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Front Office Lesson

PROGRAMME

NATIONAL DIPLOMA CATERING AND HOTEL MANAGEMENT

COURSE CODE 124: FRONT OFFICE OPERATIONS


On completion of this course the student should be able to understand the relationship of the front office department with other departments within the organisation, the value, attributes, social skills and the functions of the front office and its employees. The course is designed also to teach the checking procedures and the various records for registration, the communication processes in hospitality organisations and the importance of the telephone as a means of communication.

LECTURE TITLE
Front Office Introduction

1.

INTRODUCTION The FRONT OFFICE is the nerve centre of a hotel. Members of the front-office staff welcome the guests, carry their luggage, and help them register, give them their room keys and mail, answer questions about the activities in the hotel and surrounding area, and finally check them out. In fact, the only direct contact most guests have with hotel employees, other than in the restaurants, is with members of the front-office staff.

The front office functions can be divided into five general areas:

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Reception Bell service Mail and information Concierge Cashiers and night auditors

Two major departments are represented in this list. The employees staffing the first four areas are in the rooms department. The fifth is the financial area, where guest charges are accumulated and posted to the bills, and all cash transactions are consummated. These are all accounting-department functions, and so the cashiers and night auditors are in that department.

The Front Office function of a Hotel is to act as the public face of the hotel, primarily by greeting hotel patrons and checking in guests.

It also provides assistance to guests during their stay, completes their accommodation, food and beverage, accounts and receives payment from guests.

The Front Office Department is typically composed of 1. Reception 2. Reservation 3. Concierge 4. PBX (phone service system) 5. Telephone

Reception
The reception desk is usually the place at which guests from the first impressions of the hotel. It is also the communication centre for the hotel operations. The reception desk may comprise of such tasks which are:1. Cashiering

2. 3. 4.

Mail and information Registration Room assignment

The reception desk is located in the busiest area of a hotels lobby. The main financial tasks which are handled by the front office are as follows:1. 2. 3. 4. Receiving cash payments. Handling guest folios. Verifying checks. Handling foreign currencies /credit cards.

The above is to give an over view of the duties and organization of the front office department. Guests who found themselves away from home, in a new environment or unfamiliar settings are usually anxious to proceed with their business or vacation plans without delay. They usually want to know or learn the who, what, when, where and how of their new environment. The guests usually request or ask for information through the door man, switch board operator, front desk or clerk or cashier, because these employees are the most visible to the guest and also seem by guests as most knowledgeable. These employees response to the guests requests or questions about public transport, location of hotel facilities, special events in the community etc. indicates how well the hotel has prepared the front office for this important vole.

Front office managers must take an active role in gathering information that will be interest to guests. The relationships the front office manager develops with the other departmental directors and their employees are vital to gathering information for guests. Developing positive personal relationship is part of the communication process.

QUESTIONS

1-

Explain why the front office is called the nerve centre and focal point of all activities in the establishment.

PROGRAMME NATIONAL DIPLOMA CATERING AND HOTEL MANAGEMENT.

COURSE CODE 124: FRONT OFFICE OPERATIONS On completion of this course the student should be able to understand the relationship of the front office department with other departments within the organisation, the value, attributes, social skills and the functions of the front office and its employees. The course is designed also to teach the checking procedures and the various records for registration, the communication processes in hospitality organisations and the importance of the telephone as a means of communication.

LECTURE TITLE Interrelationship of the front office with other departments

2.1

The front office interaction and relationship with other departments. The front office staff interacts with all departments of the hotel, including marketing and sales, housekeeping, food and beverage, banquet, controller maintenance, security and human resources.

The front office is seen by these departments a communication medium in providing guest services. Each and every department has its own unique communication connection with the front office staff. The front office relationships with other departments are as follows:1. The marketing and sales department:- this department depends on the front office to provide historical data on guests and other details that concern each and every guest. 2. The billing and cashier department:- these comes under the controller who relies on the front office staff to provide a daily summary of financial transactions which goes through a well prepared high audit. Therefore, since, it is the duty of the front office to provide the controller with financial data for billing and maintenance of credit card ledgers, these two departments must relay payments and changes through the posting machine or property management system. 3. Maintenance Department: - Communication between the front office and maintenance is on room status and requests for maintenance service. Maintenance employee must know the

occupancy status of a room at the front office before attending to plumbing heating, airconditioning problem and many more repairs. If the room is already under reservation, the two departments will work out a time frame so that the room can be fixed before the arrival of the guest or another room to be assigned if repairs will take long. 4. The security department: - Communication and good relationship between the front office and the security office is very important in providing hospitality and comfort to the guest. This department relates to each other properly and must have good communication in maintaining guest security, fire safety, measures and emergency communication systems such as fire alarms, as well as procedures for routine investigation of guest security concerns. 5. The human resources management department:- This department may rely on the front office staff to act as initial point of contact for potential employees in all departments. Some directors of human resource management depend on the front office to distribute forms and other personnel related information to job applicants. 6. The food and beverage department: - this department depends on the front office to determine the quantity of food to cook and type. When the front office is expecting new arrivals, food and beverage department is notified as well as other departments

QUESTIONS 1Discuss on the relationship between the front office department and the housekeeping department. 2What are the functions of the following departments? a. b. The maintenance department The Human Resources management Department. WEEK 3

PROGRAMME NATIONAL DIPLOMA CATERING AND HOTEL MANAGEMENT.

COURSE CODE 124: FRONT OFFICE OPERATIONS

On completion of this course the student should be able to understand the relationship of the front office department with other departments within the organisation, the value, attributes, social skills and the functions of the front office and its employees. The course is designed also to teach the checking procedures and the various records for registration, the communication processes in hospitality organisations and the importance of the telephone as a means of communication.

LECTURE TITLE Front Office Different Components Relevance of Product knowledge in the Front Office Front Office Organizational Structure

INTRODUCTION The different components of the front office in relation to the following;

Front desk Concierge Switch board Porters Luggage handling

3.1

FRONT OFFICE: WHO IS IN IT?

1.

The front desk:-being said to be the most active section of the front office is usually located at the far corner of the lobby. Equipments found at the reception desk are a table, chair, booking diary, day and night porters log book. These equipments are neatly arranged. There should also be either a per stand with a good ball point pen or a pen and inkstand for the use of guests when registering, it should be clean and changed regularly. The hotel register should also be placed neatly on the desk and kept closed so that it will not be seen by everybody. If registration cards are used, they should also be placed neatly on the desk, and should be supplied constantly so guests can register with a minimum delay. For the benefit of the guest, a perpetual calendar should be placed in a convenient position, with the date and day of the week correctly shown at all times. It is also essential that a large calendar be kept for quick reference by the reception staff showing several months in advance and showing days which the hotel is fully booked. This will save time when requests for accommodation are made by telephone.

2.

The Concierge: - is a uniformed staff in the front office whose activities is directly with the guest and his needs. The concierge sometimes acts as an escort to sloops in town, or the bus station, concerts taking place in town. This uniformed staff generally runs errands for guests.

3.

The switch board:- regardless of the size of the hotel, there will be a telephone. The larger the hotel or establishment, the greater will be the need for telephone usage. A small switch board would probably be placed in or near the reception office to be operated by a receptionist or a member of the uniformed staff. In larger hotels, a switch board would be placed in a room where more than one telephone switch board operators would be employed to deal with the numerous in-coming and out-going phone calls.

4.

Porters: - Came under unformed staff and comprise of all those members of the hotel staff who wear uniforms. This uniform is of is of a colour distinctive to the hotel and the basic design is the same among hotels. The head porter is in charge of the uniformed staff. The head porter is usually responsible for allocating and supervising the duties of the members of the uniform staff. He keeps a log book in which he records all the happenings of the day arrivals, departures, messages, errands etc. he notes with each entry the time of day and the names of the persons concerned. Should any query arise reference to these records is of great assistance. In addition to the organizing and supervising of his staff, the Head Porter is in direct contact with the guests. He must have a good memory for names, faces and be able to greet guests correctly.

5.

Luggage handling: - in hotels where there is a luggage room a Head Luggage Porter is in charge and he is responsible to the Head Hall Porter for the smooth and efficient running of the organization of this room. It is his duty to ensure that a record is kept of all luggage passing through the luggage room and to know which member of his staff handled it.

3.2

THE RELEVANCE OF PRODUCT KNOWLEDGE IN FRONT OFFICE

OPERATIONS PRODUCT KNOWLEDGE is very important in front office operation. Front office personnel succeed by integrating multiple sources of information and responding quickly and effectively to customers requests and question. The following are the major areas where product knowledge can be profitable to the hotel establishment. 1. Accommodation Product:- this product does not just consist of a guest room single or double, but also the additional facilities and services which are applicable to a particular room e.g. does the room have a pleasant view, is it away

from noise etc. Since the accommodation product cannot be examined before a guest commits his/her self, a guest relies upon the front office staff to be able to describe the product accurately. It is therefore important for the front office staff to have knowledge of what is included in the accommodation of the hotel he/she is paying for. This knowledge will increase sales and productivity for the establishment. 2. Layout of the hotel:- this is also important in product knowledge of front office operation. A good receptionist should know the layout of the establishment for good impression of the guest. The guest may ask the following questions there is the restaurant, or lounge, or bar? Or what are the bar hours, when is the pool open, how early does breakfast start for those guests checking out early. What type of facilities is available? 3. Knowing all types of menus- Knowing all types of menus is very important. The staff must know all types of menus offered by the restaurant and the times of services. For example, there are mainly two types The Table Dhorte and ala cante. 4. General information:- staffs at the front office must also acquire general information about lounges, bars, hall, swimming pool etc. all being part product knowledge a receptionist must have for smooth running of the establishment, high project, and high patronage of guest. 5. Equipment available:- is also related to product knowledge in front office operation for example, equipments available for conferences, special functions, entertainments and programmes offered by the hotel. Also the size, and types of fixtures and furnishings are also important for the front office to have knowledge of since it is the focal point and nerve centre of the hotel.

