young narrators who, like many of them, approached it with caution at first. The lessons within the unit offer little flexibility regarding the order in which they are taught. The first lesson launches the unit with a look at poems about reading and writing poetry. The second invites artistic response to a poem. The third prompts discussion on what makes a poem a poem and allows for teacher demonstration of the process of modeling a poem. The fourth eases students into writing poetry by working collaboratively on a group piece modeled after another poem. The next few lessons offer opportunities for students to loosely model and write poems individually. Then, students respond to poems written by their peers and revise poems for publication in writing workshop. Finally, students learn about the use of common HTML, prepare hypertext poems for posting on the class Web site, practice reading poetry out loud, and celebrate their accomplishments in the unit finalea class poetry reading.

RATIONALE
Most secondary students would be perfectly content to throw poetry overboard and hit the throttle, all too glad to leave the genre marooned on a deserted island rather than risk stammering in a sea of stanzas. After all, poetry, as they see it, is better left for to the chosen few blessed with powers of interpretation. Thus, I compiled these modern poems to introduce them to works they can relate to written in voices that reflect their own and will help them find their own, and to show them that they, too, are blessed with powers of interpretationwe all are. While scholarly interpretations may be more authoritative, in the context of secondary education, secondary students interpretations are equally valuable. As they gain their sea legs and learn to embrace poetry, they will be far better equipped for future study of classic works and scholarly interpretations thereofand perhaps far more interested.

OBJECTIVES
Generally and ideally, reading and discussing these works will open students minds to poetry. Their experience with the titles will teach them that poetry is accessible and enjoyable; that words are carefully chosen and arranged on the page to entertain, intrigue, and enlighten; and that poets want readers to decide what their poems mean to them, to interpret the poems for

themselves rather than relying on the interpretations of critics, scholars, and teachers. Also, by writing their own poems, they will begin to analyze as writers, not just readers, becoming increasingly receptive to and appreciative of poetry. Specifically, a number of Oklahomas PASS standards for eighth-grade language arts and intermediate-level instructional technology will be met, as indicated on each daily lesson plan.

MATERIALS
Literature Introduction to Poetry by Billy Collins How To Eat a Poem by Eve Merriam Young Poets by Nicanor Parra (translated by Miller Williams) Your Poem, Man by Edward Lueders The Red Wheelbarrow by William Carlos Williams 32 Reasons Why The Red Wheelbarrow is a Poem by JoLinda Collins Whats in My Journal by William Stafford The Garden Hose by Beatrice Janosco The Builders by Sara Henderson Hay The Three Little Pigs retold by Patricia Seibert The True Story of the Three Little Pigs by Jon Scieszka Technology Overhead projector Interactive whiteboard (or other computer projection device) Computers with Internet access, Web browsers, and Microsoft Notepad Floppy disks (or other medium for saving and submitting student work electronically) Forms and Rubrics Peer Writing Conference Record (see Appendix B) Request for Permission to Publish on the Internet (see Appendix C) Hypertext Poem Rubric (see Appendix D) Poetry Reading Rubric (see Appendix E) Miscellaneous Supplies Paper Pens and/or pencils Colored pencils, crayons, and/or markers

ASSESSMENT
Student learning will be determined through a balance of formal and informal assessment methods indicated on each daily lesson plan, which range from credit for participation to points based on detailed evaluative rubrics.

LESSON PLANS
POEMS ABOUT POETRY ................................................................................................ 4 THE RED WHEELBARROW (DAY ONE)................................................................... 5 THE RED WHEELBARROW (DAY TWO).................................................................. 6 WHATS IN MY JOURNAL .......................................................................................... 7 THE GARDEN HOSE..................................................................................................... 8 THE BUILDERS ............................................................................................................. 9 I REMEMBER POEMS .................................................................................................... 10 THE GIFT OF WORDS .................................................................................................... 11 WRITING WORKSHOP (DAY ONE)............................................................................. 12 WRITING WORKSHOP (DAY TWO)............................................................................ 13 INTRODUCTION TO HTML .......................................................................................... 14 HYPERTEXT POEMS (DAY ONE)................................................................................ 15 HYPERTEXT POEMS (DAY TWO) ............................................................................... 16 READING POETRY OUT LOUD ................................................................................... 17 POETRY READING......................................................................................................... 18

