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UNRESTINSYRIA ARMY TAKES BACK CONTROL OF RESTIVE TOWN WORLD PAGE 8 DALLAS WINS 1ST NBA
UNRESTINSYRIA ARMY TAKES BACK CONTROL OF RESTIVE TOWN WORLD PAGE 8 DALLAS WINS 1ST NBA

UNRESTINSYRIA

ARMY TAKES BACK CONTROL OF RESTIVE TOWN

WORLD PAGE 8

ARMY TAKES BACK CONTROL OF RESTIVE TOWN WORLD PAGE 8 DALLAS WINS 1ST NBA TITLE SPORTS

DALLAS WINS 1ST NBA TITLE

SPORTS PAGE 11

TOWN WORLD PAGE 8 DALLAS WINS 1ST NBA TITLE SPORTS PAGE 11 ‘SUPER 8’ TOP MOVIE

‘SUPER 8’ TOP MOVIE

DATEBOOK PAGE 17

Monday June 13, 2011 Vol XI, Edition 257

www.smdailyjournal.com

San Carlos considers fire truck options

By Michelle Durand

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

The city of San Carlos should pay Redwood City $100,000 for a year of truck service as part of its hybrid fire agreement while considering buying its own new or used equip- ment, according to city officials. Ensuring the new department is ready to go at the Oct. 13 start date is the highest priority which is why contracting with Redwood City is a better option than purchasing equip- ment and training firefighters on its use, said San Carlos Assistant City

Manager Brian Moura, who is over- seeing the fire service process. The work to do so “looks daunt- ing” with the short window before October, said Moura. Instead, not purchasing equip- ment buys the city time to find the best option at the best price, he said. The choice of truck service plays a role in the annual cost of the new San Carlos Fire Department. Aside from contracting out truck service, like the city of Millbrae does with San Bruno, or buying its own truck or quint, San Carlos could theoreti- cally also establish mutual aid

agreements with neighboring cities. Doing so has no cost but was not offered by any of the cities who sub- mitted service bids, including Redwood City. Instead, Redwood City initially proposed in January an annual $719,000 for truck service. While developing the hybrid model, the cost was revised to $250,000 to $500,000 per year dependent upon use. The latest proposal includes San Carlos paying for a portion of replacing the ladder truck in use in

See FIRE, Page 20

City Council considers taking the summer off

By Michelle Durand

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

School’s out for summer — and so might be the San Carlos City Council. Calling a summer recess and canceling the meetings planned

for July 25 and Aug. 8 would save the city approximately $1,200 from not filming the meetings for broadcast. The decision not to meet, though, is less about saving money

See OFF, Page 20

Dems push for local tax vote control

GOP officials attack Steinberg bill

By Lien Hoang

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SACRAMENTO — Now that Republican lawmakers have voted against a renewal of expiring tax hikes, Democrats are turning to another, more complex way to gen- erate revenue. A bill proposed by state Senate President Pro Tem Darrell Steinberg and narrowly approved last week would dramatically expand the tax- ing powers of local governments, school boards and other jurisdic- tions. But the bill, SB23-1X, would lead

to such a com- plicated lattice- work of taxes that opponents say Steinberg is merely pulling a stunt to ramp up pressure against Republican law- makers. The Sacra-

mento Dem- ocrat said his legislation would give public schools and law enforcement

legislation would give public schools and law enforcement Darrell Steinberg See TAX , Page 20 Behind

Darrell

Steinberg

See TAX, Page 20

Behind the blue

By Heather Murtagh

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

Peter Musante enjoys being blue. Those who enjoy the color of the summer sky rarely take to an extreme of donning the shade all over their face. Foster City-native Musante embraces blue — particu- larly blue makeup — often as one of

See BLUE, Page 20

larly blue makeup — often as one of See BLUE , Page 20 A weekly look

A weekly look at the people who shape our community

Page 20 A weekly look at the people who shape our community JD CRAYNE/DAILY JOURNAL These

JD CRAYNE/DAILY JOURNAL

These workers,at the South Bay Recycling Center,are in charge of the final quality control for the optical sorting

line.This line is designated for plastic bottles and cans of San Mateo.

Sorting out a new future

Recycling center,vocational program partner up

workers are in the VRS program through the County

These

By Michelle Durand

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

The paper and bottles moving down the sorting line at the county’s new recycling center aren’t the only ones destined for a new future. The 22 men astutely pulling out cardboard and plucking out unal- lowable items — pillows? bike parts? cleats? an engine even? — are, too. The crew at the Materials Recovery Center, operated by South Bay Recycling at the Shoreway

Center, operated by South Bay Recycling at the Shoreway Environmental Center, comes from the county’s Vocational

Environmental Center, comes from the county’s Vocational Rehabilitative Services program. VRS matches hard-to-place workers formerly on public assistance with private businesses, providing a steady stream of supervised labor for the employer and job opportuni- ties for the workers. These workers, also known by VRS as clients, can have a variety of challenges in the more traditional roads to work — physical or mental

See SORT, Page 5

can have a variety of challenges in the more traditional roads to work — physical or
can have a variety of challenges in the more traditional roads to work — physical or
can have a variety of challenges in the more traditional roads to work — physical or
can have a variety of challenges in the more traditional roads to work — physical or

2 Monday June 13, 2011

FOR THE RECORD

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Quote of the Day

“It was like The Who in Cincinnati.It was totally out of control.”

— Spectator Shawn Chaisson

“Dozens jockey for coveted Anthony trial seats,” page 7

Correction

The article “Local journalist concocts a thriller of his own” in the June 10 edition of the Daily Journal stated that the con- trolling board of the Asilomar Conference Center was found to be embezzling money from the state. It was the resort con- troller who was found guilty of embezzlement, not the board.

Local Weather Forecast

Monday: Mostly cloudy. Patchy fog in the morning. Highs in the mid to upper 60s. Southwest winds 5 to 10 mph Becoming west 10 to 20 mph in the afternoon. Tuesday: Mostly cloudy in the morning then becoming sunny. Patchy fog in the morning. Highs near 70. West winds 5 to 10 mph.

fog in the morning. Highs near 70. West winds 5 to 10 mph. Lotto June 11

Lotto

June 11 Super Lotto Plus 1 24 27 34 36 17 Mega number
June 11 Super Lotto Plus
1 24
27 34
36
17
Mega number
June 10 Mega Millions 18 21 27 37 38 7 Mega number Fantasy Five 11
June 10 Mega Millions
18
21 27
37 38
7
Mega number
Fantasy Five
11
23
27
31
35

Daily Four

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Daily three midday

 
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Daily three evening

 
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The Daily Derby race winners areWhirlWin No.6, in first place; Lucky Charms, No. 12, in second place;and Big Ben,No.4,in third place.The race time was clocked at 1:40.96. time was clocked at 1:40.96.

third place.The race time was clocked at 1:40.96. State . . . . . . .

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Publisher Jerry Lee jerry@smdailyjournal.com

Editor in Chief Jon Mays jon@smdailyjournal.com

Phone:

(650) 344-5200 Fax: (650) 344-5290

To

ads@smdailyjournal.com

Classifieds:

ads@smdailyjournal.com

Events:

calendar@smdailyjournal.com

News:

news@smdailyjournal.com

Delivery:

circulation@smdailyjournal.com

Career:

info@smdailyjournal.com

800 S. Claremont St., Ste. 210, San Mateo, Ca. 94402

800 S. Claremont St., Ste. 210, San Mateo, Ca. 94402 Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter

Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words.

RPEIC

 
 
 
 

©2011 Tribune Media Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

LSLME EPDMDU ZEEFER
LSLME
EPDMDU
ZEEFER

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME

by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

Sign Up for the IAFLOFCI (OFFICIAL) Jumble Facebook fan club
Sign Up for the IAFLOFCI (OFFICIAL) Jumble Facebook fan club

Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.

Print your answer here:

as suggested by the above cartoon. Print your answer here: Saturday’s Jumbles: Answer: (Answers tomorrow)

Saturday’s

Jumbles:

Answer:

(Answers tomorrow) DECAY HABIT CELERY BEHIND Having one helped the tightrope walker stay in shape — BALANCED DIET

(Answers tomorrow) DECAY HABIT CELERY BEHIND Having one helped the tightrope walker stay in shape —
helped the tightrope walker stay in shape — BALANCED DIET Snapshot REUTERS Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi

Snapshot

tightrope walker stay in shape — BALANCED DIET Snapshot REUTERS Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi plays chess

REUTERS

Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi plays chess with Kirsan Ilyumzhinov, the president of the international chess federation, in Tripoli Sunday in this still image taken from video broadcast on Libyan state television.