The reception office is the most visible department in any hotel, where all information of an establishment and all activities of the serving departments are gotten.

3.3

FRONT OFFICE STRUCTURE OF A MODERN SMALL HOTEL

Functions of the Reception office In all hotels, the reception office is the focal point or nerve centre of the overall hotel, not only to other departments, but also the first point of contact for incoming visitors. Ideally, the reception desk should be seen immediately when a guest enters the hotel lobby and this should present a picture orderliness and effectiveness. A noisy and untidy reception office will create an unfavourable impression and will cause a guest to have negative feelings about the organization and efficiency of the whole organization. Whether the offices is a small centralized office of a medium sized hotel, or the front office a large hotel, there must be clearly defined areas of advanced reservations cashier and billing account, telephone and front desk reception. The functions of the front desk reception are as follows:Selling accommodation Receive and welcome Check in and register guest. Check out guests and deal with the settlement of their accounts. Handle enquires and complaints and provide information. Deal with advance reservation. Allocate rooms.

Keep up to the minute records of room status. Handle in-coming and out-going mails. Deal with telephone communication. Attend to all duplicating and photocopying. Maintain good communication with all departments.

In large hotels, the reception office basically, the sales department deals with enquiries and necessary records and charts for letting out accommodation. The cash control, banking accounts are deceit with in subsidiary offices to relieve the pressure in the front office. In the all average size hotel, these tasks could be centralized and dealt with by the brigade of receptionist in the front office.

QUESTIONS 2. Explain the following components of the front office a. b. Luggage handling Porters

2. Describe the front point desk and its component.

WEEK 4

PROGRAMME NATIONAL DIPLOMA CATERING AND HOTEL MANAGEMENT

COURSE CODE 124: FRONT OFFICE OPERATIONS


On completion of this course the student should be able to understand the relationship of the front office department with other departments within the organisation, the value, attributes, social skills and the functions of the front office and its employees. The course is designed also to teach the checking procedures and the various records for registration, the communication processes in hospitality organisations and the importance of the telephone as a means of communication.

LECTURE TITLE
Qualities of Front office employee Professional Attitude Hygiene Standards Etiquette and communications skills Dress Code

4.1

THE QUALITIES OF A FRONT OFFICE EMPLOYEE


The Quality of the front office employee in forms of the following:-

abcd-

High standard of professional attitude. Hygiene standards. Etiquette and communication skills Dress code

a-

High Standard of professional attitude: - a good front office staff must possess qualities ranging from good manners, common sense, adaptability and a controlled sense of humour, to diplomacy, knowledge of languages, a head for figures, and a smart appearance & high standard professionalism also includes the following.

(i)

Pleasantness- as the saying goes, pleasantness breeds pleasantness. One of the first essential qualities of a hotel employee to posses is a naturally pleasant manner. This will be a great asset in dealing with people, because the attitude of a front office employee is often and quickly reflected in the person with whom he/she is dealing with. Good manners: - is an integral part of a front office employees technical ability. The adding sir or madam when he/she addresses people does not make her /him humble or service. This showing of respect should also be extended to his/her colleagues and all staffs in the establishment.

(ii)

(iii)

Ability to think and work methodically. The cultivation of an orderly mind will materially assist in the development of efficiency and the elimination confusion, especially when working under pressure.

(iv)

Accuracy:- this is another quality absolutely essential to the front office employee, for without it her work would become a game of chance at which the hotel would be the loser. Accuracy in every aspect of the front office staffs work is vital. Accurate booking of accommodation making up of guests accounts, spelling and recording of names are all important.

(v)

Team Work:- is essential in the running of a good hotel, therefore, its staff must be loyal to one another and to the management.

b-

Hygiene Standards: - personal hygiene for men is as important as it is for women particular care should be taken about being well shaved and having properly cut hair. Unkempt hair is not encouraged. Long hair should always be kept well groomed and tidy. Both the male and female employee in the front office must ensure that their working clothes are kept clean and in good repair.

Bad Breath (Halitosis) and body odours are not pleasant and persons so afflicted should do their best by brushing teeth twice a day, using mouth

freshener, and visiting the doctor on regular basis. Perfume should not be worn to conceal odours. Hygiene standards-hands and finger nails are constantly under the gaze of visitors, should be clean and the nails well manicured. Nail varnish should be avoid or light colour used. Make-up needs to be very light or none at all.

c-

Etiquette and Communication Skills-communication is one of the tools of management for successfully getting the job done. It is therefore necessary to appreciate and comprehend the meaning, implications, purpose and problems of communication. For example, at work between workers and their managers, or between co-workers and their colleagues. Communication has a uniting force. First, it important to establish exactly what the expected standards of performance are, what a particular job entails, and to ensure that the employee knows exactly what is communicated to him, and what is expected of him. The second important aspect is to give feedback on how well tasks are being carried out and the standard of performance being achieved. This will not only ensure that the job is carried out as planned, but it will also reduce the employee role ambiguity meaning to know exactly what is expected of him, and knowledge of the actual results of work activity. In that case, if the communication was very clear, and well comprehended by the employee, it would definitely result to a high motivational effect which would be seen visibly.

Making the Right Impression at the Front Desk: How Proper Etiquette Helps
We all know that you never get a second chance to make a good impression. But just how can hotel management ensure that they are making the right impression at the front desk? As a General Manager, I believe that it is my responsibility to ensure that our guests find both efficient service and a positive, outgoing, and friendly attitude the minute they arrive at reception. Here is my advice on front desk etiquette:

Proper staff attitude starts with management and is then diffused to members of staff. This means that the positive attitude that I want my staff to have when dealing with our customers must start with me. If I approach my duties with a smile, a can-do attitude, and a determination to meet or exceed our customers' expectations, my staff is more likely to do the same. The most important part of the uniform my front desk staff wears is their smile. This smile should reflect the pride they take in their work and it should be worn not only when greeting guests in person, but should also be heard when talking on the phone. Guests should ideally be greeted within 10 seconds of their arrival. This can sometimes be complicated by the fact that your staff may already be serving another guest. However, I have trained my staff to acknowledge new guests immediately and to tell the new guests that they will be with them momentarily, even if they are presently serving someone else. Phones should be answered within four rings and with a tone of voice that reflects his or her smile. Another way that I ensure that my staff has the right attitude towards our guests is by treating them in the same way that I want them to treat our customers. I strive to create an environment in which my staff can be happy with their present job and take initiatives in new areas. I consider their individual needs and desires, and they in turn do the same for our guests. Since we are a property with a lot of repeat business, we try to learn our guests names and greet them by name when we see them. Both my staff and I do this on a regular basis; it lets our guests know that they are not just a room number but also a person whose business we value. I also give high priority to thorough training in efficient procedures. Proper training on all of the front office equipment, including the switchboard, computers, and office machines, not only increases efficiency, but also makes it less likely that your staff will get frustrated and take it out on your guests. Moreover, if your staff can efficiently operate your computer system, the process of registering guests is quicker and the billing process upon their exit will be correct. This is crucial to leaving a lasting good impression. Finally, we must also make it a point to inform guests of all of the amenities we offer as well as hours of operation and local area information. If the guest is not given this information, he or she may not realize what you are offering and what value it represents in the amount they are paying. The guest should be aware that we are staffed 24 hours per day and that we will be glad to answer any questions or concerns they might have. This gives our guests a point of reference,

whether they would like to learn about local restaurants or whether they need a light bulb replaced in their room. It is my job as a General Manager to make sure that our staff is equipped with the knowledge they need in order to efficiently perform their jobs. It is also my responsibility to create an environment in which they can thrive professionally. My individual attention and positive attitude towards my staff encourages my staff to treat our guests in the same way I treat them with respect, a can-do attitude, and a smile. Not only do we then make a good first impression, but we create a great lasting impression of our hotel and its service, which makes guests likely to return again and again. Dress Code the clothes worn by a front office employee (receptionist) when at her job are of paramount importance. A neat and well groomed appearance indicates a pride in her, and in her work. The clothes worn by a receptionist must be suitable for her job. A great number of hotels provide a uniform for their receptionists to wear which is usually plain but smart outfit. If no uniform is provided by the hotel, and the receptionist is free to decide for herself what clothes she will wear, care must be taken in the choice she makes. Both male and female receptionists must ensure that their working clothes are kept clean and in good repair. Often where uniform is worn, the hotel will provide laundering or cleaning services for the staff, or may make pressing facilities available on days off. All this helps to ensure that those who are in contact with the visitors always look well groomed and thus help create the right atmosphere.

d-

QUESTIONS
1. List 5 hygiene standards of the front office employee 2. Discuss on dress codes of the front office employee

WEEK 5

PROGRAMME NATIONAL DIPLOMA CATERING AND HOTEL MANAGEMENT

COURSE CODE 124: FRONT OFFICE OPERATIONS


On completion of this course the student should be able to understand the relationship of the front office department with other departments within the organisation, the value, attributes , social skills and the functions of the front office and its employees. The course is designed also to teach the checking procedures and the various records for registration, the communication processes in hospitality organisations and the importance of the telephone as a means of communication.