POEMS ABOUT POETRY LESSON PLAN


OBJECTIVES
Listening as others read aloud Reading, responding to, analyzing, and discussing what poets have to say, through poetry, about how the reading and writing of poetry should be approached Oklahoma PASS standards for eighth-grade language arts met: o Reading/Literature: 3.1, 3.2, 3.3, 4.1.a, 4.3

MATERIALS
Overhead projector or interactive whiteboard Introduction to Poetry by Billy Collins How To Eat a Poem by Eve Merriam Young Poets by Nicanor Parra (translated by Miller Williams) Your Poem, Man by Edward Lueders

PROCEDURES
Teacher will: Display each poem individually on the overhead projector or interactive whiteboard. Read each poem aloud to students. Then, ask students do a jump-in reading (spontaneously jump in and read aloud, one stanza per student). After reading each poem, lead discussions that encourage a personal relationship with the poem first. Then, direct students to more analytic interpretation. (For sample questions, see Appendix A.) Students will: Listen as the teacher reads, take turns jump-in reading, and participate in class discussion.

THE RED WHEELBARROW LESSON PLAN (DAY ONE)


OBJECTIVES
Listening as others read aloud Reading, responding to, analyzing, and discussing a poem Responding to a poem artistically Oklahoma PASS standards for eighth-grade language arts met: o Reading/Literature: 3.1, 3.2, 3.3, 4.1.a, 4.3 o Visual Literacy: 3.1

MATERIALS
The Red Wheelbarrow by William Carlos Williams (photocopied for each student) Paper Pens and/or pencils Colored pencils, crayons, and/or markers

PROCEDURES
Teacher will: Distribute copies of the poem. Read it aloud to students. Then, ask a student volunteer to read it aloud a second time. Ask students to read the poem silently a third time and draw a picture of what the poem means to themwhat they see as they read and reflect on the poem, how they feel it should be visually represented. Allow 10-15 minutes for students to complete their drawings. Circulate around the room monitoring activity. Divide students into small groups to share and discuss their drawings. Follow up with a class discussion of the drawings. What do the drawings in each group have in common? How are they different? Ask each group to share one drawing from the group with the class and discuss why they chose it. Finally, prompt further discussion that encourages a personal relationship with the poem. (For sample questions, see Appendix A.) Students will: Listen as the teacher and a fellow student read aloud. Draw pictures in response to the poem. Participate in small group and class discussion of drawings. Turn in drawings at the end of class. If not finished with drawings, finish them for homework and turn them in the next day.

ASSESSMENT
Students will receive participation credit for drawing in response to The Red Wheelbarrow.

THE RED WHEELBARROW LESSON PLAN (DAY TWO)


OBJECTIVES
Listening as others read aloud Reading, responding to, analyzing, and discussing a poem Oklahoma PASS standards for eighth-grade language arts met: o Reading/Literature: 3.1, 3.2, 3.3, 4.1.a, 4.3

MATERIALS
Overhead projector or interactive whiteboard 32 Reasons Why The Red Wheelbarrow is a Poem by JoLinda Collins (photocopied for each student) Photocopies of The Red Wheelbarrow by William Carlos Williams distributed the previous day Paper Pens and/or pencils

PROCEDURES
Teacher will: Revisit the poem, directing students to more analytic interpretation. (For sample questions, see Appendix A.) Then, ask students: What makes The Red Wheelbarrow a poem? As students cite reasons, note them on the overhead projector or interactive whiteboard. Distribute copies of 32 Reasons Why The Red Wheelbarrow is a Poem. Read aloud and discuss point-by-point. Discuss and demonstrate the process of modeling a poem on the overhead projector or interactive whiteboard, from brainstorming to writing/revising. Students will: Participate in class discussion. Watch and listen as the teacher models a poem after The Red Wheelbarrow.

