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wweekeekenderender NEPA’S No. 1 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT FREE WEEKLY theweekender.com vol.18 issue 32 june 29-july
wweekeekenderender
NEPA’S No. 1 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT FREE WEEKLY
theweekender.com
vol.18 issue 32 june 29-july 5 2011
A candid conversation with
Def Leppard’s Joe Elliott
about the new CD and his
views on MTV p. 33
TIPS FROM A
BARBIE CHICK is
torn by fashion p. 47
FREEDOM, FIREWORKS & THE FOURTH
FUN FA CTS ABOUT INDEPENDENCE DAY, PLUS SOME LOCAL CELEBRATIONS
by fashion p. 47 FREEDOM, FIREWORKS & THE FOURTH FUN FA CTS ABOUT INDEPENDENCE DAY, PLUS

W EEKENDER , W EDNESDAY , J UNE 29 , 2011

PAGE 2

staff

What’s your favorite thing about the Fourth of July?

Rachel A. Pugh Nikki M. Mascali Stephanie DeBalko General manager • 570.831.7398 rpugh@theweekender.com Editor •
Rachel A. Pugh
Nikki M. Mascali
Stephanie DeBalko
General manager • 570.831.7398
rpugh@theweekender.com
Editor • 570.831.7322
nmascali@theweekender.com
Staff Writer • 570.829.7132
sdebalko@theweekender.com
“‘Drawing’ my name with
sparklers.”
“Please see my letter this week.”
“Baking dorkily festive cookies
and cupcakes.”
Steve Husted
John Popko
Matt Chmielewski
Creative director • 570.970.7401
shusted@theweekender.com
Director of advertising • 570.831.7349
jpopko@theweekender.com
Account executive • 570.829.7204
mchmielewski@theweekender.com
“Duh, fireworks!”
“It’s a day off from work!”
“Fireworks. More specifically the
very loud ones with the quick,
bright flash.”
Amanda MacPeek
Mike Golubiewski
Alan K. Stout
Account executive • 570.831.7321
amacpeek@theweekender.com
Production editor • 570.829.7209
mgolubiewski@theweekender.com
Music columnist • 570.829.7131
astout@theweekender.com
“Going to the fireworks with fam-
ily and friends. To tally generic,
but it never gets old.”
“Watching people waste hun-
dreds of dollars on annoying
fireworks.”
“Properly noting the day that
Thomas Jefferson told the king to
get lost.”
day that Thomas Jefferson told the king to get lost.” L etter from the editor There

Letter from the editor

There are many reasons to love the Fourth of July. Our independence, of course, is pretty tops. For me, though, there are a few other things I love about the Fourth: Hitting up a backyard barbecue, seeing all the flags people display snapping in the breeze and that sulfur-y firework smell wafting through the air are pretty up there, too. But my No. 1 favorite thing about the Fourth of July are the memories I have with our Creative Director Steve Husted regarding his first Weekender cover design, way back on June 28, 2006. It was a huge issue, we had interviews with Dave Matthews Band, Sammy Hagar, Def Leppard (which, coincidentally, you can also find on p. 33 this week) and The Beach Boys, who were headlining Wilkes-Barre’s bicentennial celebration in Kirby Park that year. Naturally, since it was a Fourth of July-themed cover story, Steve and I went on the hunt for fireworks to inspire the design of the cover. Following an in-office all-out war of Pop Pop Snappers that we had to get out of our systems first, Steve painstakingly studied the fireworks and then began designing his own fireworks by

fireworks and then began designing his own fireworks by hand, made out of paper and tape,

hand, made out of paper and tape, which he then took pictures of and manipulated to make the graphic we used on the cover. Needless to say, in the five years since, we’ve fondly recalled — and laughed over — that cover, which you would never know was a Steve Husted design, especially seeing his great designs week after week. I’ve included a picture of said cover (with Steve’s permission, of course), which we once again chuckled over, remembering the first of many Steve-and-Nikki bonding moments. Whatever your favorite moment about the Fourth, I wish you a safe and happy one. Thanks for reading!

Nikki M. Mascali Weekender Editor

Contact us letters@theweekender.com

Weekender Editor Contact us letters@theweekender.com s ocial Online comment of the week. joelmchale I saw a
Weekender Editor Contact us letters@theweekender.com s ocial Online comment of the week. joelmchale I saw a

social

Online comment of the week.

joelmchale I saw a woman with a huge chest tattoo that read “Only God Can
joelmchale
I saw a woman with a huge
chest tattoo that read “Only
God Can Judge Me”. Cool,
but I’ve already gone ahead &
done some prelim work.
The Weekender has 8,041
Facebook fans. Find us now at
Facebook.com/theweekender
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23 23 It’s a very sweet DISH this week. i nside JUNE 29-JUL Y 5,

2323

It’s a very sweet DISH this week.

inside

JUNE 29-JULY 5, 2011

10 THE GAMER

Gaming fans rejoice in California.

26 WOMANLY WILES

Using burlesque, makeup and more to empower the ladies.

Using burlesque, makeup and more to empower the ladies. 56 56 ALBUM REVIEWS: New ones from

5656

ALBUM REVIEWS: New ones from Dolly, Molly and even Holly.

web www.theweekender.com/bonus/movies Enter the bizarre world of ‘Septien.’
web
www.theweekender.com/bonus/movies
Enter the bizarre world of ‘Septien.’

WEEKENDER , W EDNESDAY , J UNE 29 , 2011

261839

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PAG E 7

index

June 29-July 5, 2011

COVER STORY

14-15

LISTINGS

THIS JUST IN 10 LIVE ENTERTAINMENT…20

THEATER…24

AGENDA…27-28, 30-31, 34, 36, 38, 42-43

CONCERTS…48-49

SPEAK & SEE…50, 58 CAR & BIKE 54

MUSIC

MUSIC ON THE MENU… 16 DEF LEPPARD 33 GRIP OF THE GODS 39 ALBUM REVIEWS 56

CHARTS…56

STAGE & SCREEN

NOVEL APPROACH 19

STARSTRUCK…24

MOVIE REVIEW…25 RALPHIE REPORT…42

FOOD & FASHION

THE GAMER 10 NEWS OF THE WEIRD…13 BUT THEN AGAIN 16 DISH 23 GIRL’S NIGHT OUT 26 PUZZLES 27 STYLE FILES 44 TELL US 46 TIPS FROM A BARBIE CHICK 47 WHO IS 53

MISC.

TECH TALK 22 SHOW US SOME SKIN 50 SORRY MOM & DAD 54

MOTORHEAD…58

SHOW US SOME SKIN…56 SORRY MOM & DAD 57 SIGN LANGUAGE…59 WEEKENDER MAN…77 WEEKENDER MODEL…78

ON THE COVER

DESIGN BY…STEVE HUSTED VOLUME 18 • ISSUE 33

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PAGE 10

this just in

By Weekender Staff

weekender@theweekender.com

MOTIONLESS IN WHITE
MOTIONLESS IN WHITE

MOTIONLESS ON THE MOVE NEPA natives Motionless In White will be part of the inaugu-

ral All Star Tour, which kicks off in McAllen, Texas Fr iday, July 22 and runs until Aug. 22. MIW joins 14 other metal bands, including In This Mo- ment, Atilla, blessthefall, Em- mure, Alesana and iwrestleda- bearonce, on the tour. The clos- est stop to MIW’s hometown will be Thursday, Aug. 4 in Reading. Tickets are available via Ticket- master.

In other MIW news, the band

Angelo Parente, Chris Ce- rulli, Joshua Balz, Ryan Sit- kowski and Ricky Olson — will premier the title track from its debut album, “Creatures” Thursday, July 7 at 10 p.m. on its Facebook page. A live Q&A session with the band and special giveaways will follow. For more info, visit motion- lessinwhite.net.

STOPPING TRAFFIC Lackawanna College will host Rock and Roll Hall of Famer/

Traff ic alum Dave Mason at the Mellow Theater, Scranton, Thursday, July 21 at 7:30 p.m.

A pre-concert block party will

be held on the 500 block of Vine Street from 5-7 p.m. the day of the show, with live enter tainment and refreshments. Tickets are $30 and are avail- able at the box office, etix.com or by calling 570.955.1455. Tick- ets for the block party are $20, and a combination ticket for both is $40. For more info, visit lackawan- na.edu.

BRASS IN THE GRASS Members of the United States Army Field Band, “U.S. Army, Federal Brass,” will perform a free, hour-long show at The River Common Amphitheater We dnesday, June 29 at 7 p.m.

In case of inclement weather, the performance will be at the Buckingham Center for Perform- ing Ar ts (Sprague Avenue, King- ston). For more info, visit RiverCom- mon.org.

BLUES AT THE BAKEHOUSE The We st Side Blues Band featuring Rick Mayock, Jack

Exter and Charlie Singer will perform at Bakehouse (152 United Penn Plaza, Kingston) Friday, July 1 from 6-8 p.m. The evening also features Seattle-based musician Bob Rothstein. There is no cover charge. For info, call

570.714.2253.

HAVE A LITTLE FA ITH Steamtown Church, in con- junction with Grace Bible

Church of Canton, Ohio, will host a weeklong Faith in Action outreach program through Friday, July 1. The program includes work at the Ronald McDonald House, the Scranton Rescue Mission, a vacation Bible school at the Bangor Heights Apartments and more. For more info, visit steam- townchurch.com.