LECTURE TITLE
Functions of the Front Office Guest Cycle Front Office Systems

5.1

The Functions of the Front Office


1. Receiving and Welcoming guests- the following procedures should be followed The first thing a hall porter should do upon a guests arrival is to assist with luggage and escort the guest to the reception desk where the guest will be welcomed again by a friendly receptionist. The receptionist (after welcoming the guest) with a smile and polite greetings gives the guest a pen and registration form to fill out. The receptionist then checks to see whether the registration form is completely and correctly filled out. The identity booklet or key card together with any messages or letters that may be waiting for the guest is then handed to him/her. The room key is given to the porter who will escort the guest to his/her room.

Upon arrival at the room, the hall porter (who will be in front of guest) will unlock room, point out all electrical appliances, and explain to the guest about their instructions and uses. Checks the hot and cold water to see if it is working properly. The porter then places the guests key on the table makes a polite bow, saying if there is anything else I can help with, if not he makes his exit saying has a good stay.

2.

Checking in/out of guests:Functions, Activities, and procedures used for checking in and checking out of guests

I-Guest Cycle: The guest cycle describes the activities that each guest passes by from the moment he/she calls to communicate a reservation inquiry till he/she departs from the hotel. In fact, the guest cycle encompasses 4 different stages, which are depicted in the underneath diagram:

Pre-Arrival Arrival Occupancy Departure

Each stage of the guest cycle is associated guest service, and guest accounting activity/ies. 1. Guest services:

Reservation Registration Occupancy Services Check-out and history

1.

Guest Accounting:

Establishment of Credits Posting Charges Night Auditing Settlement of accounts

Below is a description of the activities undertaken at each stage of the guest cycle:

1. Pre-arrival:

At the pre-arrival stage, the hotel must create for every potential guest a reservation Record. Doing this initiates the hotel guest cycle. Moreover, reservation records help personalize guest services and appropriately schedule needed staff and facilities

The reservation department should, then, complete all the pre-registration activities and prepare guest folios (applicable only for automated systems). Doing so will eventually maximize room sales by accurately monitoring room availability and forecasting room revenues

2. Arrival:
At the arrival stage, registration and rooming functions takes place and the hotel establishes a business relation-ship with the guest. The check-in clerk should determine the guests reservation status (i.e. pre-registered guests versus walk-ins). Later, he/she shall prepare a registration record or make the guest sign the already-printed pre-registration record (under some of the semi-automated and all fully automated systems).

The registration records shall include the following personal and financial items:

a) Personal information: 1. Name and Surname of the guest along with billing address, telephone number, and any other coordinates 2. Passport number, birth certificate, and/or driving license number (whatever applicable) 3. Any special needs or requests 4. Guest Signature

b) Financial information: 1. Date of arrival 2. Expected date of departure or length of stay depending on how the system in the hotel is designed

3. Assigned room number 4. Assigned room rate 5. Guest's intended method of payment

Registration records can be used for various purposes: a) Satisfy guest needs b) Forecast room occupancies c) Settle properly guest accounts d) Establish guest history records at check-out [personal & financial information] e) Assign a room type and a room rate for each guest f) Determine long-run availability [i.e. reservation information] versus short-run availability [i.e. room status] g) Satisfy special categories of guests such as disabled people through barrier-free designs

3. Occupancy:
At the occupancy stage, the front office department shall coordinate guest services in a timely and accurate manner. Moreover, front office clerks should encourage repeat guests by paying a great attention to guest complaints. This is ensured by placing complaint and/or suggestion cards in every public place and revenue centres in the hotel. Moreover, the hotel shall, at least on a daily basis, collect comment cards, proceed with their analysis, and provide positive feedback to guest as soon as possible.

In addition, shall design effective procedures in order to protect the funds and valuables of guests. This might be ensured through guest key control, property surveillance, safe deposit boxes, and well designed emergency panels and exits

Another activity at occupancy is to process posting of guest charges [i.e. post room rates, F&B charges, additional expenses, and taxes] to various guest folios, master Folios While doing so, front office clerks shall continuously check for deviations from the house limit, and take corrective measures as to change the status of the guest to Paid-in-advance. Finally, front office clerks shall periodically review Account Balances in coordination with the night auditor.

4. Departure:
At the departure stage, the guest shall be walked out of the hotel. Moreover, front office clerks shall create guest history record. Finally, cashiers shall settle guest account outstanding balances [i.e.: balance the Guest account to 0]

In general, a proper checkout occurs when the guest: a) Vacates the room b) Receives an accurate settlement of the guest account c) Returns room keys d) Leaves the hotel

At departure, checkout personnel should encourage guests to consider returning to the hotel on any future date. That's why cashiers should act like a true sales person, and might eventually accept guest future reservations. That way, the stages of the guest cycle become really a cycle (i.e. start from where it ends).

If at departure, the guest account is not fully settled, then late charges accumulates. In such an undesired case, the responsibility of collection lies within the accounting department, however the front office department shall provide all necessary types of information to make this collection easier, quicker, and feasible.

II- Front Office Systems: Until the 1960's, nearly all hotels were operating under the manual system. At late 70's, with the introduction of computers, hotels shifted to semi-automated systems. Nowadays, most of the five-star hotels operate under the fully automated system. Below is a brief description of the three different systems under which hotels might operate. 1. Non-automated [manual] systems: This very system is the one characterized by the sole usage of hands. In fact, all formats, procedures, and different kinds of calculations are done manually.

2.

Semi-automated [Electro-mechanical] systems: This system gets use of some Electromechanical equipment. In fact, under the semi-automated system, each department might have its own computer system under which it handles all its operations.

3.

Fully automated [computer based] systems: That's the best system ever used in the hotel industry. In fact, it is characterized by the excessive use of departmental software package programs integrated and connected to a main frame or terminal situated at the front office department.

QUESTIONS
12Explain how arrival and departure is prepared. Discuss on the Different front office systems

WEEK 6

PROGRAMME NATIONAL DIPLOMA CATERING AND HOTEL MANAGEMENT

COURSE CODE 124: FRONT OFFICE OPERATIONS


On completion of this course the student should be able to understand the relationship of the front office department with other departments within the organisation, the value, attributes, social skills and the functions of the front office and its employees. The course is designed also to teach the checking procedures and the various records for registration, the communication processes in hospitality organisations and the importance of the telephone as a means of communication.

LECTURE TITLE

Guest Cycle under Three Different Systems

6.1

Guest Cycle under Three Different Systems:


At this stage, it is essential to notice that the following stages of the guest cycle under the three different systems do not conflict with each other. In fact, the only differences are due to the nature of the system use. Therefore, what will be discussed above is not the repetition of the sequence; rather only differences will be highlighted.

1.

Non-automated systems:

Pre-arrival activities: At the pre-arrival stage, reservation requests should be introduced in a loose-leaf notebook or index card. Moreover, only reservations up to 6 months horizons shall be honoured. Lastly, it is not practical, under this very system, to issue reservation confirmation numbers, initiate pre-registration activities (at the exception of VIP and groups) and prepare occupancy forecasts. The reason is, time and money loss along with insufficient labour force to manually conduct all the above mentioned activities.

Arrival activities: At the arrival stage, guests shall either sign a page in the registration book or fill manually a registration record. Under this very system, the most widely used front office equipment is the room rack, in which registration records are inserted to serve as room rack slips. Moreover, registration books and records shall be time stamped as an internal control proving when the guest exactly came, who registered him/herLastly; guest folios shall be opened for each registered guest.

Occupancy activities: Under the occupancy activities, registration records shall be prepared with multi-copies. In fact, one copy shall be distributed to room rack, another stamped to the guest folio, and another given to switchboard operators, and a final copy handed to the uniformed service personnel. Lastly, guests with charge privileges charges and payments shall be posted to respective guest folios.

Departure activities: At departure stage, cashiers should settle each guest account's outstanding balance and get room keys back from guests. Moreover, cashiers shall notify the housekeeping department that the room is no more occupied (i.e. room status change) to let this very department clean the room and prepare it for new arrivals. In addition, cashiers shall remove room rack slips from room racks to indicate departure. Lastly, these very rack slips of departed guests shall be filed in a cardboard box to serve as a guest history record

2.

Semi-automated systems: This very system is less common in small and middle size hotels. For, these very hotels, financially wise, might not afford the huge investments associated with the installation of different hardware and software.

The main advantage of this very system over manual system is that various reports can automatically be generated. However, the major disadvantages associated with this system are various complexities of operating and controlling devices due to the fact that these equipments are not integrated with other systems and are subject to frequent maintenance problems.

A.

Pre-arrival activities: At this very stage, guests can either call a national reservation network or directly contact the hotel. Moreover, reservation clerks can prepare pre-registration records, guest folios, and information rack slips.

B.

Arrival activities: At this very stage, already reserved guests shall verify their pre-registration forms and have only to sign it. On the other hand, walk-ins shall complete a multiple copy registration record from the beginning.

C.

Occupancy activities: At the occupancy stage, in order to track the different guest charge expenditures and all other possible guest transactions, hotels get an intensive use of various kinds of vouchers. Moreover, the most widely used equipment, under this very stage, is the mechanical cash registers and front office posting machines. Lastly, under this very stage, night auditor shall continuously resolve any discrepancy in guest accounts and efficiently reconcile guest folios.

D.

Departure activities: At this very stage, cashiers shall relay room status information to the housekeeping department. Moreover, they should place registration records of departed guests in propertys guest history files.

4.

Fully automated systems:

A.

Pre-arrival activities: Under this stage, the reservation department is equipped with a software package, which is interfaced and connected with one or more central reservation office(s). Moreover, the reservation department can automatically generate letters of confirmation, produce requests for guest deposits and handle pre-registration activities for all types of guests and generate daily expected arrival lists, occupancy and revenue forecast lists

B.