WHATS IN MY JOURNAL LESSON PLAN


OBJECTIVES
Listening as others read aloud Reading, responding to, analyzing, and discussing a poem Collaboratively writing a poem modeled after another poem Oklahoma PASS standards for eighth-grade language arts met: o Reading/Literature: 3.1, 3.2, 3.3, 4.1.a, 4.3 o Writing/Grammar/Usage and Mechanics: 1.1, 2.4

MATERIALS
Overhead projector or interactive whiteboard Whats in My Journal by William Stafford Paper Pens and/or pencils

PROCEDURES
Teacher will: Display the poem on the overhead projector or interactive whiteboard. Read it aloud to students. Then, ask a student volunteer to read it aloud a second time. Lead discussion that encourages a personal relationship with the poem first. Then, direct students to more analytic interpretation. (For sample questions, see Appendix A.) Instruct students to follow Staffords model and write two lines each about whats in their journals. Allow 5-10 minutes for students to do so, circulating around the room to monitor progress. Ask each student to read his or her lines aloud, transcribing them on the overhead projector or interactive whiteboard to form a collaborative poem. Read the poem aloud. Students will: Listen as the teacher and a fellow student read aloud. Participate in class discussion. Write two lines about whats in their own journals. Participate in the composition of a class poem.

ASSESSMENT
Students will receive credit for participation.

SOURCES
This lesson plan is adapted from a mini-lesson described by Nancie Atwell on pages 349-51 of the second edition of In the Middle: New Understandings About Writing, Reading, and Learning.

THE GARDEN HOSE


OBJECTIVES
Listening as others read aloud Reading, responding to, analyzing, and discussing a poem Writing a poem modeled after another poem Oklahoma PASS standards for eighth-grade language arts met: o Reading/Literature: 3.1, 3.2, 3.3, 4.1.a, 4.3 o Writing/Grammar/Usage and Mechanics: 1

MATERIALS
Overhead projector or interactive whiteboard The Garden Hose by Beatrice Janosco Paper Pens and/or pencils

PROCEDURES
Teacher will: Display the poem on the overhead projector or interactive whiteboard. Read it aloud to students. Then, ask a student volunteer to read it aloud a second time. Lead discussion that encourages a personal relationship with the poem first. Then, direct students to more analytic interpretation. (For sample questions, see Appendix A.) Discuss personification. Instruct students to brainstorm objects they could personify in poems of their own, jotting lists if they wish. Ask them to write poems that personify an object, showing it through a different lens as Beatrice Janosco shows The Garden Hose. Circulate around the room monitoring progress and conferring with students. If students finish writing with time to spare, divide them into small groups to share what they have written. Afterward, if theres still time, invite a few students to share with the entire class. Students will: Listen as the teacher and a fellow student read aloud. Participate in class discussion. Write poems modeled after The Garden Hose. If time permits, share poems in small groups. Turn in poems at the end of class. If not finished with poems, finish them for homework and turn them in the next day.

ASSESSMENT
Students will receive participation credit for writing modeled poems.

THE BUILDERS LESSON PLAN


OBJECTIVES
Listening as others read aloud Reading, responding to, analyzing, and discussing a poem Comparing and contrasting points of view Writing a poem loosely modeled after another poem Oklahoma PASS standards for eighth-grade language arts met: o Reading/Literature: 3.1, 3.2, 3.3, 3.4.c, 3.4.d, 3.4.e, 4.1.a, 4.2, 4.3 o Writing/Grammar/Usage and Mechanics: 1

MATERIALS
The Builders by Sara Henderson Hay (photocopied for each student) The Three Little Pigs retold by Patricia Seibert The True Story of the Three Little Pigs by Jon Scieszka Paper Pens and/or pencils

PROCEDURES
Teacher will: Distribute copies of the poem. Read it aloud to students. Then, ask a student volunteer to read it aloud a second time. Lead discussion that encourages a personal relationship with the poem first. Then, direct students to more analytic interpretation. (For sample questions, see Appendix A.) Read The Three Little Pigs and The True Story of the Three Little Pigs aloud to students. Discuss the different points of view. Instruct students to write a poem loosely modeled on The Builder from the point of view of one of the first two little pigs who built their houses out of straw and twigs. Circulate around the room monitoring activity. If students finish writing with time to spare, divide them into small groups to share what they have written. Afterward, if theres still time, invite a few students to share with the entire class. Students will: Listen as the teacher and a fellow student read aloud. Participate in class discussion. Write poems loosely modeled after The Builder from another pigs point of view. If time permits, share poems in small groups. Turn in poems at the end of class. If not finished with poems, finish them for homework and turn them in the next day.