GIVE ME SOME AIR Air Supply will perform an outdoor concert at Mount Airy Casino Resor t (44 Wo odland Rd., Mount Pocono) on Sunday, July 3 at 7:30 p.m. The resort

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Games 1, California 0

O n Monday, June 27, after

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0 O n Monday, June 27, after more than five years, the Games like the one
0 O n Monday, June 27, after more than five years, the Games like the one

Games like the one pictured here and below were a topic of controversy in California recently.

multiple examples that video games require no exception, that the industry’s self-regulation through the Entertainment Soft- ware Rating Board is adequate. It even mentions “Choose-Your- Own-Adventure” books when speaking to the interactive nature of video games, pointing out that video games are not entirely unique in this regard. The opinion of the court places the burden of responsibility squarely on the shoulders of parents, even mentioning that not all parents disapprove of their children consuming violent media while pointing out the vague, hypocritical nature of the law. “Banning violent games would have necessitated bans else- where,” the opinion read. “Cali- fornia’s argument would fare better if there were a longstand- ing tradition in this country of specially restricting children’s access to depictions of violence, but there is none. Certainly the books we give children to read — or read to them when they are younger — contain no shortage

of gore.” As you can see, the real danger of the court upholding this law was the slippery slope it present- ed, bringing other forms of media into close scrutiny and asking why they are not also included. The law had a definite chilling effect. According to the opinion, the law covered games “in which the range of options available to a player includes killing, maiming, dismembering, or sexually as- saulting an image of a human being, if those acts are depicted” in a manner that “(a) reasonable person, considering the game as a whole, would find appeals to a deviant or morbid interest of minors,” that is “patently offen-

sive to prevailing standards in the community as to what is suitable for minors” and that “causes the game, as a whole, to lack serious literar y, ar tistic, political, or scientific value for minors.” Reading that description, sev- eral games come to mind, but it leaves a vague enough impres- sion that you’re left wondering, where exactly do you draw the line? Personally speaking, I don’t believe children should have access to material designed for adults, violent or otherwise. However, I also don’t believe it’s the government’s place to in- tervene. I believe the court made the right decision. To put it an-

other way, this was a triumph.

W

U.S. Supreme Court ruled

to strike down a law signed by then Califor nia Gov. Ar nold Schwarzenegger. In a decision

split 7-2, the court decided that a law restricting the sale of violent video games to minors was un- constitutional. It was a landmark case, decid- ing that video games are protect- ed under the First Amendment and that the government has no place in regulating their sale or distribution. The decision of the court came down to the fact that California failed to prove why video games should be given certain restric- tions when the state currently does not restrict the sale of vio- lent content in other mediums such as books, movies or music. The state also failed to prove what makes the interactive nature of video games different from other mediums. Unable to per- suade the court with evidence of video games’ psychological impact or any basis to consider video games a special case when it comes to violent content, the court was forced to rule against the state. The opinion of the court, writ- ten by Justice Antonin Scalia, reads, “Video games qualify for First Amendment protection. Like protected books, plays, and movies, they communicate ideas through familiar literary devices and features distinctive to the medium. And ‘the basic princi-

ples of freedom of speech

not vary’ with a new and differ- ent communication medium.” The opinion is littered with choice quotes, references and

do

vary’ with a new and differ- ent communication medium.” The opinion is littered with choice quotes,

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news of the weird

By Chuck Shepherd

Weekender Wire Services

INEXPLICABLE: An April Associated Press story, citing federal government sources, reported that 247 people on the terrorist “watch list” were nonetheless legally permitted to purchase guns in 2010 — about the same number who did so le- gally in 2009.

WHERE’S THE BEEF? Somehow, upscale restaura- teurs believe that diners will soon willingly pay more for a beef dish if it comes with dis- closure of the DNA of the actual cow being eaten, according to a May Associated Press report. “People want to know where their food is coming from,” said one excited chef, lauding the knowledge to be gleaned from a calf’s upbringing. (A more prac- tical beef-supply executive added that DNA can help identify the “multiple animals” whose parts were used in hunks of ground beef — a 10-pound package of which may include contributions from “hundreds” of different cows.)

CAN’T POSSIBLY BE TRUE -- It was not difficult to find critics when the Orlando-area government job-service engine Workforce Central Florida said it was spending more than $70,000 of federal stimulus money to help the laid-off by handing out 6,000 satiny capes for jobless “superheroes” to “fight” “Dr. Evil Unemployment.” (“Abso- lutely absurd” was the reaction of a laid-off customer-service representative.) Several critics interviewed by the Orlando Sen- tinel noted that such an awkward program further erodes the un- employed’s fragile self-respect. WCF, though, remained con- vinced. In the words of a spo- keswoman, “Everyone is a super- hero in the fight against unem- ployment.” -- Urban Legend Come to Life: Too-good-to-be-true stories have circulated for years about men who accidentally fell, post- erior first, onto compressed-air nozzles and self-inflated to re- semble “dough boys,” usually

with fatal results. However, in May in Opotiki, New Zealand, trucker Steven McCormack found himself in similar circum- stances, and had it not been for quick-thinking colleagues who pulled him away, he would have been killed — as the air, punc- turing a buttock, had already begun separating tissue from muscle. McCormack was hospi- talized in severe pain, but the air gradually seeped from his body (according to a doctor, in the way air “usually” seeps from a body). -- Oops! Oswind David was convicted of “first-degree as- sault” in a 2006 trial in New York City, but unknown to him, his lawyer and the judge, the charge had already been dismis- sed by another judge due to prosecutorial error. Nonetheless, David has been in prison since his conviction, serving a 23-year term, and was freed only in May when the error came to light. (However, the New York City district attorney still resisted releasing David, arguing that only the “first-degree” part had been dismissed. A judge finally freed David on bail while prose- cutors ponder reopening the case.) -- Parents were puzzled in June after Dry Creek School District in Roseville, Calif., passed out questionnaires asking for biographical details of pro- spective students, including whether or not the child has been delivered by C-section. Parents told Sacramento station KOVR- TV that school officials were refusing to explain why they wanted to know that.

NEWS THAT SOUNDS LIKE A JOKE (1) Night club singer Simon Ledger was arrested following a

performance at the Driftwood Beach Bar on Britain’s Isle of Wight in April after a patron complained to police. Ledger was covering the 1974 hit “Kung Fu Fighting,” and two customers of Chinese descent reported that they felt victims of illegal “ra- cially aggravated harassment.” (2) Leslie Clarke, 29, turned himself in to police in Darwin, Australia, in May after author-

ities released surveillance tape of

a break-in and vandalism at the

Hidden Va lley Tave rn . Clarke, a large man, confessed to going on

a drunken prowl with friends, but

said he remembered the break-in only when he saw the video and recognized his distinctive image from the back, including several inches of his butt crack.

THE REDNECK CHRONICLES (1) Zachar y Woody, 21, of Calhoun, Ga., was charged with aggravated assault in May after stabbing a friend. Allegedly, Woody had escalated what was initially just a fistf ight over whether Fords are better than Chevrolets. (2) Joseph Hayes, 48, was arrested in South Memphis, Tenn., in June after allegedly threatening (with a gun in his waistband) the hostess of a birth- day party to which his kids had been invited but which ran out of cake and ice cream. “Y’all didn’t save my kids no damn ice cream and cake,” he was heard to say, and “I ain’t scared to go to jail.”

A NEWS OF THE WEIRD CLASSIC (JAN. 1994) In December (1993), a New York appeals court rejected Edna Hobbs’ lawsuit against the com- pany that makes the device called The Clapper. Hobbs claimed she hurt her hands be- cause she had to clap too hard in order to turn her appliances on:

“I couldn’t peel potatoes (when my hands hurt). I never ate so

many baked potatoes in my life. I was in pain.” However, the judge said Hobbs had merely failed to

adjust the sensitivity controls.

W

Handy addresses:

NewsoftheWeird.blogspot.com,

WeirdUniverse.net ,

, NewsoftheWeird.com and P.O. Box 18 737, Ta mpa FL 33679.

WeirdNews@earthlink.net

WEEKENDER , W EDNESDAY , J UNE 29 , 2011

PAGE 14

WEEKENDER , W EDNESDAY , J UNE 29 , 2011 PA GE 14 Stars, stripes and

Stars, stripes and sparks

A brief look at the history of Independence Day, plus festivities around NEPA

By Stephanie DeBalko

Day, plus festivities around NEPA By Stephanie DeBalko Weekender Staff Writer “ Independence Day” as we
Weekender Staff Writer “ Independence Day” as we know it in America is more than
Weekender Staff Writer
“ Independence Day” as we know it in America
is more than just a Will Smith movie from the
’90s. It is also the day that commemorates July
4, 1776, when the Declaration of Independence
was adopted, and we declared freedom from Britain.
Somehow, over the years, the federal holiday came
to be synonymous with firecrackers, hot dogs and
indiscriminant drinking, but the mystique surrounding
the Fourth of July goes a lot deeper than you might
think, proven by the flurry of facts we dug up about this
very patriotic day.
Get in my belly
The Fourth of July Hot Dog
Eating Contest at Nathan’s
Famous in Brooklyn, was,
Whether it’s in contest form
or not, Americans will likely
eat 150 million hot dogs on
according to archives, first held Independence Day, enough to
the year the store opened in
stretch from Washington, D.C.
1916, and has been happening to Los Angeles more than five
Memorial Day to Labor
Day has been dubbed “Hot
Dog Season,” during which
Americans typically consume 7
billion hot dogs or 818 hot dogs
every second.
almost every year since.
times.
As time goes by
Although the most common artillery salute — and issued
4: Declaration signers Thomas
Independence Day by the numbers
event associated with July 4 is them a double allowance of rum Jefferson and John Adams died
2.5 million: The estimated
towns, villages and census-
our freedom from those pesky
Brits, many other monumental
things occurred on the day
in honor of the day.
In 1802, the United States
Military Academy opened in
number of people living in the designated places) with “liberty”
through history. In 1778, from West Point, N.Y.
his headquarters in New Jersey,
Gen. George Washington
In 1827, slavery was
abolished in the state of New
on the date in 1826, and James
Monroe passed away in 1831.
In 1997, the year after Smith
kicked alien butt in theaters,
NASA sent the Pathfinder space
probe to land on the surface of
Mars.
newly independent nation in
July 1776.
311.7 million: The nation’s
estimated population on July 4,
2011.
directed his army to put “green York.
31: Number of places (cities,
in their name.
35: Number of places with
“eagle” in their name.
11: Number of places with
“independence” in their name.
1: Place named “patriot.”
boughs” in their hats for an
Three presidents died on July

WEEKENDER , W EDNESDAY , J UNE 29 , 2011

PAG E 15

What’s in a name? “4th of July,” is a song title “4th of July,” is

What’s in a name?

“4th of July,” is a song title

“4th of July,” is a mystery

that has been used by the Beach novel by James Patterson.

Boys, U2, and Soundgarden.

“Born on the Fourth of July,”

“4th of July (Fireworks),” is is the autobiography of Vietnam

a song by Kelis. “4th of July, Asbury Park (Sandy),”is a song by Bruce Springsteen.

veteran Ron Kovic, which was made into a film in 1989. Fourth of July is a type of non-cherry tomato.

in 1989. Fourth of July is a type of non-cherry tomato. Other tidbits: signature by John

Other tidbits:

signature by John Hancock is

actually set to the tune of an old almost 5 inches long.