Arrival activities: At this stage, various reservation records can be transferred to front office department. Moreover, hotels might be equipped with an on-line credit authorization terminals for timely Credit Card Approval, self check-in / check-out terminals. Lastly, all guest charges and payments are saved in electronic guest folios.

As far as walk-ins are concerned, all registration activities should be initiated from the very beginning.

C.

Occupancy activities: Under this very stage, guest purchases at different revenue outlets are electronically transferred and posted to appropriate guest accounts. Moreover, the front office department can run and process continuous trial balances and, therefore, eliminate the tedious work for the Night Auditor.

D.

Departure activities: At this very stage, cashiers can automatically produce bills to be sent to various guests with direct billing privileges and create electronic guest history records.

IV.

Front Office Forms: At different stages of the guest cycle different forms are used depending on which operating system a hotel chooses. Below are some of the common forms used:

1.

Pre-arrival activities: a) b) c) Reservation record or a reservation file Letter of confirmation Reservation rack and reservation rack slips

2.

Arrival activities: a) b) Registration card (or record) or registration file Room rack and room rack slips

3.

Occupancy activities: a) Guest folio: shall be of duplicate forms and pre-numbered for cross-indexing control purposes b) Vouchers: support documents detailing facts of a transaction, but does not replace the source document (i.e. the invoice). Examples of vouchers might include charge vouchers, allowance vouchers, paid-out voucher, and correction vouchers c) Information rack slips

4.

Departure activities:

a) b) c) d) e)

Credit card vouchers Cash vouchers Personal check vouchers Transfer vouchers Guest history records

V.

Front Office Functional Organization: Whatsoever system and setting the hotel might use, it should reflect easy access to the equipment, forms, and supplies necessary. Moreover, the setting shall reflect position flexibility. Moreover, nowadays trend shows that traditional mail, message, and key racks are unnecessary at the Front Desk. Rather, they shall be stored in drawers or slots located under or away from the Front Desk. For, this would ensure security and safety of guests.

1.

Front Desk designed alternatives: a) Circular or semi-circular structure: this very structure provides an effective service to more guests and appears more modern and innovative but since guests will approach the Front Desk from all angles, more staff is needed. b) Traditional straight desk: Under this very design, fewer staff is needed, but fewer guests can be served at the same time. c) Deskless environment: Under this design, there is no Front Desk at all. This is usually replaced by a hostess, or steward welcoming the guest, seating him or her on a chair/sofa, and conduct registration activities there while, for example, having a cocktail or a drink.

VI.

Front Office Equipment: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. Room rack Mail, message, and key racks Reservation racks Information racks Folio trays or folio buckets Account posting machine Voucher racks Cash registers Telephone equipment

QUESTIONS
12List 3 front office Equipment Discuss on the stages of the guest cycle WEEK 7

PROGRAMME NATIONAL DIPLOMA CATERING AND HOTEL MANAGEMENT

COURSE CODE 124: FRONT OFFICE OPERATIONS On completion of this course the student should be able to understand the relationship of the front office department with other departments within the organisation, the value, attributes , social skills and the functions of the front office and its employees. The course is designed also to teach the checking procedures and the various records for registration, the communication

processes in hospitality organisations and the importance of the telephone as a means of communication.

LECTURE TITLE Other Functions of the Front Office Functions of the Front Office Manager Allocation of Accommodation

7.1

OTHER FUNCTIONS AND ACTIVITIES OF THE FRONT OFFICE The front office being a major department that makes up the hotel organizations has various. It is not only visible to guests out to all serving departments. The front office is always at the centre of the guest service activities. It is a point of contact for all in-coming and outgoing guests.

The front office in direct relation to the guest is as follows. Where the guest is first met by a representative of the hotel; Where information is available to the travelling public; Where guests receive their keys and messages. Where guests settle their accounts, and lodge their complaints.

The front office is viewed as a key department that coordinates and sets the pace for most guest services including the following:(1) Housekeeping department regarding changes to guest accounts e.g. laundry charges etc. (2) Accounting department regarding cash, credit, and front office billings.

Functions of a Front Office Manager

Planning This is perhaps the most important of functions. We have already seen that before we can even start operating we have to plan our business. This is effectively what we did when we planned our room rates based on our required return on investment. Planning gives us

direction and focus. If a Front Office Manager does not plan, he may become overly involved with tasks that are inconsistent with what should be his department's goals.

Kasavana recommends that the first step in planning is defining the department's goals, which should then be used as a guide to planning more specific, measurable objectives. Planning also includes determining the strategies that will be used to attain the objectives.

Organising A good Front Office Manager must be able to organise his staff, by dividing work amongst them. Work cannot be always divided equally some members of staff will have certain strengths which

cannot be overlooked. However, dividing work must ensure everyone gets a fair treatment so that work can be completed on time. Organising will involve determining in which order tasks are to be performed and establishing completion dates for each group of tasks.

Coordinating This will involve bringing together and using available resources to achieve planned goals. It is useless to organise work without effectively coordinating it, as it will often become apparent (through coordinating work) that it may be necessary to make changes to the way things are organised.

Staffing Having determined your objectives and planned goals you need to make sure that you have recruited the best qualified staff for your positions. Staffing involves scheduling employees. This process will involve determining the number of employees required to cater for the expected demand to meet guest and operational needs under specified conditions.

Leading A Front Office Manager must be a leader capable of directing his staff, overseeing,

motivating, training, disciplining, and setting an example. The Front Office Manager must be able to analyse the work to be done, organise tasks in a logical order, whilst bearing in mind the conditions within which employees are expected to perform their work.

A good Front Office Manager will be able to step into situations where his staff cannot deal with the workload.

Controlling Every front office will have a system of internal controls to keep in check the hotel's assets and protect its revenue. A Front Office Manager must ensure that his staff follow established procedures.

The hotel will also have performance targets, both in terms of revenue budgets as well as employment targets, and the Front Office Manager will exercise a control function when keeping front office operations on course in attaining planned goals.

Evaluating This is the function of determining to what extent planned goals are attained. Unfortunately this function is often overlooked or performed without much thought. Evaluating involves reviewing

and when necessary revising front office goals. This is why these management functions are often referred to as the "management cycle" because management is a continuous cycle organising, motivating and reviewing. of planning,

Operating ratios In a past lecture we looked at occupancy ratios and how these may be used to evaluate departmental performance. The following operating ratios look at the financial position of front office, evaluating or instance the major expenses incurred by the front office operation.

Dividing the payroll and related expenses of the rooms division by the department's net revenue yields one of the most frequently analysed areas of front office operations: labour cost. The table in the next page gives us a number of operating ratios that may be used.

7.2

ALLOCATION OF ACCOMODATION The correct room type allocation can be essential to guest satisfaction. Selection is a matter of training and experience as there are several aspects to consider when allocating to reservations. The order of importance of the criteria may depend on local or corporate standard operation procedures.

RATE This selection criterion is pretty much self explanatory. If there are two guests with same room type requests, you may want to assign the nicer room to the guest who pays the higher rate.

LENGHT OF STAY A guest who checks in late might not be too concerned about the view of location of the room, as long as he or she gets a good night sleep. On the other hand a guest staying with family or spouse for several days, will certainly have expectations regarding view and room location.

LOYALTY TO THE HOTEL/FREQUENT-STAY PROGRAMME With completion fiercer than ever, loyalty is becoming more and more important. Almost every hotel chain has a frequent-stay programme that offers various membership levels, based in number of room-nights stay in the hotel. These membership levels have a great impact on room allocation. The hotel must ensure the most loyal customers are recognised for their repeating business.

RESERVATIONS GUARANTEES

Many hotels have introduced the concept of reservation guarantees. For example: Room type, bed type, smoking preference or connecting rooms guaranteed when the reservation is made and based on availability. Monetary compensation to guests is offered to guests if the guarantee is not met at check in.

VIP LEVELS Hotels have individual VIP levels indicating the importance of the guest checking in. For example a group VIP, meeting planner, corporate executive, celebrity, political figure.

SPECIAL REQUESTS Special requests on reservation might include information about allergies, rollaway and baby crib requests, high floor/low floor, request for a universally accessible room and so on.

QUESTIONS 12List 3 functions of the front office manager Discuss on the criteria of room allocation

WEEK 8

PROGRAMME NATIONAL DIPLOMA CATERING AND HOTEL MANAGEMENT

COURSE CODE 124: FRONT OFFICE OPERATIONS On completion of this course the student should be able to understand the relationship of the front office department with other departments within the organisation, the value, attributes , social skills and the functions of the front office and its employees. The course is designed also to teach the

checking procedures and the various records for registration, the communication processes in hospitality organisations and the importance of the telephone as a means of communication. LECTURE TITLE

Account Payment and Billing Luggage Handling Mail Handling

8.2

LUGGAGE HANDLING

The number and pieces of luggage the guest has should be entered in the luggage book before the luggage is dispatched to the guests room. The room number should be ticked off on the arrival and departure list, and guests name entered on the tabular ledger and their bills should also be entered.

LUGGAGE BOOK/LUGGAGE CLEARANCE PASS

Arrival The number of pieces of luggage a guest has on arrival should be entered into the luggage book. This is entered carefully and kept at the hall porters desk.

Departure At the time of departure, the hall porter will organise his staff to handle luggage. In some hotels, a luggage clearance pass is handed to the porter when the account has been settled by the reception office. The head porter will check hi/her own list of departure when luggage is cleared and correctly ticked during departure. Name Address ROOM NO ARRIVAL DEPARTURE NO OF LUGGAGE

8.3

MAIL HANDLING

Handle messages as follows: For registered guests: deliver it to the room. For arrivals: place the top copy with the registration card at Reception. Discard the second copy. For visitors: hand the top copy of the message to the person who will be visited. Discard the second copy. For staff: hand to the Head of Department for distribution.

