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GOPFLEXIBILITY? COURT HALTS GAY MILITARY BAN BARACK OBAMA AIMS FOR HIGHER CUTS IN BUDGET TALKS
GOPFLEXIBILITY?
COURT HALTS GAY
MILITARY BAN
BARACK OBAMA AIMS FOR HIGHER CUTS IN BUDGET
TALKS
NATION PAGE 7
NATION PAGE 28
Thursday • July 7, 2011 • Vol XI, Edition 278

SWEDEN STUNS U.S.

SPORTS PAGE 11

www.smdailyjournal.com

278 SWEDEN STUNS U.S. SPORTS PAGE 11 www.smdailyjournal.com BILL SILVERFARB/DAILY JOURNAL Ed Morey runs his business

BILL SILVERFARB/DAILY JOURNAL

Ed Morey runs his business out of his Belmont home.His home office also doubles as a family fun room.He prefers working from home for the flexible hours and the extra time he gets to spend with his wife and children.

Want to be your own boss?

More and more people are choosing to work from home

Five tips for starting your own business

Get free help:

You should enlist the support of others. Find

service partners willing to invest their time for a piece of the venture’s future income instead of upfront cash.The same person who would laugh you out of their office if you asked for a $2,500 investment may gladly trade $2,500 worth of services for a small piece of ownership in a promising new venture. Why? Like you, most people are looking for an opportunity to get ahead without risking too much.If someone can invest

a little of their time with the hopes of making a huge return,they may jump at the chance. Make small bets:

In the investing world, everyone talks about risk

tolerance — a measure that determines how psychologically comfortable you are with the possibility of losing money.This is good to know, but more critical is knowing your risk capacity — that is, how much money can you afford to lose without it destroying your finances and your ability to pay the rent? Start small and start slowly. Immediately committing thousands of dollars to an idea is as ridiculous as walking up to a girl you’ve

never met and asking her to marry you.You need to put a little out there and get a little back.Then you can put a little more out there and hopefully get a little more back. Negotiate fiercely:

You must be relentless about getting what you need.You don’t have the luxury of a six-figure budget.You’ve got to get your ventures up and running as cheaply as you can. One way to minimize risk is to negotiate everything. Don’t accept anything as is. Negotiate discounts,

concessions, bonuses, terms, etc. It will feel awkward at first,but keep practicing. Limit liability:

If you are producing a product or providing a service that could lead you to get sued,you must protect yourself against lawsuits by incorporating and by having the proper liability insurance.Don’t risk financial disaster by failing to shield your personal assets from your business assets. Keep your day job (at least for now):

It’s important to have that steady and predictable income during the day while you swing for the fences at night.

By Bill Silverfarb

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

More people are taking their nancial futures into their own hands by starting their own home-based businesses. Some do it for exibility and others do it per- haps because there is no boss to answer to. Whatever the reason, the trend is growing. Locally, the San Mateo Area Chamber of Commerce reports that more of its members now work from home, includ- ing graphic designers, information tech- nology specialists, life coaches, techni- cal writers, consultants and many more. Home-based companies are a vital part of San Mateo’s business communi- ty, said Linda Asbury, the chamber’s chief executive ofcer.

See HOME, Page 20

Statewants

controlover

healthrates

Bill would give officials the power to reject insurance rate increases

By Adam Weintraub

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SACRAMENTO — A California legislative committee on Wednesday narrowly approved a bill that would give state of- cials the power to reject proposed health insurance rate increases, but even some supporters said it will need major changes to survive. The Senate Health Committee voted 5-3 along party lines to advance the bill, AB52, with Democrats in favor and Republicans opposed. It will go before another committee before coming to the full Senate. The debate has implications across the United States. California regulations have national inuence and the state, home to one in eight Americans, makes up 11 percent of the national market for those with health insurance through an employer and 15 percent of those with individual coverage.

See RATES, Page 20

Report: Airport noise needs more attention

Grand jury claims enthusiasm waning on oversight group

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT

Ofcials need to put more effort into monitoring airport noise, beginning with greater participation in the San Francisco International Airport Roundtable, according to the San Mateo County Civil Grand Jury. In a report released yesterday, the civil grand jury concluded the roundtable’s effectiveness has diminished and “participa- tion and enthusiasm” has similarly declined. Daly City, the jurisdiction most impacted by noise and vibrations, withdrew from the roundtable completely because of budget restraints, the Board of Supervisors representative has been absent since

See NOISE, Page 18

Former Belmont-Redwood Shores trustee to be president-elect of state PTA

By Heather Murtagh

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

Colleen You began her work with the California State PTA like most parents, while her children were in elementary school. As of July 1, the 51-year-old Belmont resident became the presi- dent-elect of the statewide organiza-

became the presi- dent-elect of the statewide organiza- Colleen You tion. You was elected to the

Colleen You

tion. You was elected to the two-year term of office at the association’s 112th annual convention in Long Beach this spring. “It’s like pres-

ident in training,” You said. You spent 14 years in the medical

eld. Her volunteer work grew to a

point in which it is now her main focus. Her new role means four additional years on the state board, two as president-elect and soon enough as president. “I am honored to work with an association that does so much to

improve the lives of children every day,” You said. “I’m excited to

dedicate myself to PTA’s work on all issues that affect the whole child, including education, health, safe communities and parent engagement. It’s especially rewarding to me to support and mentor emerging PTA leaders to help them to work even more

effectively on all these issues.” Many people associate PTAs with fundraising, which is one aspect of what local groups do. You wants Californians to use the PTA as a go- to for information about issues fac- ing children since the organization works to build local leaders while advocating for youngsters and edu-

See YOU, Page 20

children since the organization works to build local leaders while advocating for youngsters and edu- See
children since the organization works to build local leaders while advocating for youngsters and edu- See
children since the organization works to build local leaders while advocating for youngsters and edu- See
children since the organization works to build local leaders while advocating for youngsters and edu- See

2 Thursday July 7, 2011

FOR THE RECORD

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Quote of the Day

“The debt ceiling should not be something that is used as a gun against the heads of the American people to extract tax breaks for corporate jet owners or oil and gas companies.”

— Barack Obama

“As GOP shows exibility, Obama adopts hard tone,” see page 7

Local Weather Forecast

Thursday: Sunny. Highs in the mid to upper 80s. West winds around 5 mph increasing to 10 to 20 mph in the afternoon. Thursday night: Mostly clear. Lows in the mid to upper 50s. Southwest winds 10 to 20 mph. Friday: Sunny. Highs in the mid to upper 80s. West winds 5 to 10 mph. Friday night: Clear. Lows in the upper 50s. Saturday: Sunny. Highs in the 80s. Saturday night: Clear. Lows in the mid 50s.

in the 80s. Saturday night: Clear. Lows in the mid 50s. Lotto July 6 Super Lotto

Lotto

July 6 Super Lotto Plus 5 7 11 18 33 25 Mega number
July 6 Super Lotto Plus
5
7
11 18
33 25
Mega number
July 5 Mega Millions 1 10 13 18 46 19 Mega number
July 5 Mega Millions
1 10
13 18
46 19
Mega number

Fantasy Five

1 5 12 13
1
5
12
13

Daily Four

7
7
8
8
2
2
0
0

Daily three midday

 
4
4
2
2
3
3

Daily three evening

 
1
1
0
0
1
1
21
21

The Daily Derby race winners are No.5 California Classic in first place; No. 3 Hot Shot in second place; and No. 2 Lucky Star in third place. The race time was clocked at 1:46.00.

Star in third place. The race time was clocked at 1:46.00. Obituaries .   . .

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Opinion.

 

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Publisher Jerry Lee jerry@smdailyjournal.com

Editor in Chief Jon Mays jon@smdailyjournal.com

Phone:

(650) 344-5200 Fax: (650) 344-5290

To

ads@smdailyjournal.com

Classieds:

ads@smdailyjournal.com

Events:

calendar@smdailyjournal.com

News:

news@smdailyjournal.com

Delivery:

circulation@smdailyjournal.com

Career:

info@smdailyjournal.com

800 S. Claremont St., Ste. 210, San Mateo, Ca. 94402

800 S. Claremont St., Ste. 210, San Mateo, Ca. 94402 THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME by David

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME

by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words. CNEBH
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
CNEBH
©2011 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
RTYDA
ASFCIO
RDEHNC
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
Sign Up for the IAFLOFCI (OFFICIAL) Jumble Facebook fan club
Sign Up for the IAFLOFCI (OFFICIAL) Jumble Facebook fan club “ ” Answer: Yesterday’s Jumbles: Answer:
Sign Up for the IAFLOFCI (OFFICIAL) Jumble Facebook fan club “ ” Answer: Yesterday’s Jumbles: Answer:
Sign Up for the IAFLOFCI (OFFICIAL) Jumble Facebook fan club “ ” Answer: Yesterday’s Jumbles: Answer:

Up for the IAFLOFCI (OFFICIAL) Jumble Facebook fan club “ ” Answer: Yesterday’s Jumbles: Answer: (Answers
Up for the IAFLOFCI (OFFICIAL) Jumble Facebook fan club “ ” Answer: Yesterday’s Jumbles: Answer: (Answers
Up for the IAFLOFCI (OFFICIAL) Jumble Facebook fan club “ ” Answer: Yesterday’s Jumbles: Answer: (Answers
Up for the IAFLOFCI (OFFICIAL) Jumble Facebook fan club “ ” Answer: Yesterday’s Jumbles: Answer: (Answers
Up for the IAFLOFCI (OFFICIAL) Jumble Facebook fan club “ ” Answer: Yesterday’s Jumbles: Answer: (Answers

Answer:

Yesterday’s

Jumbles:

Answer:

(Answers tomorrow) FELON POKER ZOMBIE INVEST The cows had no chance of winning the debate
(Answers tomorrow) FELON POKER ZOMBIE INVEST The cows had no chance of winning the debate

(Answers tomorrow) FELON POKER ZOMBIE INVEST The cows had no chance of winning the debate because everything they said was a — “MOO” POINT

POKER ZOMBIE INVEST The cows had no chance of winning the debate because everything they said
POKER ZOMBIE INVEST The cows had no chance of winning the debate because everything they said
because everything they said was a — “MOO” POINT Snapshot REUTERS Elodie and Mathurin of France

Snapshot

everything they said was a — “MOO” POINT Snapshot REUTERS Elodie and Mathurin of France perform

REUTERS

Elodie and Mathurin of France perform during the Lent festival in Maribor,Slovania.

Inside

perform during the Lent festival in Maribor,Slovania. Inside Garden Crocuses add touch of spring to fall
perform during the Lent festival in Maribor,Slovania. Inside Garden Crocuses add touch of spring to fall

Garden

Crocuses add touch of spring to fall

See page 19

Wall Street

Stock market shrugs off weak service sector report See page 10

This Day in History

1981

President Ronald Reagan announced he was nominating Arizona Judge Sandra Day O’Connor to become the first

female justice on the U.S. Supreme Court. In 1846, U.S. annexation of California was proclaimed at

Monterey after the surrender of a Mexican garrison. In 1860, composer-conductor Gustav Mahler was born in Kalischt, Bohemia, Austria-Hungary (in the present-day Czech

Republic).

In 1865, four people were hanged in Washington, D.C., for conspiring with John Wilkes Booth to assassinate President Abraham Lincoln. In 1898, the United States annexed Hawaii. In 1911, composer Gian Carlo Menotti was born in Cadegliano, Italy. In 1919, the rst Transcontinental Motor Convoy, in which a U.S. Army convoy of motorized vehicles crossed the United States, departed Washington, D.C. (The trip ended in San Francisco on Sept. 6, 1919.) In 1930, construction began on Boulder Dam (later Hoover Dam). In 1941, U.S. forces took up positions in Iceland, Trinidad and British Guiana to forestall any Nazi invasion, even though the United States had not yet entered the Second World War. In 1969, Canada’s House of Commons gave nal approval to the Ofcial Languages Act, making French equal to English throughout the national government. In 1983, 11-year-old Samantha Smith of Manchester, Maine, left for a visit to the Soviet Union at the personal invitation of Soviet leader Yuri V. Andropov. Ten years ago: Racial violence between white and south Asian youths erupted in Bradford, England.