English drinking song called “To Anacreon in Heaven.” Benjamin Franklin wanted the turkey to be the national animal but was outvoted when John Adams and Thomas

Jefferson chose the bald eagle. census.gov, famousbirthdays.

The national anthem is

In 1791 the first recorded use of the name “Independence Day” occurred.

Sources: history.com, pbs.org, nathansfamous.com, hot-dog.org,

The Declaration’s famous

com, examiner.com

hot-dog.org, The Declaration’s famous com, examiner.com PHO TO BY PETE G. WILCOX/ THE TIMES LEADER Celebrate

PHOTO BY PETE G. WILCOX/ THE TIMES LEADER

examiner.com PHO TO BY PETE G. WILCOX/ THE TIMES LEADER Celebrate Alpine style Most people are

Celebrate Alpine style

Most people are so giddy with rides, food and of course,

delight over the prospect of a three-day weekend that they’ve

had their Fourth of July activities fun day,” Adam Vodofsky, planned for months. But for those former marketing director

who have yet to map out their patriotic festivities, one event to consider could be the First

Annual Independence Weekend event. … We’re absolutely

Extravaganza at Alpine Mountain hoping to make this into a

in Analomink, presented by the resort and the Sherman Theater, Saturday, July 2. The day features live music

from bands, including Forbidden p.m. Tickets are $10 and can be

Dreams, The Kevin Brennan

Band, Big Things and North Of com. The City, in addition to carnival

fireworks. “It’s going to be a really

of the Sherman Theater, said last week. “It’s like your quintessential summertime

recurring annual event.” The bands begin playing at 4 p.m., and the fireworks are tentatively scheduled for 10

purchased at shermantheater.

tentatively scheduled for 10 purchased at shermantheater. Fr om left, Kevin Ku tch, Justin Rice and

From left, Kevin Kutch, Justin Rice and Paul Adamchick of Pizza Paul Pyrotechnics.

PHOTO BY STEPHANIE DEBALKO

Band of Brothers

There are plenty of people who enjoy setting off a casual firecracker or lighting a sparkler or two for the Fourth of July, but there are only a

few professionals who have the may have something to do with

licensing and skills to pull off handling the big guns. The masterminds behind Pizza Paul Pyrotechnics are definitely part of that class, and they will be showing off

their tricks, engineered through addiction.

their self-described research and development sessions, for

the fireworks display Monday, members are trained and

July 4 at Kirby Park in Wilkes- certified, because safety is always

Barre.

“It’s going to be 10 times as large as it was last year, safe to say,” said Kevin Kutch, a member of the Pizza Paul team. The aforementioned tricks

the “orchestrated chaos” the company is known for, which sets off a tangible rush for each of the men involved, whose passion for fireworks can only be described as an innocent

And a somewhat safe addiction, as all of Pizza Paul’s

a top priority. Safety aside, one

gets the feeling that the business is more a brotherhood than an entrepreneurial enterprise. That feeling no doubt influences their shows, where owner Paul Adamchick says putting on a good, fun show — not money — is most important. “If me and my crew go down there, and we can make everybody forget about their problems for 20 minutes, and put a smile on their face, and cheer at the end, it’s worth it,” said Adamchick. “That’s what it’s about.” For more info, visit pizzapaulpyro.com.

it’s about.” For more info, visit pizzapaulpyro.com. Downt ow n, where all the lights are bright

Downtown, where all the lights are bright

New things are brewing in Lackawanna County for this year’s holiday celebration. In

addition to the fireworks at Nay Pennsylvania Philharmonic,

Aug Park on Saturday, July 2, Lackawanna County and the city of Scranton are bringing a star-spangled day-long affair to Courthouse Square Sunday, July 3. Beginning at 3 p.m. with food and entertainment vendors, the event will also feature live entertainment and

local bands (starting at 4:30 p.m.) and a performance at 7:45 p.m. by the Northeastern

before ending with a fireworks display at 9:15 p.m. In previous years, the Philharmonic performed at PNC Field in Moosic for the Fourth, but this year’s switch to

kick off the fireworks with the end of its performance, according to Sandra Opshinsky, special events for the City of Scranton. “In an urban environment, there are a lot of people who can’t get in the car and drive out to the stadium, but they can walk to Courthouse

Courthouse Square is an attempt Square,” said Mayor Chris

to escalate the amount of arts available to people in downtown

Doherty about the move. For more info, visit

Scranton. The Philharmonic will WeAreScrantastic.com.

WEEKENDER , W EDNESDAY , J UNE 29 , 2011

PAGE 16

WEEKENDER , W EDNESDAY , J UNE 29 , 2011 PA GE 16 b ut then

but then again

By Jim Rising

Weekender Correspondent

No good deed

J ust another drive up the spine of the Back Mountain on the Memo-

rial Highway. Then, out of the blue, twin flashes of blinding light. Fireworks? It was really bright. Like arc welding, avert your eyes, bright. It was in two spots simultane- ously. Seemed like it was a pyrotechnic display. But then I saw wires whipping around and tree branches falling on passing cars. Something bad electrically had happened. It raised the hair on back of

my neck. We have ve ry little idea about the power passes over our heads. All the time. You don’t stop or slow on the Memorial Highway un- less you want to become a stain on the road surface. So my glimpse of the aftermath was just that, a glimpse.

I tried to do the right

thing. On my tombstone it will say: “No Good Deed Goes Unpunished.” “911 wh atisyouremerga n- cy?” “Something happened to the power lines on the Me- morial Highway between

Sheetz and the animal hospi- tal. Explosions.” “Your name?”

I told him, wondering why. “Cell phone?” Now I was concerned. So

far, most of the conversation had not been about the emergency. Did he need to know my name? And 911 doesn’t have caller ID? I live in Lehman Tw p., we barely have roads, and we have caller ID. But I told him.

“Where?”

“Southbound on the Me- morial Highway near Sheetz.” “Town?” “Town? I dunno. Shaver- town. Dallas maybe.” “Address?” “Address? I dunno. Be- tween the Sheetz and the animal hospital.” (If you are keeping score that was the third time I told him where.) “Which Sheetz?”

“There is only one here.” “Power lines are in the road?”

fair: 911 guys

work long hours. They are

underpaid. They get loads of prank calls. But I had been on the phone for a while, and now we were just get- ting to what happened, and he had it wrong.

Now to be

“No,

I

didn’t say that. I

don’t know because I am long past there now. I know there was debris in the road.” “Debris?” My instinct was to go all “Air plane” on the guy. De- bris, yeah, you know: Rub- ble, wreckage, ruins, litter

and discarded garbage/refuse/ trash, scattered remains of something destroyed. I

didn’t. “Yeah, tree branches may- be.” “I’ll alert them.” Click. The paper said the next day

that a tree

power lines in the Back Mountain. Not sure if that was my incident or not. I’ll probably never know.

W

fell on some

911 doesn’t have caller ID? I live in Lehman Twp., we barely have roads, and we have caller ID.

in Lehman Twp., we barely have roads, and we have caller ID. M usic on the

Music on the menu

By Alan K. Stout

Weekender Music Columnist

on the menu By Alan K. Stout We ekender Music Co lumnist Rick Jones will re

Rick Jones will release ‘Chronicles of the Heart’ Friday, July 8.

Jones puts heart on sleeve

C athartic. That’s how singer/songwriter Rick Jones describes the

process of crafting the songs that are featured on his de- but CD, “Chronicles of the Heart.” Fueled and inspired by a turbulent period in his personal life, Jones says the songs helped get him through it while also provid- ing for a creative outlet. “The CD is basically about relationships,” says Jones, 33, of Carbondale. “I write

what I

times that I went through with relationships — they all came back to me. And when you’re going through that hard time, emotionally, that’s what inspires me to write.” Some local music fans might be familiar with Jones from his work with the now disbanded Madison Ave. He also currently plays with the

modern-rock group Silent Arms Race and the classic rock group The Six East

feel. All of the hard

Band. “Chronicles of the Heart,” a solo effort, was recorded at Windmill Studios in Mt. Cobb and was pro- duced by Jones and mastered by Eric Ritter. Jones wrote and sang all of the songs and also played bass, acous- tic guitar and keyboards. Additional musicians in-

cluded Ritter, Allen Va nWer t and R.J. Minichello. “I was tired of playing covers,” says Jones, when asked what other factors inspired him to record the album. “Music, in my life, was everything. And I want to leave my mark somehow. When it’s all said and done,

I want to tell my kids, ‘This is what your dad did.’” Jones names Barry Mani- low as one of his favorite songwriters, as well as Bryan Adams, KISS, Aero- smith and Rick Springfield. “I’m an ’80s guy,” he

says. “When I get on stage,

I

think of it as

more of a

“I was tired of playing covers … And I want to leave my mark somehow.”

Rick Jones

show, rather than just play- ing the music. I move

around a lot on stage,

and I

think I get that from KISS.” Tracks on Jones’ new CD include “Without You,” “Just Don’t Tell Me,” “Real Love” and “October Day.” It is available at iTunes, CD Ba- by, Amazon and at Gallery of Sound. He says he en- joyed working with Ritter and his other musical collab- orators at Wind Mill Studios and that he’s already begun work on a second CD, which he hopes to release later this year. He’ll hold a CD re- lease party for “Chronicles of the Hear t” on Friday, July 8 at Clam Diggers in Dick- son City. Also on the bill will be Sounds of the Time Machine and Silent Arms Race. Though Jones says his music was inspired by per- sonal experiences, he says the themes are universal and that he hopes listeners will connect with the songs. In

fact, he’s fairly certain they will.

want them to be able to

relate,” he says. “I think anybody that was in a rela- tionship or in love can relate to the CD and hopefully feel good about it. When it’s all said and done, I just want people to remember who I was, and hopefully my songs can stand the test of time.” W

“I

Rick Jones CD release party ft. Sounds of the Time Machine & Silent Arms Race,
Rick Jones CD release party ft.
Sounds of the Time Machine &
Silent Arms Race, Fri., July 8,
9 p.m., Clam Diggers (1946
Scranton-Carbondale Hwy.,
Dickson City). Find Jones on
Facebook or call 570.780.2661
for info.
WEEKENDER , W EDNESDAY , J UNE 29 , 2011 PAG E 17 297770
WEEKENDER , W EDNESDAY , J UNE 29 , 2011
PAG E 17
297770

WEEKENDER , W EDNESDAY , J UNE 29 , 2011

PAGE 18

WEEKENDER , W EDNESDAY , J UNE 29 , 2011 PA GE 18 art of the
art of the week Artist: Mark Ciocca, printmaker, illustrator Upcoming Show: For the month of
art of the week
Artist:
Mark Ciocca,
printmaker, illustrator
Upcoming Show:
For the month of June, a collection of printmaking and
pen and ink illustrations at Norther n Light Espresso Ba r,
536 Spruce Street, Scranton.