Inside

from video broadcast on Libyan state television. Inside Mexico’s president at Stanford Calderon speaks to grads
from video broadcast on Libyan state television. Inside Mexico’s president at Stanford Calderon speaks to grads

Mexico’s

president at

Stanford

Calderon speaks to grads at Stanford

See page 6

Sexting

lawmaker

Anthony Weiner wants to take leave from House

See page 7

This Day in History

1971

The New York Times began publish- ing excerpts of the Pentagon Papers, a secret study of America’s involvement

in Vietnam from 1945 to 1967. In 1886, King Ludwig II of Bavaria drowned in Lake Starnberg. In 1911, the ballet “Petrushka,” with music by Igor Stravinsky and choreography by Michel Fokine, was first per- formed in Paris by the Ballets Russes, with Vaslav Nijinsky in

the title role. In 1927, aviation hero Charles Lindbergh was honored with a ticker-tape parade in New York City. In 1935, James Braddock claimed the title of world heavy- weight boxing champion from Max Baer in a 15-round fight in Long Island City, N.Y. In 1944, Germany began launching flying-bomb attacks against Britain during World War II. In 1966, the Supreme Court ruled in Miranda vs. Arizona that criminal suspects had to be informed of their constitution- al rights to consult with an attorney and to remain silent. In 1967, President Lyndon B. Johnson nominated Solicitor- General Thurgood Marshall to become the first black justice on the U.S. Supreme Court. In 1981, a scare occurred during a parade in London when a teenager fired six blank shots at Queen Elizabeth II. In 1986, Benny Goodman, the clarinet-playing “King of Swing,” died in New York at age 77. In 1996, the 81-day-old Freemen standoff ended as 16 remaining members of the anti-government group surrendered to the FBI and left their Montana ranch. Ten years ago: President George W. Bush met behind closed doors with NATO leaders in Brussels, Belgium, where he pitched his missile defense plans.

Thought for the Day

“A faith is a necessity to a man. Woe to him who believes in nothing.” — Victor Hugo, French writer (1802-1885).

in nothing.” — Victor Hugo, French writer (1802-1885). The U.N.’s Ban Ki-moon is 67. Birthdays Singer

The U.N.’s Ban Ki-moon is 67.

Birthdays

(1802-1885). The U.N.’s Ban Ki-moon is 67. Birthdays Singer Rivers Cuomo is 41. Actress Mary-Kate Olsen

Singer Rivers Cuomo is 41.

Ban Ki-moon is 67. Birthdays Singer Rivers Cuomo is 41. Actress Mary-Kate Olsen is 25. Actor

Actress Mary-Kate Olsen is 25.

Actor Bob McGrath is 79. Artist Christo is 76. Magician

Siegfried (Siegfried & Roy) is 72. Singer Bobby Freeman is

71. Actor Malcolm McDowell is 68. Singer Dennis Locorriere

is 62. Actor Richard Thomas is 60. Actor Jonathan Hogan is

60. Actor Stellan Skarsgard is 60. Comedian Tim Allen is 58.

Actress Ally Sheedy is 49. TV anchor Hannah Storm is 49. Rock musician Paul deLisle (Smash Mouth) is 48. Actress Lisa

Vidal is 46. Singer David Gray is 43. Rhythm-and-blues singer Deniece Pearson (Five Star) is 43. Rock musician Soren

Country

singer Susan Haynes is 39. Actor Steve-O (“Jackass”) is 37.

Rasted (Aqua) is 42. Actor Jamie Walters is

Country singer Jason Michael Carroll is 33. Actor Ethan Embry is 33. Actor Chris Evans is 30. Actress Sarah Schaub is

28. Singer Raz B is 26. Actress Kat Dennings is 25. Actress

Ashley Olsen is 25.

Entertainment news

Comcast’s $4.4B Olympian bid a bold online bet

LOS ANGELES — NBC lost more than $200 million the last time it showed the Winter Olympics, and it’s bracing for similar losses in London next year. So, plenty of people scoffed when the network bid $4.4 billion — nearly a bil- lion more than runner-up Fox — for the U.S. rights to carry the four games through 2020. Yet the price may prove right. The growth of Internet video and opportunities under NBC’s new owner, Comcast Corp., should help cut losses significantly and perhaps make the Olympics profitable after the London Games. There’s also an intangible pro- motional benefit to NBC. Consider this: Even at a loss, the Olympics generate huge audiences. About 185 million people saw some of the Olympics in Vancouver last year. The struggling broadcaster can promote new shows to those viewers as it tries to dig out of fourth place. NBC didn’t pay all that much for the Olympics, considering that TV rights fees for other major sports such as Pac- 12 college basketball have been dou- bling or tripling. For the 2014 and 2016 games, it’s paying about the same as it has been. For the final two games in the deal, NBC is paying just 19 percent more. Morgan Stanley analyst Benjamin

Swinburne called NBC’s deal an “Olympic win at the right price.” He said NBC should be able to cut its Olympic losses in half after London, as long as viewership doesn’t change and advertising rates keep improving. Beyond that, NBC can create more ad opportunities by tapping sports channels added to the NBCUniversal family when Comcast took control in January. One is the Golf Channel — convenient for Comcast as golf joins the Olympics in 2016. Another is Versus, which Comcast is positioning as a competitor to ESPN, another Olympic bidder. NBCUniversal will have about 20 channels and more than 40 websites to cover the games. By contrast, it used five channels and one website in 2010, when it was controlled by General Electric Co. The Olympics coverage can also help Comcast get higher fees from other cable TV companies such as Time Warner Cable Inc. to carry those chan- nels in their lineups. “It does not take too much to move it across the finish line in terms of getting more in the black,” said Matthew Harrigan, an analyst with Wunderlich Securities. NBC should also benefit from spon- sorship packages developed by the U.S. Olympic Committee two years ago when the advertising market looked grim. One such package creates a direct connection between the USOC, NBC

and the sponsors — in this case, Citigroup, TD Ameritrade and a home- improvement company that still hasn’t been determined. As part of the deal, the sponsors are committed to buying ads on NBC, giving the network a head start in selling commercials. Because NBC will get rights for at least nine more years, the USOC will be in a better position to make such long- term ad deals, USOC marketing chief Lisa Baird said. One unknown is how fast Comcast can increase revenue from online view- ing. For the 2008 Summer Games in Beijing, NBC ran an unprecedented 2,200 hours of coverage over the Internet. For some fans it still wasn’t enough. The network was pilloried, for instance, for waiting more than half a day to televise the men’s 100-meter final so it could show Usain Bolt’s record- breaking run in prime time. Starting with the 2014 games in Sochi, Russia, NBC plans to carry every single event live in some format or another. It will repackage the best events for U.S. television audiences when evening arrives. Mark Lazarus, chairman of NBC Sports Group, told reporters last week that technology is changing so rapidly that the deal gives NBC the ability to exploit the games on every platform “now known or to be known or still to be conceived.”

THE DAILY JOURNAL

LOCAL

Monday June 13, 2011

3

Police reports

Foster City fisticuffs

Three to five people were fighting in a parking lot on Foster City Boulevard in Foster City before 2:33 a.m. Saturday, June 4.

BELMONT

Vandalism. A street sign was damaged at the intersection of O'Neill Avenue and Kedith Street before 4:43 p.m. Tuesday, May 31. Theft. A person took a tool box from the bed of a pickup truck on Valdez Avenue before 1:27 p.m. Tuesday, May 31. Theft. Cash and a GPS were stolen from a vehicle on Sequoia Way before 8:45 a.m. Tuesday, May 31. Vandalism. Vehicle tires were slashed on Monserat Avenue before 4:20 p.m. Sunday, May 29. Accident. A major injury vehicle accident occurred on North Road before 7:26 p.m. Saturday, May 28. Vehicle burglary. A purse was stolen from a vehicle on Irene Court before 11:25 a.m. Friday, May 27.

FOSTER CITY

Accident. A woman was struck by a vehicle near Pizza Hut on Triton Drive before 9:44 p.m. Tuesday, June 7. Bike theft. A bicycle worth $400 was stolen from Rock Harbor Lane before 2:58 p.m. Sunday, June 5. Bike theft. A mountain bike was stolen from in front of a home on Flying Fish Street before 9:16 a.m. Sunday, June 5. Vandalism. Two teen boys were seen remov- ing a light cover and tossing it into the lagoon at the Sand Cove Apartments on Shell Boulevard before 4:10 p.m. Friday, June 3. Grand theft. A four-person paddle boat was stolen on Grenada Lane before 2:23 p.m. Tuesday, May 31. Reckless driving. A driver nearly hit a woman and sped off on Beach Park Boulevard before 11:56 a.m. Monday, May 30.

Sneath Dairy in San Bruno

before 11:56 a.m. Monday, May 30. Sneath Dairy in San Bruno I n 1875, Richard George

I n 1875, Richard George Sneath (#1), was born in Maryland and migrated to California by way of the Isthmus.

After making his fortune around the mines in red Bluff, Calif., Sneath purchased the land located west of El Camino Real, north of what is now called Sneath Lane in San Bruno, and the Brentwood Addition in South San Francisco. The property ran to west of Skyline Boulevard area (Sweeney Ridge) and north to Westborough Boulevard in South San Francisco. Eventually, had he had more than 2,000 acres under his control. Many rows of euca- lyptus trees still mark the boundary of his property in these areas. In 1878, George Sneath had a dairy operat- ing from the main buildings about 1,500 yards west of El Camino Real facing Sneath Road (across from 1001 Sneath Lane). At present, the Golden Gate Cemetery has its mainte- nance yard in the area where the farmhouse stood. Across the road, to the south, lived Maria Tanforan and her large family. East of the Tanforans on 30 acres lived the Silva fam-

ily and they had a horse ranch. Custodial Silva bought this land in 1871. The Crossroads Apartment complex is now being built on this property. The dairy complex, where the Golden Gate Cemetery is now, was designated Jersey Dairy #1; to the west of Skyline Boulevard was

See HISTORY, Page 4

to the west of Skyline Boulevard was See HISTORY , Page 4 AUTHOR’S COLLECTION Sneath’s dairy

AUTHOR’S COLLECTION

Sneath’s dairy (center) in San Bruno ran from the El Camino (lower) to Pacifica.