Thought for the Day

“Memory depends very much on the perspicuity, regularity and order of our thoughts. Many complain of the want of memory, when the defect is in their judgment; and others, by grasping at all, retain nothing.” — Margaret Fuller, American (1810-1850)

Birthdays

— Margaret Fuller, American (1810-1850) Birthdays Olympic medal figure skater Michelle Kwan is 31. Pulitzer
— Margaret Fuller, American (1810-1850) Birthdays Olympic medal figure skater Michelle Kwan is 31. Pulitzer
— Margaret Fuller, American (1810-1850) Birthdays Olympic medal figure skater Michelle Kwan is 31. Pulitzer

Olympic medal figure skater Michelle Kwan is 31.

Pulitzer Prize-winning author David McCullough is 78. Rock star Ringo Starr is 71. Singer-musician Warren Entner (The Grass Roots) is 68. Rock musician Jim Rodford is 66. Actor Joe Spano is 65. Pop singer David Hodo (The Village People) is 64. Country singer Linda Williams is 64. Actress Shelley Duvall is 62. Actress Roz Ryan is 60 Actor Billy Campbell is 52. Rock musician Mark White (Spin Doctors) is 49. Singer-songwriter Vonda Shepard is 48. Rhythm-and-blues musician Ricky Kinchen (Mint Condition) is 45. Actress Amy Carlson is 43. Actress Jorja Fox is 43. Actress Cree Summer is 42. Actress Kirsten Vangsness is 39. Actor Troy Garity is 38. Actor Hamish Linklater is 35. Rapper Cassidy is 29. Country singer Gabbie Nolen is 29 Actor Ross Malinger is 27.

Conductor Doc Severinsen is 84.

Actor-comedian Jim Gaffigan is 45.

Duped: Big California gold nugget actually Aussie

NEVADA CITY — A 6.2-pound hunk of gold was auctioned for nearly half a million dollars in March after a man claimed to have found it on his Sierra Nevada property, but it turns out to it was actually dug up decades earlier in Australia. Australian prospector Murray Cox compared pictures of the “Washington Nugget” that sold for $460,000 in March with “The Orange Roughie” he unearthed near Melbourne in 1987. They were an exact match. Last year, a man named Jim Sanders claimed to have unearthed the chunk on his property. The men who auctioned the nugget for Sanders said they investigated after Cox came forward and agreed it was from Australia. The buyer was reimbursed and the

gold was sold to another bidder from the March auction.

Lightning strikes twice for New Jersey Lucy the Elephant

MARGATE, N.J. — Who says light- ning never strikes twice in the same place? Certainly not Lucy the Elephant. The national historic landmark on the Jersey shore was damaged over the weekend by a lightning strike that knocked out electrical, computer, alarm

Strange but True

and air conditioning systems. Richard Helfant, executive director of the group that operates Lucy, says Sunday’s lightning strike could cost any- where from $10,000 to $100,000 to x. Lucy was also hit by lightning in 2006. That hit caused $162,000 worth of damage to her riding carriage, called a howdah. After that incident, lightning rods were installed. They may have helped limit the damage from Sunday’s strike. The popular 65-foot tall wood and metal tourist attraction just south of Atlantic City remains open and will mark its 130th birthday in two weeks.

Woman charged with putting antifreeze in smoothie

SALT LAKE CITY — A woman was being held on an attempted murder charge Wednesday after police say she spiked her roommate’s peach smoothie with antifreeze three years ago. Selena Irene York, 33, was arrested this week in Eugene, Ore., where she remained jailed pending extradition back to Utah. Police say Ed Zurbuchen, now 78, nearly died after York bought the smoothie from a nearby store, dumped out half of it and poured in antifreeze before he drank it. The Sept. 29, 2008, case went cold until a jilted boyfriend of York’s recent- ly came forward with new information,

authorities said. Police in Vernal, Utah, received a let- ter from Joseph Dominic Ferraro, who was awaiting trial on an unrelated case in Oregon but had information about the crime, according to court documents. The documents say he provided specic details of where York bought the smoothie and the antifreeze. The biological father of York’s teenage daughter also told investigators that the girl told him about the man they were living with and how they planned to “knock him off.” Ferraro said he came forward with the information after York drained his bank accounts and sold both of his cars while he was in jail. He said she told him she planned to obtain power of attorney over Zurbuchen’s nancial records, then kill him. Authorities say they questioned York again in late June after receiving the letter and she admitted to poisoning Zurbuchen. She claimed she only did it because she wanted him to “stop being mean” to her children. When Zurbuchen was taken to a hos- pital after drinking the smoothie, He suf- fered from dizziness, speech problems and numbness on his face, authorities said. Tests determined he ingested ethyl- ene glycol, the main ingredient in antifreeze. At the time, York acknowledged giv- ing Zurbuchen the smoothie but denied putting antifreeze in it, and police didn’t have enough to charge her.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

LOCAL

Thursday July 7, 2011

3

Transient accused of raping

19-year-oldpleadsnotguilty

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT

The transient accused of beating and sodomizing a 19-year-old acquaintance inside

a van parked near the Redwood City library

pleaded not guilty yesterday to sexual assault charges that could send him to prison for life.

Corey Lee Bell, 32, returns to court Aug. 17 for a preliminary hearing on the charges of sodomy causing great bodily injury, assault by force and making criminal threats. Bell, who is deemed a habitual sex offender under the law, faces life imprisonment if con- victed because of the state’s one-strike sen- tencing rule. Prosecutors say the teen joined Bell to drink in his van May 10 but was attacked by the defendant and another man. Bell and the other man, who remains unidentied, allegedly held the teen down and

remains unidenti fi ed, allegedly held the teen down and Corey Bell sodomized him until he

Corey Bell

sodomized him until he passed out. The teen said when he awoke Bell was the only man with him and the other suspect remains at large. Hospital staff reported the alleged assault days later after Bell sought medical care.

Bell’s previous convic- tions, all in 1993 in Santa Clara County, include forced penetration with a foreign object, forced oral copulation with a minor under 14, lewd and lascivious act with a child under 14 and forcible sodomy with a child under 14. He was last released from prison in 2008, according to the Megan’s Law database. He remains in custody in lieu of $500,000 bail and a no-bail parole hold.

Transit repairmen pleading not guilty to stealing $40K

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT

Two transit repairmen accused of stealing more than $40,000 from Caltrain ticket machines pleaded not guilty to more than a

dozen charges of embez- zlement and grand theft. Orvilla Taylor, 59, and Herbert Todd, 52, will learn at an Oct. 25 prelim- inary hearing if they’ll stand trial on the 14 charges each face. If con- victed, they face between three and 15 years

depending upon whether they can be sentenced for each count individ- ually or collectively. Prosecutors say the men, both employees of

or collectively. Prosecutors say the men, both employees of Orvilla Taylor Herbert Todd the San Mateo

Orvilla Taylor

Prosecutors say the men, both employees of Orvilla Taylor Herbert Todd the San Mateo County Transit

Herbert Todd

the San Mateo County Transit District for more than 25 years, stole money on 12 separate dates from broken ticket machines they brought in to repair. They reportedly disassem- bled the equipment, took the money and returned the machines to service.

Caltrain discovered money was missing during an internal audit and the defendants were reportedly caught acting “suspicious and irregular” on station surveil- lance videos, according to the District Attorney’s Ofce.

Taylor and Todd are on unpaid administra- tive leave and free from custody on $150,000 bail each.

Dental bookkeeper pleads not guilty to embezzling — again

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT

A bookkeeper pleaded not guilty to stealing $70,000 from a Redwood City dentist shortly after being red by another dentist for embez- zlement. Between March 2009 and August 2010, Jasmine Delafuente, 31, took the cash paid by patients and deleted proof of payment from ofce records, prosecutors said. Just prior to working for the office, Delafuente had been red in February 2009 for stealing $6,793 through the same means. Delafuente was prosecuted and convicted of felony embezzlement in August 2010, settling

a case that had been pending in court through

most of the time she was working for her sec-

court through most of the time she was working for her sec- Jasmine Delafuente ond alleged

Jasmine

Delafuente

ond alleged victim. “It’s egregious. Literally, as the case was in court she got a new job and started the same thing,” said District Attorney Steve Wagstaffe. She was sentenced to 60 days jail and felony proba- tion for the rst case. After pleading not

guilty yesterday in the new case, she was scheduled for jury trial Jan. 30, 2012. She remains in custody in lieu of $100,000 bail and a no-bail probation violation hold.

Kathleen Ann Nordman Smith

Kathleen Ann Nordman Smith of San Mateo died June 25, 2011 of ovarian cancer. She was 75. She was a graduate of Abraham Lincoln High School in San Jose and continued her education at Mills College in Oakland grad- uating with honors in 1957. She worked for the Employment Development Department for 25 years, retired then became self employed as an independent insurance agent for 27 years. She was blissfully married to the late Bruce B. Smith of Alamo for 30 years. They enjoyed sailing, wine tasting and the pursuit of making the perfect wine. After the passing of Bruce she became the wine maker at the Vineyard of Stahr Dust in Stonyford, in Northern California. She will be greatly missed by her sister-in- law Sandra, husband Jerry and son Russ

Obituary

Stahr of Stonyford, niece Sheryl and nephew Randy Stahr of Concord. A memorial service will be held at the Hope Lutheran Church at 600 42nd Av. in San Mateo 10 a.m. Saturday, July 16. All are welcome to attend and celebrate Kay’s life with her family and friends.

As a public service, the Daily Journal prints obituaries of approximately 250 words or less with a photo one time on the date of the family’s choosing. To submit obit- uaries e-mail information along with a jpeg photo to news@smdailyjournal.com. Free obituaries are edited for style, clarity, length and grammar. If you would like to have an obituary printed more than once, longer than 250 words or without editing, please submit an inquiry to our advertising depart- ment at ads@smdailyjournal.com.

Police reports

How do you take your coffee?

A person threw a cup of coffee at some-

one at the Industrial Hotel in South San Francisco before 5:15 p.m. Friday, July

1.

SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO

Narcotics. A man was reported to be smoking marijuana at the Citigarden Inn before 8:32 p.m. Saturday, July 2. Disorderly conduct. An extremely intoxicat- ed person was reported at the Caltrain station on Dubuque Avenue before 5:28 p.m. Saturday, July 2. Assault. A landlord reportedly “went crazy” and punched a person on Grand Avenue before 9:41 p.m. Friday, July 1. Narcotics. A person reported smelling mari- juana on Aspen Avenue before 6:40 p.m. Friday, July 1. Warrant Arrest. A person was arrested on warrants at the Industrial Hotel on the 500 block of Cypress Avenue before 10:04 a.m. Friday, July 1. Petty Theft. A petty theft was reported on Keoncrest Drive before 8:29 a.m. Friday, July

1.

SAN BRUNO

Hit and run. A hit and run accident occurred on the 300 block of El Camino Real before 3:09 p.m. Monday, July 4. Petty Theft. Two cases of petty theft occurred on the 1100 block of El Camino Real before 1:17 p.m. Monday, July 4. Petty Theft. A male suspect took three credit cards out of someone’s purse and made fraud- ulent purchases on the 1100 block of El

Camino Real before 4:15 p.m. Sunday, July 3. Vandalism. Damage was done to the passen- ger’s-side front bumper of a green BMW 525i on the 200 block of Mastick Avenue before 1:20 p.m. Sunday, July 3.

REDWOOD CITY

Stolen vehicle. A vehicle was stolen at Broadway and Main Street before 3:41 p.m. Tuesday, July 5. Theft. Two people took beer from a store on Broadway before midnight Monday, July 4. Theft. Items were taken on El Camino Real before 1:10 a.m. Monday, July 4. Theft. A vehicle registration sticker was stolen on Harrison Avenue before 1:21 p.m. Monday, July 4. Stolen vehicle. A vehicle was stolen on Broadway before 9:51 a.m. Sunday, July 3. Burglary. A safe containing jewelry, a watch and passports was stolen from a residence on Jefferson Avenue before 12:14 p.m. Sunday, July 3.