If a visitor wishes to leave a message for a guest, proceed as follows: Hand the visitor a message pad and a pen (make sure that the pen is in a good condition); When the visitor has completed the message, place it in an envelope and deliver it to the guest's room

Handle faxes and telefaxes as follows: Faxes and telefaxes should be placed in an envelope with the guests name and room number written on it. Proceed as follows: For registered guests: deliver to the room. For arrivals: place with the registration card at Reception. For a guest on the guest history and scheduled to return: place it in the arrivals file under the arrival date, to be attached to the registration card when appropriate. For a guest on the guest history but not scheduled to return: mail forward if the address is available, or inform sender. For staff: hand to the relevant Head of Department for distribution. For former staff: inform sender

Procedure for collecting, sorting and distributing letters: These will be collected once or twice a day and delivered to the Porter's desk by the Driver. Post must be sorted as follows: For guests - registered or arrivals; departed guests; etc. Staff - sort by department Items to be reposted - items which will be returned to the sender. For registered guests they should be delivered to the room as described previously. For arrivals, place with the registration card at Reception. For a guest on the guest history and scheduled to return, place it in the arrivals file under the arrival date, to be attached to the registration card when appropriate. For a guest on the guest history but not scheduled to return, mail the item forward if the address is available. If the address is not available, return the item to the sender. For staff, place it in the pigeonhole of the relevant Head of Department for distribution. For former staff, return to sender.

Procedure for collecting and sorting Parcels: All parcels are recorded in a Collection Book at Reception or Porters and then placed in the Porters store. The following information must be placed in the book : Date of delivery. The addressee. The name of the person recording the delivery.

Write a duplicated message on a message slip notifying the guest that there is a parcel to be collected. Place one copy in the pigeonhole for the relevant room and deliver the other copy as described above. When the guest collects the parcel, he/she must sign the book and note the date on which the parcel was collected.

Proceed as follows: For arrivals: place the notification message with the registration card at Reception. For a guest on the guest history and scheduled to return: place the notification message in the arrivals file under the arrival date, to be attached to the registration card when appropriate. For a guest on the guest history but not scheduled to return: mail forward if the address is available, or return to sender. For staff: hand to the relevant Head of Department for distribution. For former staff: return to sender.

Procedures

Below are procedures for uncollected items

Step 1.

Action Deliver messages, faxes, letters to customers who cannot be located by: Placing under door. Placing in pigeon hole. Putting on a message board. By securely storing for the customer (i.e. parcels or registered post).

2.

Return any messages, letters, faxes etc. not collected by customer or member of staff to the reception desk straight away.

3. 4.

Do not leave the item on the desk, hand it over to a member of staff. If there is a courier delivery for a departed guest/ or a guest leaves without collecting items, then: Check that the organisation has a forwarding telephone number and address Provide this information to the courier, and offer to telephone the guest on behalf of the courier in order to collect the item/get instructions as to what should be done. If the is unknown or if the organisation has no forwarding address or telephone number, send the item back

QUESTIONS

123-

Explain on luggage book and luggage clearance pass State the procedure for uncollected items Briefly discuss on account settlement WEEK 9

PROGRAMME NATIONAL DIPLOMA CATERING AND HOTEL MANAGEMENT

COURSE CODE 124: FRONT OFFICE OPERATIONS On completion of this course the student should be able to understand the relationship of the front office department with other departments within the organisation, the value, attributes , social skills and the functions of the front office and its employees. The course is designed also to teach the checking procedures and the various records for registration, the communication

processes in hospitality organisations and the importance of the telephone as a means of communication.

LECTURE TITLE Checking Procedures for Guest Registration Guest history records

9.1

Day Shift Procedure Arrive early for your shift. Go through the pre-shift meeting check list. Prepare your Daily Log Report. Read Previous reports and initial. Check Current Status. Check out the expected arrival on screen and print. Check for Pre-Registration. Check for discrepancies in Guest Registration. Check for expected departures. Check the interfaces for the telephones and movies to see that they are operational. Do a printout of charges and put in check-out drawer. Record all wake-up calls on the mastersheet at the front desk. Call the guest after the system has printed the message. Be polite. Count your cash ($000.00). Shortages are the clerks responsibility. Turn the outside lights off. Check incidental deposit to see which rooms have left an incidental deposit. Review Group Files for arrivals and departures and block any special requests. Do any specials, Credit Check Reports or V.I.P. requests. Provide guest with all promotional information on check-out. The Movie System is to be blocked when the guest has paid cash, Group Arrivals and Special Request. Check-in procedure:

The Registration Card must be filled out in its entirety (including vehicle information).

If a cash customer, Drivers License or other major I.D. must be on the Registration Card.

If the customer is paying by credit card, be sure to put the date, room number, your initials, authorization number and amount you have authorized on the credit card form.

The guest must be clear on their room rate. The Registration Card must be signed.

_____ Post all charges to the Guests Folio. Leave the charges with the folio. _____ Upon check-out, have the guest sign the folio and keep one copy. _____ Ask that the keys be returned to the front desk upon check-out. _____ Complete the Housekeeper's Log of changes for any supplies leaving the desk. _____ Be sure that Housekeeping is aware of which rooms have cots in them. _____ Be sure that Housekeeping is aware of any rooms which have Day Rate check-ins. _____ Be sure that Housekeeping is aware of late departures or new check-ins. _____ Check all due out rooms and room discrepancies and process any charges. _____ Do your deposit and put it in the safe (include all cash, credit cards, direct bills). _____ Count the float in back safe if you have made a change during your shift. Leave tape with Date, Initials & shift. _____ Complete the Daily Log listing all exceptional occurrences that happened during the shift.

9.2

GUEST HISTORY RECORDS

Hotels keep records of guests so that in the event of a re-booking any information in their previous visit may be used to ensure that their preferences are acknowledged.

These records also give immediate access to information about guests with whom the management does not wish to do any further business. These records are very useful for tracing guest who have left property in the hotel, for advertising new business deals, and remembering guests who call regularly.

Sample of a guest history card: Name Address REMARKS: Tel No:

A/C ARRIVAL DEPARTURE ROOM NO RATE PAID BY DATE PAID

QUESTIONS 12List 5 procedures of the day shift personnel Briefly discuss on guest history records and illustrate what a history card looks like. WEEK 10

PROGRAMME NATIONAL DIPLOMA CATERING AND HOTEL MANAGEMENT

COURSE CODE 124: FRONT OFFICE OPERATIONS On completion of this course the student should be able to understand the relationship of the front office department with other departments within the organisation, the value, attributes,

social skills and the functions of the front office and its employees. The course is designed also to teach the checking procedures and the various records for registration, the communication processes in hospitality organisations and the importance of the telephone as a means of communication.

LECTURE TITLE Record for Guest Registration Double booking and cancellation Change of room and chance guest

10.1

RECORDS FOR GUEST REGISTRATION TYPES HOTEL REGISTER There are 3 basic types of hotel registers this include book form, loose leaf and individual

card.

Book Form: The hotel register book is the oldest and still the most common type. It is a bound volume of suitable ruled pages in which each guest particulars are entered in chronological order of arrival.

BOOK FORM SPECIMEN DATE FULLNAME NATIONALITY ADDRESS

There is little justification for including in this type of register and other particulars such as room numbers or prices which may be seen by other guests. Where it is deemed essential, a code should be used for such information. Loose Leaf: Where the loose leaf method is adopted, a loose sheet of the same ruling as in the book form specimen is used and usually placed on a blotting file. It is either removed and filed in a fixed binder at the end of each day and re-placed by a new blank page or used as long as space permits and then re-placed.

Individual Card: The individual card is a more recent development in hotel registration and is meeting with increasing acceptance as a modern method suitable for any hotel.

10.2

DOUBLE BOOKING AND CALCELLATION This means letting out the same room twice for different people which can cause considerable ill-will and embarrassment to the hotel and therefore must be avoided. This can be done by careful attention to details of the reservation and correspondence and by accurate charting of the conventional chart. Cancellations however are bound to occur. To avoid having rooms left vacant, some hotels calculate the cancellation rate percent over a period of time and overbook their rooms by this percentage.

Cancellation X Rooms available for letting 100%

If rooms are over-booked and the hotel cannot accommodate the guests, they often have a reciprocal agreement with other hotels which can accommodate the overflow. It is therefore the responsibility of the over-booked hotel to pay for any expense in transporting the guest to any other hotel.

10.3

CHANGE OF ROOM AND CHANCE GUEST CHANGE OF ROOM

If a guest wishes to change rooms, and his or her arrival has already been entered on the arrival list, the change of room must be treated as a departure from one room and arrival in another room. As the change of room will have no effect on the number of guests staying in the hotel, no entry is made in the column showing number of guests. If the arrival and departure list has already been circulated, a change of room notification slip must be sent to all departments informing them of the room change.

CHANGE ROOM SLIP No______ Date Name No of Nights No of Sleepers Time From Room No To Room No Rate Terms

Signature

CHANCE GUESTS Chance visitors are those that arrive without previous reservation. If a guest has no luggage, payment in advance is usually requested. If, however, a chance guest with luggage can produce credit cards and identification, no deposit is asked for. Tact must always be used when asking for identification or payment in advance.

QUESTIONS 12. Briefly discuss on how to treat a chance guest List the three different types of registers and explain them.