ASSESSMENT
Students will receive participation credit for writing loosely modeled poems.

I REMEMBER POEMS LESSON PLAN


OBJECTIVES
Brainstorming and sharing ideas Watching and listening as the teacher models the poetry writing process Writing poetry Reading aloud Listening as others read aloud Responding to the writing of peers Oklahoma PASS standards for eighth-grade language arts met: o Reading/Literature: 3.1, 3.2, 3.3, 4.1.a, 4.3 o Writing/Grammar/Usage and Mechanics: 1

MATERIALS
Overhead projector or interactive whiteboard Paper Pens and/or pencils

PROCEDURES
Teacher will: Instruct students to quickly jot down lists of memoriesimportant or trivialon a piece of paper, each line starting with I remember Make a list alongside students. Share lists briefly. Then, choose the lines from the teachers list that will become part of a poem. Draft a poem on the overhead projector or interactive whiteboard, using the chosen line or lines, adding to them as necessary, and editing in the process. The poem can be about different memories that are related somehow or expand upon a single memory. After modeling the process for students, ask them to write I remember poems of their own. Circulate around the room monitoring progress and conferring with students as needed. If students finish writing with time to spare, divide them into small groups to share what they have written. Afterward, if theres still time, invite a few students to share with the entire class. Students will: Jot down I remember lists. Share lists briefly. Watch and listen as the teacher composes an I remember poem. Write I remember poems. If time permits, share poems in small groups. Turn in poems at the end of class. If not finished with poems, finish them for homework and turn them in the next day.

ASSESSMENT
Students will receive participation credit for writing I remember poems.

SOURCES
This lesson plan is adapted from an activity recommended on pages 161-62 of the third edition of Inside Out: Strategies for Teaching Writing by Dan Kirby, Dawn Latta Kirby, and Tom Liner.

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THE GIFT OF WORDS LESSON PLAN


OBJECTIVES
Brainstorming Watching and listening as the teacher models the poetry writing process Writing poetry Reading aloud Listening as others read aloud Responding to the writing of peers Oklahoma PASS standards for eighth-grade language arts met: o Reading/Literature: 3.1, 3.2, 3.3, 4.1.a, 4.3 o Writing/Grammar/Usage and Mechanics: 1, 2.8

MATERIALS
Overhead projector or interactive whiteboard Paper Pens and/or pencils

PROCEDURES
Teacher will: Discuss the idea of giving the gift of wordswriting poems or poetic pieces for others. Draft a poem on the overhead projector or interactive whiteboard or share a gift of words poem already written. Discuss for whom it is/was written and why. Instruct students to brainstorm persons to whom they might like to give the gift of words, jotting lists if they wish. Ask them to write gift poems of their own. Circulate around the room monitoring progress and conferring with students. If students finish writing with time to spare, divide them into small groups to share what they have written. Afterward, if theres still time, invite a few students to share with the entire class. Students will: Watch and listen as the teacher discusses giving the gift of words and composes a poem or shares one previously written. Decide on recipients and write poems for others. If time permits, share poems in small groups. Turn in poems at the end of class. If not finished with poems, finish them for homework and turn them in the next day.

ASSESSMENT
Students will receive participation credit for writing poems.