SAN MATEO

Burglary. A residence was broken into, a water pipe was cut and the stove was stolen on the 1800 block of Cottage Grove Avenue before 3:08 p.m. Friday, July 1. Burglary. A residence was broken into on the 400 block of Colgate Way before 2:55 p.m. Friday July 1. Robbery. Someone was assaulted and robbed by an adult male in his 20s at the intersection of South Norfolk Street and Beacon Avenue before 12:14 p.m. Friday, July 1 Vandalism. A mailbox was torn apart on the 1600 block of East Poplar Avenue before 10:22 a.m. Friday, July 1. Disturbing the peace. A landlord pushed a tenant on the 700 block of Highland Avenue before 5:29 p.m. Thursday, June 30.

Disturbing the peace. A landlord pushed a tenant on the 700 block of Highland Avenue before

4

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THE DAILY JOURNAL

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6 Thursday July 7, 2011

LOCAL/STATE/NATION

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Restaurant surveillance footage appears to show art thief suspect

BAY CITY NEWS SERVICE

A well-known San Francisco restaurant

might have surveillance video of a thief who walked into a Union Square art gallery on Tuesday morning and walked out with a Picasso drawing worth hundreds of thousands of dollars. Lefty O’Doul’s restaurant is next door to the main showroom of the Weinstein Gallery, located at the corner of Geary and Powell streets, where the thief took the sketch at about 11:40 a.m. Tuesday before getting in a taxicab, according to the gallery and police. Lefty’s owner Nick Bovis, also the owner of Burlingame’s Broadway Grill, said that when he learned Tuesday night that a distinctively dressed man had walked out with a 1965 Picasso sketch called “Tete de Femme,” he checked his tapes and quickly homed in on a suspect. “We’ve never seen anything like it,” he said. The footage shows a man in a grayish jack-

et and light pants walking briskly but casually at 11:39 a.m. away from Weinstein’s and toward the Handlery Hotel, which had a line of taxicabs waiting a few doors down from Lefty’s. The footage is time-stamped at 12:12 p.m., but Bovis said his camera’s clock is 33 min- utes fast. The man in the shot is carrying something framed in his left arm and wearing loafers but no socks — a key part of the suspect descrip- tion obtained by police. Investigators reviewed the footage this morning but declined to comment on it. Bovis said police downloaded it from his hard drive and planned to use it in their search.

“It appears it could be our suspect,” police

spokesman Ofcer Albie Esparza said. “The description is similar and he’s holding art, obviously, but not until we arrest him can we say that’s the guy we’re looking for.”

him can we say that’s the guy we’re looking for.” PHOTO COURTESY OF LEFTY O’DOUL’S Witnesses

PHOTO COURTESY OF LEFTY O’DOUL’S

Witnesses described the thief as a white man about 6 feet tall,between 32 and 35 years old, wearing a dark jacket, light shirt, dark pants, loafers with no socks and large sunglasses.

Bovis said he installed the surveillance cam- eras a few years ago when someone stole the left arm of the restaurant’s mascot, a man- nequin dressed as left-handed pitcher Lefty O’Doul. “I put up the camera to catch an arm thief and got someone stealing a Picasso,” he said. Witnesses originally described the thief as a white man about 6 feet tall, between 32 and 35 years old, wearing a dark jacket, light shirt, dark pants, loafers with no socks and large sunglasses, Esparza said. Anyone with information about the theft is asked to call San Francisco police at (415) 575-4444, text a tip to TIP411, or call 911.

police at (415) 575-4444, text a tip to TIP411, or call 911. REUTERS FILE PHOTO The
police at (415) 575-4444, text a tip to TIP411, or call 911. REUTERS FILE PHOTO The

REUTERS FILE PHOTO

The FBI and Homeland Security Department sent a memo to security officials around the country warning of people surgically implanting explosives in their bodies.

Alert says terrorists look to implant bombs in humans

By Eileen Sullivan

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — Airlines are being warned by the government that terrorists are considering surgically hiding bombs inside humans to evade airport security. As a result, travelers may nd themselves subjected to more scrutiny when ying in the heart of sum- mer vacation season, especially to the U.S. from abroad. The FBI and Homeland Security Department sent a memo to security ofcials around the country on Wednesday about “body packing,” describing it as a “criminal tactic with possible terrorist application.” The memo, obtained by the Associated Press, cited a 2005 incident in which Colombian men were accused of surgically implanting narcotics into human couriers. The memo offered possible indicators of sur- gically implanted contraband, including a dis- tended stomach or other unusual bulging, and visible physical discomfort from a pat-down. Bombs-in-the-body is not a new idea, but recent intelligence indicates a fresh interest in using this method. People-scanning machines in airports aren’t able to detect explosives hid- den inside humans. Still, there is no current information that points to a specic plot involv- ing surgically implanted explosives, a U.S. security ofcial said, speaking on condition of anonymity to discuss such sensitive matters. As airport security has increased since the Sept. 11, 2001, terror attacks, so has the terror- ists’ creativity in developing methods to get around it. Aviation continues to be a special tar- get, and evidence from Osama bin Laden’s compound showed that the al-Qaida leader retained his fascination with attacking airplanes until his death in May. Last year, it was reported that British ofcials uncovered intelligence that al-Qaida was seek-

ing to surgically implant bombs inside people,

a move some believed was prompted by the use

of full-body imaging machines at major air- ports around the world. “This is something we’ve been concerned about for quite some time,” said J. Bennet Waters, a security consultant with the Washington, D.C.-based Chertoff Group and a former Transportation Security Administration ofcial in the Bush administration. The U.S. government has been working with

foreign air carriers and governments to identify ways to discover hidden explosives, including bombs potentially hidden inside of humans. Ofcials did not want to discuss specic secu- rity measures under consideration so as not to tip off terrorists who could seek ways to get around them. Once a terrorist nds a willing suicide bomber, secures the explosive material and makes the bomb, carrying off this tactic is not that difcult, said Chris Ronay, a former chief

of the FBI explosives unit.

“It’s rather easy and the damage could be rather severe,” Ronay said. Surgery to implant explosives could be done

a couple of days before a planned attack, said

James Crippin, an explosives expert in Colorado. In order for it to work, there would need to be a detonation device, and it’s con- ceivable that if the explosive was implanted in

a woman’s breast, the detonator could be

underneath the breast so that all the operative would have to do is press downward, Crippin said. But Jimmie C. Oxley, a chemistry professor

at the University of Rhode Island and explo-

sives expert, said it would be tough to carry out such an effort successfully. She said there are only so many places to hide a bomb in the body, and a suicide bomber would have to recover enough from the surgery to travel and set off the device.

STATE GOVERNMENT • On Wednesday, the Assembly Governmental Organization Committee approved two open government

STATE

GOVERNMENT

• On Wednesday, the Assembly Governmental Organization Committee approved two open government measures authored by state Sen. Leland Yee, D-San Francisco/San Mateo. Senate Bill 8 would bring greater trans- parency and accountability to California’s public higher education institutions — University of California, California State University and the state’s community col- lege system. Senate Bill 8 will next be considered the full Assembly before heading to the gover- nor. Senate Constitutional Amendment 7 is a constitutional amendment that would ensure

public entities follow requirements to post agendas and to disclose any actions taken. If approved by two-thirds of the Legislature, Senate Constitutional Amendment 7 would go before voters during the next statewide ballot. • The state Legislature has approved Senate Bill 445 by state Sen. Joe Simitian, D-Palo Alto, to provide 21st century privacy protections for California library patrons. California’s library privacy laws were creat-

ed before the use of the Internet. As a result,

an individual’s interaction with the library outside of the typical library book circula- tion is not protected under current law.

The change in law was suggested by one

of Simitian’s constituents through his annu-

al “There Oughta Be A Law” contest. Cupertino resident and library law consult- ant Mary Minow submitted her winning entry after attending one of Simitian’s Town Hall meetings.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

NATION

Thursday July 7, 2011

7

Obama takes on ‘tweeters’

By Ben Feller and Julie Pace

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — So much for 140 characters or less. A president, it seems, gets to respond to a tweet on his own terms. President Barack Obama got an avalanche of questions on Wednesday at a town hall forum through Twitter, the popular social media service. Of the many thou- sands that streamed in, he answered 18 in a familiar, spoken explanatory style that well-exceeded the limited length of a tweet. Obama’s rst answer, to a ques- tion on mistakes made in handling the recession, was relatively short by his standards. It still amounted to about 2,300 characters — 2,160 longer than a tweet can be. “I know, Twitter, I’m supposed to be short,” Obama conceded in the midst of another multilayered response about college costs. The White House had warned this might happen. “He’s the leader of the free world,” presidential spokesman Jay Carney said. “He decides how short his answers will be.” No one seemed that concerned. The broader image was one of a president up for re-election and eager to connect directly with those using the ever-popular communica- tion site, especially younger voters whose enthusiasm will be vital to his bid for another term. So let history show Obama was the rst president to host a Twitter town hall at the White House. He made little news over the course of about an hour, but that wasn’t his point.

the course of about an hour, but that wasn’t his point. REUTERS Barack Obama reacts after

REUTERS

Barack Obama reacts after tweeting at his first ever Twitter Town Hall in the East Room at the White House in Washington,D.C.

Obama wanted to get in touch with people outside Washington, promote his agenda, prod Congress and embrace the fast-moving online conversation site that is increasingly seen as a home of national buzz. The event drew enormous interest on Twitter. Questions streamed in long after the event had nished. The president started by sending out what he called his rst “live tweet” by using a laptop set up on a lectern. “How about that,” Obama declared to his East Room audience and those watching on TV or online. His tweet set the tone of the eco- nomic discussion. Obama asked fol- lowers what they would cut, and what spending they would protect, to trim the decit (the debate that has Washington’s divided govern-

ment in a stalemate.) For the purposes of Twitter, the White House made Obama briefer than he was. Overall, the town hall felt much like one Obama has had many times since taking ofce. Even a familiar critic got his voice heard. Twitter selected the questions for the president, and one was from House Speaker John Boehner, who asked Obama, “After embarking on a record spending binge that left us deeper in debt, where are the jobs?” “This is a slightly skewed ques- tion,” Obama said of his political rival’s inquiry. The president went on to answer Boehner’s question by noting that the economy is creating jobs, though not at a fast enough pace.

As GOP shows flexibility, Obama adopts hard tone

By Andrew Taylor

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — As a top House Republican signaled new

exibility on White House demands

to close wasteful or ineffective tax loopholes, President Barack Obama responded with some of his harshest

political rhetoric to date in advance of a Thursday negotiating session on the budget. Wednesday’s salvo came hours after House Majority Leader Eric Cantor, R-Va., opened the door to closing wasteful or unfair tax loop- holes in the battle over a must-pass proposal to increase the govern- ment’s borrowing authority. Obama suggested that Republicans are using the debt limit measure “as a gun against the heads” of Americans to retain breaks for corporate jet owners or oil and gas companies. “If the president wants to talk loopholes, we’ll be glad to talk loopholes,” Cantor said, adding that revenues raised from those revisions “should be coupled with offsetting tax cuts somewhere else.” Shortly thereafter, at a White House Twitter town hall, Obama

red a sharp response. It was far

more partisan than the language he used Tuesday to invite top lawmak- ers in both parties to the White House to move the budget talks for- ward. They’ve been stalled since a bipartisan group led by Vice President Joe Biden broke up last month after Republicans declared an impasse on taxes. “The debt ceiling should not be something that is used as a gun against the heads of the American

“The debt ceiling should not be something that is used as a gun

against the heads of the American people to extract tax breaks for corporate jet owners or oil and gas companies.”

— Barack Obama

people to extract tax breaks for cor- porate jet owners or oil and gas companies that are making billions of dollars,” Obama said. “I’m happy to have those debates. I think the American people are on my side on this.” Obama is seeking to reduce the decit, in part, through new tax rev- enue raised by closing loopholes and tax subsidies. Among the exam- ples the White House cites are tax benets for companies that buy cor- porate jets. He also has called for ending subsidies to oil and gas com- panies, a proposal that would gener- ate about $40 billion in revenue over 10 years.