, Page 4 AUTHOR’S COLLECTION Sneath’s dairy (center) in San Bruno ran from the El Camino
, Page 4 AUTHOR’S COLLECTION Sneath’s dairy (center) in San Bruno ran from the El Camino

4 Monday June 13, 2011

LOCAL

THE DAILY JOURNAL

HISTORY

Continued from page 3

1,500 acres of Jersey Dairy #2 (Pacific Heights, Portola Highlands, San Francisco County Jail); and the Sweeney Ridge prop- erty was Jersey Dairy #3. Sweeney Ridge had the highest elevation of the ranch, approximately 1,300 feet. Richard George (#1) was married to Kathryn Myers (1832-1936). They had five children, but only two sons and one daugh- ter survived childhood. Daughter Minnie married Frank Dillingham of San Francisco; son Harry became the superin- tendent of the dairy business in the city; son George Richard (#2), born in 1861, man-

aged the dairy business at the ranch in San Bruno. Richard George, became vice presi- dent of the Peninsula Ice Company in San Mateo (1928?), and he married Nancy Fyfe and had two children; son George (born 1919), and daughter Polly (born 1925). Richard Sneath (#1) organized the Consumers Ice Company of San Francisco and, in July 1890, was made president of the company. The Sneath Jersey Dairy was very successful in the 1800s, but as time went on, more dairies were formed on the Peninsula. The competition was intense and eventually most of the dairies joined togeth- er to succeed. The merged dairies became known as the Dairy Delivery in 1906 — the largest dairy on the Peninsula. In 1925, the Millbrae Dairy sold its distributing business in San Francisco to the Dairy Delivery Company. Its headquarters were on

McAllister Street in San Francisco. In 1927, Dairy Dale Company was formed on a com- bination of Riverdale and Dairy Delivery and a purchaser of the San Francisco Dairy. In 1929, Borden took over Dairy Dale and, in 1938, the Millbrae Dairy of the Mills Estate was combined into the San Francisco group. In 1929, a number of acres of flat land, nestled in the hills west of Jersey Dairy #2 were sold to San Francisco County and a jail was built on the property. It was during the 1920s that the Sneath land began being leased to numerous people for the purpose of growing vegetables and flowers and small dairy operations. Water was impounded by an earth dam where College Drive now flows in Pacific Heights. The lake that formed, however, was drained in the 1950s.

In 1939, 180 acres of flat land along Sneath Lane and El Camino Real was sold to the U.S. government for the development of the Golden Gate National Cemetery. Just prior to this, the Junipero Serra Highway (Highway 101) was extended from Hickey Boulevard to Sneath Lane, which became the connecting link to El Camino Real. By the mid-1950s, the Rollingwood Addition was purchased for housing by A. Oddstead. Monte Verde Addition was devel- oped and Pacific Heights housing was begun in 1957. Portola Highlands was begun in the early 1960s. Skyline College was built in 1969, and the L.D.S. Church on Sharp Park Road opened in 1969.

Rediscovering the Peninsula by Darold Fredricks appears in the Monday edition of the Daily Journal.

appears in the Monday edition of the Daily Journal. Who Are “private HEROES” ? How Firefighters
appears in the Monday edition of the Daily Journal. Who Are “private HEROES” ? How Firefighters

Who Are “private HEROES” ?

How Firefighters Set Example

By Paul Larson

HEROES” ? How Firefighters Set Example By Paul Larson MILLBRAE – Firefighters are “public HEROES”!

MILLBRAE

Firefighters

are

“public HEROES”! In the way that members of our Military travel to foreign war zones and risks their own

lives in the name of preventing terrorism … and in the way our Police Officers enter a sketchy part of town to apprehend suspects who’ve harmed others and may do more harm … the same goes for our Firefighters who are trained to enter potentially explosive situations to prevent the spread of fires and rescue those caught in hazardous peril. These “public HEROES” touch our lives on a daily basis, most times without our knowledge. Our general safety and well-being can be attributed to the day to day actions of our “public HEROES”. With the recent joint-funeral for the two San Francisco Firefighters who died in the line of duty it is important to acknowledge their lives and say thank you. These “public HEROES” had a natural inclination to help others above their own selves. Their efforts to serve the public were of great value, and that value is to be remembered and admired. Just like we learn from the funerals of our “public HEROES”, we can learn from the funerals of those who have touched our personal lives … our “private HEROES”. Family, friends, local acquaintances and even those we know of but don’t know personally have the ability to affect us in ways we may not be consciously aware. We ourselves also have the potential to affect the lives of others in ways we’re not aware. A single act of kindness; the opening of a door; a caring gesture; a supportive

word; an offer to help; volunteering in a service club; etc. all set examples for others to emulate and absorb as a part of their own life-experience. Both “public HEROES” and “private HEROES” enrich our lives and help us as individuals to be little bit better. When ever we attend a “funeral” (the deceased being present) or “memorial” (the deceased not being present) we always learn about how the deceased affected the lives of others. Also, our attendance not only shows the family that we care, but in a positive way can affect the family’s healing process. To us what may seem a small caring gesture may be an enormous life moment to the person we are affecting. We never know how we affect the lives of others … but it’s a fact that we do so every day. These kind acts, unconscious and conscious, along with other small acts potentially make us each a “private HERO” in the eyes of those we’ve affected. It doesn’t matter how minor you’ve touched somebody’s life … it matters that they were able to take something away and enrich their own life with your kind act. Just like “public HEROES” whose actions affect our daily well-being, “private HEROES” have the power to positively affect the lives of their family, friends, and those they interact with on a daily basis. When our work on earth is done and our lives conclude we each can be remembered as a “private HERO” for the way we touched the lives of those we’ve left behind. If you ever wish to discuss cremation, funeral matters or want to make pre- planning arrangements please feel free to call me and my staff at the CHAPEL OF THE HIGHLANDS in Millbrae at (650) 588-5116 and we will be happy to guide you in a fair and helpful manner. For more info you may also visit us on the internet at:

www.chapelofthehighlands.com.

Advertisement

and helpful manner. For more info you may also visit us on the internet at: www.chapelofthehighlands.com
and helpful manner. For more info you may also visit us on the internet at: www.chapelofthehighlands.com
and helpful manner. For more info you may also visit us on the internet at: www.chapelofthehighlands.com

THE DAILY JOURNAL

LOCAL

Monday June 13, 2011

5

SORT

Continued from page 1

conditions, incarceration, transfer- able skills or a lack of work history. Fred Chapman, 54, chalks up his 12-year employment gap to “prison and a boatload of whiskey.” But Chapman, who lauds SBR as leading the way toward a world without any landfills, is happy to be back among the employed. A former blacksmith, Chapman said he feels pride to wake up and have a place to go. The best part? “Not being on welfare,” he said. Workers like Chapman arrive at work around 6:30 a.m. to prepare for the 7 a.m. start and stay until 3 p.m. They make minimum wage but are eligible for a bonus after successfully completing a year, said VRS Manager Carmen O’Keefe. Receiving those checks and man- aging the money is part of the other skills clients learn. The VRS program at South Bay runs 18 months and Chapman, like several of the others, is keeping his fingers crossed that it will end with an offer of regular employment. There are no promises, Chapman and the others say, but there is at least one living example — a former VRS client who now holds a union job operating a fork lift on the other side of the center to initially sort out large and unrecyclable items from among the piles before they start up the maze

of conveyor belts. That worker participated in the VRS recycling program in its first incarnation at the previous center ran by Browning Ferris Industries. Allied Waste dropped the program in 2007 prior to the South Bay Waste Management Authority, now ReThinkWaste, picking South Bay as the new operator and breaking ground on the high-tech Shoreway Environmental Center. VRS, which also places clients in other programs like food service, packaging and even technology, was deal another small hit, too, when the county-operated cafe at the Hall of Justice closed. Both left VRS without those options for its clients and the challenge was compounded with state budget cuts and escalating need that added to the county’s requests for general assistance. The costs have grown by $818,000, all borne by the county, and VRS programs transition many of the recipients into lives of employment, said Amanda Kim, spokeswoman for the Human Services Agency. But in April, the Shoreway Center opened and with it came a resurrect- ed three-year sorting program. The Board of Supervisors in late May approved the contract with SBR.

‘Win-win-win’

The agreement is a “win-win-win,” said SBR General Manager David Langer, who was involved with the previous VRS recycling program eight years ago.

“I’m extremely impressed with what they’ve done. The guys are energetic and interested and work really hard,” Langer said. Working hard is practically a requirement. “It’s not rocket science,” conceded Donald Evans, 48. Maybe, but that doesn’t mean it’s easy. The center receives approximately 150 tons of goods a day from resi- dential and commercial customers who are now able to place their recy- clables together. As the items are dumped from trucks, they begin a long journey to weed out the recyclable from the non-recyclable, the plastic bags from the newspaper and the items too large to fit through the machinery without a possible jam. Each worker is trained for roughly three weeks on what is allowed and how best to sort before they hit the line. Cardboard is thrown in marked metal bins on one side, non-recycla- ble goods like cleats and irons are tossed into garbage cans. Their hands fly as though the work is second- nature, as the machine hums loudly and a slightly sweet scent hangs in the air. The remnants of sodas and beer in cans and bottles, perhaps. Then there is the motion sickness. “Everybody gets a little seasick,” laughed Evans, which surprised the former Burlingame cafe owner since he’s no stranger to boats. Evans said he married the wrong girl, drank a little too much and need- ed to get his head back on straight.