WEEK 11

PROGRAMME NATIONAL DIPLOMA CATERING AND HOTEL MANAGEMENT.

COURSE CODE 124: FRONT OFFICE OPERATIONS


On completion of this course the student should be able to understand the relationship of the front office department with other departments within the organisation, the value, attributes , social skills and the functions of the front office and its employees. The course is designed also to teach the checking procedures and the various records for registration, the communication processes in hospitality organisations and the importance of the telephone as a means of communication.

LECTURE TITLE

The Reservation Status Chart Receiving and Welcoming Guests Arrivals and Departures

11.1 THE RESERVATION STATUS CHART


THE RESERVATION STATUS CHART are where rooms located and charted, not only for the client to get the type of accommodation they have requested for, but also for the hotel to achieve the maximum occupancy of the rooms.

The reservation forms are specifically designed to provide all the necessary details and information that are required to process the booking of

accommodation. The reservation form in most hotel establishments is included in the hotel brochure. Details of the reservation form are: (i) (ii) (iii) (iv) (v) (vi) (vii) Reservation receipt date. Name, addresses, nationality of client. Date and time of expected arrival. Duration of stay. Date of departure. Advance deposit. Special request e.g. garage, special diet, requirements for children or pets. (viii) Signature of the clerk processing the reservation form.

2.

The billing office ensures that charges are correctly posted to the guest port-folio, while the accounts office has to deal with all aspects of the account system. The cashiers office- is usually a separate office that receives all payments for guests accounts, deals with foreign currencies and petty cash disembursement, takes care of guests valuables that may be deposited for safe-keeping.

3.

4.

The enquiry office- deals with all messages and enquiries for guests. The key and letter racks are located in the enquiry office, and the head porter is responsible for that.

5.

The uniformed staff section- for a normal size hotel, the head porter is responsible for the allocation of duties to all uniformed staffs, and works in close liaison with the reception office.

The head porter usually keeps a log book in which he records all the various activities and events during the day

11.2 RECEIVING WELCOMING AND REGISTERING OF GUESTS


1On arrival, the guests are helped with their luggage by the porter who escorts/ accompany them to the reception counter. 2The receptionist welcomes the guest with a smile and hands out a pen to the guest and asks them kindly to fill-out the registration form and sign the hotel register. 34The room key for the guest is taken from the rack and given to the guest. The receptionist points out to the guest the location of the restaurant, lounge, and any public rooms and emergency exit, and asks the guest if there is anything they need to know or will require. 5Either the receptionist or the hall porter will escort the guests to their rooms, depending on how busy the reception office is. 6The escort should walk in front of the guest to lead him/her to the room with the room key in his hands. The escort should only the door and allow the guest to enter first. A quick check should be made by the porter when in the room to see that everything is in order. Electrical appliances should be pointed out to the guest. Before leaving the room, the porter should ask the guest if there is any question or if the guest needs any further services, if not, the porter should wish the guest a happy stay and leave.

The identity booklet or key card together with any messages or letters that may be waiting for the guest is then handed to him. The receptionist then checks to see if the registration form is correctly and completed filled out by guest.

11.3

ARRIVALS AND DEPARTURES

A list is prepared from the front-office and distributed to the hall porters desk, the cashier, the billing office, telephonist, and housekeeping they all need to be aware of the of the names and numbers of guest arriving and departing.

A computer VDU will give an instant list or a point out may be prepared and distributed. Checking-out guests the following procedures must be followed:1. Make sure that all last minute charges have been entered onto the guests account, such as breakfast, telephone calls and newspapers.

2. 3. 4.

Present the final account to guests and receive payment. Call a porter to collect and to take guests luggage(s). Delete guests names from the departure list. Adjust the room status board.

QUESTIONS
12Explain how arrival and departure is prepared. Give 3 procedures to be followed when checking out guests. WEEK 12

PROGRAMME NATIONAL DIPLOMA CATERING AND HOTEL MANAGEMENT.

COURSE CODE 124: FRONT OFFICE OPERATIONS On completion of this course the student should be able to understand the relationship of the front office department with other departments within the organisation, the value, attributes, social skills and the functions of the front office and its employees. The course is designed also to teach the checking procedures and the various records for registration, the communication processes in hospitality organisations and the importance of the telephone as a means of communication.

LECTURE TITLE

Security of Guests Security of Staff Security of the Hotel

12.1

SECURITY Security has always been a concern for hotels worldwide. The recent increase in terrorist acts has had its toll on travel and tourism worldwide. Whilst there is no indication that hotels are a primary target for the perpetration of terrorist acts, hoteliers must ensure that

their properties are secure if anything to give a sense of security to guests and staff whilst at the same time protecting their investment.

There are two types of security threats hotels should be concerned with: 1. 2. Threats that might affect a guest's health, comfort or well-being. Threats that affect the hotel directly, in particular its fixtures and fittings, its revenue and its reputation.

Protecting Guests

Fire One of the major threats is that of fire. Although we have not had loss of life in hotels in Malta (perhaps as a result of our methods of construction and the absence of wall to wall carpeting) hotels here are also bound by law to take the necessary fire safety precautions. A front office manager is duty bound to ensure that he is satisfied with a hotel's fire detection systems fire containment provisions escape procedures fire-fighting equipment

Terrorist threats This has been dealt with in a previous module, and includes bomb threats. There is little, if anything, a front office manager and his staff may do if there is some kind of assassination attempt for instance. However, bomb threats are received by someone at the front line a telephonist or a front office clerk and a procedure must be in place to ensure that all the information that can be taken about the nature of the threat is in fact recorded.

Threats to privacy It is the duty of front office to protect the privacy of its guests even and perhaps especially if they are in the public eye. It is very tempting to tell one's friends all about a well-know person who might be staying at your hotel, but you will have no control over

the information passed over from your friends to their own friends. In no time at all, your guest may be pestered by fans, autograph hunters, paparazzi and reporters. However, it is not only the privacy of well-known guests that must be respected. Every one of our guests is entitled to his or her privacy and steps must be taken to ensure that information about

our guests is not divulged to outsiders. Giving room numbers to individuals other than the persons being accommodated in those rooms is unethical and should be avoided at all costs. There is a tendency amongst representatives locally to divulge room numbers to taxi drivers, restaurants etc. It may prove difficult to ascertain whether the breach of confidentiality is the responsibility of the hotel or not, but guests have every right to hold the hotelier accountable.

Threats to guests' property We have already discussed in a previous lecture the hotelier's obligation to provide safe deposit facilities. Although the hotelier's liability is limited, it is in the interests of the hotel to ensure the safety of its guests and their property if anything to protect the reputation of the hotel. If the hotel is in an unsafe area, or in an area roamed by unscrupulous characters, guests should be made aware of this especially if they intend to venture out of the hotel at night. In Malta, hotels should be especially aware of the problems caused by prostitution. Prostitution is not per se illegal but a hotel would be acting illegally if it were to knowingly encourage or allow prostitution within its premises. It is not for us to make a general characterisation of prostitutes, but some prostitutes may well be thieves and since hotel guests will often negate their involvement with a prostitute they may accuse hotel staff of pilfering their property rather than admit to the fact that they hosted a girl in their room. Unfortunately, we must also face the fact that there are instances where guests are robbed by staff. There may be a "social divide" between staff and guests, which may lead the former to pilfer money or valuable items from a guest (although this is by no means the only reason why guests may be robbed by staff). If the hotel has a policy of randomly

checking staff's property before they leave the hotel, this may act as a deterrent and waive the hotel's liability should this arise.

Confidence tricksters or conmen may also find themselves into a hotel. There is very little a hotel can do if a confidence trickster makes his way into a guest's "life". These type of people often settle their own room accounts and are simply guests from a hotel point of view. However, when the identity of a conman is known the hotel is ethically bound to blacklist him and refuse him accommodation in the hotel. Guests themselves may also threaten each other's enjoyment. If a traveller turns up in a drunken state asking for a room a hotel is entitled to refuse him on the grounds that he is not a fit state to be received. This is true even if he already has a booking, as he has broken one of the implied conditions of the contract. Similarly if the guest misbehaves throughout his stay the hotel is not obliged to let him stay. When guests complain about being kept awake by a noisy couple or a drunkard next door, it is not good enough to tell a guest that "nothing can be done about that." One must employ considerable tact in dealing with such situations.

12.2

Protecting Staff Staff should be able to work in a harmonious and secure environment. In this sense, all measures taken to protect guests will provide further security for employees. Some guests are unscrupulous and although it is highly unlikely that guests will rob staff property some guests may put into question the integrity of the staff. Unfortunately this may happen to female staff who refuse sexual advances from guests. It is in the interest of the hotel to protect its staff by ensuring that the integrity of employees is safeguarded and it would be unwise for a manager to immediately accept the guest's complaint without hearing the employee's version of events.

12.3

Protecting the hotel Theft from hotel It is unfortunate even the wealthiest of guests may have a propensity to pilfer a hotel's property if the opportunity arises.

This normally happens at check out when a guest leaves the hotel with a variety of items virtually anything that is not securely fastened down: soap, towels, mats, sheets, blankets, coat hangers, lamps, trouser presses, electric kettles, TV sets and even plumbing fixtures! Some hotels ask housekeepers to check rooms for pilfering as soon as a client leaves the room to check out. This is not however always practical. Again considerable tact has to be employed when dealing with such situations and there are no fast rules to follow. There are instances where a hotel will simply have to write off stolen items rather than insist on ensuring that no items have been stolen.