At the same time, Cantor’s com- ments reflected important, if nuanced, exibility for Republicans. His earlier position was that closing loopholes should wait for a compre- hensive overhaul of the tax code. Cantor declined to specify what tax cuts should be nanced by any new loophole-related revenues. He declined to rule out using them to extend expiring tax cuts, such as a credit for new research and develop- ment that’s popular with businesses.

them to extend expiring tax cuts, such as a credit for new research and develop- ment
them to extend expiring tax cuts, such as a credit for new research and develop- ment

8 Thursday July 7, 2011

LOCAL

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Reporters’ notebook

L ike the Port of Redwood City? Be its friend on Facebook and get updates on goings on, accolades

and plans. There is a link on the port’s website www.redwoodcityport.com or put “Port of Redwood City” in the Facebook search box. *** Speaking of the port, cargo tonnage for fiscal year 2010-11 is at a record high of 871,940 metric tons. The 3.5 percent increase over the prior year is attributed to record exports of scrap metal. *** Odd Day is coming Saturday, July 9, 2011. Three consecutive odd numbers make up the date only six times in a cen- tury. After July 9, only two days remain in this parade of Odd Days which began with Jan. 3 2005. The previous stretch of dates like this started with Jan. 3, 1905 — 13 months after the Wright Brothers’ flight. A contest was established with the prize of ($791.10) to be shared by the winners. Prizes will be distributed to those who involve the most people in the oddest parade of odd characters, write the best odd ode or create the best odd celebra- tions. For more information visit www.odd- day.net or be sign up to attend Odd Day as a Facebook event.

*** County parks fees went up July 1 but anyone who made a reservation prior to the new fiscal year needn’t worry. The county will honor those at the previous rate.

*** Anyone a fan of lollypops? Or is it lol- lipops? Either way, July 20 is National Lollypop Day and South San Francisco- based See’s Candies is celebrating this

year by offering free samples of their lol- lypops at their more than 200 retail shops across the U.S. See’s Candies has made their chocolate, vanilla, café latte and but- terscotch gourmet lollypops for the past 80 years.

*** Lollypop fans can also enter See’s Candies National Lollypop Day Sweepstakes, in which the grand prize winner and a guest will receive a once-in- a-lifetime VIP tour of the lollypop factory and candy kitchen in South San Francisco. This rare opportunity will offer the winner a glimpse at where and how the more than 100 See’s Candies legendary sweets are made. The grand prize also includes

round-trip airfare for two, four nights at a San Francisco hotel, ground transportation and a $100 per diem. Entrants will also have the chance to win $50 See’s Candies gift cards. Enter the sweepstakes through July 23 at www.sees.com/lollypopsweep- stakes or at any of the retail shops. Winners will be randomly selected Aug.

26.

*** Standard and Poor’s rating service announced last week that it has upgraded its underlying and long-term rating of San Francisco International Airport bonds from “A” to “A+”, with a “stable” outlook. The increased rating reflects the airport’s continued success at controlling cost increases, attracting new service and man- aging future growth at the airport. These credit ratings apply to the airport’s out- standing debt and to its upcoming bond transactions, according to airport officials.

The Reporters’ Notebook is a weekly collection of facts culled from the notebooks of the Daily Journal staff. It appears in the Thursday edition.

Who Are “private HEROES” ?

How Firefighters Set Example

By Paul Larson

HEROES” ? How Firefighters Set Example By Paul Larson MILLBRAE – Firefighters are “public HEROES”!

MILLBRAE

Firefighters

are

“public HEROES”! In the way that members of our Military travel to foreign war zones and risks their own

lives in the name of preventing terrorism … and in the way our Police Officers enter a sketchy part of town to apprehend suspects who’ve harmed others and may do more harm … the same goes for our Firefighters who are trained to enter potentially explosive situations to prevent the spread of fires and rescue those caught in hazardous peril. These “public HEROES” touch our lives on a daily basis, most times without our knowledge. Our general safety and well-being can be attributed to the day to day actions of our “public HEROES”. With the recent joint-funeral for the two San Francisco Firefighters who died in the line of duty it is important to acknowledge their lives and say thank you. These “public HEROES” had a natural inclination to help others above their own selves. Their efforts to serve the public were of great value, and that value is to be remembered and admired. Just like we learn from the funerals of our “public HEROES”, we can learn from the funerals of those who have touched our personal lives … our “private HEROES”. Family, friends, local acquaintances and even those we know of but don’t know personally have the ability to affect us in ways we may not be consciously aware. We ourselves also have the potential to affect the lives of others in ways we’re not aware. A single act of kindness; the opening of a door; a caring gesture; a supportive

word; an offer to help; volunteering in a service club; etc. all set examples for others to emulate and absorb as a part of their own life-experience. Both “public HEROES” and “private HEROES” enrich our lives and help us as individuals to be little bit better. When ever we attend a “funeral” (the deceased being present) or “memorial” (the deceased not being present) we always learn about how the deceased affected the lives of others. Also, our attendance not only shows the family that we care, but in a positive way can affect the family’s healing process. To us what may seem a small caring gesture may be an enormous life moment to the person we are affecting. We never know how we affect the lives of others … but it’s a fact that we do so every day. These kind acts, unconscious and conscious, along with other small acts potentially make us each a “private HERO” in the eyes of those we’ve affected. It doesn’t matter how minor you’ve touched somebody’s life … it matters that they were able to take something away and enrich their own life with your kind act. Just like “public HEROES” whose actions affect our daily well-being, “private HEROES” have the power to positively affect the lives of their family, friends, and those they interact with on a daily basis. When our work on earth is done and our lives conclude we each can be remembered as a “private HERO” for the way we touched the lives of those we’ve left behind. If you ever wish to discuss cremation, funeral matters or want to make pre- planning arrangements please feel free to call me and my staff at the CHAPEL OF THE HIGHLANDS in Millbrae at (650) 588-5116 and we will be happy to guide you in a fair and helpful manner. For more info you may also visit us on the internet at:

www.chapelofthehighlands.com.

Advertisement

Gangmember sentenced to11 years in mistaken identity murder

One of three gangmembers charged with murdering a 24-year-old San Mateo man

after mistaking his work uniform for rival gang colors was sentenced the week of July 8, 2006 to 11 years in prison for voluntary manslaughter. Miguel Adolfo Hernandez, 20, also admitted being a gangmember, the use of a

Teen arraigned in royals’ death

The 18-year-old East Palo Alto woman accused of causing the fatal crash that claimed two members of the Tongan royal family is a “lovely” former honor roll stu- dent who is apologetic and emotional, according to the defense attorney who entered a not guilty plea on her behalf the week of July 8, 2006 to three counts of vehicular manslaughter with gross negligence. Calling the crash an “unfathomable tragedy,” defense attorney Randy Moore nonetheless said he believed his client, Edith Delgado, was not guilty of the charges. Prince Tu’ipelehake, 55, and his wife Princess Kaimana, 45, were in a red Ford Explorer when another car collided with it on northbound Highway 101 near Marsh Road in Menlo Park. Tu’ipelehake was the nephew of 88-year-old King Taufa’ahau Tupou IV who maintained a home in Hillsborough. The couple’s driver, Vinisia Hefa, 36, of East Palo Alto, was also killed during the crash.

South City robbery victim dies of heart attack

A 75-year-old woman who suffered a heart attack after chasing the man who allegedly swiped her purse from a South San Francisco restaurant died the week of July 8, 2006 shortly before the accused man’s arraignment. Jeanette Tyson, 75, of South San Francisco had a heart attack when she tried to chase the man who stole her purse from a table at McDonald’s on El Camino Real. Trenal Clark, 18, of Daly City was arrest- ed and faced commercial robbery charges that carry a maximum of three years in prison.

From the archives highlights stories originally printed ve years ago this week. It appears in the Thursday edition of the Daily Journal.

It appears in the Thursday edition of the Daily Journal. fi rearm and committing a serious

rearm and committing a serious

felony as part of the plea agreement reached May 12, 2006. According to the prosecution, the defen- dants are Norteño members who shot Meza Nov. 14, 2004 after mistaking his restaurant

work uniform for rival gang clothing. Meza stopped at a liquor store for a phone card after work, according to his wife, and Ponce allegedly shot him three times after a brief exchange of words. The gunre propelled Meza’s vehicle into a pole and the suspects

ed.

Former mayor gets 45 days jail

Former San Carlos Mayor Mike King was sentenced the week of July 8, 2006 to 45 days in jail for defrauding the South County Fire Authority of more than $13,000 to repay a campaign debt but a judge stayed the term pending an appeal. King dropped his head slightly when Judge Barbara Mallach said she felt jail was appropriate but otherwise appeared stoic dur- ing the sentencing hearing. After denying a defense request to reduce King’s two felony convictions to misde- meanors, Mallach imposed two concurrent 45 day sentences — half that recommended by the probation report — which could be served through the Sheriff’s Work Program. After a two-week trial, a jury convicted King April 18 of defrauding the South County Fire Authority of $13,300 to pay Peg Collier for political consulting work.

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THE DAILY JOURNAL

OPINION

Thursday July 7, 2011

9

The future of the U.S. Postal Service

— Florida Times-Union, Jacksonville

U nless Congress acts quickly, the U.S. Postal Service could go the way of Fannie Mae and Freddie

Mac. It may need a massive federal bailout that the taxpayers neither want nor can afford. That’s what several members of Congress, all sponsoring postal reform bills, are saying. And they have a point. The service ran a decit of more than $8 billion last year, and this year is expected to be no better. It cannot keep running huge decits for long without either getting a big infusion of

Other voices

federal money or going out of business. The service’s problem is that it uses an archaic technology that some day no longer will be needed. The gures speak for themselves: In 2000, 80 percent of household bills were paid by traditional mail. But the number paying elec- tronically has quadrupled since then. Some day, sooner than some may think, only a few people will use the mail for pay- ing their bills. And, of course, most people already use

email — or Facebook or Twitter — for per- sonal correspondence. It’s free, and the mes- sage gets there immediately. Friends can cor- respond back and forth several times in the

time that it takes for a single piece of tradi- tional mail to arrive at its Why not privatize the Postal Service? Sell it. Give it away. If necessary, pay somebody to take

A truly private board could make decisions

based on efciency, without interference from politicians who pander for votes in a way that runs up the service’s de cits. They might keep the service solvent until sometime in the future when it really no longer is needed.

Letters to the editor

Thank goodness for New York

Editor, Now that the state of New York has made it legal to have same-sex marriages, we can congratulate them for their progressive lead- ership, being the fth state in the union to pass such a law. Unfortunately, our suppos- edly progressive state of California is not yet among them. The only near stumbling block in the path for New York legislators was the strong resistance to the passage of this law by the state’s Christian churches and other religious organizations. These religious institutions had no intention of easing up on their pro- gram of discrimination. Thank goodness the New York Legislature was able to work out an accommodation for these religious organi- zations.

Don Havis

San Mateo

What’s fair

Editor, Fairness, like beauty, is in the eye of the beholder. Is it fair that one person becomes ill while another does not? Is it fair that a person is better at something than another? Is it fair to penalize either? Was it fair that a minority group, the Republicans, kept with its principles by standing up to the majority group, the Democrats? Thank goodness another minority group, the gay community, did the same thing or else we would not be trying to get an Equal Marriage Act passed. Is it fair that we were not allowed to vote for tax extensions? Would it be fair if we could not vote on other ideas such as pension reform, collective bargaining, spending cap, tort reform or a at tax? Do not think that your concept of fairness represents another’s concept of fairness. That would be unfair.

Randy Swan

San Mateo

Recuperative but

not remunerative

Editor, Maybe sleeping at work without pay should be a condition of employment, just as police ofcers and parole agents have to carry rearms as a condition of employment. Overtime pay to sleep just doesn’t seem rational (“Fire contract splits council on its budget” in the June 29 edition of the Daily Journal). The nature of the job and its requirement require exibility, and yes, unin- terrupted sleep is one of those costs that may be surrendered in this occupation. It is time to modify future retirement bene-

ts — increase employee contributions, reduce benets or increase employee contri- bution to receive those benets, and stop allowing employees to bank more than 15 days of sick time or vacation time. Government employees should have to serve

a minimum of 20 years to be invested in the

pension (much like the military) and then the pension should not kick in until age 62 or 65

(in the manner of Social Security). The gives retired workers up to 15 years to contribute additional quarters into Social Security even

if the Windfall Elimination Provision kicks

in. Those employees with less than 20 years of service can cash out their contribution, but the state’s contribution stays in the PERS/STIRS. Don’t forget Gov. Jerry Brown in his sec-

ond term compelled government rank-and-

le to join unions or pay a portion of dues in lieu to a designated nonprot organization. Of course, the state is required to withhold the union dues from the employees’ pay- check to reduce the free rider problem awarding unions greater control over mem- bership.