VRS provides that sense of pur- pose, he said. “It helped me get of a dark place,” he said. Sorting is a good fit because he has good eyes and is up to the physical challenge. He also hopes for a job with SBR after the VRS term ends.

Worker camaraderie and developing skills

Evans, a self-subscribed people person, appreciates the camaraderie of his fellow workers and supervi- sors. Everybody looks out for one another and the supervisors and job coaches through SBR and VRS help with other possible challenges that might come up like punctuality, he said. These soft skills, as they are known, are as important to success as learning how to sort plastics or keep the conveyor moving, said SMCWorks Director John Joy. They include readying resumes and prepping for interviews, learning how to work with others and follow direction. Clients begin working on those at the work center and when ready are offered the chance to apply to off-site programs, like the recycling program. “What we’re really looking at is getting people into this operation so that they have a regular day-to-day job and build the confidence to con- tinue once they finish,” Joy said. The transition is also good for the greater community, Joy said, because the clients move from tax

drain to tax payer. There have been a few women who’ve worked in recycling — they actually make the fastest and most accurate sorters, said Supervisor Art Martinez — but all have since moved on to other vocations. Of the current crew, supervisor Neil Singh estimates at least 75 per- cent will succeed. Singh said he also works as a job coach for the men and sees more enthusiasm in them then he ever did in previous workplaces. “They are all so appreciative,” he said. Singh, too, said he had to get used

to the labor-intensive work, the noise

and — of course — the motion sick- ness. But just as the job gives the

VRS clients a focus, he said working with and guiding them offers himself

a feeling of success. It also helped

him drop a few pounds, he joked, and showed him that people will try recy- cling just about anything — and he does mean anything.

A La-Z-Boy recliner once. Fax

machines and scanners. Plastic bags

way too much; they choke up the sys- tem and end up in the landfill any- way, he said. Singh’s not the only one with a new set of recycling know-how. Chapman said he’s certainly more aware of his personal garbage and

So how does it influence

his recycling at home?

“It doesn’t,” he laughs. “I just bring

packaging

it here.”

And for the VRS clients working at SBR, here is a pretty great place to be.

laughs. “I just bring packaging it here.” And for the VRS clients working at SBR, here
laughs. “I just bring packaging it here.” And for the VRS clients working at SBR, here
laughs. “I just bring packaging it here.” And for the VRS clients working at SBR, here
laughs. “I just bring packaging it here.” And for the VRS clients working at SBR, here
laughs. “I just bring packaging it here.” And for the VRS clients working at SBR, here
laughs. “I just bring packaging it here.” And for the VRS clients working at SBR, here

6 Monday June 13, 2011

LOCAL/NATION

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Mexican president speaks at Stanford

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

PALO ALTO — Thousands of people turned out to hear Mexican President Felipe Calderon speak at Stanford University’s 120th com- mencement on Sunday. In noting that this year’s gradu- ates came from 44 countries, during his 18-minute speech, Calderon spoke of the need to create a global economy, while still preserving the environment. “It is possible to promote eco-

nomic growth and, at the same time, preserve nature,” he told the crowd. “It is possible to fight poverty and fight climate change simulta- neously.”

Stanford offi- cials estimated 25,000 to 30,000 people attended the commencement exercise, which was held at the uni-

the commencement exercise, which was held at the uni- Felipe Calderon versity’s remodeled football stadi- um.

Felipe Calderon

versity’s remodeled football stadi- um. At the conclusion of his address, Calderon received a stand- ing ovation. During the commencement, 4,941 students received diplomas for bachelors, masters and doctorate degrees, university officials said. Calderon stayed away from speaking about immigration issues during his speech, but he did address the issue during an earlier appearance at San Jose’s Center for Employment and Training.

He told a crowd of more than 600 people Saturday that walls or what he called “abusive laws” would not stop people from migrating to the U.S. In nominating Calderon to be the speaker at Stanford, student leaders said they wanted to send a message about the need for leadership in international cooperation and social justice. Stanford President John Hennessey had previously praised Calderon for his work on issues such as immigration reform, arms

control and fighting drug cartels. Calderon was elected to a six-

year term as Mexico’s president in

2006.

He’s the third president of a coun- ty to speak at a Stanford com- mencement. President Alejandro Toledo of Peru gave a commencement speech at the university in 2003, while U.S. President Herbert Hoover spoke at commencement exercises in 1925 and 1935, according to Stanford spokesman Dan Stober.

2012 troubles ahead for Obama in Florida?

By Brendan Farrington

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. — President Barack Obama has prob- lems in Florida that he didn’t have when he won the prized state in 2008. The state’s economy is worse than elsewhere. Foreclosures are high. Property values are low. As president, Obama could be blamed. Voters’ shifting attitudes show the degree to which the atmosphere has changed since his first campaign. Florida Democrats made gains in 2008 with Obama on the top of the ticket, but the GOP won big two years later. All that explains why Florida Democrats are redoubling their efforts to re-energize the rank and file, including at the state party’s Jefferson-Jackson dinner Saturday night. And it’s why Obama’s campaign team has been on the ground training volunteers 17 months before the elec-

on the ground training volunteers 17 months before the elec- Barack Obama tion and why the

Barack Obama

tion and why the president has been such a fre- quent visitor to the Sunshine State. Over the past 10 months, he has played mini- golf and hit the

waves in Panama City Beach, eaten a corned beef sand- wich at a Miami Beach deli, visited Cape Canaveral, addressed commu- nity college graduates in Miami and headlined fundraisers for Florida politicians. He’s set to return in the coming week for three fundraisers. Florida offers 29 electoral votes, more than 10 percent of the 270 he needs to win a second term. “The president can win the White House re-election without Florida, but it’s certainly easier if he does win Florida,” said Steve Schale, Obama’s Florida director in 2008.

On Saturday, more than 1,000 Democratic activists attended the state party fundraiser and rallied in support of Obama. “In order to stop their extreme agenda, each and every one of us must give it all we’ve got. Tell your friends and neighbors about our pri- orities versus theirs, about our values versus their values. Work tirelessly every single day to re-elect one of our most courageous leaders in our nation’s history, President Barack Obama,” said Democratic National Committee Chairwoman and Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz, who was speaking in her congressional district. “The future of our nation and our state are depending on us, so let’s go make history once again.” Florida’s unemployment rate was 10.8 percent in April, or nearly 2 per- centage points higher than the nation- al average. The state has been hit harder by foreclosures and loss in property values than most of the country.

Palin emails show engaged leader who sought VP nod

By Becky Bohrer

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

JUNEAU, Alaska — There are no bombshells, no “gotcha” moments. The emails of Sarah Palin — more than 24,000 pages of them released Friday by the state of Alaska from her first two years as governor — paint a picture of an image-conscious, driven leader, closely involved with the day- to-day duties of running the state and riding herd on the signature issues of her administration. She angled for a vice presidential nomination months before John McCain picked her, but hesitated to endorse him until she got an explana- tion about “pro-environmental stands he’s taking that could hurt Alaska.” The messages give a behind-the- scenes look at a politician who burst onto the national stage after serving as Wasilla mayor and less than two years as Alaska governor. They show

mayor and less than two years as Alaska governor. They show Sarah Palin a woman striving

Sarah Palin

a woman striving to balance work and home, fierce- ly protective of her family and highly sensitive to media cover- She

expressed a

sometimes moth-

ering side with aides but was quick to demand answers or accountability. They seem to depict a more moder- ate Palin who worked to find a state response to global warming — she has since dismissed studies support- ing climate change — and gave props to then-Sen. Barack Obama for his support of a natural gas pipeline in Alaska. The records, comprising more than 13,400 emails, shed new light on Palin’s rise from little-known gover- nor to national political sensation.

age.

than 13,400 emails, shed new light on Palin’s rise from little-known gover- nor to national political
than 13,400 emails, shed new light on Palin’s rise from little-known gover- nor to national political

THE DAILY JOURNAL

NATION

Monday June 13, 2011

7

First photos of Giffords released since shooting

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

HOUSTON — Images of a smil- ing Rep. Gabrielle Giffords were posted Sunday on her Facebook page, two photos that show her with shorter, darker hair but few signs that she suffered a gunshot wound to the head. The photos were taken May 17 outside the Houston rehabilitation facility where Giffords has been undergoing treatment since she was wounded five months ago at a meet- and-greet event with constituents. Six people died and a dozen others were hurt in the Jan. 8 attack in Tucson, Ariz.

dozen others were hurt in the Jan. 8 attack in Tucson, Ariz. Congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords smiles

Congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords smiles at TIRR Memorial Hermann Hospital in Houston, the day after the launch of Endeavour. She posted this photo on Facebook page Sunday.