Walk-outs, skippers or runners There a number of guests who leave without paying. These guests can generally be divided into three groups: 1. The `accidentals'. These are guests who simply forget to pay, often their extras bills. Most of these guests do not intend to leave the hotel without paying they simply believe their account is being settled by someone else. When contacted these guests pay their bill immediately and are highly embarrassed. The hotel should deal with them courteously. 2. `Opportunists'. These guests check in with the intention of paying their bill on departure, but when they realise that they can get away with not paying their bill (or simply a transaction that should have found itself on their bill e.g. last minute breakfast or mini-bar consumption) they make a run for it! 3. `Premeditators'. These are guests who, from the start, have the intention of leaving the hotel without paying. Some of these guests go into considerable lengths in order to avoid paying. These guests generally stay for short periods and will move to other hotels as soon as payment is demanded.

When hotels network between themselves they are in a position to warn each other of such guests. Experienced room staff can often detect premeditated walkouts because generally they do not unpack their belongings to facilitate a quick run. If the hotel staff communicate effectively it may be possible for a hotel to operate like an intelligence-gathering machine, with the doubtful guest being

reported on all his activities whilst the security manager determines whether or not he or she is a bona fide guest.

QUESTIONS 12Briefly discuss on theft from the hotel List the fire safety precautions the Front office manager has to ensure are in place WEEK 13

PROGRAMME NATIONAL DIPLOMA CATERING AND HOTEL MANAGEMENT

COURSE CODE 124: FRONT OFFICE OPERATIONS On completion of this course the student should be able to understand the relationship of the front office department with other departments within the organisation, the value, attributes, social skills and the functions of the front office and its employees. The course is designed also to teach the checking procedures and the various records for registration, the communication processes in hospitality organisations and the importance of the telephone as a means of communication.

LECTURE TITLE

Importance of Communication Communication Systems Types of Communication in the Front Office

13.1

COMMUNICATION Communication is the exchange of information or idea between two persons or objects. The response is to get the message across and get back a response. The importance of communication in any organization cannot be over emphasized.

Communication is one of the tools of management for successfully get the task or work done. It is therefore necessary to appreciate and comprehend the meaning, implication, purpose, and problems of communication for example, at work between workers and their colleagues. First or all, communication has a uniting force, it is important to establish exactly what a particular job entails, and what the expected standard of performance are. Also to ensure that the employee knows exactly what is communicated to him, in any case, the employee should know and understand both aspects.

Secondly, another impotent aspect is to feed back on how well tasks are being carried out and the standard being achieved. There will not only ensured that the job is carried out as planned, but it will also reduce the employees role ambiguity meaning to know exactly what is expected of him, and the knowledge of the actual results or work activity. In this case, if the communication is very clear and well comprehended by the employee, it would definitely result to a high motivational effect which would be seen visibly.

13.2

The Communication Systems are as follows:

The different telecommunication systems and how they are operated in any organization. Telecommunication plays a very important role in the hotel establishment. With effective communication by telephone, selling the hotel and promoting an image of efficiency is made possible. Applying the rules of good verbal communication which are more applicable to telephone communication helps the client to judge the standard of the hotel. Answering the phone promptly with an appropriate greeting, will make the guest or client feel confident that the organization is efficient. Effective communication by telephone will not only promote the image of efficiency.

The following are the different types of telecommunication used in any organisation i i ii private Branch Exchange (PBX) private Automated Branch Exchange (PABX) The push button intercom system

Telecommunication plays a very important role in the hotel establishment, with effective communication by telephone, selling the hotel and promoting and image or efficiency is made possible. Applying the rules of good verbal communication which are more applicable to telephone communication helps the client to judge the standard of the hotel.

Answering the phone promptly with an appropriate greeting, the quest or client will feel confident that the organist ion is efficient. Effective communication by telephone will not only assist in selling the hotel, but also promote and image of efficiency.

Communication devices

1. Private Branch Exchange (PBX) Telephone services in most establishments involve the use of private branch exchange. This is connected to a public exchange by one or more lines at the end of a switch board, and extension telephone in the carious offices and departments. Calls must pass through the switchboard with a minimum delay and maximum courtesy.

2. Private Automated Branch Exchange (PABX) This system combines exchange services with automatic inter-communication facility. Each telephone instrument has its own dial and from it can be dialled other extensions as well as outside calls.

3. Push Button Intercom System This telephone system provides communication between each extension as well as connections to the public exchange.

Another device found is the Loud speaking device. This is attached to the telephone to enable several people to listen to a call simultaneously, and it is also useful. If you wish to keep your hands free during a call.

13.3

TYPES OF COMMUNICATION IN THE FRONT OFFICE 1. Verbal Communication 2. Non Verbal Communication

VERBAL COMMUNICATION Good verbal communication is very important in many jobs but rarely in the reception office. Although it is very important in almost all hotels, that the receptionist speaks well, as this is the first link between the guest and the hotel, especially now that most hotels deal with foreign clientele some of whom may speak little or no English at all. It is therefore important for the receptionist to be able to speak properly and clearly. The receptionist should also be fairly a linguistic in some international languages. The receptionist is expected to deal with many people some of whom might require special treatment or attention health wise or otherwise. It is therefore important for the receptionist to develop skills of communication at all levels.

The rules that apply to good communication is that the client has only the telephone conversation on which to judge the standard of the hotel. As long as the call is answered promptly and properly, with a polite greeting, the client will feel confident that the organisation is efficient. In addition to the correct greeting, all switch-board operators and receptionists should be familiar with the procedures for overcoming the most common problems that occurs in areas such as: Credit card calls Directory Enquiries Collect/Reverse charge calls Early morning Calls

NON VERBAL COMMUNICATION This brings us to the saying actions speak louder than words. But this could not always be true. Non verbal communication can easily be misinterpreted or purposely denied. But then again, they can be very obvious that they cannot be denied. Examples of non verbal communications are sign language, body movements, facial expressions etc.

QUESTIONS 123Discuss on the importance of communication in an organisation List and explain 2 different communication devices Explain Non-verbal communication WEEK 14

PROGRAMME NATIONAL DIPLOMA CATERING AND HOTEL MANAGEMENT

COURSE CODE 124: FRONT OFFICE OPERATIONS On completion of this course the student should be able to understand the relationship of the front office department with other departments within the organisation, the value, attributes , social skills and the functions of the front office and its employees. The course is designed also to teach the checking procedures and the various records for registration, the communication processes in hospitality organisations and the importance of the telephone as a means of communication.

LECTURE TITLE

Hotel Keys Safety Deposit Boxes

14.1

HOTEL KEYS SECURITY OF KEYS

In all cases regular checks should be made on the movement of and security of, key suites in hotels. Most common losses arise among room keys thus it is necessary for the front office to keep reserve set of barrels for interior door locks, so that rooms may continue to be let. Replacement door locks and reissuing of keys should be under the supervision of the security officer or manager.

Room Keys These are issued by the front office to guests and used by guests during their stay in the hotel to gain access to their rooms. They should be handed in to the front office when guests leave the hotel building or when they check out/depart.

Grandmaster This is held by the management level of staff and used to gain access to any room for supervisory or emergency use. The grandmaster key will double lock any room in the case of an emergency. Loss of the grandmaster key means no room is secure, therefore strict control of such keys is essential.

Floormaster This key is issued to the floor supervisor/housekeeper, who has the responsibility for checking the rooms on that floor. It will open all the doors on that floor.

Supply Keys These are keys necessary to open such areas as service rooms, storage rooms, cupboards within departments and handed in at the end of the working shift. These keys should never be taken off the premises because of the value of the stock/equipment involved.

Guest Key Card A key card is issued to each guest as he/she registers in the hotel. It is used as a means of guest identification, and means staff can identify any guest as genuine by asking to see the guests key card.

The appropriate room key will only be issued upon receipt of this card (see below)

<HOTEL NAME> Guest___________________ Rate______________________

Room No.________________ Room Type_________________ Date From________________ Breakfast___________________ Date To___________________

Electronic Keys These take the form of plastic key/cards that have a unique lock combination which is changed with the arrival of each guest. They create a secure room without trouble of replacing lost conventional keys. The electronic key is placed in a slot-type lock on the door to the guests room; when it is correctly placed into the lock the door will unlock.

14.2

SAFETY DEPOSIT BOXES Some hotels offer guests the use of individual safe box we sited in the cashiers office area o the hotel. Here guests may have the exclusive use of a safe box to deposit any valuables such as airline tickets, passports, foreign currency and travellers cheques. This facility is required under the Hotel Proprietors Act 1986. Some luxury hotels have now installed individual room safes in guests rooms; these are made from electrically welded steel and are anchored to the wall or floor with four steel bolts. They are locked with steel bolts into a solid frame, guests are provided with the room safe key when they are biked into the bedroom or suite. This system is preferred by guest, since it eliminates the necessity to queue up at the cashiers desk whenever there is a need to get to their safe box. The provision of room safes is an added item to include in the marketing of the rooms, as many guests now expect this provision to be available.

The night audit will check the charges against the guests account and therefore prepare up-to-date bills ready for the morning. The daily trading analysis forecasts the next days trading. Stock levels are read and reorders prepared. The use of a computerised system makes this auditing and control check far easier. Quicker and more accurate, it is one of the main advantages of installing a computerised control system in any business.

QUESTIONS 1Discuss on the following: a. Electronic keys

b. Grandmaster c. 2Floormaster

Briefly explain safety deposit boxes. WEEK 15

PROGRAMME NATIONAL DIPLOMA CATERING AND HOTEL MANAGEMENT

COURSE CODE 124: FRONT OFFICE OPERATIONS On completion of this course the student should be able to understand the relationship of the front office department with other departments within the organisation, the value, attributes , social skills and the functions of the front office and its employees. The course is designed also to teach the checking procedures and the various records for registration, the communication processes in hospitality organisations and the importance of the telephone as a means of communication.