Foti’s twice-monthly hate mail (“Dark Days Ahead” letter to the editor in the June 30 edi- tion of the Daily Journal) — limited, thank- fully, by the Daily Journal’s editorial policy — I am left with the following thought: Foti hates freedom, hates America and is patently un-Christian, both in thought and deed. Shame on this sorry fool, but kudos to the Daily Journal for keeping his right to free speech alive.

Spare us from Foti

Editor,

Andrew Dunlop

Redwood City

I can’t believe you allowed the moron Ross

Foti to libel the gay and lesbian people in your audience with his religious drivel

(“Dark Days Ahead” letter to the editor in the June 30 edition of the Daily Journal).

If my recollection is correct from earlier

nonsense of his you have published, he is apparently a rabid Catholic, making him a devotee of what seems to be the world’s old- est and largest pedophile organization. If he wants to rail about something and do some

good, he should start with his church.

I don’t suppose there is any use in pointing

out to him that the existence of his god has never been proven, that gay people do not

choose their orientation, that the world is

dying from over population (dark days indeed), that the United States has never been a “Christian country,” and that “the sanctity of marriage” only lasts about half the time. It has been my experience that those with that much energy on the issue of gay marriage more often than not have some unnished business with their own orientation.

I am amazed that you actually published

Jack Kirkpatrick

his arrogant and bigoted screed. Please spare

Redwood City

us from more of the bile from this seriously ignorant person.

Shame on Ross Foti

Editor, After reading the latest installment of Ross

David Jonson

Burlingame

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Star power

R ex Walheim is scheduled to reach for the stars tomorrow. The NASA astro- naut with Peninsula roots belongs to

the crew of the Atlantis, the nal shuttle set to launch Friday morning in the historic journey that ends this chapter of the American space program. Before the Atlantis crew was named, I’d never recognize Rex Walheim as either an astronaut or a San Carlos hometown boy. Perhaps this shows that unless an astronaut was among the originals with the Right Stuff, one of the 15 who died or — sadly — one that went a little crazy and stalked a love rival, their names melt into the oblivion of public consciousness. The space program, once so vaunted and awe-inspir- ing, doesn’t have individual celebrities in the same way as an athletic team or band. Ask the average person to name a space cowboy and don’t be surprised if they instead more easily recall Lance Bass’ aborted orbital training or Sir Richard Branson’s private efforts. “Astronaut” is the quintessential childhood dream yet the adults who actually reach the goal aren’t necessarily the rst role models or idols that spring to mind. The shuttle itself takes center stage, leaving the astronauts without instant recognition outside of a prelaunch media blitz. Yet, these men and woman are amazing. We should all know their names and how they reached this pinnacle; we should all care that they depart and arrive back on Earth safely. This plea to give folks like astronauts more respect and acknowledgment than say a Kardashian or a professional athlete isn’t new. The advent of the nal launch just gives it a lit- tle more weight, especially when future space travelers won’t even have their own craft with which to draw attention. Maybe that’s why the idea one of these few grew up in our own backyard is, for lack of a more mature and weighty description, cool. We may not know him, we may not have even heard his name before, but suddenly his birth in Redwood City and his claims to San Carlos make Rex Walheim a little more attainable. Plus, Walheim has given the cities and San Mateo County a bit of cachet. These are the schools that put him on the right educational path. These are the stores he visited, the people he looked up to, the parks where he may have shot off a model rocket or two. He probably rode Caltrain and maybe watched reworks in either Foster City or Redwood City, seeing sparkles in the night sky long before he became its visitor. Did he eat breakfast at the now-shut- tered Vic’s or spend a summer weekend at any of the numerous Peninsula festivals? The short window between learning of Walheim’s San Carlos ties and liftoff tomorrow meant he wasn’t available for some rst-hand perspective on his history and the mission at hand. I must be content with ofcial biogra- phies and passed along trivia like his place in San Carlos history and that he brought a San Carlos ag on a previous mission. Who knew San Carlos even had a ag? Who knew it would go where most men and women never will? What I do know is these very human traits make people like Walheim seem very down to earth. These tidbits are what make kids in school trying to gure out their life plans real- ize they, too, might just be able to follow the same path. If the guy who can pick Laurel Street out on a map can achieve so much, so can any number of others. The space program as we know it will be grounded after Walheim’s trip on Atlantis but that doesn’t mean he and the others can’t keep inspiring future generations. If these generations feel a connection to these mentors, chances are probably greater they’ll give a little more consideration to math and sci- ence and the idea there is more to success than reality shows and dot-com startups. On Friday, Rex Walheim and his fellow astro- nauts will once again reach for the stars. And down here on Earth, those with the same dream will know they can too.

on Earth, those with the same dream will know they can too. Michelle Durand’s column “Off

Michelle Durand’s column “Off the Beat” runs every Tuesday and Thursday. She can be reached by email: michelle@smdailyjournal.com or by phone: (650) 344-5200 ext. 102. What do you think of this column? Send a letter to the editor:

letters@smdailyjournal.com.

10 Thursday July 7, 2011

BUSINESS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Dow 12,626.02 +0.45% 10-Yr Bond 3.0950% -0.0410 Nasdaq 2,834.02 +0.29% Oil (per barrel) 97.10 S&P
Dow
12,626.02
+0.45%
10-Yr Bond 3.0950% -0.0410
Nasdaq 2,834.02
+0.29%
Oil (per barrel)
97.10
S&P 500 1,339.22 +0.10%
Gold
1,529.10

Stocks see slight gains

By David K. Randall and Matthew Craft

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — Stock indexes man- aged slight gains Wednesday as investors shrugged off slower growth in the U.S. service sector. The Institute for Supply Management reported Wednesday that business growth slowed at U.S. service providers in June. Financial companies and health care providers reported the weakest results. On the positive side, June marked the 19th consecutive month of growth at service companies, which employ the majority of American workers. U.S. stocks opened mixed after a broad sell-off in Europe and another interest rate hike in China. Major banks fell sharply after Moody’s lowered Portugal’s credit rat- ing to “junk” status late Tuesday. That raised fresh concerns about the strength of the European financial sys- tem and investment banks’ exposure to possible bond defaults. Bank of America Corp. lost 2.4 percent. JPMorgan Chase dropped 1.2 percent. Some investors were surprised that stock indexes held up after the weak economic report. Dorsey Farr, a co- founder of Atlanta investment advisory firm French Wolf & Farr, said attractive

Wall Street

stock prices in technology and pharma- ceutical companies helped the market rebound. The Standard & Poor’s 500 index rose 1.34 to close at 1,339.22. Rupert Murdoch’s News Corp. was among the index’s biggest losers, dropping 3.6 percent, as a phone-hacking scandal engulfed one of the media giant’s tabloids. Some British legislators called on regulators to block News Corp. from taking over British Sky Broadcasting. The Dow Jones industrial average rose 56.15 points, or 0.4 percent, to

close at 12,626.02. Caterpillar Inc. rose

1.5 percent, the most of any stock in

the average, followed by Intel Corp. The Nasdaq added 8.25 points, or 0.3 percent, to 2,834.02. China raised a key interest rate for the third time this year in an attempt to curb inflation. Many U.S. companies have focused on the country as a source of profit growth and are hoping that

interest rate hikes there will not lead to an economic slump. Among U.S. companies, General Motors gained 1 percent after analysts upgraded the stock. Walgreen Co. rose

1.5 percent after reporting strong June

sales.

Big movers

Stocks that moved substantially or traded heavily Wednesday on the New York Stock Exchange and Nasdaq Stock Market:

NYSE

Tesoro Corp.,up 95 cents at $24.10

A Barclay’s analyst upgraded the oil refiner and

increased its stock price target, saying restructuring efforts will improve results. Kinetic Concepts Inc.,up $7.42 at $66.20 Citing anonymous people,Bloomberg reported that private equity firms were talking about acquiring the health care products maker. Bank of America Corp.,down 26 cents at $10.74 The bank led declines of big financial companies. An investor objection could

obstruct its $8.5 billion mortgage settlement.

Nasdaq

News Corp.,down 66 cents at $17.47 Britain’s prime minister demanded an inquiry into the widening phone hacking scandal at the media company’s U.K.tabloid,News of the World. Companies pulled ads from the newspaper. Delta Petroleum Corp.,up 1 cent at 46 cents. The oil and gas producer has hired investment

banks to advise it on “strategic alternatives,” including a possible sale of the copmany. Hutchinson Technology Inc., up 48 cents at

$2.75

Because of growing shipments, the company forecast higher sales in the quarter ended in June than analysts had expected. Immunogen Inc.,up $1.16 at $13.37

A Jefferies analyst rated the company a “Buy,”

saying itsT-DM1 drug candidate will become a standard treatment for breast cancer. Ener1 Inc.,up 6 cents at $1.06

A Wunderlich Securities analyst upgraded the

battery maker to“Hold”after the company got funds to help pay its bills.

Auto industry seeing new life

By Dee-Ann Durbin

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

DETROIT — Volkswagen opened a plant in Tennessee last month with 2,000 workers. Honda is hiring 1,000 in Indiana to meet demand for its best-sell- ing Civic. General Motors is looking for 2,500 in Detroit to build the Chevy Volt. Two years after the end of the Great Recession, the auto industry is hiring again — and much faster than the rest of the economy. As an employer, it’s grow- ing faster than airplane manufacturers, shipbuilders, health care providers and the federal government. The hiring spree is even more remark- able because memories of the U.S. auto industry’s near-death experience are fresh. In 2009, General Motors and Chrysler both got government bailouts and entered bankruptcy, and auto sales

hit a 30-year low. In June of that year, about 623,000

will make its new Passat, will create 9,000 spin-off jobs in the region, includ-

people were employed by the auto

ing

500 at auto-supplier plants that are

industry in the United States, the fewest

springing up nearby.

since the early 1980s. Now the gure is

Automakers are hiring again because

almost 700,000, a 12 percent increase.

car

sales are rising. Americans bought

Sales are back up, too, and automakers

10.4

million cars and trucks in 2009 and

are hiring by the thousands to meet

11.6

million in 2010. This year, they’re

increased demand.

on track to buy 13 million or more, and

“The buzz is incredible around here

auto

companies are adding shifts to meet

about what opportunity we’re going to

the demand.

get if we can build a great product,” says

“Everybody got so lean and mean dur-

Ben Edwards, who went to work for

ing

the downturn that they’re trying to

Volkswagen in Chattanooga, Tenn., last

rebuild staff,” says Charles Chesbrough,

year and is now a team leader on an assembly line that installs tires and seats.

senior economist with IHS Automotive.

a

Edwards was working as a general contractor until the housing market dried up. He says the pay at Volkswagen, which starts at $14.50 an hour, is fair and the benets are generous. Besides hiring 2,000 people itself,

The auto industry’s 12 percent increase in jobs compares with a 0.2 per- cent gain for the economy as a whole, excluding farming and adjusted for sea- sonal variation, since June 2009. The Labor Department reports Friday on

Volkswagen gures the plant, where it

jobs

gained or lost last month.

Facebook launches video calls,group chat features

By Barbara Ortutay

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — Quick on the heels of Google’s launch of its latest social-net- working venture, Facebook said Wednesday that its 750 million users will now be able to make video calls on the site. The feature will be powered by the Internet phone service Skype. Facebook also redesigned its chat feature, so that the people a user messages the most

often show up rst. To make video calls, Facebook users with webcam-equipped computers have to select the friends they want to chat with. In the chat window that pops up, clicking on a small blue video icon brings up the video chat feature. Currently there is no option to video chat more than one person. That feature is available on Google Plus, a social serv- ice that Google began testing last week with a small number of invited users. Facebook is also adding a group chat option. This works much the same way

as the group chat on Google Plus. Once

you are chatting with one friend, you can

click an icon to add more people to the conversation. Facebook’s new products come after a relatively quiet period for the world’s largest online social network. Zuckerberg, 26, said the company is embarking on “launching season 2011.”