Since then, access to the Arizona congresswoman has been tightly con- trolled. Until Sunday, no clear images had been released. The only recent sign of Giffords came in late April, when grainy tele- vision footage showed her slowly ascending a flight of steps to a NASA plane that took her to Florida to watch her astronaut husband rocket into space. The image was so blurry that it was impossible to confirm it was Giffords until doctors did so at a news conference in mid-May. Giffords spokesman C.J. Karamargin said staff members released the photos Sunday to help satisfy “intense interest in the con-

gresswoman’s appearance.” The timing coincides with plans to release Giffords from the hospital later this month or in early July. Her staff hopes the images will help curb unwanted photography when she begins visiting an outpatient clinic in a more public setting. “What we wanted to avoid was a paparazzi-like frenzy,” Karamargin said. The professionally shot pictures were taken before Giffords under- went surgery to replace a piece of her skull that had been removed shortly after the shooting to allow her brain to swell. The images suggest the con- gresswoman is returning to her for-

mer appearance — though she still looks slightly different than before. But the photos give little indication of Giffords’ cognitive abilities — what, for example, her speech is like after being shot in the left side of the head, which controls communication. The images also provide no hints as to when, or if, she will be able to resume her job. “There’s nothing that unique about the outer presentation,” said Jordan Grafman, director of the Traumatic Brain Injury Research Laboratory at the Kessler Foundation Research Center in West Orange, N.J., explain- ing that many brain injury patients look good within months of being hurt.

Sexting Wiener wants to take leave from House

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — Under fierce pressure from fellow Democrats to resign in a sexting scandal, Rep. Anthony Weiner announced Saturday he was entering profession- al treatment at an undisclosed loca- tion and requested a leave of absence from Congress. An aide for the embattled New York lawmaker made the disclosure in a statement shortly after several Democratic party leaders demanded he quit for exchanging messages and photos ranging from sexually sug- gestive to explicit with several women online. “This sordid affair has become an

unacceptable

distraction for

Representative

Weiner, his fami-

con-

stituents and the House,” Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz, the

party chair- woman, said in a written statement calling for the 46-year-old married lawmaker to step down. The House Democratic leader, Rep. Nancy Pelosi of California, said Weiner “has the love of his family, the confidence of his constituents and the recognition that he needs help.”

his constituents and the recognition that he needs help.” AnthonyWeiner ly, his Dozens jockey for coveted

AnthonyWeiner

ly,

his

Dozens jockey for coveted Anthony trial seats

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

ORLANDO, Fla. — Spectators trying to get one of the 60 court- room seats available to the public in the Casey Anthony trial have creat- ed scenes reminiscent of the running of the bulls in Spain or a Walmart on the Friday after Thanksgiving. Those who have arrived as early as 1 a.m. to wait for a seat in the trial of the Florida mother charged with killing her 2-year-old daughter Caylee have been jostled, elbowed and pushed aside by fellow specta- tors while running from the side- walk to the Orange County Courthouse entrance before dawn. They aren’t allowed to camp out on courthouse property, so they hang out on the sidewalk in front of the 23-story building until they are

sidewalk in front of the 23-story building until they are Casey Anthony allowed to line the

Casey Anthony

allowed to line

the

entrance at 5:30 a.m.

up

at

“It

is

a

mad

stampede

 

of

angry

people,”

said

Natalie

Sutton,

22,

a

Walt

Disney

World

worker

who skipped sleep and arrived at 3:15 a.m. Friday to line up for a cov- eted seat. People then wait until less than an hour before the daily hearing starts at 9 a.m., when the first 60 are given white tickets allowing them to sit in the courtroom all day. Those who don’t return after lunch are replaced by afternoon spectators who wait in line during the morning beside a

stanchion outside. The dash from the sidewalk — and the ensuing wait — is not always orderly. The horde became even more intense than usual Friday, when a woman fell during the dash to the entrance and later had to be treated by paramedics. A few spec- tators tried to help her, but others raced past. “It was like The Who in Cincinnati,” said spectator Shawn Chaisson, referring to 11 fans who were crushed to death during a stampede at one of the rock band’s concerts in 1979. “It was totally out of control.” The waiting crowd was then thrown into a tizzy after three women cut in front of dozens of others who had been waiting several hours longer.

dozens of others who had been waiting several hours longer. Nation briefs NRC chief in hot
dozens of others who had been waiting several hours longer. Nation briefs NRC chief in hot

Nation briefs

NRC chief in hot seat over work to delay nuke site

WASHINGTON — In the two years that Gregory Jaczko has led the nation’s independ- ent nuclear agency, his actions to delay, hide and kill work on a disputed dump for high- level radioactive waste have been called “bizarre,” “unorthodox” and “illegal.” These harsh critiques haven’t come just from politicians who have strong views in favor of the Yucca Mountain waste site in Nevada. They’ve come from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s own scientists and a former agency chairman. An inspector general’s report released last week exposed the internal strife under Jaczko. The internal watchdog said he intimidated staff members who disagreed with him and withheld information from members of the commission to gain their support.

Circus performer exits hospital after 20-foot fall

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. — A Ringling Bros. Circus performer has been released from a hospital after falling 20 feet before a Colorado Springs crowd. Production manager for the Ringling Bros. circus Chantal Stringer tells the Colorado Springs Gazette the performer suffered minor hip and wrist bruises and will miss the remaining shows in Colorado Springs. The performer was carted out of the World Arena during an intermission at the circus Saturday. The performer’s name has not been released. Stinger says the performer was outside of a wheel that rotates on an axis preparing for an act when he plunged onto what circus-goer John Flores described as a thin piece of padding. No wheel act will be in Sunday’s performances. The cause of the fall is under investigation.

Huge AZ wildfire spreads, health conditions worsen

SPRINGERVILLE, Ariz. — An eye-sting- ing, throat-burning haze of smoke spewing

from a gigantic wildfire in eastern Arizona is beginning to stretch as far east as central New Mexico, prompting health officials to warn residents as far away as Albuquerque about potential respiratory hazards. The 672-square-mile blaze was no longer just an Arizona problem on Saturday as fire- fighters moved to counter spot fires sprouting up across the state line and lighting their own fires to beat it back. The forest fire remained largely uncontained and officials worried that the return of gusty southwesterly winds dur- ing the afternoon could once again threaten small mountain communities that had been largely saved just a few days ago. Levels of tiny, sooty particles from the smoke in eastern Arizona were nearly 20 times the federal health standard on Saturday. The good news was that was down from roughly 40 times higher a day earlier, but it was all at the mercy of the ever-changing winds. Sunday could get even worse, said Mark Shaffer of the Arizona Department of Environmental Quality. “Things got better but they’re still bad,” Shaffer said Saturday.

NY contractor fraud case scandal a thorn for mayor

NEW YORK — Mayor Michael Bloomberg landed his hard-fought third term in part by selling himself to voters as a savvy businessman and no-nonsense manager who could secure the city’s finances in tough eco- nomic times. But with yet another city contractor accused of profiting off a payroll technology kick- backs scheme on the mayor’s watch, and still more arrests in the pipeline, the steady drip, drip, drip of bad news on the scandal is chip- ping away at his public image, some analysts say. The project to computerize the timekeeping system for city employees started in 1998 and carried an estimated price tag of $63 million. In the years since Bloomberg took office in 2002, the timeframe has more than doubled and the cost has ballooned to more than $700 million — a total that prosecutors now say includes at least $85 million in kickbacks and falsified billing.

8 Monday June 13, 2011

WORLD

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Syria’s army seizes back restive town

By Bassem Mroue

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

BEIRUT — Elite Syrian troops backed by helicopters and tanks regained control Sunday of a town where police and soldiers joined forces with the protesters they were ordered to shoot — a decisive assault from a government prepared for an all-out battle to keep power. Troops led by the president s brother shelled Jisr al-Shughour as the gu nships hovered overhead, paving the way for scores of tanks and armored personnel carriers to roll in from two directions. By early afternoon, the sounds of battle faded. The army was in control. S u nday s developments, and actions by opponents of the Syrian government, marked a major depar- ture from what had been a largely

marked a major depar- t u re from what had been a lar g ely REUTERS

REUTERS

Syrian refugees are seen in a refugee camp in the Turkish border town of Boynuegin in Hatay province Sunday.Syrian tanks and helicopters shelled and machinegunned a northern town on Sunday,residents said,in a drive to crush an uprising against President Basher al-Assad that has led thou- sands of refugees to flee to Turkey.

peaceful protest movement. Among them: the discovery of a mass grave filled with uniformed bodies and the increasing willingness of mutineers and o u t gu nned residents to fi g ht back. President Basher Assads response in Jisr al-Shughour, the first town to spin out of government control since the uprising began in mid-March, mirrored his fathers 1980 assault there. It was a clear message to any- one contemplating defiance. Syrians who were among thou- sands to flee for the nearby Turkish border said about 60 mutineers were defending the town alongside some 200 unarmed residents. Their fate was unknown late Sunday, but the government reported three deaths in the fighting — one of its own soldiers and two unidentified men whose bod- ies were shown to reporters.