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WRITING WORKSHOP LESSON PLAN (DAY ONE)


OBJECTIVES
Reading aloud Listening as others read aloud Responding to the writing of peers Revising poetry Oklahoma PASS standards for eighth-grade language arts met: o Writing/Grammar/Usage and Mechanics: 1, 2.8, 2.10, 3.1

MATERIALS
Poems students have written during the unit Peer Writing Conference Record (photocopied for student use) (see Appendix B) Request for Permission to Publish on the Internet (see Appendix C) Paper Pens and/or pencils

PROCEDURES
Teacher will: Explain the writing workshop is a time for revising drafts of poems they have written over the course of the week, polishing their pieces for publicationgiving to others, posting on the class Web site, and sharing during the class poetry reading. Emphasize the importance of working quietly without disturbing others. Distribute copies of the Peer Writing Conference Record. Instruct students to confer quietly in pairs. Explain that each student should respond to his or her partners piece by filling out the Peer Writing Conference Record. Then, instruct them to begin revising individually. Circulate around the room to monitor activity and confer with students. Before the end of class, distribute the Request for Permission to Publish on the Internet and briefly discuss. Students will: Work in peer-response pairs, filling out a copy of the Peer Writing Conference Record for their partners. Give the record to the writer for whom it was filled out. Then, revise individually. Take permission slips home for parents signature and turn in the next class day.

SOURCES
This lesson plan is fashioned after workshops described by Nancie Atwell in the second edition of In the Middle: New Understandings About Writing, Reading, and Learning.

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WRITING WORKSHOP LESSON PLAN (DAY TWO)


OBJECTIVES
Revising poetry Oklahoma PASS standards for eighth-grade language arts met: o Writing/Grammar/Usage and Mechanics: 1, 2.8, 2.10, 3.1

MATERIALS
Poems students have written during the unit Peer Writing Conference Record (filled out by peer responders the previous day) Paper Pens and/or pencils

PROCEDURES
Teacher will: Remind students the writing workshop is a time for revising drafts of poems they have written over the course of the week, polishing their pieces for publicationgiving to others, posting on the class Web site, and sharing during the class poetry reading. Emphasize the importance of working quietly without disturbing others. Instruct students to continue revising individually. Circulate around the room to monitor activity and confer with students. Students will: Continue revising individually. Finish revisions for homework.

SOURCES
This lesson plan is loosely modeled after workshops described by Nancie Atwell in the second edition of In the Middle: New Understandings About Writing, Reading, and Learning.

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INTRODUCTION TO HTML
OBJECTIVES
Gaining familiarity with the structure of HTML documents and the elements used within Oklahoma PASS standards for instructional technology met: o Intermediate Level prior to completion of grade 8: 4

MATERIALS
Computer with Internet access, Web browser, and Microsoft Notepad Interactive whiteboard (or other computer projection device) Paper Pens and/or pencils

PROCEDURES
Teacher will: Compose a simple HTML document in Notepad, displaying the screen on the interactive whiteboard or through another computer projection device. Discuss each step. View the resulting Web page in a browser. Add and change attributes, discussing each addition or change and viewing the results in a Web browser. Discuss elements such as <HTML>, <TITLE>, <BODY>, headings, paragraphs, and breaks. Discuss attributes such as ALIGN. Discuss file names. Caution students about the use of characters such as quotation marks, dashes, and ampersands. Print out the HTML document created at the end of class for photocopying and distributing to students. Students will: Watch, listen, and take notes as the teacher discusses and demonstrates the use of common HTML.

SOURCES
This lesson plan is adapted from activities described by Katherine Nowak Kellen in her article titled Expanding Our Reach: Writing HTML Commands to Create Student Hypertext Writing Projects, which appeared in the January 2002 issue of The English Journal.