WEEKENDER , W EDNESDAY , J UNE 29 , 2011

PAG E 19

novel approach

, W EDNESDAY , J UNE 29 , 2011 PAG E 19 n ovel approach “The
, W EDNESDAY , J UNE 29 , 2011 PAG E 19 n ovel approach “The
, W EDNESDAY , J UNE 29 , 2011 PAG E 19 n ovel approach “The

“The Empty Family” By Colm Toibin Rating: W W W W W

A

stark look at lives

By Kacy Muir

Weekender Correspondent

C olm Toibin’s latest novel,

“The Empty Family” is

evidence that his depth

and understanding of the writ- ing craft has continued to advance. Though the book encompasses nine separate novellas, the literal independ- ence of the pieces from one another is interconnected by the theme of solitude. At first, the idea of empti- ness in agreement with family suggests a contradiction. How- ever, as each of the protago- nists divulge their stor y, read- ers realize that sometimes the strongest sense of connection we have is to ourselves. An interesting aspect about the book is that the settings and time periods vary tremen- dously throughout in ranging from major cities in America, England, Ireland, and Spain

during the early 19th century to present-day. While time and location changes, profound themes of regret, death and loss can be consistently found throughout the novel therein bonding each of the characters together in their search for acceptance. But, in creating such stark- ness in the overall tone of the book, Toibin ultimately il- lustrates how readers begin to empathize with his protagonists to the point that their flaws become the one humanizing aspect connecting the reader to each character. The protagonist in “Silence,” for example, is desperately attempting to seek meaning in her own life subsequent to loss. She writes “(a) list of grim facts led by a single inescapable thought — that love had eluded her, that love would not come back, that she was alone and she would have to make the best of being alone.” As readers may observe, Toibin has an interesting and eloquent style of writing. Rhythmic and winding, each novella hangs in the reader’s mind like a melody. “The Color of Shadows” is perhaps one of the most nota- ble of the pieces. The story greatly captures the sense of alienation in one’s own family. Most specifically, the protago- nist, Paul, signifies the exact definition of the empty family — the idea of having everyone around you, but not being able to share your truths, dreams and beliefs with them. “The Pearl Fishers” is anoth- er top preference. The stor y, even in its bleakest of senti- ments, is beautifully written with a modernized take on a Celtic tale. It is difficult to decide which of the novellas is su- preme, as each captures differ- ent reactions from the readers. Overall, it would be incorrect to convey to readers that only one of these nine novellas stands out as superior, as each not only stands alone, but also works in collaboration with the other to further the themes of isolation and eventually, reflec- tion.

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CCooooppeerr’’ss CCaabbaannaa::CC--NN--RR
KKiinngg’’ss,,MMoouunnttaaiinnTToopp-- RRoobb aanndd HHaammmmeerr oonn tthhee ppaattiioo
TToommmmyybbooyyss BBaarr && GGrriillll::NNAASSCCAARR
WWooooddllaannddss::TThheeTToonneess ww// DDJJ GGooddffaatthheerr
FFrriiddaayy::
55SSttaarrBBaarr&&GGrriillll::FFrreeeeJJuukkeebbooxx
BBaarr,,SSttaatteeCCoolllleeggee::MMrr EEcchhoossoollooaaccoouussttiicc
BBaarrtt &&UUrrbbyy’’ss::AAsshheessffoorrTTrreeeessww// ssppeecciiaall gguueesstt ZZaacckkZZoommbbeezz
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BBrreeaakkeerrss,,MMoohheeggaannSSuunn::UUUUUU
BBrreewwssBBrrootthheerrss,,LLuuzzeerrnnee::DDJJBBoouunnccee
BBrreewwssBBrrootthheerrss,,PPiittttssttoonn::CCoouunnttrryyNNiigghhtt ww// DDJJCCrroocckkeetttt
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GGrroottttoo,,HHaarrvveeyyssLLaakkee::JJeeaannnneeZZaannooBBaanndd
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tthhee LLaavvaa LLoouunnggee
TToommmmyybbooyyss BBaarr && GGrriillll::OOppeenn MMiicc NNiigghhtt
TThheeWWooooddllaannddss::CCoorrppoorraattee KKaarraaookkee
PAGE 20
WEEKENDER , W EDNESDAY , J UNE 29 , 2011

WEEKENDER , W EDNESDAY , J UNE 29 , 2011

PAG E 21

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PAGE 22

WEEKENDER , W EDNESDAY , J UNE 29 , 2011 PA GE 22 t ech talk

tech talk

By Nick Delorenzo

Special to the Weekender

Thinking outside the box
Thinking outside the box
Special to the We ekender Thinking outside the box Photog ra phers using the Ly tro

Photographers using the Lytro Light Field camera can change the focus of an image after it’s captured.

I f you thought digital cameras were an amazing leap forward from film, you’d better hold on to

your hat, because a company called Lytro has developed a camera that it says has the potential to forever change the photographic scene.

color, intensity and direction of each of the light rays that it can see. Compare this to a conventional digital camera sensor, which captures all of the light rays and outputs them as a single light source. Lytro’s camera also introduces powerful software algorithms that replace mirrors, lenses and the like to produce more rapid capture of images and better control over the result. So what’s the difference in the photograph? You take a picture with Lytro’s camera, and then you decide where you want the focus to be. And you can do it again and again and again, producing multiple images that are focused on different subjects, all from the same photograph. Moreover,

the time you press the shutter

captur ed instantly. Until now, the theoretical foundations of this technology were available only in laboratories, where it has been around for many years. This is one of those things that needed to be portable in order to be practical. Goodbye out- of-focus or poorly focused pictures. Lytro is calling its concept “Living Pictures,” and from what I can see it’s pretty amazing. Unfortunately, you can’t get one just yet — soon, but not just yet. You can, however, request to be notified once the cameras start rolling off the production line. It’s expected to be launched around the end of the year and slated to cost less than $500. W

Nick DeLorenzo is director of Interactive and New Media

him at ndelorenzo@timesleader. com.

images, but the optics work much the same as those of

What’s different about it? “Shoot first, focus later,” is the

bold proclamation on the Lytro conventional film cameras. You most of us know that from

website. And after looking at some of the photographs, I think they might be onto something. A modern digital camera uses a light sensor to capture

still need to zoom, you still

need to focus, and you still need button on a camera, it can take

to adjust the settings. Lytro’s camera is different. It utilizes a light field sensor — a sensor that captures the

one or more seconds to actually for The Times Leader. Write

capture the image. A light field camera doesn’t need to do any adjusting, so the photo is

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dish

By Nikki M. Mascali

Weekender Editor

STOCK 295074 d ish By Nikki M. Mascali We ekender Editor Ag ave Ca nt ina
STOCK 295074 d ish By Nikki M. Mascali We ekender Editor Ag ave Ca nt ina

Ag ave Ca nt ina & Te quila Ba r’s yummy mango chicken salad.

CUPCAKES … AND TEQUILA

O ne thing I love about writ-

ing this column is getting

to sample some great fare

from all around NEPA. Since I’m a firm believer in having dessert first, let’s start with the yummy cupcakes now available at Canteen 900 (900 Rutter Ave., Fo rt y Fo rt ), wh ich are made by Twisted Cakes. Before you roll your eyes and say, “Not another cupcake baker,” with flavors like bananas foster, tiramisu, chocolate-covered cher- ry and salted caramel, it’s easy to see that Twisted Cakes’ cupcakes are different. “It’s kind of like a creative thing for me,” owner Tish Rossi told Dish. “I like all these great desserts, but I don’t like to eat huge portions of it, so I thought it would be an awesome idea to mix and match a little bit of every- thing and see if I could squeeze it down into cupcakes. I just browse through recipes and try this and that until it works.” And it does. When I visited last week, I sampled Twisted Cakes’ raspberry pie crust and bananas foster cupcakes. The former had a flakey crust outside and a moist cupcake inside, filled with tasty raspberry filling and topped with a delectable pud- ding-like frosting. The bananas foster tasted like a moist, dense buttermilk biscuit filled with flavorful mashed bananas, and the cream cheese frosting was velvety and delicious. Rossi, a North Carolina native who founded Twisted Cakes in December, said it took three or four tries to perfect the bananas

foster. “The most important thing to me when I make these cupcakes is I really want it to taste like the true dessert,” she said. “So it’s a lot of work — and a lot of eating cupcakes to get it just right. Thank goodness I run, or I’d never be able to survive!” The flavors at Canteen 900 change daily, and diners can watch for mango coconut mousse in the future, though “I haven’t quite figured out how to stuff the mousse in the cupcake just yet,” Rossi mused. Find Canteen 900 and Twisted Cakes on Facebook to see what flavors will be offered or call 570.338.2547 or 690.1047. Also on my Dish rounds last

week, I paid a visit to Agave Cantina & Tequila Bar, which occupies the other half of the building occupied by Bellissimo Pizzeria & Ristorante (223 Northern Blvd., Clarks Summit). Agave is bright and air y, giving the feel of a seaside cantina,

especially with its bevy of entic- ing tequila-laced drinks on the menu. General Manager Amau- ry Oliveira said Agave offers 50-plus brands of tequila, in- cluding el Jimador, Cazadores and Patron, including the brand’s new XO, a tequila-coffee hybrid. And then, of course, there’s Agave’s ample food menu, from tacos and tortas (sandwiches) to burritos and enchiladas, no Mex- ican craving will be unfed. I nibbled the Agave sampler, which included a delish chicken quesadilla, yummy spicy beef nachos, a crispy beef taquito and a tender chicken flauta, plus the mango chicken salad, which featured grilled chicken, tomato and mango with an amazing honey-lime homemade dressing. Check Agave out for yourself — and have a watermelon mar- garita (or two) for me. Call 586.6001 or find the restaurant

on Facebook for more info.