“The Syrian army is fi g htin g itself,” said Muhieddine Lathkani, a London-based Syrian writer and intellectual. “The armys response was strong because they did not want the mutiny to become larger.” Nei g hborin g Tu rkey, abo u t 12 miles (20 kilometers) away, has given sanctuary to more than 5,000 fleeing Syrians, nearly all of them in the past few days from Idlib province. Turkeys prime minister has accused the Assad regime of “savagery.” Arab governments, which were unusually supportive of NATO inter- vention in Libya, have been silent in the face of Syrias crackdown, fear- in g that the alternative to Assad would be chaos. The country has an explosive sectarian mix and is seen as a regional powerhouse with influence on events in nei g hborin g Israel, Lebanon, Iraq.

NATO at the crossroads

By Jamey Keaten

THE JASSOCIATED PRESS

PARIS — Created as a bulwark against Soviet expansion, NATO is facing an identity crisis as its mem- bers g rapple with just how m uch its lon g and often- unpop ular mission in Afghanistan and its new air cam- pai gn in Libya size up as national interests — or not — when many countriesbu d gets are under strain. In an un usually blunt partin g speech Friday, outg oin g U.S. Secretary of Defense Robert Gates called on the Atlantic allies of the U.S. to pay and do more to overcome the

alliances military shortcomings — raising the question: What is NATO today, and what does it need to be? The allies will be doin g some so u l-searchin g in the comin g months, with Osama bin Laden dead, many European state coffers squeezed by hig h debt and slow eco- nomic g rowth, the U.S. drawdown

in Af ghanistan abo ut to start and to ug h q uestions abo u t how lon g its air campaign over Libya co uld last. The alliance has g rappled with diver g in g internal views over whether NATO sho uld be an instr u - ment of “hard” combat missions —

g enerally the U.S. view — or the

preference among some in Europe for “soft” power, like “h umanitari- an, development, peacekeepin g , and talkin g tasks,” as Gates p ut it. Ever since the Berlin Wall fell, NATO s raison d etre has been questioned. Now, with its hands in two military bi g campai g ns in Afghanistan and Libya, the do ubts about the alliances future have hit a new crescendo. Gates pointed to the “real possi- bility of collective military irrele- vance” and called on members to look at new ways of raisin g combat capabilities in procurement, train-

ing , lo g istics and sustainment.

Libya rebels battle into key oil port near Tripoli

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

ZAWIYA, Libya — Libyan rebels battled their way back into a major oil port just 30 miles (50 kilometers) west of Tripoli on Saturday, forcing Moammar Gadhafis troops to close the vital coast highway and key sup- ply route from Tunisia. The renewed rebel offensive marked a significant

rebound for opposition forces who were crushed and driven out of the city nearly three months ago. Rebels first took Zawiya in early March, but were brutally expelled less than two weeks later in an assa u lt by members of an elite brigade commanded by Gadhafis son Khamis. That had left rebels with only ten u o u s footholds in

Libyas far west. On Saturday, Guma el-Gamaty, a London-based spokesman for the rebelspolitical leadership council, said opposition fighters had taken control of a large area on the western side of the city. A rebel fighter who fled Zawiya at the end of March said “there are clashes inside Zawiya itself.”

Somalis, Kenyans hail al-Qaida leader’s death

By Abdi Guled

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

MOGADISHU, Somalia — The killin g of an al-Qaida mastermind who planned the devastatin g bombin g s of two U.S. embassies in Africa drew praise on S u nday from Kenyans and Somalis, while Somalia s president showed doc u - ments linkin g the dead man to militants who are tryin g to topple

his nation s fra g ile, U.N.-backed

g overnment. Faz u l Abd u llah Mohammed el u ded capt u re for 13 years and topped the FBI s most wanted list for plannin g the A ug . 7, 1998, U.S. Embassy bombin g s in Kenya and Tanzania. His death, reported Sat u rday by Somali officials, was the third major blow to al-Qaida in six weeks. The worldwide ter- ror g ro u p was headed by Osama bin Laden u ntil his death last month. B u t Somali President Sheik Sharif Sheik Ahmed said Mohammed also posed a g rave threat to Somalia, which has been rava g ed by two decades of anar-

con-

flict. Ahmed

con g rat u lated g overnment soldiers for killin g Mohammed on

T u esday at a

M o g adish u sec u rity check- point.

“His aim was to commit violence in and o u tside

the co u ntry,” Ahmed said, show- in g reporters doc u ments and pic- t u res he said g overnment troops recovered from Mohammed. Ahmed did not let reporters check the doc u ments, b u t he held u p photos he said were of Mohammed s family and opera- tional maps for the militants in Mo g adish u . Ahmed also held u p a condo- lence letter he said Mohammed sent after bin Laden s death. He didn t say who it was addressed to, b u t said Mohammed co- a u thored the letter with a known Islamist leader in Somalia, Sheik Hassan Dahir Aweys.

known Islamist leader in Somalia, Sheik Hassan Dahir Aweys. Fazul Abdullah Mohammed chy and REDISTRICTING IN

Fazul Abdullah

Mohammed

chy

and

Sheik Hassan Dahir Aweys. Fazul Abdullah Mohammed chy and REDISTRICTING IN CALIFORNIA & SAN MATEO COUNTY
Sheik Hassan Dahir Aweys. Fazul Abdullah Mohammed chy and REDISTRICTING IN CALIFORNIA & SAN MATEO COUNTY
REDISTRICTING IN CALIFORNIA & SAN MATEO COUNTY A public forum YOU ARE INVITED This workshop
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A public forum
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THURSDAY JUNE 16
6pm-8pm
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GET INVOLVED!
Funding provided by the League of Women Voters of CA Education
Fund to the LWV North & Central SM County through a grant from
the LWV Education Fund and the Open Society Foundation.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

OPINION

Monday June 13, 2011

9

That creepy feeling

“E very man is the creature of the age in which he lives; very few are able to raise

themselves above the ideas of the times.” — Voltaire All of the publicity about the possible Republican candidates for the 2012 presidential election is an interesting study of political maneuvering. Everyone from Romney, to Bachmann, Pawlenty, Gingrich, and, of course, Palin, presents us with a revealing pic- ture of the GOP. If more of us would only look! The trouble is, elections have become more and more a media circus. In today’s culture, how many people’s choices on the ballot are determined by how much attention the candidate has mustered up in the media? How many people actually read newspapers or other rational publications to learn about those running for office? Or do they rely on something like their televi- sion impression of a candidate as maybe “someone who’s a good Christian like me,” or “who I’d like to have a beer with,” or “friendly and con- fident” though there may be little of actual substance there? (Think George W.) Consider political aspirants like Sarah Palin and Michele Bachmann. They both seem to believe that God has told them that they would make wonderful and capable presidents of the United States. They both seem to be quite dis- tanced from reality. As far as Palin is concerned, you get the idea that she is oblivious to the rest of us and is not responsive to anyone but her own spe- cial deity that provides her permission to carry on as she pleases, always look- ing for the limelight, completely obsessed with herself. As David Brooks said on “Meet the Press,” May 30, “Running for president isn’t American Idol.” In 2004, Gordon Livingston, MD, author of “Too Soon Old, Too Late

Smart,” wrote: “If our cultural icons are flawed, our political leadership is no more inspiring. The level of intelligence and integrity displayed by those we elect to office is generally unimpressive. In fact, it sometimes seems that our political system is designed to select those whose nar- cissism and hunger for power overwhelm their professed concerns for the welfare of their fel- low citizens.” Add what Peggy Noonan wrote for the Wall Street Journal four years later when Palin was running for vice president: “The Palin candidacy is a symptom and expression of a new vulgarization in American pol- itics.” So Palin organizes a bus tour appar- ently to bestow her charms on the gullible, in well-chosen places, and what many think is preparation for run- ning in the 2012 presidential race, and

to feed her relentless quest for power.

She knows that many Americans latch on to those who make the most noise and have a charisma that fascinates them — like the celebrities who they worship in the media. There’s little con- cern about the person’s intelligence, character and beliefs, or if they would be able to handle the job. It’s unbelievable that so many people

so easily fall under the spell of charis- matic figures and how they so readily give in to those who are out to use them for their own purposes — like to feed their narcissism, to become wealthy, or

to bask in the celebrity of the presiden-

tial candidacy. The followers glom on

to the message: “Go along with me and

I’ll take you to Paradise.” The rational mind is in limbo. Even people who seem to be quite intelligent in other ways went along with Bernie Madoff and his ilk. And think about Jim Jones

with Bernie Madoff and his ilk. And think about Jim Jones and all of the people

and all of the people who swallowed his message (in more ways than one). As Michael Shermer wrote in “The Believing Brain,” “Most social institu- tions — most notably those in religion, poli- tics, economics — reward belief in the doctrine of the faith or party or ideology, punish those who challenge the authori- ty of the leaders, and discourage uncertainty and especially skepticism.” That’s why children should be taught very early — preferably by example — to be skeptical and very wary of someone who claims to have all of the answers, and promises things they could never deliver — whether related to religion, politics or finance. Those who allow themselves to be taken in by such persuasive, dogmatic, egocentric types are a threat to the wel-

fare of our nation. As our culture con- tinues to produce and encourage people who easily fall under the spell of the celebrity or proselytizer, I get that creepy feeling that it is possible that Palin or some other seriously unquali- fied candidate could become president and hasten the unraveling of our coun- try. I’ve been hopeful that President Obama might be one of the few who could “raise themselves above the ideas of the times” and prevent disaster in 2012. The potential is there, but so far, politics being what it is, it doesn’t look too promising. The “ideas of the times”

are very hard to overcome.