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HYPERTEXT POEMS LESSON PLAN (DAY ONE)


OBJECTIVES
Composing simple HTML documents Oklahoma PASS standards for instructional technology met: o Intermediate Level prior to completion of grade 8: 4

MATERIALS
Previously written and revised poem Printouts of the HTML document created previously in class (photocopied for each student) Hypertext Poem Rubric (photocopied for each student) (see Appendix D) Computers with Internet access, Web browser, and Microsoft Notepad Floppy disks (or other medium for saving and submitting student work electronically)

PROCEDURES
Teacher will: Ask HTML-savvy students to spread out and sit among those who are new to working with HTML. Distribute floppy disks, printouts of the HTML document created in class the previous day, and the Hypertext Poem Rubric. Briefly discuss the rubric. Walk students through launching Notepad and beginning composition of HTML documents following the example on the printout. Circulate around the room monitoring activity and helping students as needed. Ask students familiar with HTML to assist their less familiar peers as well. As students complete their documents, walk them through launching a Web browser and opening their documents in the Web browser. Help them troubleshoot should anything not appear correctly in the Web browser. Students will: Compose HTML documents. View HTML documents in Web browsers. Turn in floppy disks with saved HTML documents in progress at the end of class.

SOURCES
This lesson plan is adapted from activities described by Katherine Nowak Kellen in her article titled Expanding Our Reach: Writing HTML Commands to Create Student Hypertext Writing Projects, which appeared in the January 2002 issue of The English Journal.

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HYPERTEXT POEMS LESSON PLAN (DAY TWO)


OBJECTIVES
Composing simple HTML documents Oklahoma PASS standards for instructional technology met: o Intermediate Level prior to completion of grade 8: 4

MATERIALS
Previously written and revised poem Printouts of the HTML document created previously in class (from the previous day) Hypertext Poem Rubric (from the previous day) Computers with Internet access, Web browser, and Microsoft Notepad Floppy disks (or other medium for saving and submitting student work electronically)

PROCEDURES
Teacher will: Ask HTML-savvy students once again to spread out and sit among those who are new to working with HTML. Distribute floppy disks. Instruct students to pick up where they left off the previous day with their HTML documents. Circulate around the room monitoring activity and helping students as needed. Ask students familiar with HTML to assist their less familiar peers as well. Help students troubleshoot should anything not appear correctly in the Web browser. Students will: Continue composing HTML documents. View HTML documents in Web browsers. Turn in floppy disks with saved HTML documents at the end of class. If not finished, complete for homework and turn in the next day, or make arrangements with teacher for time to complete them on computers in the classroom or elsewhere in the school.

ASSESSMENT
Student work will be evaluated according to the Hypertext Poem Rubric (see Appendix D).

SOURCES
This lesson plan is adapted from activities described by Katherine Nowak Kellen in her article titled Expanding Our Reach: Writing HTML Commands to Create Student Hypertext Writing Projects, which appeared in the January 2002 issue of The English Journal.

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READING POETRY OUT LOUD


OBJECTIVES
Developing understanding of and appreciation for oral recitation of poetry Reading aloud Listening as others read aloud Oklahoma PASS standards for eighth-grade language arts met: o Oral Language/Listening and Speaking: 1.2, 1.3, 2.3

MATERIALS
Computer with Internet access and Web browser Interactive whiteboard (or other computer projection device) Poetry Reading Rubric (photocopied for each student) (see Appendix E) Previously written and revised poems students have chosen for the poetry reading Paper Pens and/or pencils

PROCEDURES
Teacher will: Display How to Read a Poem Out Loud by Billy Collins (http://www.loc.gov/poetry/180/ p180-howtoread.html) on the interactive whiteboard or through another computer projection device. Read and discuss with students. Distribute Poetry Reading Rubric and briefly discuss with students. Divide students into small groups to practice reading the poems they have chosen for the poetry reading. Circulate around the room monitoring progress and conferring with students. Students will: Participate in class discussion. Practice reading and listening to others read in small groups.

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POETRY READING LESSON PLAN


OBJECTIVES
Reading aloud Listening as others read aloud Oklahoma PASS standards for eighth-grade language arts met: o Oral Language/Listening and Speaking: 1.2, 2.3

MATERIALS
Previously written and revised poems students have chosen for the poetry reading

PROCEDURES
Teacher will: Call students one by one to stand at the front of the classroom and read their poems to the class. Sit at the back of the room, watching and listening as students read their poems. Students will: Listen respectfully as others read their poems. Read aloud when called upon.

ASSESSMENT
Student readings will be evaluated according to the Poetry Reading Rubric (see Appendix E).