W

Send your food and drink news to nmascali@theweekender.com or call 570.831.7322.

“The most important thing to me when I make these cupcakes is I really want it to taste like the true dessert.”

Twisted Cakes owner Tish Rossi

like the true dessert.” Twisted Cakes owner Tish Rossi Tw isted Ca ke s’ ba nanas
like the true dessert.” Twisted Cakes owner Tish Rossi Tw isted Ca ke s’ ba nanas

Tw isted Ca kes’ ba nanas foster, left, and ra spberr y pie crust cupcakes, now available at Canteen 900 in Forty Fort.

WEEKENDER , W EDNESDAY , J UNE 29 , 2011

PAGE 24

starstruck
starstruck

Kevin Wilkinson Sr., second from left, with The Rods May 25 at Galler y of Sound in Wilkes-Barre Twp.

Had an encounter with someone famous? If so, the Weekender wants your pictures for our Starstruck. It doesn’t matter if it happened five months ago or five years ago. Send us your photo, your name, hometown, the celebrity you met, and when and where you met them, and we’ll run one photo here each week. E-mail high resolution JPEGs to weekender@theweekender.com, or send your

photos to Starstruck, c/o The Weekender, 15 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA,

18703.

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theater listings

Center, Edwardsville 570-714-8888 t heater listings BLOOMSBURG THEATER ENSEMBLE (Alvina Krause Theatre, 226

BLOOMSBURG THEATER ENSEMBLE

(Alvina Krause Theatre, 226 Center St., Bloomsburg, 570.784.8181, 800.282.0283, www.bte.org)

“The Landlover: A Pirate Musical:”

July 21-31. Tues.-Thurs., 1 p.m.; Thurs.- Sat., 7:30 p.m.; Sun., 3 p.m. $13/adult, $7/under 12. Group rates available. For tickets, call box office. Summer Theater School: Held at the Alvina Krause Theatre, BTE’s Mitrani Production Center, and Cald- well Consistory

Teen Shakespeare Workshop: July 5-15, Mon.-Fri., noon-1:30 p.m.

Treasured Teens: July 25-29,

grades 9-12. “Treasure Island,” by Robert Louis Stevenson.

Integrated Arts: Aug. 1-12, 9

a.m.-3:30 p.m., weekdays at The Caldwell Consistory. Grades 3-8. Focus on music, stories, art, culture

from the Caribbean .

Teen Comedy Improv: Aug. 8-12,

2-3:30 p.m. Improvisation games, perform scenes without a script.

F.M. KIRBY CENTER

(71 Public Square, Wilkes-Barre,

570.826.1100)

“Monty Python’s Spamalot:” Oct. 15, 2 & 8 p.m., $29-$59

GREEN RIDGE YOUTH THEATRE

(1501 Wyoming Avenue, Scranton,

570.346.7106)

“Beauty and the Beast:” July 1, 7

p.m., July 3, 2 p.m., Scranton High School Auditorium. $12/ticket.

THE LAKESIDE PLAYERS

(Lakeville Community Hall, Route 590, Lakeville, across from Caesars Cove Haven, 570.226.6207, www.lakesi- deplayers.net)

Free Theater Camp: July 11-15, 18-22, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Ages 9-13. Theater games, rehearse scenes, learn the basics of acting. Kids interested in working behind the scenes also welcome. Children will perform July 23. For info, call 570.857.2226.

MUSIC BOX PLAYERS

(196 Hughes St., Swoyersville:

570.283.2195 or 800.698.PLAY or www.musicbox.org)

“Evita:” July 22-24, 28-31, Aug. 4-7. Call for info.

Children’s Summer Theatre Work-

4-7. Call for info. • Children’s Summer Theatre Work- shops: ages 8-12, Mon., Wed., Thurs., July

shops: ages 8-12, Mon., Wed., Thurs., July 25-Aug. 19, 9 a.m.-noon to per- form “Aladdin Kids” Aug. 19-20. $200.

Call to enroll.

PENNSYLVANIA THEATER

FOR PERFORMING ARTS

(JJ Ferrara Center, 212 W. Broad St., Hazleton, 570.454.5451, ptpash- ows.org)

Summer Drama Camp program:

Aug. 14-20, Ferrwood Music Camp (Drums), 9 a.m.-5 p.m. daily, younger campers, over age 10 can choose

day/resident camp. $150/camper, discount children same family. $275/ residents. Application deadline, Aug. 10. Some scholarships available. For info, call 454.5451.

THE PHOENIX PERFORMING ARTS CENTER

(409-411 Main St., Duryea, 570.991.1817, www.phoenixpac.vpweb.com, phoe-

nixpac08@aol.com)

“13” musical: July 8-10, 15-17, Fri.,

Sat., 7 p.m., Sun., 1 p.m. $10. Call for reservations. Presented by Limelight Players.

SCRANTON CULTURAL CENTER

(420 N. WASHINGTON AVE., SCRANTON)

Broadway Theatre League of NEPA presents:

Dancing with NEPA Stars: July 8, July 29, Aug. 19, 5:30 p.m., $16

SHAWNEE PLAYHOUSE

(570.421.5093, www.theshawneeplay- house.com)

“River’s Edge: The Story of Shaw-

nee:” through Sept. 2, Fri. and Sat., 8 p.m., matinees, 2 p.m., $18/adults, $15/seniors, students, $10/children. Meal, show packages.

“Sisters of Swing: The Story of the Andrew Sisters:” through Sept. 3.

$28/adults, $25/seniors, $15/children under 12. Advance purchase advised, can be made at theshawneeplayhou- se.com or 570.421.5093. Meal, show,

group packages available.

“Nunsense 2: The Second Coming:”

through Sept. 4, Fri., Sat., 8 p.m.,

matinees, 2 p.m. Adults/$28, seniors/ $25, children/$15. Call for reserva- tions.

“School House Rock Live! Jr.:”

through Aug. 17, $10, get advanced

tickets by calling the box office.

“Alice in Wonderland. Jr.:” July

7-Aug. 27, $10. For tickets, show times and more, call.

SHERMAN THEATRE

(524 Main St., Stroudsburg, 570.420.2808, www.shermanthea-

ter.com)

“Ragtime:” July 9, 8 p.m., July 10, 2 p.m. $13-$17. Based on the 1975 novel by E.L. Doctorow.

TEATRO BENEFITO

“The Cat, The Sun, and The Mirror:”

July 16, Canteen 900 (900 Rutter Ave., Kingston, 570.338.2547).

WISECRACKERS

(15 S. Pennsylvania Blvd., Wilkes-Barre)

American Cancer Society Benefit:

Aug. 5, 9 p.m., $15. For tickets, call

570.562.9749. Proceeds benefit Amer- ican Cancer Society. Featuring Joe

Bryan, Meghan Hanley, Moody McCar- thy.

W

WEEKENDER , W EDNESDAY , J UNE 29 , 2011

PAG E 25

movie review

By Mike Sullivan Weekender Correspondent

Rating: W 1/2

By Mike Sullivan We ekender Co rrespondent Rating: W 1/2 Cameron Diaz, Jason Segel and Justin
By Mike Sullivan We ekender Co rrespondent Rating: W 1/2 Cameron Diaz, Jason Segel and Justin
By Mike Sullivan We ekender Co rrespondent Rating: W 1/2 Cameron Diaz, Jason Segel and Justin

Cameron Diaz, Jason Segel and Justin Ti mberlake star in ‘Bad Te acher.’

This film flunks

S top it. Just stop it, America. Cameron Diaz is not going to sleep with you. So please stop

pretending that this marginally talented person is funny. If not, you’re only going to get more movies like “Bad Teacher.” Is that what you want? To watch joy and laughter die slowly in a ditch? Because that’s what is going to happen if you allow her to continue making comedies. It’s your decision, America. Choose wisely. “Bad Teacher” has nothing at all to do with “Bad Santa” and does not involve Billy Bob Thornton as a foul-mouthed janitor who moonlights as a physics teacher or whatever (sadly). Instead “Bad Teacher” involves Diaz as Elizabeth

Halsey, a foul-mouthed teacher who glumly sleepwalks through her job when her rich fiance dumps her for being a gold digger. With no desire to continue molding young minds, Elizabeth attempts to seduce Mr. Delacorte (Justin Timberlake, who isn’t going to sleep with you either, America.

Stop encouraging him), a nerdy, admittedly, is very convincing

oblivious substitute teacher who also happens to be an heir to a watch-company fortune. However, a rival teacher (Lucy Punch, overacting wildly), who

actually shares more in common way that she quickly destroys

with Delacorte, stands in the

way of Elizabeth’s self-centered scene she appears in although,

desires. What the hell happened here? Jake Kasdan has directed strong underrated comedies like

“Zero Effect” and “Walk Hard:

The Dewey Cox Story,” while screenwriters Gene Stupnitsky and Lee Eisenberg have written some of the strongest episodes of “The Office” (most notably “The Dinner Party” and “The Coup”). So why exactly is “Bad Teacher” such a failure? Mostly it’s because of Diaz who,

as a grotesquely vile human being (what a surprise) but there’s no spark or bite behind the performance. Diaz portrays Elizabeth in such a dour, lifeless

the comic potential of every

not that many scenes had very much comic potential to begin with. The movie is dark comedy at

its most blandly calculating. It’s dramas like “Stand By Me” in

the kind of movie that too often substitutes swearing with actual

humor. This manufactured shock corruptive influence Elizabeth

value might have been tolerable has over her meek quasi-friend,

if it had been played with even

a minor degree of subtlety, but

everything about “Bad Teacher” cameo appearance from “The

is broad and over-the-top. Just like Stupnitsky and Eisenberg’s

disappointing “Year One,” cheap impersonator who loathes his and easy laughs are mined from job and a funny scene between

boners, farts and dry-humping

while Elizabeth’s fellow faculty members are nothing more than dorky, one-dimensional foils.