Since 1984, Dorothy Dimitre has written more than 500 columns for various local newspapers. Her e-mail address is gramsd@aceweb.com.

Letter to the editor

Be very careful what you preach

Editor, I am responding to Jorg Aadahl’s letter to the Editor, (“Be careful what you preach,” June 2 edition, Daily Journal), referencing non-believers we are more indebted to for our heritage than for reli- gious individuals. Our country was founded on Judeo/Christian values. Some Jews and Christians we are indebted to:

George Washington Carver, Martin Luther King Jr., Samuel Morse, Louis Pasteur, Wright Brothers, Isaac Newton, Christopher Columbus, Nicolas Copernicus, Blaise Pascal, Robert Oppenheimer, Jonas Salk, George Washington, John Adams, Patrick Henry, Pocahontas, Clarence Thomas, Abraham

Lincoln, C.S. Lewis, Anne Frank, Simon Wiesenthal, Florence Nightingale and George Frideric Handel. Aadahl stated, statistically, there is a direct correlation between education and belief in the supernatural. Perhaps well- educated individuals are so intelligent and know definitively that God does not exist. There is not any verifiable proof for God’s non-existence. Some believe it takes more faith to be an atheist than it does to believe in a Creator. Our complex world and universe provide a case for existence of a creator. Aadahl stated the book (Bible) “is just

a collection of stories that have been writ- ten, changed and embellished upon by men long after the events, without eye- witnesses or corroboration from contem-

porary historians.” His statement is not correct. World-class scholar Bruce Metzger said compared with other ancient documents, there are an unprece- dented number of New Testament manu- scripts, and they can be dated extremely close to the original writings. The mod- ern New Testament is 99.5 percent free of textual discrepancies, with no major doc- trines in doubt. Archeologist John McRay said archeological findings have enhanced the New Testament’s credibility and no discovery has ever disproved a biblical reference. I do agree with Aadahl on one point; be careful what you preach.

John Bloomstine

Sunnyvale

Jerry Lee , Publisher Jon Mays, Editor in Chief Nathan Mollat, Sports Editor Erik Oeverndiek,

Jerry Lee, Publisher

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Moving south

T he Citizens Redistricting Commission’s first draft of

new legislative and congressional districts shows a sig-

nificant shift to the south. San Mateo County’s popula-

tion remains static while Santa Clara County grows and San Francisco declines. San Francisco is expected to lose a state Senate seat. Assemblyman Jerry Hill may be interested in San Mateo’s new state Senate seat which will comprise most of the county. Meanwhile Hill’s Assembly district will go as far as Atherton while Assemblyman Rich Gordon’s district may extend further into Santa Clara County leaving him just the southern tip of San Mateo County. His district, however, would move up on the coast into Half Moon Bay. U.S. Rep. Jackie Speier’s congressional district will also move south putting most of U.S. Rep. Anna Eshoo’s district in Santa Clara County. You can find out more at a League of Women Voters workshop Thursday, June 16 from 6 p.m.-8 p.m. at the Silicon Valley Conference Center, 1300 S. El Camino Real in San Mateo. You will also have a chance to express your opinion on the proposed new lines at the league meet- ing and at commission meet- ings in San Jose, June 2 and June 27 in San Francisco. Before voters passed Proposition 11 in 2008, incumbents were usually in charge of redistricting. Lines were drawn, following every 10-year census, to protect members of both parties. Today, that process is in the hands of a citizens commission. Statewide, many incumbents and would-be candidates could be at risk especially when an officeholder’s home is no longer in the district he or she repre- sents. The commission must meet the following criteria: equal population, compliance with the Voting Rights Act, contiguity, compactness and integrity of cities and communities of interest. As for the Board of Supervisors, it will not be immune from change as the population in the north declines. Overall, the change in boundaries may mean less representation for resi- dents of San Mateo County at the state and federal level. *** Why newspapers are still vital: As more people, especially younger ones, get their news online or via mobile devices, what is the future of old-fashioned news printed on paper? The good news is that the New York Times will still be around, both online and on paper. The bad news is that it will be one of the few mega dailies still standing. San Mateo native Bill Keller has just stepped down as the New York Times executive editor but he will continue writing for the paper. “A couple of years ago everybody was wringing their hands about doomsday for the news business,” Mr. Keller said in his farewell to staff. “People talked, some of them rather smugly, about even the New York Times not being long for this world. And now you look around, and we are economically sturdy. We are rich in talent. We are growing.” That’s in part to a new online business strategy and the affec- tion that the publisher, Arthur Ochs Sulzberger Jr., has for the family business. While there have been cutbacks, preserving the culture of The Times is something the publisher cares about and is willing to put his money where his mouth is. Not so with many of the other chain-owned dailies or those acquired through corporate mergers. The other success stories are local dailies such as the Daily Journal. This paper has just won 15 press club awards, more than any other paper in the Bay Area, and is respected for being reliable (versus sensational) and thorough. Unlike some of the competition, it has an experienced staff in Jon Mays, Bill Silverfarb, Michelle Durand, Heather Murtagh and Nathan Mollat (each received one or more press awards) who know and understand the community. It does not suffer the turnover as some of the other free dailies because publisher Jerry Lee and editor Mays (whose grandmother was in the newspaper busi- ness) treat their employees well and forsake bigger profits to keep salaries fair. Newspapers are important as an in-depth source of current information on which the web and bloggers depend. Without these daily papers, you would have a hard time finding accurate and timely news online.

*** Student newspapers also play an important role. They prepare young reporters for college and careers by providing hands-on lessons in writing, communicating accurately and meeting deadlines. Students who work on their school paper usually do better on essay portions of exams. They have learned how to organize their thoughts and put them on paper quickly. So it is sad that high school newspapers are having the same problems as commercial ones. Lack of adequate funding to do the job. And often regulated to a very low priority of electives. Sequoia High School in Redwood City enjoys an excellent student paper, The Raven Report. It’s just two years old, but it has grown from a small group of 10 students to a staff of 40. But it needs help to survive. Here’s the need: funding for sup- plies and printing costs; a digital power shot camera; digital voice recorders; thumb/flash drives. Used is OK if workable. Donations can be made to Sequoia High School Raven Report, 1201 Brewster Ave., Redwood City, CA 94062.

Raven Report, 1201 Brewster Ave., Redwood City, CA 94062. Sue Lempert is the former mayor of

Sue Lempert is the former mayor of San Mateo. Her column runs every Monday. She can be reached at sue@smdailyjour- nal.com.

10 Monday June 13, 2011

BUSINESS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

On the move

Dean Delis, John Zialcita and Van Zannis have opened a Mason-McDuffie Mortgage Corp. branch at 1900 Alameda de las Pulgas, suite 110, in San Mateo. Mason-McDuffie is headquartered in San Ramon in the East Bay. The company provides a full-range of mortgage products.

The company provides a full-range of mortgage products. Trees,grapes split groups By Jason Dearen THE ASSOCIATED
The company provides a full-range of mortgage products. Trees,grapes split groups By Jason Dearen THE ASSOCIATED

Trees,grapes split groups

By Jason Dearen

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

ANNAPOLIS, Calif. — The ocean fog and cool climate of California’s rugged northern coast allow redwood trees to thrive and help give wine grapes a distinc- tive flavor. But in the village of Annapolis in Sonoma County’s coastal mountains, a quiet battle is pitting trees against vine- yards. Here, where many homes are found off dirt roads that snake through dense foliage that has regrown after the clear-cut logging of a half-century ago, the usually mellow residents are riled up over plans to raze hundreds of acres of redwoods and firs to make room for grapes. At issue are two proposed “timberland- to-vineyard” conversion projects, the first such applications that California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection, or CalFire, officials can remem- ber in which large areas of redwoods and firs would be removed for vineyards. Even with a three-year drop in the price of high-end wines like those grown in Sonoma County, and a glut of wine grape production on the more than 62,000 acres of vineyard already planted

in the valley below Annapolis, two large wine companies want to remove nearly 2,000 acres of trees. The companies say they simply want to make great wines. Opponents argue the projects are unnecessary in a county already producing more pinot and other grapes than the market can bear, and that the vineyards will hurt endangered fish struggling to rebound in the Gualala River by siphoning off water and introducing pesticides. At least one of the proposed sites contains sacred tribal artifacts. Annapolis residents say the county has enough wine grapes, and that the tribal artifacts and environmental concerns are being thrust upon the community because just so two large winemakers can grow “vanity vineyards” that yield small amounts of expensive wines. “The watershed’s on its heels as far as fish goes, which is why it’s important to keep the flow. If you put all these straws in the watershed drawing water out, you might as well kiss it goodbye,” said Chris Poehlmann, a museum exhibit designer who lives in Annapolis and heads a local conservation group. The grape growers argue these lands will be developed one way or another as

the county grows, and that it is better to have vineyards than housing develop- ments. Napa’s Artesa Vineyards, owned by a Barcelona, Spain-based wine heavy- weight Grupo Cordoniu known for mak- ing sparkling wine, wants to develop 151 acres of pinot noir and chardonnay vine- yard on a site containing artifacts from ancient Kashaya Pomo villages. Premier Pacific Vineyards is seeking to put rows of grapes on about 1,800 acres of 20,000 it owns nearby in a project that will also include residential housing called “Preservation Ranch.” Decisions on both projects are expect- ed by county and state officials within the next year or two. Both winemakers argue the projects are undergoing detailed environmental review, and that in some cases the developments will help, not hurt, the environment by pro- viding better management of the land and repairing decades-old damage by logging companies. “The vineyard has been designed as a state-of-the art operation with environmen- tal and other resources in mind,” Artesa’s attorney Andrea Matarazzo said in an email.