Users can expect “a lot of stuff coming

out” from Facebook in the next couple

of weeks and months, he said at an event at the company’s Palo Alto headquar- ters.

Visa sees debit card rules slowing growth in 2012

NEW YORK — Visa Inc. on Wednesday said it still expects its revenue to increase as much as 15 percent and its earnings to rise more than 20 percent this year. But it warned that growth will slow in 2012 after new regulations on the fees banks can charge for debit card transac- tions kick in. The San Francisco payments network operator repeated an earlier forecast for its current scal year, which ends Sept. 30, for revenue growth between 11 per- cent and 15 percent and earnings-per-

Business briefs

share growth of greater than 20 percent. Next year, however, Visa said it expects its revenue growth to slow to the high-sin- gle-digit to low-double-digit range. The company expects earnings-per-share growth to slow to the mid-to-high teens. Analysts, on average, were forecasting 11 percent revenue growth and 16 percent earnings growth for 2012. The slowdown will reflect the rules announced by the Federal Reserve last week that kick in on Oct. 1 and next April. The first will limit the fees that banks can charge retailers for process-

ing debit card transactions.

Microsemi to buy ASIC Advantage

IRVINE — Circuit and semiconductor

maker Microsemi Corp. said Wednesday

it plans to acquire ASIC Advantage Inc.,

a privately held semiconductor company. Financial terms were undisclosed. Microsemi, based in Irvine said it plans to discuss the acquisition later this month when it releases its third-quarter results. Microsemi makes semiconductors for a range of industries, including the aero- space, defense and security industries.

DANGEROUS DAY: CRASHES, HIGH WINDS HIGHLIGHT TOUR DE FRANCE STAGE 5 >>> PAGE 13 Thursday,
DANGEROUS DAY: CRASHES, HIGH WINDS HIGHLIGHT TOUR DE FRANCE STAGE 5 >>> PAGE 13
Thursday, July 7, 2011
<< A’s avoid sweep, shut out Mariners, page 12
• Women’s World Cup roundup, page 13

U.S. has tough road after loss to Sweden

By Nancy Armour

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WOLFSBURG, Germany — The Americans can’t do things the easy way. Needing only a tie to avoid Brazil in the quarternals, the U.S. fell 2-1 to Sweden on Wednesday night, the team’s fourth loss since November and rst ever in group play at the World Cup. “After, what I said to the team is, my glass

is half-full,” U.S. coach Pia Sundhage said. “Even though we lost, we can come out as a

winner if we take a different

ly want to play in the nal. But we have to play some great games, play some great teams. I really want us to embrace this process. I think the team will get stronger. That’s the plan. “It’s a little bit different for me to talk about the nal,” she added. “That’s what it takes when we take a different road.”

We real-

what it takes when we take a different road.” We real- Abby Wambach Lisa Dahlkvist convert-

Abby

Wambach

Lisa Dahlkvist convert- ed a penalty and Nilla Fischer scored on a free kick for Sweden, which won Group C and will play Australia on Sunday in Augsburg. Abby Wambach got the U.S. back in the game in the 67th minute with her rst goal of the tournament, but as they

On to the title game

Pacifica American gets shot at 10-11 District 52 crown

By Nathan Mollat

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

It’s been so long since the Pacica American Little League All-Star program has won a District 52, the players’ dads were playing Little League. It’s been 28 years — 1983 — since the last Pacica American Little League team hoisted a District 52 championship banner, but it will get that chance Sunday as it advanced to the 10- and 11-year-old championship game Sunday by virtue of its 10-6 win over Redwood City National Wednesday evening at the Belmont Sports Complex. It was the winners’ bracket nal and, after falling behind 3-1, Pacica rallied for six runs in the third to take a 7-3 lead on its way to the vic- tory. “It’s just exciting. I’m so excited for the kids, for the parents,” said Pacica American manager Ryan Gordon. “The whole (Pacica) community has rallied around this team.” Both teams’ aces were unavailable, which made conditions ripe for a high-scoring game Wednesday. “We kind of had a feeling we would have to score a lot of runs to win,” Gordon said. The key for Pacica American was starting pitcher Sean Snead, who Gordon said served as the team’s closer in the rst three games of the tournament. Although Redwood City National touched him up for two runs in the rst and one more in the third, Snead did a good job of wig- gling out of trouble. A couple more Redwood City National hits could have broken open the game, but Snead kept his team close until the Pacica American offense came to life. “I was so proud of Sean,” Gordon said. “We tell all our starting pitchers, ‘Your job is to keep us within striking distance.’”

See ALL-STARS, Page 14

us within striking distance.’” See ALL-STARS , Page 14 NATHAN MOLLAT / DAILY JOURNAL Pacifica American’s

NATHAN MOLLAT / DAILY JOURNAL

Pacifica American’s Danny Mack strokes a first-inning single during his team’s 10-6 win over Redwood City National.Mack was 3 for 4 with two runs scored and also pitched two innings of scoreless relief as Pacifica American will go for its first District 52 crown since 1983.

have all year the Americans squandered too many other chances and now must Brazil on Sunday in Dresden. Brazil was the runner-up to the Americans at the last two Olympics and to Germany at the 2007 World Cup, and is led by ve-time FIFA player of the year Marta. As the nal whistle sounded, Sweden’s players rushed onto the eld, gathered in a cir- cle and did the dance that’s quickly becoming

See SOCCER, Page 14

Where wood is welcome

T he high school summer baseball

season means different things to

different players and coaches. One

camp believes it supposed to be sheer fun.

Go to the plate, take your hacks, play with

a little air defensively. The opposite end

of the spectrum is the ultra-competitive program, which practices throughout the summer, works on situational hitting and treats it like a job. There are a few more options for players. Some can fall into the above camps, but others have their own rea- sons for playing base- ball during the sum- mer: they want to get better for the next level. Whether that be their senior year in high school or fresh- man year in college, most summer players have their eye on the ultimate prize — professional baseball. Players have different ways to reach their goal by their approach to the game, and their equipment. There is a quartet of players on the San Carlos Tribe American Legion team who are actually looking beyond the next step.

Alex Blandino, Dylan Mayer, Richard Prigatano and Geo Saba are preparing for a shot in pro ball now — by using wood bats for the Tribe. Using wood instead of metal bats means players need to really square up the ball and make solid contact because the sweet spot on wood bats is much smaller than on

a metal or composite bat. With the high school bat rules not in effect this summer, players are allowed to

or composite bat. With the high school bat rules not in effect this summer, players are

See LOUNGE, Page 13

Persistence pays off: South Korea wins Olympic bid

By Stephen Wilson

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

DURBAN, South Africa — The victory mar- gin was massive and the message loud and clear:

Persistence paid off for South Korea in its third consecutive bid for the Winter Olympics. After two stinging defeats in a decade of try- ing, the South Korean city of Pyeongchang nally won its Olympic prize Wednesday, bury- ing two European rivals in a landslide vote for the 2018 Winter Games and bringing them back to the lucrative Asian market. “We are grateful to people who persevere and are patient, and each time the bid has improved,”

“Koreans have been waiting for 10 years to host the Winter Games. … I believe that all the IOC members understood our message.They understood it was right time,right place,right now.”

— Cho Yang-ho,South Korea Olympic bid leader

International Olympic Committee President Jacques Rogge said. The Koreans lost narrowly in the nal round of voting for the 2010 and 2014 Games, but this time they defeated Munich and Annecy, France, by a one-sided margin that few had expected. “Koreans have been waiting for 10 years to host the Winter Games,” bid leader ChoYang-ho

said. “Now we have nally achieved our dream. “I believe that all the IOC members under- stood our message. They understood it was right time, right place, right now.” Needing 48 votes for victory, Pyeongchang won an overwhelming 63 of the 95 cast in the rst round of the secret ballot. Munich received 25 and Annecy seven.

“I was surprised by the one-round victory and

I was surprised by the margin,” Rogge told The

Associated Press. “We had three technically equivalent bids and then the other factors came into play and denitely the patience and perse-

verance of the Koreans has been rewarded.” South Korean President Lee Myung-bak, who delivered a speech in English during the nal presentation, reminded the IOC of his country’s successful hosting of the 1988 Summer Olympics in Seoul, and said: “Now Korea wants to give back to the Olympic movement and to the world.” Pyeongchang will be the third city in Asia and

See OLYMPICS, Page 14

12 Thursday July 7, 2011

SPORTS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Summer Roundup

Shockers go 2-3 in Reno Tournament

The American Legion Post 82 San Mateo Shockers suffered a losing trip to Reno, Nev. last weekend for the the 2011 Reno Muckdogs Wood Bat Invitational 4th of July Tourney. The Shockers rotated a loss for a win in ve games, falling to the Watsonville Aggies in their nal contest 7-3. Tyler Cyr took the loss in a game where the Shockers were only out- hit by one, but committed four errors and were put away by a three-run fourth inning by the Aggies. Jordan Paroubeck picked up a pair of RBI for the Shockers in the game. The loss came after the Shockers survived another four-error performance in game four of their tournament, defeating the East Bay All-Stars 7-2. Chris Lewis had two hits in the game and Kyle Ferris drove in three San Mateo runs. Sean McMillian also had a pair of RBI. In game three, Top Speed Baseball put up a four-spot in the top of the seventh to nally put some considerable distance between them and the Shockers for the 6-1 win. It was another another messy game for San Mateo, which committed ve errors in the loss. The Shockers also managed only two hits. That performance came after pounding out 11 hits, including a home run by Jordan Paroubeck in a 12-7 win against the Colt 45s. San Mateo put up seven runs in the bottom of the fourth to take a 7-3 lead only to see it evaporate in the top half of the fth when the 45s put up four runs of their own. But only a big crooked number by San Mateo was the difference in the ball game — ve runs in the bottom half of fth. In game one of the tournament, San Mateo loss 2-1 to W.M Ports despite Dario Bortolotto and McMillian limiting the opposi- tion to only three hits. The difference in the game was a single run scored by the Ports in the bottom of the sixth.

San Mateo Palomino 9, Los Altos/Mountain View 7

After surrendering six runs in the bottom of the rst inning, the White Sox all but shut down the Knight bats for the next six and roared back for a 9-7 win. It was San Mateo’s second win against LAMV in a week. John Coloma went deep twice and Nick Davenport added a home run and a double in the win. Mark Hurley had a pair of two-baggers. For the Knights, Jake Bruml homered and drove in four runs. The win lifts San Mateo’s league record to

10-4.

Athletics shutout Mariners for the win

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

OAKLAND — Guillermo Moscoso was more worried about shutting down Seattle than his status in Oakland’s rotation. Moscoso made a strong case to keep his spot by allowing two hits in seven innings and Scott Sizemore homered to help the Athletics sal- vage the nale of a three-game series with a 2- 0 victory over the Mariners on Wednesday. “Like I said before the game. I have to be focused today and not worry about if this would be my last start,” Moscoso said. “I just had to stay focused and make quality pitches today and give the team a chance to win. That’s what we’re looking for.” Sizemore hit a solo homer in the second inning and added an RBI single in the fth against Jason Vargas (6-6) to give Moscoso (3- 4) more than enough support to win for the rst time since May 29. Moscoso won his rst two starts before going 0-4 in June, despite posting a 2.25 ERA. Despite the solid performance, Moscoso’s spot in Oakland’s rotation is in jeopardy with Tyson Ross expected to come off the disabled list fol- lowing the All-Star break. “I just have to do my best, keep doing my best and try to stay deep into games and give the team a chance to win,” he said. “Any role, starter or reliever. I’m just trying to stay here as long as I can.” Moscoso made a strong case to remain in Oakland’s starting ve, allowing only singles to Dustin Ackley in the second inning and Adam Kennedy in the seventh. Moscoso

A’s 2, Mariners 0

and Adam Kennedy in the seventh. Moscoso A’s 2, Mariners 0 Guillermo Moscoso struck out fi

Guillermo

Moscoso

struck out ve, walked one and got 13 of his outs in play on yballs. Moscoso has allowed just one earned run in his past 24 2-3 innings, lower- ing his ERA to 2.16. “Every time out he’s been that strong,” closer Andrew Bailey said. “I wouldn’t say today is his

best but it’s denitely one of them. Everything he’s asked to do he’s done, whether it’s bullpen or start. Each and every time out he’s made the most of the opportunity. It’s going to be a tough decision. That’s what you want. You want the front ofce to have to make a tough decision. That means you’re pitching well and playing good baseball.” Joey Devine pitched a perfect eighth and

Bailey nished for his eighth save in nine chances. The Mariners managed just two hits and had their three-game winning streak snapped. “We just didn’t put a lot of pressure on him,” DH Adam Kennedy said of Moscoso. “You look at his numbers and he’s a yball pitcher but we should be able to make adjust- ments. We just didn’t get it done today.” The A’s lost the rst two games between the AL’s lowest-scoring teams in predictably tight fashion. Seattle won the opener 2-1 behind a

strong start by Michael Pineda and then won 4-2 Tuesday with help from a throwing error by Oakland shortstop Cliff Pennington in the 10th inning. Sizemore got the A’s started in the rst

inning when he turned on a rst-pitch fastball from Vargas and drove it into the left-eld seats for his third homer of the season to make

it 1-0.