It reveals what “The Office”

would be like if every character was Michael Scott, and it’s not pretty. Still, considering the level of talent behind the scenes, there are occasional glimpses of the smart comedy “Bad Teacher” could have been. In one of the best running gags, Elizabeth ironically shows her students feel-good high school

lieu of an actual lesson plan, while the bits involving the

Lynn (Phyllis Smith) are

well-observed. There’s even a

Upright Citizen Brigade’s” Matt Besser as an Abraham Lincoln

“Reno 911’s” Thomas Lennon and “Modern Family’s” Eric Stonestreet. Unfortunately, these moments are fleeting and mostly

left in the margins. A lot of critics have wrongly dismissed “Bad Teacher” because the movie doesn’t give you any characters you can root for or side with. Although that is true, that isn’t the real issue with “Bad Teacher.” The film isn’t a failure because it’s filled with truly unlikable characters. It’s a failure because none of those unlikable characters are funny.

because none of those unlikable characters are funny. r eel attractions Upcoming attractions Opening this week:
because none of those unlikable characters are funny. r eel attractions Upcoming attractions Opening this week:

reel attractions

Upcoming attractions

Opening this week:

“Transformers: Dark Of The Moon,” “Larry Crowne,” “Monte Carlo”

Opening next week:

“Zookeeper,” “Horrible Bosses”

Opening next week: “Zookeeper,” “Horrible Bosses” Oh, what could be so bad about ‘America’s Sweetheart?’
Opening next week: “Zookeeper,” “Horrible Bosses” Oh, what could be so bad about ‘America’s Sweetheart?’
Opening next week: “Zookeeper,” “Horrible Bosses” Oh, what could be so bad about ‘America’s Sweetheart?’
Opening next week: “Zookeeper,” “Horrible Bosses” Oh, what could be so bad about ‘America’s Sweetheart?’

Oh, what could be so bad about ‘America’s Sweetheart?’

Horrible Bosses

WEEKENDER , W EDNESDAY , J UNE 29 , 2011

PAGE 26

Bringing sexy back

By Stephanie DeBalko

Weekender Staff Writer

U nlike pole dancing and stripteasing, the genre of burlesque has got-

ten a bad rap for being something that it’s tech- nically not. Sure, it some- times involves provocative dancing and often risqué costumes, but its rich history speaks more to the femi- ninity of women (of all siz-

es) than it does to satisfying the primal urges of someone else. But you don’t have to take our word for it. The owners of Star Tresses Grand Salon & Day Spa in Forty Fort, Carolyn Salvaggio and Hil- ary Forlenza, in conjunction with some of the women behind Whirligig Hoopers, Susan Anderson and Jenny Hill, are offering “Girls’ Night Out: An Evening of Burlesque” Friday, July 1 from 6-8 p.m. at the salon. The workshop will feature

a history of the genre — which is more theatrical than sexual — along with demon- strations of some basic tech- niques for glove and stock- ing peels, taught by An- derson and Hill. Attendees will also make a fascinator,

a hair accessory that is his-

torically quite flamboyant, and will be given a sexy little hair and makeup trans- formation by the team at Star Tresses. The idea for the class came about spontaneously, as Anderson and Hill are in- volved in hooping (a type of dance that involves the use of a large hoop) and An- derson has been a client of the salon for a long time and has a close relationship with Forlenza, who is also an experienced makeup art- ist. After a hoop class at The New York School of Burlesque, where hooping and burlesque were com- bined, and a straight bur- lesque class in Philadelphia, Anderson and Hill developed an interest in the genre and began to talk about the idea

an interest in the genre and began to talk about the idea Susan Anderson and Jenny
an interest in the genre and began to talk about the idea Susan Anderson and Jenny

Susan Anderson and Jenny Hill are two of the women behind “Girls’ Night Out.”

“It’s by personality, because everyone that walks through this door is not going to be as adventurous or as conservative.”

Star Tresses co-owner Hilary Forlenza

of doing something locally that would give women the same feeling of empower-

ment they experienced in the varied classes they took. “We just want them to know we’re real people,” Anderson said. “This is not what we do (for a living). There are days that I feel less than perfect, there are

days that I feel better about myself. But it’s something

that has made us feel a little bit better, and we kind of want (guests) to take that home with them.” The workshop is in line with what the salon has al- ways aimed for, which is to create looks for women that make them feel confident and unique. And attendees can expect a makeover that will be less period drama and more evening sexy. “It’s by personality,” For- lenza said, explaining her technique. “Because every- one that walks through this

door is

maybe, adventurous or as conservative. You have con- servative women, you have

athletic women, you have no-nonsense women, you have dramatic women, you

not going to be

as,

have exotic women, and that’s what I play on. You don’t want to do something to someone that’s going to make them feel uncomfort- able.” And comfort is what the evening is all about. Nobody will have to get up and per- form in front of the entire

class. Instead, guests will be

able

wine and some pampering, and then learn some theat- rical techniques in, most likely, a roundtable style. “It’s about empowering women, it’s about conf i- dence, it’s about feeling

beautiful, and feeling secure, inside your own body,” For- lenza said. “That’s the bot-

to enjoy a

glass of

tom line.” W “Girls’ Night Out,” Fri., July 1, 6-8 p.m., Star Tresses Grand Salon
tom line.”
W
“Girls’ Night Out,” Fri., July 1,
6-8 p.m., Star Tresses Grand
Salon & Day Spa (123 Welles
St., Forty Fort). $30. 21+. Info:
570.283.0200, startresses-
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WEEKENDER , W EDNESDAY , J UNE 29 , 2011

PAG E 27

agenda

WEEKENDER , W EDNESDAY , J UNE 29 , 2011 PAG E 27 a genda BAZAARS/FESTIVALS

BAZAARS/FESTIVALS

7th Annual Festival of Unity July 9, noon, Nay Aug Park. Live music, ethnic cuisine, messages from members of community. Bring lawn chairs, blankets.

20th Annual Ukrainian Folk Festival Aug. 21, noon, Ukrainian American Sport Center (Tryzub, County Line and Lower State Roads, Horsham). Open to public, $15, $10/ students, free/kids under 15. Stage show 1:30-4:30 p.m. Public dance 4:30-8 p.m. Proceeds benefit youth soccer, cultural programming. For info, visit tryzub.org.

Holy Fa mily Su mmer Picnic June 8-9, 6-11 p.m., July 10, 5-10 p.m., Holy Family Church (828 Main St., Sugar Notch), rain or shine. Food, games, prizes, bingo. Kids’ Night Sat., pony rides, balloon wars. Music by Oz, Fri.; Groove Train, Sat.; Tyme, Sun. Call 570.822.3483 for info.

Mountaintop Hose Company No. 138th Annual Bazaar July 15-17, Fri. 5:30 p.m., Sat. 5 p.m., Sun. 4 p.m. Food, games, prizes, drawings, more. Firemen’s Parade, Sat., 5 p.m., Pat Ward Magic Show, 7 p.m. New Merchandise Auction Sun., 5 p.m.

St. Mary’s/SS. Peter and Paul’s Churches Annual Summer Festival July 14-16, 6 p.m. nightly on grounds of St. Mary’s School (corner of Hawthorne, Spring Streets, Avoca). Live music, polka, food, raffles, face painting, more. For info call 570.457.3412.

BENEFITS / CHARITY EVENTS

2nd Annual Cancer Wellness Gold Open July 7, 10:30 a.m., Irem Country Club (397 Country Club Road, Dallas). Registration/lunch, shotgun start, noon, cocktail hour/dinner immediate following. Captain & Crew

format. Prizes, chair massages for golfers! $125/person, $500/team.

4th Annual Zachary Shoe- maker Dodgeball Tourney July 17, noon, Nanticoke Armory, $10. 8/ team, deadline day of. Call 570.574.5945 or contact dodge- ball4zack@gmail.com for info.

Candy’s Place (570.714.8800)

2nd Annual Cancer Wellness Golf

Open: July 7, registration 10:30 a.m.,

noon start, Irem Country Club, captain & crew format. Call for info.

Show Your Passion Through Your

Fashion 2: July 24, 11 a.m.-2:30 p.m., The Woodlands, Plains Twp. $25/ person, $250/table of ten, $100/ vendors. Call for info.

Dance in the No Bully Zone Aug. 6, register 8:30-9:15 a.m., dance 9:30 a.m.-noon, Wyoming Valley West High School. $10 until Aug. 3, $15/door. Noon-3 p.m.: singers Mike Dougherty, Kendall Mosley, speaker Charles Balogh, World Class Boxing. Info:

570.690.6003, kickboxn@gmail.com.

Live Harness Racing July 23, doors 5:30 p.m., pre-race show 6 p.m., post time 6:30 p.m. Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs (1280 Rte. 315, Plains Twp.). $50/ballroom, 21+. $10/patio. Proceeds benefit Wyoming Valley Children’s Association. Info and tickets: wvcakids.org or 570.714.1246.

Pa uly Fr iedman 5K Family Walk-Run Aug. 14, registration 8:30 a.m., walk 9:30 a.m., Misericordia University (Lake St., Dallas). Post-

event party at Banks Cafeteria. Bene- fits Help Line. Call 570.823.5144 for info.

WFTE FM 90.3/105.7 Get On the Air Benefit Concerts “Celebrate Your Independence from Commercial Radio:” July 3, Irish Wolf Pub (Linden St., Scranton). Ded & Buryd, Days in Transit, Astorian Stig- mata, Molly Bridger.

EVENTS

24th Annual A&A Auto Stores Summer 4-Wheel Jamboree Nationals July 8, 10 a.m.-6 p.m., July 9, 9 a.m.-8 p.m., July 10, 9 a.m.-3 p.m., Bloomsburg Fair- grounds (620 W. 3rd Street, Blooms- burg). Advance tickets, A&A Auto, Jack Williams Tire, Quaker Steak & Lube, Perkins, online at 4Wheel- Jamboree.com. Advance: $16/adult, $10/child. Gate: $19/adults, $10/child. 2-3 day passes available.

28th Annual Bernie’s Memo- rial 3 Mile Run/Walk July 4, walk 8:30 a.m., run 9:10 a.m., start River St., through Wilkes-Barre, finish Public Square. Free Kids Fun Run, 8:30 a.m. Proceeds benefit adult, youth wellness programming. For info, visit wbymca.org.