LECTURE TITLE

The Importance of Telephone in a hotel Establishment

How a hotel Switchboard operates Telephone Etiquette

15.1

THE IMPORTANCE OF THE TELEPHONE IN A HOTEL ESTABLISHMENT The telephone is a very important and vital instrument in the hotel establishment. No reference to communication could be made without considering the vital role that the telephone plays in any business organization. Effective communication by telephone will not only assist in profitability, but also give customer satisfaction.

THE SWITCH BOARD Regardless of the size of the hotel, there will be a telephone. The larger the hotel or establishment, the greater will be the need for telephone usage. A small switch board would probably be placed in or near the reception office to be operated by a receptionist or a member of the uniformed staff. In larger hotels, a switch board would be placed in a room where more than one telephone switchboard operator would be employed to deal with the numerous in-coming and out-going phone calls.

The switch board (also called a manual exchange) is a device used to connect a group of telephones to one another, or to an outside connection within and between telephone exchanges or Private Branch Exchange (PBE). The user is typically known as an operator.

The switch board is usually designed to accommodate only the operator using it. It has a high back panel which consists of rows of female operators (or Jacks as they are sometimes called). On the table or desk area in front of the operator are columns of keys, lamps, and cards. Each column consists of a front key and a rear key followed by a front cord and a rear cord, making up a cord circuit. When a call is received, a jack lamp lights up on the back panel and the operator responds by placing the rear cord into the jack and throws the front key forward. The operator now converses with the caller.

15.2

HOW A HOTEL SWITCHBOARD IS OPERATED

In every hotel, whether small or large, there is always a telephone room with a switchboard. In larger hotels, there is a need for more out-going lines and internal extensions making it necessary for a telephone switchboard.

The telephone room requires a number of operators on duty at all times. Their duties are receiving in-coming calls and connecting them with required extensions. As soon as the in-coming call is answered, the caller commences to be charged. If the required extension is engaged, the caller should be invited to hold the line, call back, or leave a message.

Some hotels on SUBSCRIBER TRUNK DIALLING (STD) exchanges have a meter fixed to each out-going line. This registers the number of units used on all out-going calls.

When the guests dials the call himself, it is automatically recorded and metered on a panel in the bills office. The use of this type of switch board, helps to relive the pressures on the hotel telephone operators. This also speeds up telephone calls. The telephone; it is part of us. What would we do without it? It is as common as apple pie and summer sunshine. As much a part of our lives as learning to walk and talk and perhaps that is why we, at most times, give it little thought. Nonetheless, we do think about it, when we have had the experience of being treated rudely or abruptly while using this mode of communication. We bristle at the idea of someone's brusqueness to us, and most probably never take thought of the times we have shown our bad manners while speaking on the telephone.

The tendency to be short and curt to salespersons is common. The feeling that they are, in fact, invading our privacy is a widespread notion and the fist inclination is to cut them off with a positive projection of irritation. Perhaps supposing this will discourage any return calls, "wish on!" Treating those person who call pitching a product without kindness, solves nothing and makes no validity, so why not include them in you simple and polite response, "no thank you, have a good day," "good-bye." This response is much less apt to

raise your blood pressure and reduce your feelings of guilt later, for incivility over the telephone.

15.3

Correct way to answer the telephone:

INCORRECT TELLEPHONE ETIQUETTE

The proper way to answer the telephone is "hello." On the other hand, simply answering "yes" is a curt and inappropriate response. The person making the call draws a very quick conclusion, and that is, to think of that person as cold and aloof, and hesitates to communicate readily. At times, someone other than the head of the house will an CORRECT TELLEPHONE ETIQUETTE

swer the telephone. If that person is asked, "may I speak to Mr. ________ please," the response should be, "one moment please, I will get him for you." If the head of household is not available the response should be, "I am sorry, Mr. _____ is not available at this time, may I take a message?" This is simply a form of good manners, whatever form it may be expressed, thoughtfulness for the feelings of others. This person may be calling to offer a new job with great pay and benefits, who's to know! What would he or she

think if the answer to the question, "is Mr. _____ home please," would be an abrupt "no." This response would reflect negatively, on the actual person being called. Making telephone calls:

Think about what time it is, when placing a call. You would not want to call when there is the possibility that person may be asleep. For example on a work morning before 7:00 a.m. would not be a good time. After 9:00 to 10:00 p.m. in the evening is not a good time, and remember to avoid calls around the usual period most people will be eating. Courtesy is expected when using the telephone just as if you are talking in person.

Give your name when the telephone is answered, before asking for the person you are requesting.

Dialing too quickly, or in inadequate lighting may be the cause of dialing a "wrong number," never just hang-up. Express your apology, letting them know you have dialed a wrong number. To avoid disturbing another person unnecessarily dial carefully and make sure you can see the dial pad.

When speaking, think of the way you sound. Make sure you enunciate you words clearly and precisely. It is embarrassing to be asked to repeat what you are saying. Your voice reflects your courtesy, since that person on the other end of the line cannot see your facial expressions your "tone of voice" will need to express this.

Basic Good Manners, Telephone Tips: Let the telephone ring a reasonable length of time. It is frustrating to just get to the telephone and hear a dial tone. If you dial a number that is wrong, apologize, promptly and hang-up. Calling a business at or very near closing time is to say the least un-thoughtful. When it is time to go home, after a long day, do not delay them. State your name when placing a call. The game of "guess who this is" may not play very well to a busy friend. When speaking to anyone who is working and time is of the essence, make your call informative and short. *Dial carefully and in proper lighting to avoid calling a wrong number and inconvenient others.

Many things have changed over the years, especially in the evolving world of business. One thing has not changed though, and that is the need for proper telephone etiquette in the work place. Along with company downsizings and layoffs has come a necessity for companies to merge jobs together in order to eliminate human resources and save money. While that may be necessary, it is not necessary that the common element of etiquette, especially telephone etiquette, be left to suffer.

Since customers are the ones who infuse the profits into a business, they do not appreciate being treated with rudeness in their dealings with a company. This includes any business that is conducted on the telephone.

Proper telephone technique involves some basic common sense in which everyone who works for a company should use. Here are some basic tips:

Incoming Calls: Tip 1- All incoming calls should be answered in a timely manner.

Tip 2- Business telephones should always be answered with a phrase like, "Good morning, ABC Company, Carol speaking, may I help you?" In a busy office setting that fields hundreds of calls each day, this particular phrase may be too much to say. If so, it can be shortened to a phrase that is less wordy. But the name of the company needs to be stated as soon as the phone is answered along with the person's name who answered the phone. This lets the caller know that they have indeed reached the right business, and lets them know with whom they are speaking.

Tip 3- Never put a caller on hold, but if you have to, be sure to check back with them every minute or so and ask if they would like to continue to hold. This lets them know that they have not been forgotten, and that you are attending to their call.

Tip 4- Speak clearly and slowly when you answer a business telephone. Do not slur or mumble your words. Speak with confidence so the person on the other end has the feeling that you know what you are doing.

Tip 5- Never be rude to a caller, no matter how nasty they are. Always remember to handle yourself in a professional, business-like manner. This includes handling the situation in a calm, cool manner.

Outgoing Calls: Tip 1- Same as Tip 4 above--Speak clearly and slowly when you make a business call. Time may be money, but if the other party cannot understand what you are saying, then you might as well have saved your breath and not made the call at all.

Tip 2- Same as Tip 5 above--All customers expect to work with a professional organization. One sign of a professional organization is how they are treated by the people who work there.

Tip 3- When calling another business, it is proper etiquette to give your name and the company's name you work for to whomever answers the telephone. Do not make them guess who it is or make them pry it out of you.

Tip 4- If you get the wrong number, apologize to the person who answers the phone--do not just hang up. This is especially important nowadays when people have Caller ID on their phone lines. All they have to do is to check their device to find out who just rudely hung up on them.

Tip 5- When leaving a phone message; always state your name, company, phone number and reason for calling. Do not stammer or stutter and use up an unreasonable amount of time.

QUESTIONS 12List 3 correct ways of answering the telephone. Describe the hotel switch board TABLE OF CONTENTS WEEK 1 1.0 Front Office Introduction

WEEK 2 2.1 Front Office Inter-relationships with other departments

WEEK 3 3.1 3.2 3.3 Different components of the Front Office Relevance of Product Knowledge Organisational structure of the Front Office

WEEK 4 4.1 Qualities of the Front office employee

WEEK 5 5.1 Functions of the Front Office

WEEK 6 6.1 Guest Cycle under Three Different Systems

WEEK 7 7.1 7.2 Other Functions of the Front Office Functions of the Front Office Manager Allocation of Accommodation

WEEK 8 8.1 8.2 8.3 Account Payment and Billing Luggage Handling Mail Handling

WEEK 9 9.1 9.2 Checking Procedures for Guest Registration Guest history records

WEEK 10 10.1 10.2 10.3 Record for Guest Registration Double booking and cancellation Change of room and chance guest

WEEK 11 11.1 11.2 11.3 The Reservation Status Chart Receiving and Welcoming Guests Arrivals and Departures

WEEK 12 12.1 Security of Guests

12.2 12.3

Security of Staff Security of the Hotel

WEEK 13 13.1 13.2 13.3 Importance of Communication Communication Systems Types of Communication in the Front Office

WEEK 14 14.1 14.2 Hotel Keys Safety Deposit Boxes

WEEK 15 15.1 15.2 15.3 The Importance of Telephone in a hotel Establishment How a hotel Switchboard operates Telephone Etiquette