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APPENDIX A
SAMPLE QUESTIONS FOR DISCUSSION OF POETRY
Questions that encourage a personal relationship with the poem: Do you like it? What does the poem remind you of? What did you think about while listening to it? Where did your mind go? Has anything been said in the poem to remind you of something in your life? What pictures did this poem give you? And what feelings do you get from those pictures? Does the poet bring up ideas youd like to ask him or her about? Ideas youve often thought about yourself? Questions that direct students to more analytic interpretation: What do you notice about the rhythm of the poem? What do you notice about line lengths? Why are some lines different? How does the length of the lines affect the way you read the poem? What would happen if the lines were shorter? Longer? Are there repeated sounds? Do the sounds direct attention? Do the sound patterns connect images? Which images affect you most? If you were writing this poem, what would you change? What would you keep?

SOURCES
Taken from Poets on Teaching Poetry, which appeared in the September 1994 issue of The English Journal

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APPENDIX B
PEER WRITING CONFERENCE RECORD
Writers Name ____________________________________ Date _______________________ Responder ______________________________ Title of Piece _________________________

Writer, before you ask for a conference, consider what you want help with: ideas, language, images, organization, coherence, a part of the piece, a sense of the whole? Tell the responder what you want response to:

Responder, help the writer think and make decisions about the writing: Ask what he or she needs help with. Listen as the writer reads, try to understand the writing, then tell what you heard. If there are parts that you dont understand or youd like to know more about, ask the writer about them. It will help you and the writer if you jot down your questions during and after the reading in the space below. Ask the writer what he or she plans to do next. Give this record of the conference to the writer.

Adapted from the second edition of In the Middle: New Understandings About Writing, Reading, and Learning by Nancie Atwell

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APPENDIX C
REQUEST FOR PERMISSION TO PUBLISH ON THE INTERNET
Dear Parents/Guardians, During our poetry unit, students will be developing and publishing Web pages on the class Web site. Each student will have one page dedicated to an original poem he or she has written, which will include the students first name and last initial. No last names will be published. School web pages are public documents welcoming the outside world to the school. Before displaying student material on the Internet, I am requesting your permission to include your students poem and name in the manner indicated. If you have not visited the class Web site, I encourage you to do so at [insert URL here]. Sincerely,

L. Alicia Monroe --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------I grant permission for my students poem and name (first name and last initial only) to be published on the class Web site on the Internet. Students Name ________________________________________________________________ Parents Signature __________________________________ Date ______________________

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APPENDIX D
HYPERTEXT POEM RUBRIC
Students Name ____________________________________ Date __________________ Poem Student wrote original poem (10 points participation credit). 0 10

HTML Usage Point rating system: 2 = correct use of element or attribute, 1 = incorrect use of element or attribute, 0 = no use of element or attribute The documents title appears in the title bar (use of <TITLE> element). The poems title appears and stands out in the Web browser window (use of <H1> element). The poem appears in the Web browser window (use of <BODY> element). Lines are separated (use of <BR> element), and, if the poem has more than one stanza, stanzas are separated (use of <P> element) in the Web browser window. The authors name (first name and last initial only) appears in the Web browser Window and is aligned the same as the title and the poem, either all centered or all on the left-hand side of the Web browser window (use of ALIGN attribute in <P> element). Score Total number of points earned (out of 20 possible). Comments: 0 1 2

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APPENDIX E
POETRY READING RUBRIC
Students Name ____________________________________ Date __________________ Point rating system: 1 = Poor, 2 = Satisfactory, 3 = Good, 4 = Very Good, 5 = Excellent Student is prepared. Student has a copy of poem to read and appears to have rehearsed. Student is enthusiastic. Students tone and expression reflect interest in the assignment. Student reads slowly. Student reads at an easy pace, pausing for a few seconds between the title and the first line. Student reads in a normal, relaxed tone of voice. Student reads naturally, following the rhythm of the poem, and speaks clearly. Student projects his or her voice. Student reads loudly enough to be heard throughout the classroom. Score Total number of points earned (out of 25 possible). Comments: 1 2 3 4 5

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