53rd Annual Antique Show and Sale July 22, 10 a.m.-7 p.m., July

SEE AGENDA, PAGE 28

ACROSS DOWN 1 Seeks answers 1 Diving birds puzzles last week 5 Couric’s network 2
ACROSS
DOWN
1
Seeks answers
1 Diving birds
puzzles
last week
5
Couric’s network
2 Staircase component
8
“Zounds!”
3 Comic Danny
12
Beehive State
4 Drag (Var.)
13
Chop
5 Habitual
14
Unchanged
6 Plead
15
Bogart-Bacall movie
7 Scabbard contents
17
Animal’s stomach
8 Portuguese pre-euro
18
Swimsuit brand
money
19
Red-orange fish
9
Ugly-faced waterspout
21
Skillet
10
Asian nursemaid
22
Old fogy
11
Moist in the morn
23
Actress Zadora
16
Hebrew month
26
Edge
20
“- -la-la!”
28
Card-game rulebook
23
Joad and Kettle
31
Frizzy coiffure
24
“- Were King”
33
Ta xi
25
Any of Jason’s crew
35
Insult
27
Frenzied
36
Highway warnings
29
Haul
38
Go down slightly
30
Work unit
40
Early bird?
32
Advancing
41
Hasn’t paid yet
34
Lens created by Ben
43
“Great!”
Franklin
45
Rent payer
37
D.C. VIP
47
Sedative
39
Hemingway
51
Winged
nickname
52
Snail, on a French
42
Fulton’s power
menu
source
54 Te nnyson poem
44
Canoe material
55 Alias abbr.
45
Author Janowitz
56 Gator’s kin
46
Verve
57 Picnic invaders
48
Ta j Mahal city
58 Wire measure
49
Tugboat noise
59 ”
“Thirty days -
50
Engrave, in a way
53
Schuss

WEEKENDER , W EDNESDAY , J UNE 29 , 2011

PAGE 28

AGENDA, FROM PAGE 27

23, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Mountainhome United Methodist Church (Rte. 390 & 191). $4 donation. Ice cream social Fri., 7-8 p.m., with music. Program on Battle of Gettysburg, Sat., 2 p.m. All proceeds benefit the church.

Adopt a Shelter Cat Month:

SPCA of Luzerne County offers “Free to a Really Good Home” program for

cats 1 year+. Donations welcome. Call 570.825.4111 for info.

Back Mountain Bloomers

Tour of Back Mountain Gardens:

July 2, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. $25. Proceeds benefit Anthracite Scenic Trails Association. Tickets available at backmountainbloomers.org or

570.696.5082.

Chamber Networking Mixer June 30, 5:30-7:30 p.m., Bennett Infiniti (1060 Highway 315, Plains). RSVP to Jean Kile, jeankile@wilkes- barre.org, online at wilkes-barre.org/ calendar.

Chinchilla United Methodist

Church (411 Layton Rd., South Abing- ton Twp., 570.226.6207)

Frank-James Duo: July 27, 7 p.m.,

free, donations accepted.

Doug Smith’s Dixieland All Stars:

Aug. 20, during annual craft fair, free, donations accepted.

Clambake July 23, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Polish American Veterans Pavilion (Oak St, Hudson). Sponsorships avail- able to members, suppliers. $30.

Clifford United Methodist Church (Main St. Clifford)

Chicken-n-Biscuit or Ham Dinner:

July 20, 4-6 p.m., $7.95, dinner, dess- ert, drink, take out or dine in.

Dietrich Theater (60 E. Tioga Street, Tunkhannock, 570.996.1500,

www.dietrichtheater.com) calendar of events:

Kids Classes:

Acting Camp for Kids: Camp 2: July

25-29, 2-3:30 p.m., ages 4-6, $40/week.

Dino-mite-Theatre/Visual Arts

Camp: through July 1, ages 7-12, 10

a.m.-noon ($60), 4-6, 1:30-2:30 p.m. ($40). Call to register.

Things in the Sky: July 6, 13, 20, 27; Ages 5-8, 10-11 a.m., ages 9-12, 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., free.

All About Pottery & Sculpture Camp:

July 11-15, 3:30-5 p.m., $60, ages 6-12. Explore the medium of clay. Space limited.

Mixed Media Camp: Mommy & Me

(ages 3-4), July 11-15; Preschool Art (ages 4-5), July 18-22, 10-11 a.m., $50/

camp.

Jammin’ in a Jugband: July 18-20,

22, 10-11:15 a.m., free. Create music with homemade instruments. Students may perform at Celebrate Our River Day.

Mask Making Camp: July 18-22, 3:30-5 p.m., $60, ages 6-12.

Quilting for Kids: Wed. through July 20, 3:30-5 p.m., ages 6+, $6/class; learn early-American quilting tech-

niques.

Intergenerational Classes:

Jammin’ in a Jugband: July 18-20,

22, 1-2:15 p.m., free, ages 13-adult. Students may perform at Celebrate Our River Day.

Quilting: Wed. through July 20,

6-7:30 p.m., 13+. $6/class. Learn early- American quilting techniques to make

double pinwheel quilt. All materials provided, call to register.

Adult Classes:

Decorative Painting: June 29,

noon-3 p.m., 16+, $20/class + cost of painting surface. Pre-registration

required, call.

Pottery and Sculpture: July 11, 7-8:30 p.m., $60. All materials provided, all

levels of experience. Call to register.

Jewelry Making: Intro to Glass

Fusing: July 11, 25, 6-9 p.m., $60, ages 16-adult. All materials provided.

Knit a Mobius Scarf: July 14, 28, 7

p.m., $35, ages 16+. Beginners wel- come, materials provided.

Special Events:

Life on the Susquehanna River 2011

Photo Contest: Amateur photog- raphers of all ages. People, animals,

birds, dish, recreation, transportation. 8” x 10”, framed, wire on back, entry

form taped to photo back. Black/ white, color. Drop at office July 1, 10

a.m.-4 p.m.

Everhart Museum Bus Trip: July 9, departs from Dietrich 9:30 a.m.,

returns 2 p.m., $10/person. Box lunch

included. Pre-registration required.

Songs & Games for Tots: July 16, 11

a.m., free. A fast-paced musical expe- rience. Call to register.

Girls’ Night Out: An Evening of Burlesque July 1, 6-8 p.m., $30, Star Tresses Grand Salon & Day Spa (123 Welles Street, Forty-Fort). Learn the history of burlesque, get a new

hairdo, makeup application by profes-

sionals. Refreshments. Must be over 21. Registration required. Call salon at 570.283.0200 or visit startresses.com for info.

Independence Day Concerts by Northeastern Pennsylva-

nia Philharmonic July 3, Scran- ton, Courthouse Lawn. July 4, Wilkes- Barre, Kirby Park. 7:45 p.m. Free.

Jim Thorpe events:

Merchants and Neighbors Sidewalk:

July 9-10, noon-5 p.m., rain or shine.

For info, email marj@RosemaryRe- membrances.com or call

570.325.4452.

Luzerne County Pit Bull Owners Group

America’s Dog BBQ: July 2, noon-3

p.m., Village Pet Supplies & Gifts (2301

Sans Souci Pkwy, Hanover Twp.). $6. Pets welcome, leashed, cleaned up after. Info: luzernecountypitbullow- nersgroup@gmail.com, LuzerneCoun-

tyPitBullOwnersGroup.com.

Marywood University events (2300 Adams Avenue, Scranton,

www.marywood.edu, 570.348.6211)

Summer Festival: July 29-31.

Mount Airy Casino Resort

Signature Sun. Jazz Brunch: every

Sun., 11 a.m.-3 p.m. $24.95. Includes brunch, live music by Marko Marcinko.

“Old Friends Reunion Con-

cert” July 16, rain date July 17, gates 5 p.m., music 6 p.m., Factoryville Sportsmen’s Club. Only 1500 tickets; $8/advance, $10/gate. Under 12/free. Food, light refreshments. Parking, $1/per vehicle. For info, visit old- friendsband.com, fsc.org, or call

570.378.2582.

SEE AGENDA, PAGE 30

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293390
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WEEKENDER , W EDNESDAY , J UNE 29 , 2011
PAG E 29
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WEEKENDER , W EDNESDAY , J UNE 29 , 2011

PAGE 30

AGENDA, FROM PAGE 28

Olde Tyme Family Lawn Par- ty July 4, 6-10 p.m., West Side Career and Technology Center (75 Evans St. in the Pringle Borough). Fireworks, food, DJ, face painting, games, rum- mage sale 6-8 p.m.

Operation Care and Comfort to Suppor t Our Troops July 1-4, Old Navy (437 Arena Hub Plaza, Wilkes-Barre). Donate personal care products, purchase items to send over seas. Purchase an item to donate and receive10% off entire purchase. Buy 2 furnishing items (underwear, socks, tanks), get 1free. Military, families receive 10% off all weekend.

The Osterhout Free Library

events (71 S. Franklin St., Wilkes- Barre, www.osterhout.info, 570.823.0156, ext. 217)

Board Game Night: Mon., 6:30-8 p.m.

Open Computer Lab: Mon./Wed., 5-8

p.m.; Sat., 1-4 p.m. Videogaming: July 6, 6-8 p.m., Reading Room.

Knitting & Crocheting Group: July 9,

23, 10:30 a.m.-noon. Bring yarn, knit- ting needles. Open to all ages. New knitters welcome.

Pancake Breakfast every sec- ond Sun. of the month through Oct., 7:30-11:30 a.m., Teeple-Stevenson-

Young American Legion Post 765, Lookout (Rt. 191, North of Honesdale), $6 adults, $3 children.

Penn State Wilkes-Barre events:

Summer Youth Program: half,

full-day camps for children grades 1-10, Wilkes-Barre campus located in Leh- man. For info visit wb.psu.edu/ce/ youth or 570.675.9219.

16th Annual Penn State “Masters”

Golf Tournament: July 15, registration/ lunch 11:30 a.m., tournament 1 p.m. Banquet 6:30 p.m., Blue Ridge Trail Golf Club, Mountain Top. Captain & Crew format. Info, call 570.675.9228. Raises money to several initiatives to help students.

Sports Camps: July 11-15, 18-22, 25-29. Field hockey, grades 4-9, soccer, grades 1-8, golf, grades 4-7, tennis, grades 4-10. For info visit wb.psu.edu/ ce/youth or call Teri at 570.675.9219.

Petco Outdoor Adoption & Nutrition Event July 9, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., Petco (3480 Wilkes-Barre Twp. Commons, Wilkes-Barre).

Pond Hill-Lily Lake Fire Co.