Oakland added a second run in the fth inning when Pennington reached second on an ineld single and throwing error by short- stop Brendan Ryan. He moved to third on a balk and scored on Sizemore’s two-out hit to center eld. Vargas allowed two runs and ve hits in eight innings for his fourth complete game in his past seven starts.

“Sizemore got him a couple times but Jason threw the ball well again, gave us every opportunity to win the ballgame,” manager Eric Wedge said. “You can’t say enough about how consistent he’s been. He was efcient all day long.” NOTES: The Mariners matched a season- worst with three errors, having also done it

Oakland reliever Grant

April 6 at

Balfour (right oblique) felt good after a one- inning rehab assignment Tuesday and will be

activated from the DL on

OF

Josh Willingham also might be ready to return

Thursday from a strained left

The

Mariners called up inelder Kyle Seager from

Triple-A Tacoma after the game and designat- ed catcher Jose Yepez for assignment.

Schierholtz ends marathon with HR

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SAN FRANCISCO — Nate Schierholtz hit his second home run of the game leading off the bot- tom of the 14th inning to give the San Francisco Giants a 6-5 victory over the San Diego Padres on Wednesday night. Schierholtz had three hits and drove in three runs for the Giants, who beat the Padres for just the third time in 12 games at AT&T Park. Javier Lopez (4-1) threw two scoreless innings while Pat Neshak (1-1) took the loss. Pablo Sandoval drove in three runs, including the game-tying runs in the eighth inning, as the Giants rallied from a three-run decit. Andres Torres had three hits. Sandoval’s two-run double came against Mike Adams, who had not allowed a run in 15 of his previous 16 appearances against the Giants. Ryan Ludwick drove in two runs, Chase Headley, Jesus Guzman and Rob Johnson all had one RBI for the Padres, who had won 10 of their

Giants 6, Padres 5

for the Padres, who had won 10 of their Giants 6, Padres 5 Nate Schierholtz last

Nate

Schierholtz

last 13. The Giants snapped a three-game losing streak. Padres starter Dustin Moseley allowed four runs and ve hits over 7 1-3 innings. He walked one and struck out a career-high nine. Moseley was 1-3 over his previous eight games despite allowing no more than three

runs in a game over that span. He has the lowest run support of any NL pitcher. Giants starter Madison Bumgarner has the second-lowest. Bumgarner lasted six innings, allowing ve runs

and nine hits. He walked one and struck out six. He is 1-5 in nine starts at home. Ludwick had a two-run double in the rst, but Torres doubled leading off the home half of the

inning and eventually scored on Sandoval’s groundout. The Padres added a run in the third on Headley’s sacrice y and in the fourth on Guzman’s double. Schierholtz’s fth home run of the year, a two- run shot that glanced off the right eld foul pole, narrowed the decit to 4-3 in the fourth. Orlando Hudson singled with two outs in the sixth, stole second and advanced to third on Chris Stewart’s throwing error. He scored on Johnson’s single to make it 5-3. Torres sparked the tying rally with a one-out sin- gle off Moseley. Adams came in and allowed Brandon Crawford’s single ahead of Sandoval’s drive into the right-center eld alley. NOTES: Giants’ LHP Jonathan Sanchez threw

a bullpen session and has another scheduled for Injured Giants C Buster Posey made an appearance in the broadcast booth during the Giants OF Cody Ross (slight hamstring strain) was out of the starting lineup for the second straight day.

booth during the Giants OF Cody Ross (slight hamstring strain) was out of the starting lineup
booth during the Giants OF Cody Ross (slight hamstring strain) was out of the starting lineup
booth during the Giants OF Cody Ross (slight hamstring strain) was out of the starting lineup

THE DAILY JOURNAL

SPORTS

Thursday July 7, 2011

13

Crashes mar 5th Tour stage

By Jamey Keaten

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

CAP FREHEL, France — Crashes, crashes everywhere:

Alberto Contador and some other top Tour de France riders tumbled to the asphalt Wednesday in a nervous ride on Brittany’s narrow, wind- swept roads. Most recovered, and a rider who skirted trouble to excel was British speedster Mark Cavendish, who again showed that he’s one of the world’s top sprinters by leading a frenzied mass dash to the nish to win Stage 5. Gritting it out through pain of bruises, scrapes or broken bones, defending champion Contador and most of the other crash victims bounced back to nish the 102-mile trek from Carhaix to Cap Frehel along the rocky western French shores on the English Channel. The top of the standings didn’t change. Thor Hushovd of Norway kept the yellow jersey for a fourth day, with a 1-second lead over Cadel Evans of Australia. Frank Schleck of Luxembourg is third, 4 seconds back. One who didn’t make it through

was RadioShack rider Jani Brajkovic, who was briey knocked unconscious in a crash and taken to hospital where he was diagnosed with a concussion and a collarbone fracture. The promising 27-year-old Slovenian, who quit the race, was but one of the U.S. team’s riders to run into trouble. “It’s a bad day for us,” said Johan Bruyneel, the RadioShack team manager, bemoaning also that Jaroslav Popovych of Ukraine badly injured his right wrist and scraped up his left knee and elbow. Bruyneel said Brajkovic was so dazed and disoriented that he could- n’t remember the crash: “He could- n’t tell us what happened, where he was and on which race.” American veteran Levi Leipheimer, another RadioShack star and a four-time top-10 nisher at the Tour, was also involved in a crash but returned to the course. French time-trial champion Christophe Kern also dropped out. The stage ran along a picturesque patch of rocky Brittany cliffs over- looking the Atlantic — but it was anything but pretty for many of the riders. Leipheimer complained

about the dangers of the tight Brittany roads that often forced the pack to suddenly compact, making crashes more likely. “These roads don’t belong in the Tour, especially 1st week,” he tweeted. At least six crashes marred the stage. Sky rider Bradley Wiggins of Britain and the Netherlands’ Robert Gesink, of the Rabobank team, joined Contador as title hopefuls who went down but recovered to

nish. “It was very nervous, and because of that you get a lot of crashes, because there are 200 riders who want to be in front,” said Hushovd. The course was tricky, but so was the nale. Cavendish, one of the world’s best sprinters, collected his 16th career Tour stage victory and his rst this year by speeding past Philippe Gilbert of Belgium — who nished second — and Jose Joaquin Rojas in third. “I am really happy. It was a dif- cult nish,” said Cavendish, who rides with the HTC-Highroad team.

“I put everything into it

it’s not because we’re lucky, it’s

because we’re good.”

If we win,

Women’s World Cup Roundup

Australia 2, Norway 1

LEVERKUSEN, Germany — Kyah Simon scored twice Wednesday to give Australia a 2-1 win over Norway and put her team into the quarternals of the Women’s World Cup. Elise Thorsnes had given Norway the lead in the 56th minute, but Simon tied it just a minute later. Her power- ful header from Kim Carroll’s corner kick then sealed the win in the 87th. Before 18,474 fans at the Bay Arena, neither side created any clear-

cut chances before the game came to life when Thorsnes capitalized on a defensive mixup to open the scoring. Norway defender Trine Ronning hit the crossbar with a free kick in the

84th.

Norway needed to beat Australia to advance from Group D. It’s the rst time the team failed to advance from the group stages at the World Cup.

Brazil 3, Equatorial Guniea 0

FRANKFURT, Germany — Erika’s brilliant footwork got a frus- trated Brazil on track for a 3-0 win over Equatorial Guinea to secure the top spot in Group D at the Women’s World Cup. After the Africans neutralized the heavy favorites with dogged defend-

ing for 49 minutes, Erika controlled a loose ball on her chest, then tapped it from her right foot to the left to send

a volley ying past goalie Miriam

from 13 yards. Five minutes later, Marta, the world’s top player, sent a low pin- point cross into the center to Christiane for the second goal. Christiane celebrated with jubilant body ips, and then added the third score from the penalty spot in injury time. Brazil won Group D with nine points.

North Korea 0, Columbia 0

BOCHUM, Germany — North Korea and Colombia drew 0-0 on Wednesday at the Women’s World

Cup, ensuring neither team scored a goal at the tournament. Both teams were already eliminat- ed after having lost their opening games to the United States and Sweden. Colombia made the better start in an entertaining match, but North Korea came closest to scoring when

Jo

Yun Mi’s shot ew narrowly wide

of

the corner in the 6th minute.

Both sides went all out to score toward the end, when North Korea captain Jo was close again, heading narrowly wide in the 86th minute.

LOUNGE

Continued from page 11

switch to so-called “hot bats” — traditional metal bats. Those who just want to have fun swing metal. It’s an easy way to put up huge summer numbers. Swinging wood bats is no way to hit .500. But the Tribe’s foursome realizes it’s the best way to prepare for the future. Tribe manager Rich Vallero fully supports them. “At the end of summer, it’s about getting better,” Vallero said. “Whatever they need to do to elevate their game, I’m all for it.” Using wood certainly hasn’t hampered the Tribe. Going into last Friday’s game at the Burlingame Fourth of July tournament,

Vallero said the Tribe had beaten their last ve of their last six opponents by 10 runs or more. That included an 11-1 win over Palo Alto in which the quartet nished 3 for 13. Not great numbers, but they did combine for four runs scored, three RBIs and three walks. Making the adjustment to wood is no easy task. It’s easy to get frustrated knowing that a groundout with a wood bat could easily be extra bases with a metal bat. But Vallero won’t tell anyone what type of bat to swing. He will, however, spend the time making his players better hitters — period — regardless of their preference. Now, Vallero said he will intervene if he thinks a kid is using a bat that is not con- ducive to success — such as one that is too heavy. But he won’t recommend a change even if a player is in an 0 for 24 slump. “There’s a lot of things in this game you

have to gure out on your own,” Vallero said. *** The other night, I caught the “champi- onship game” sequence from the original “The Bad News Bears” movie, starring Walter Mathau as the crusty Bears’ coach, Morris Buttermaker. As I watched Bears’ catcher ip off the Yankees’ pitcher, the swearing of players at their opponents, child abuse on the part of the Yankees’ manager (and the pitcher’s dad) and Buttermaker starting the same kids every game — along with all-world center elder Kelly Leak — I couldn’t help but wonder if the movie changed the way the game is played today. Now, there is no indication that the Bears or the league in which they were playing was in any way afliated with Little League Baseball, but there is a scene in which Buttermaker clears his bench in the champi-

onship game — kids who have barely seen any playing time all season — because it was the right thing to do and Buttermaker had his heart softened. Look at the Little League playoffs nowa- days. All players have to play at least one inning defensively or get one at-bat — in every game. The sportsmanship rules Little League employs are arguably the best around as only positive reinforcement is encouraged. Given the delinquent aspect of the “The Bad News Bears,” I have to think Little League was taking notes to make sure its league didn’t turn into movie fodder.

Nathan Mollat can be reached by email:

nathan@smdailyjournal.com or by phone: (650) 344-5200 ext. 117. You can also follow him on Twitter@CheckkThissOutt.