(344 Pond Hill Mtn. Rd., Wapwallopen, 570.379.3144) events:

Breakfast Buffet: July 17, 8 a.m.-

noon. All you can eat. Take-out avail- able.

Punk Rock Flea Market July 30, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., WFTE Community Radio Station parking lot (930 Mead- ow Ave., Scranton). Vendors space, $10, e-mail stephanie@wfte.org to reserve. Call 570.212.WFTE for info.

Safe Haven Dog Rescue (www.SafeHavenPa.org, Safe- Haven@epix.net)

Adoption Day: July 23, 10 a.m.-2

p.m., Berger’s Agway (Route 209, Brodheadsville). Pre-adoption applica- tion, references, home visit required prior to adoption.

St. Michael’s Church (corner of Church/Winter Sts., Old Forge,

570.457.2875)

Chicken Barbecue Dinner: July 16,

pick up noon-3 p.m. $9. Place orders by July 11, 570.562.3965.

St. Michael’s Ukrainian Or- thodox Church (540 N. Main Ave., Scranton, 570.343.7165)

Pierogi Sale every Fri., 11 a.m.-5 p.m.

Unity: A Center for Spiritual

Living (140 South Grant St., Wilkes- Barre, 570.824.7722)

A Course in Miracles: Wed. eve-

nings, 6:30 p.m.

Fri. Night Discussion Group: July 15, 7 p.m., Tobyhanna. Showing the mo- vie, What the Bleep Do We Know? Down the Rabbit Hole.

Th e Va lley’s Fa stest Man

(3-race series, $30/series, $15/race. Register: lin-mark.com; by mail:

Wilkes-Barre Racing, P.O. Box 2487, Wilkes-Barre. Checks payable Wilkes- Barre Racing, Inc. Proceeds go to foster care, adoption)

NEPA Crossfit Kirby Park Mile, Kirby Park: Aug. 17, 7 p.m.

Fitness HQ Giants Despair Chal-

lenge, Laurel Run, Aug. 24, 7 p.m.

Wet Paint T-Shirts River Street Mile, Wilkes-Barre, Sept. 3, 7 p.m.

Vendors Wanted for Leh- man’s 1st Autumn Festival Oct. 15, 1-6 p.m., Lake-Lehman High School. Flat $20 donation. Live music,

food, vendors free to public. For info,

go to autumnfestival.webs.com, call

570.262.6725.

Waggin’ Tails Pet Rescue (WagginTailsRescue.com, info@wag- gintailsrescue.com, 570.992.4185)

Bake Sale: July 8, 4-8 p.m.; July 9,

5:30-8 p.m., Kinsley’s Shop Rite (Route 209, Brodheadsville). All proceeds go to housing, feeding, veterinary ex- penses for dogs/cats in sanctuary/ foster care. To help, volunteer, e-mail

or call.

Waverly Community House (1115 N. Abington Rd., Waverly, 570.586.8191, www.waverlycomm.org) events:

Family Concert and Block Party:

July 28, 5:30 p.m., Waverly Community House, $25/family.

William Walker Hose Compa- ny Annual Corn and Clam Slam July 13-16, 5 p.m., company

grounds, 803 Penn Avenue, Mayfield. Ashley’s Attic, July 13; Hillbilly D’Lux,

July 14; Jeffrey James Band, July 15; Maybe Someday, July 16. Parade July

16, 7 p.m. Free. Info: cornnclamslam- .com.

Wyoming Seminary Perform- ing Arts Institute (201 North Sprague Avenue, Kingston,

570.270.2186). Events free and open to public.

Counselor Recital: July 18, 8 p.m.,

Great Hall (228 Wyoming Avenue, Kingston).

U.S. Army Field Band Brass Quintet:

June 29, 7 p.m., River Commons, Wilkes-Barre.

Student Recital: June 30, July 6, 13,

20, 27, Aug. 2-3, 8 p.m., Great Hall (228 Wyoming Avenue, Kingston).

Wind Ensemble and the Jazz En-

semble: July 1, 8,15, 23, 29, 8 p.m.

Masterworks Chorale, Chamber

Orchestra, Institute Chorus and Sym- phony Orchestra: July 2, 9, 22, 30, 8 p.m., Great Hall (228 Wyoming Avenue, Kingston).

SEE AGENDA, PAGE 31

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AGENDA, FROM PAGE 30

String Faculty special performance by Russian composer Alfred

Schnittke: July 3, 8 p.m., Great Hall (228 Wyoming Avenue, Kingston).

Faculty Recital: July 5, 25, 8 p.m., Great Hall (228 Wyoming Avenue, Kingston).

Armenian classical guitarist Gohar

Vardanyan: July 11, 8 p.m., Great Hall (228 Wyoming Avenue, Kingston).

Y Walk Wed. Guided evening walks in Wilkes-Barre and Hazleton. Begin 6 p.m., meet in lobby either city’s YMCA.

In case of rain, walk same time follow- ing day. Info: Wilkes-Barre YMCA, 570.823.2191; Hazleton, 455.2046:

From Emily Post to FM Kirby:

Wilkes-Barre Mansions: June 29, Wilkes-Barre.

Stained Glass and Sacred Spaces:

July 6, Wilkes-Barre.

HISTORY

Electric City Trolley Museum and Coal Mine Tour (Cliff Street, Scranton 570.963.6590) Museum open 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Excursions: Wed.-Sun. 10:30 a.m., noon, 1:30 p.m., 3 p.m. Rides:

$10 adults, $9 seniors, $7.75 ages 3-12. Mine open daily 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Tours hourly, $8 adults, $7.50 seniors, $5.50

ages 3-12.

Escape from Wyoming July 16, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., July 17, 9 a.m.-3 p.m., 376 Hitchcock Rd., Mount Cobb. $5/car. A living history event of the American

Revolution. For info, visit

24thCMR.org.

Lackawanna Historical So- ciety (The Catlin House, 232 Monroe Avenue, Scranton, 570.344.3841) Summer Downtown Walking Tours (free and open to the public):

July 1, 5 p.m., Radisson’s Lackawan-

na Station Hotel parking lot, focus on architecture, industry, business, more.

Luzerne County Historical

Society (49 S. Franklin St., Wilkes- Barre, 570.823.6244, lchs@epix.net)

Forty Fort Meeting House Tours:

Sun. through Sept. 25, July 4, 1-3 p.m. 20 River Street, Forty Fort Cemetery.

$2 adults, $1 children. Call 570.287.5217 for info.

Nathan Denison House Tours: Sun.

through Sept. 25, July 4, 1-4 p.m., 35

Denison St., Forty Fort. $4 adults, $2 children, free, under 5.

233rd Anniversary/133rd Annual

Commemorative Service of the Battle and Massacre of Wyoming: July 4, 10 a.m. Wyoming Monument. Free and open to the public.

Pennsylvania’s Anthracite Heritage Museum (McDade Park, Scranton: 570.963.4804, www.phmc.state.pa.ust) Open year

round, Mon.-Sat. from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sun., 12 p.m. to 5 p.m.

Lithuanian Heritage Day July 31, 1-5

p.m. “Singing Revolutionary” docu- mentary. Choral Tribute, 3 p.m. The Endless Mountains Children’s Choir, 4 p.m. Seating limited, reservations advised.

Steamtown National Historic

Site (I-81to Exit 53, Scranton:

570.340.5200 or 888.693.9391, www.nps.gov/stea)

Ongoing: Interpretive programs,

visitor center, theater, a history museum. Open daily, 9-5 p.m. $7 adults, $6 senior citizens, $2 children ages 6-12.

LEARNING

A.C. Moore (2190 Wilkes-Barre Twp.

Marketplace, 570.820.0570)

Mom and Me art classes: every Fri.,

noon-1 p.m. $15, includes supplies. Sign up 24 hours in advance, call to regis-

ter.

Academy of Northern Mar- tial Arts (79 N. Main St., Pittston) Traditional Kung Fu & San Shou. For

Health and Defense. Adult & Children’s Classes held Mon.-Thurs., Sat. First class Free. Walk-Ins welcome, call 371.9919 or 817.2161 for info.

Aikido of Scranton, Inc. (1627 N.

Main Ave., Scranton, 570.963.0500)

Self-Defense Class taught by Aikido

Master Ven Sensei, every Mon. & Wed., 7-9 p.m. $10.

Traditional Weapons Class, every Thurs., 7-9 p.m. $10.

Back Mountain Martial Arts Center & Mountaintop Kar- ate Center For info, call either location, Back

Mountain (4 Carr Ave., 570.675.9535)

or Mountaintop (312 S. Mountain Blvd., 466.6474): Visit Website at www.fu-

doshinkai1.com.

Instruction in Traditional Karate,

Jujutsu, and Sivananda Yoga (Back Mountain): Tues., Wed., Thurs., 4:30-9

p.m., Sat., 8:30 a.m.-12 p.m. (Mountain- top Karate Center Mon., Weds., Fri., 4:30-9 p.m.

Instruction in Traditional Karate,

Jujutsu, and Sivananda Yoga (Moun- taintop): Mon., Wed., Fri., 4:30-9 p.m.

Carbondale Chiropractic Center (267 Brooklyn St., 570.282.1240, www.carbondalechi- ropractic.com).

Run with Doc: Sun. 9-10 a.m. at Lake

Scranton. Jog around Lake Scranton with Dr. Andrew Rivera. Visit Website for info.

Core Chiropractic Center (180 United Penn Plaza, Kingston,

570.718.1672)

Freedom Process Workshop: June

30, 6:30-8:30 p.m., $35. Pre-regis- tration required, call.

Dance Contours (201 Bear Creek

Blvd., Wilkes-Barre, 570.208.0152, www.dancecontours.com)

Adult classes in ballet, tap, lyrical, CardioSalsa, ballroom dance.

Children/teen classes in ballet, tap, CheerDance, HipTech Jazz, a funky form of dance developed by Jennifer Magnotta, blending basic Jazz Tech- nique with the styles of street dance

and hip hop.

Zumba classes for adults: Tues., 6

p.m., Sat., 10 a.m. First class free.

Adult ballet: Sat. morn.

Danko’s Core Wrestling

Strength Training Camp (DankosAllAmericanFitness.com)

Four sessions/week, features two

clinics, two core strength. 4 sessions/ week. Increase power, speed, agility. Group discounts, coaches, teams, clubs, free stuff. Visit website or call

SEE AGENDA, PAGE 34

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