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14 Thursday July 7, 2011

SPORTS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

ALL-STARS

Continued from page 11

Redwood City National wasted little time in taking the lead. Tony Masetti, Nico Rollandi, Chris Cook and Trevor Crowell all singled in the inning, with Cook and Crowell driving in runs. Redwood City National starter Eric DeBrine got huge help from his defense to keep Pacica American off the scoreboard early. Pacica had two hits in each of the rst two innings, but each time Redwood City National turned dou- ble plays to get out of jams. In the rst, Redwood City shortstop Masetti elded a grounder near second base. He stepped on sec- ond for the rst out and threw on to rst to end the rst inning. In the second, after Diani Shanahan reached on an error and later scored on a wild pitch, Masetti was again involved in an inning-ending double play. With a runner on second, Masetti elded a grounder and threw to rst for one out. The runner at second broke for third and Redwood City rst baseman Kyle Pruhsmeier red to third baseman Cook, who applied the tag in time to get the runner and end the inning. “You pitch and play defense. That’s how you win these games,” said Gordon, whose team turned a similar double play of its own in the top of the fth. Redwood City upped its lead to 3-1 in the top of the third on a Crowell RBI single before the Pacica American bats nally got going.

“The rst time through (the batting order), we were out front a little bit,” Gordon said. “But we were condent they would make the adjustment.” Pacica American sent 10 batters to the plate in the bottom of the third, scoring six runs on ve hits. Snead, Jack Gilmore, Shanahan and Brett Karalius all had back-to-back-to-back-to- back RBI singles and it appeared Pacica was poised to run away with the win. Redwood City came right back in the top of the fourth to make it a game again. It scored three runs in the fourth on Crowell’s third RBI of the game and two more unearned runs to close to a run, 7-6. “That third inning really turned things upside down,” said Redwood City National manager Joe Masetti. “I thought [our] kids showed a lot of heart. They have been down for only one inning (in the tournament thus far). This was new territory. I loved the way they responded.” It was as close as Redwood City National would get as Pacica American tacked on two more runs in the fourth on RBIs from Mario Fare and Karalius, and added an unearned run in the bottom of the fth. While Pacica American now has three days off before Sunday’s championship game at noon, Redwood City National will have to win the consolation bracket nal Saturday and then beat Pacica American twice to claim the crown. Redwood City National is not conceding anything. “Even though we’re in the consolation bracket … there is every opportunity to come out and win this thing,” Masetti said.

opportunity to come out and win this thing,” Masetti said. NATHAN MOLLAT / DAILY JOURNAL Redwood

NATHAN MOLLAT / DAILY JOURNAL

Redwood City National center fielder Joe Mejia-Clifford tracks down a fly ball.

OLYMPICS

Continued from page 11

rst outside Japan to host the Winter Games. Japan held the games in Sapporo in 1972 and Nagano in 1998. Under the slogan “New Horizons,” Pyeongchang drove home the theme that it deserved to win on a third try by offering the potential of spreading the Olympics to a lucra- tive new market and become a hub for winter sports in the region. “They have tried very hard and they have done everything that we told them to do and I think that a lot of people felt that they really deserved it,” Norwegian IOC executive board member Gerhard Heiberg said. “And they will have a really good legacy for the whole of east Asia.” Pyeongchang hit all the right notes in its nal presentation, combining emotion and humor with its solid technical bid plans. “We never gave up, and tried again and lis- tened to your advice and improved our plans,” said Kim Jin-sun, the former governor of Gangwon Province, where Pyeongchang is located. “I believe it is my destiny to stand in front of you for the third time,” he said, his voice chok- ing and eyes welling with tears. “Our people have waited for over 10 years for the Winter Olympics. Today I humbly ask for your support for the chance of hosting the Winter Games for the rst time in our country.”

the Winter Games for the fi rst time in our country.” SOCCER Continued from page 11
the Winter Games for the fi rst time in our country.” SOCCER Continued from page 11

SOCCER

Continued from page 11

their tradition. They then took a victory lap around the eld, delighting the many Swedish fans in the crowd of 23,468 who whistled and cheered.

“It was one of the better matches,” Sweden coach Thomas Dennerby said. “To get nine points in the group phase, that’s really good.”

The U.S. is a two-time World Cup champion, two-time defending Olympic gold medalist and the No. 1-ranked team. But it’s had a rough few months since being stunned by Mexico in the seminals of regional World Cup qualifying, needing to beat Italy in a playoff just to get to Germany. The Americans then lost to Sweden in the opener of the Four Nations tournament in January, and dropped their rst game to England since 1988.

and dropped their fi rst game to England since 1988. But they seemed to have regained
and dropped their fi rst game to England since 1988. But they seemed to have regained

But they seemed to have regained their mojo in the rst two games of the World Cup, scoring ve goals and playing with a looseness and joy that hasn’t been seen in recent months. Still, no offense to North Korea or World Cup newcomer Colombia, the Americans hadn’t seen a team as good as Sweden, either. “We have great respect for the U.S. team but, at the same time, we know we’re good, too,” Lotta Schelin said. And they wasted little time showing it. With German chancellor Angela Merkel watching with the Germany squad, Sweden put the U.S. on its heels early after Amy LePeilbet tripped Schelin in the box in the 14th minute to earn a penalty kick. Dahlkvist took the penalty, curling it into the left side of the net. Hope Solo dived in full stretch, but the ball was just beyond her ngertips. “I was thinking that she’s smaller than me now in this moment,” Dahlkvist said. “She’s afraid of me.” The goal snapped Solo’s scoreless streak at 796 minutes, second longest in U.S. history. It also ended a run of eight shutouts, dating back to March 2010.

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THE DAILY JOURNAL

SPORTS

Thursday July 7, 2011

15

’Field of Dreams’ gets pigskin sequel online

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — Voices are still being heard in Iowa cornelds, only this time, they want Taylor Lautner to build a football eld. The website Funny Or Die debuted a three- minute “Field of Dreams” sequel Wednesday. The “Twilight” star plays the equivalent of Kevin Costner in a mock movie trailer that quickly drew more than 150,000 views. The video, “Field of Dreams 2: Lockout,” a riff on the NFL labor negotiations, is one of Funny Or Die’s most ambitious undertakings yet. It pulled together a number of famous actors, gathered some dozen currently out-of- work NFL stars and utilized lmmaking tech- niques seldom employed for Internet videos.

In the clip, Lautner builds a football eld that attracts locked-out NFL players eager to play. League owners locked out players in March, and negotiations are ongoing. Whereas Costner in “Field of Dreams” was mysteriously moved to build a baseball dia- mond, Lautner is pushed to erect a pigskin par- adise. When the voice whispers, “Are you ready?” Lautner answers, “For what?” The voice replies: “Some football.” NFL stars who make appearances include Ray Lewis of the Baltimore Ravens, Tony Gonzalez of the Atlanta Falcons and Shawne Merriman of the Buffalo Bills. NFL Network’s Rich Eisen shows up to broadcast the action.

Ray Liotta, who played “Shoeless” Joe Jackson in the original “Field of Dreams,” returns to play NFL commissioner Roger Goodell. Dennis Haysbert (“24”) takes the James Earl Jones role. Even Costner makes a cameo. “It is safe to say that this is de nitely the biggest Funny Or Die video,” says director Eric Appel. Appel previously worked for the website and was asked to return from TV work to make the video. As is typical with Funny Or Die videos, the cast worked for free on the appeal of doing something fun for a few hours. The video was shot over two days last week in Thousand Oaks, Calif.

Sports Brief

Stanford’s Dawkins receives 2-year extension

STANFORD— Stanford men’s basketball coach Johnny Dawkins has signed a two-year contract extension that takes him through the 2015-16 season with the Cardinal. Athletic director Bob Bowlsby made the announcement Wednesday about the new deal for Dawkins, who owns a 49-48 record in three seasons at Stanford, including last sea- son’s 15-16 mark. The 47-year-old Dawkins was a longtime Duke assistant under Mike Krzyzewski and a former All-America at the school where he had been on the coaching staff since the 1997- 98 season. He played for a national champi- onship and won it all as an assistant coach.

THU FRI SAT SUN MON TUE WED 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 vs.
THU
FRI
SAT
SUN
MON
TUE
WED
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
vs. Padres
vs. Mets
vs. Mets
vs. Mets
ALL-STAR
ALL-STAR
ALL-STAR
7:15 p.m.
7:15 p.m.
6:05 p.m.
5:05 p.m.
GAME
BREAK
BREAK
CSN-BA
CSN-BA
CSN-BA
MLB-TV
5
p.m.
@ Rangers
@ Rangers
@ Rangers
@ Rangers
ALL-STAR
ALL-STAR
ALL-STAR
5:05 p.m.
5:05 p.m.
5:05 p.m.
12:05 p.m.
GAME
BREAK
BREAK
CSN-CAL
CSN-CAL
CSN-CAL
CSN-CAL
5
p.m.
7/9
7/12
7/16
7/20
7/23
7/30
8/6
vs.West
vs.Union
@ Crew
@RSL
vs.United
vs.Van.
vs.Timbers
Bromwich
7:30 p.m.
4:30 p.m.
7p.m
7:30 p.m.
7:30 p.m.
7:30p.m.
Albion
CSN-BA
CSN-BA
CSN-BA
CSN-CA
CSN-BA
CSN-CA
7:30 p.m.

TRANSACTIONS

BASEBALL

American League BOSTON RED SOX — Placed LHP Jon Lester on the 15-day DL. Recalled RHP Scott Atchison from Pawtucket (IL). CLEVELAND INDIANS — Activated 1B Matt La- Porta from the 15-day DL.Optioned RHP Josh Judy to Columbus (IL). NEW YORK YANKEES — Activated RHP Phil Hughes from the 60-day DL.Released RHP Kanekoa Texeira from Scranton/Wilkes-Barre (IL). BASKETBALL National Basketball Association GOLDEN STATE WARRIORS — Named Marty Glick chief financial officer. INDIANA PACERS — Named Frank Vogel coach. HOCKEY National Hockey League COLUMBUS BLUE JACKETS — Signed D Radek Martinek to a one-year contract. MINNESOTA WILD — Signed LW Colton Gillies to

a two-year contract.

OTTAWA SENATORS — Re-signed F Erik Condra to

a two-year contract.

PHOENIX COYOTES — Signed D Nathan Oystrick,

D Dean Arsene and F Matt Watkins to one-year con-

tracts.

ST. LOUIS BLUES — Signed F Jason Arnott and F Jamie Langenbrunner to one-year contracts. SAN JOSE SHARKS — Re-signed GThomas Greiss to a two-year contract. TAMPA BAY LIGHTING — Signed C Tom Pyatt to

a one-year contract.

WASHINGTON CAPITALS — Signed RW Troy Brouwer to a two-year contract.

MLS STANDINGS

EASTERN CONFERENCE

 

W

L

T

Pts GF

GA

New York

6

3

10

28

34

23

Philadelphia

7

4

6

27

21

16

Columbus

7

5

6

27

21

19

Kansas City

5

6

6

21

22

23

Houston

4

6

8

20

21

22

D.C.

4

5

7

19

23

29

Chicago

2

4

12

18

19

22

Toronto FC

3

8

9

18

17

34

New England

3

8

7

16

16

24

WESTERN CONFERENCE

 

W

L

T

Pts GF

GA

Los Angeles

9

2

9

36

25

15

FC Dallas

10

4

4

34

26

17

Seattle

8

4

8

32

25

18

Real Salt Lake

7

3

6

27

21

12

Colorado

5

5

9

24

20

22

Chivas USA

5

7

6

21

23

22

San Jose

5

6

6

21

22

21

Portland

5

8

3

18

19

28

Vancouver

2

9

8

14

18

26

NOTE:Three points for victory, one point for tie.

Wednesday, July 6 New York 5,Toronto FC 0 Sporting Kansas City 1, Colorado 1, tie Columbus 1,Vancouver 0 Chivas USA 2, San Jose 0

Saturday, July 9

Chivas USA at Sporting Kansas City, 7:30 p.m. D.C. United at New York, 7:30 p.m.

WOMENS WORLD CUP

x-advanced to quarterfinals GROUP A

 

W

D

L

GF

GA

Pts

x-Germany

3

0

0

7

3

9

x-France

2

0

1

7

4

6