States weigh relaxing penalties for teen sexting

By David Klepper

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

PROVIDENCE, R.I. — A congress- man who sends an X-rated photo of him- self jeopardizes his reputation and his job. But in many states, teens caught doing the same thing can risk felony charges, jail time and being branded sexual offenders. That’s because a minor who transmits a sexually explicit photo of themselves according to many state laws, is manufac- turing and distributing child pornography. Lawmakers across the country, however, now say the problem of teen sexting did- n’t exist when they enacted harsh punish-

ments for child porn and are considering

changes that would ensure minors don’t face jail time for youthful mistakes. “Let’s just call this what it is: stupid,”

said Rhode Island state Rep. Peter Martin, a Democrat from Newport who is sponsoring a bill to downgrade teen sex- ting from a felony to a juvenile offense. “These are kids we’re talking about. I don’t think minors should face these severe punishments just for being stupid.” Legislatures in Rhode Island and 20 other states have considered bills this year to adjust penalties for teen sexting, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures. California lawmakers are considering legislation that would enable schools to expel students caught sexting. Florida lawmakers voted to pun- ish teen sexting with a $60 fine and com- munity service. Lawmakers in New York, where U.S. Rep. Anthony Weiner is embroiled in a sexting scandal, have introduced legisla-

tion that would allow judges to send teens who send explicit photos to counseling instead of jail if prosecutors agree they meant no harm. Studies show that one in five teens has electronically transmitted explicit photos of themselves, and one third say they have received such photos. It’s a 21st cen- tury update of “I’ll show you mine” with one critical difference: lewd photos can be passed on with the push of a button and live forever on the Internet. “It’s an extraordinarily common behav- ior among kids, like it or not,” said Amy Adler, a law professor at New York University who has studied how child pornography laws have been applied to sexting. “I hope lawmakers and prosecu- tors figure out quickly how to address it, because it’s not going away.”

quickly how to address it, because it’s not going away.” Bye-Bye bidets! U.S. troops leaving Saddam

Bye-Bye bidets! U.S. troops leaving Saddam palaces

By Rebecca Santana

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

BAGHDAD — Available soon: nine palaces in lakeside complex frequented by visiting kings and dictators, beautiful molded ceilings and light fixtures, many bidets, Saddam Hussein mural and former prison cell. As is, with Tomahawk missile damage. Contact: U.S. Army. Thus might read a real estate ad for the Victory Base Complex, one of the many properties the U.S. military is vacat- ing as the Dec. 31 deadline for its withdrawal from Iraq approaches. It will leave behind probably some of the most elaborate, some would say tacky, office spaces ever used by American soldiers, sailors or Marines. The U.S. military has been headquartered in the complex near Baghdad International Airport almost since GIs reached Baghdad in 2003. Countless U.S. dignitaries have passed through. It is an odd place to work, surrounded by so much Saddam history and grandiosity. By the time the dictator was toppled, he had built about 75 palaces and VIP complexes nationwide. That is according to the then U.S. military historian’s report on the Victory Base Complex written last year. Touring the complex is a bit like touring Saddam’s mind. There is the Victory over Iran palace, commemorating the 1980-1988 war he started that ended in stalemate and half a million dead. And the Victory over America palace commemo- rating the 1991 Gulf War in which a U.S.-led coalition drove Saddam’s invading forces out of Kuwait. “Any war that Saddam survived was a victory,” said Col. Les Melnyk, the current U.S. military historian in Iraq. Now the Iraqi government must figure out what to do with all this square footage.

The Mavericks defeat the Heat to win their first NBA title. See Sports page 13.
The Mavericks defeat the Heat to win
their first NBA title. See Sports page 13.
Soe Han Tha and Jan Banquiles dominate PAL to win top honor By Julio Lara
Soe Han Tha and Jan Banquiles dominate PAL to win top honor
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
This year, the San Mateo Daily Journal
Badminton Players of the Year are a famil-
iar face and a former doubles player who
stepped into the singles spotlight this sea-
son and shined.
For the second year in a row, Westmoor’s
Soe Han Tha captures the honor on the
girls side.
A year ago, the sophomore burst onto the
scene, taking on opponents from the
Peninsula Athletic League’s Bay and
Ocean divisions en route to her first PAL
championship. She then took that momen-
tum and rode it to a second place finish in
the Central Coast Section championships,
finishing second to Palo Alto’s Karine Hsu.
What did she do for an encore? Well, the
exact same thing.
The sophomore elevated her game with
See AOTS, Page 14

Tom Martinez

says he has month to live

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT

College of San Mateo Hall of Fame member and legendary coach Tom Martinez announced via Facebook yesterday that he only has a month to live. In a post on his daughter’s wall, Martinez said, “We have received some bad news that I wanted to share with all of you. I have been given a week to a month to live, depending on my body's response to medication. I want to thank you for the relationship that we shared and the friendships that allowed me to have a very successful career. As much as I would like to talk to you each in person, that is not feasible so please respect my family's need for some privacy now. If the number of lives that I've been involved with are in the thousands, then it isn't possible to talk to each and every one of you. I feel blessed to have had the opportunity to teach and coach you all and I ask that you take one or two of my life lessons and pass them on to your family and friends and that will keep me alive forever. With much love and appreciation, I wish all of you a very successful and fulfilled life. TM.”

See COACH, Page 14

Giants find

a way again

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SAN FRANCISCO — Aubrey Huff had three hits and two RBIs, Jonathan Sanchez pitched six wildly effective innings and the San Francisco Giants rallied from two runs down for a 4-2 victory over the Cincinnati Reds on Sunday night. Nate Schierholtz delivered the go-ahead sacrifice fly off reliever Jose Arredondo (0-2) during a two-run seventh inning that helped the Giants earn a four-game series split. Sanchez walked five and struck out five in six innings. He constantly pitched out of jams and forced three inning-ending double plays, giving San Francisco a chance to come back after chasing Reds starter Edinson Volquez after six innings. Ramon Ramirez (2-0) earned the win and Brian Wilson pitched a scoreless ninth for his 18th save in 20 opportunities. Sanchez struggled with his control again but kept the game close. And the Giants, even

See GIANTS, Page 12

12 Monday June 13, 2011

SPORTS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Cal reinvigorates Schott in playoffs

By Terry Bernal

DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT

SANTA CLARA — Cal fans seemed to quickly make themselves at home at Santa Clara University’s Stephen Schott Stadium this week- end, turning out in droves for the first baseball Super Regional in school history. Many of the 1,431 in attendance were attending the venue for the first time, the majority of which showed up an hour early to boast a tremendous showing even for batting practice. And from the time the patented “Go Bears!” chant echoed early through the strange rafters, to the “Boom! Boom! Clack!” of a timely late-inning thunderclap, it was evi- dent throughout Cal’s dominant Game 1 win over Dallas Baptist that this was the fan-friendly environ- ment SCU has intended since Schott Stadium opened in 2005. Schott Stadium hasn’t exactly become a baseball Mecca. The home team’s play undoubtedly prompts poor turnouts. The Broncos finished last in the West Coast Conference this season and over the past three years have posted just a 36-52 home record. The attendance reflects this, as the Broncos failed to draw more than 500 fans to any individual home game this year. The last time Santa Clara played for a sellout crown was May 1, 2009 when the Broncos hosted San Diego State and that was the night phenom Stephen Strasburg came to town.

Epic fanfare

With Cal’s Super Regional series – which was moved to Santa Clara to fulfill television requirements, as

Evans Diamond at Cal doesn’t have lights – the cozy confines of Schott Stadium aren’t lost on the Golden Bears. This was apparent when cleanup hitter Marcus Semien swift- ly answered the crowd’s first thun- derclap by depositing a majestic bomb onto the roof of the batting cage in left-center field. “I heard a little bit of [the thun- derclap],” Semien said. “And when everybody stood up during the last two outs, it was like: ‘This is how it should be.’ I kind of wish at Evans we had something like this, with the lights and a little more seating.” And the fan-friendly environment extends beyond the near 1,500 capacity seating within the stadium. The condominiums over the right- field wall are furnished with bal- conies overlooking the field. And while hardly anyone takes advan- tage of them for Broncos home games, there were dozens of onlookers Saturday that watched the entire game from the balconies. Also, upwards of a hundred people gathered in the courtyard beyond the center-field wall to enjoy playoff baseball. And that doesn’t count the people who viewed the game through the right-field fence from the sidewalk that extends through the easement between the outfield wall and the condo complex.

Emergency maintenance

Not that Schott Stadium was ini- tially primed for playoff baseball — in addition to being responsible for ticket sales and box-office staffing and providing 11 ushers for each game, Cal brought over its grounds crew to tend to the field. And upon receiving the news last Tuesday that

the Super Regional was to be hosted at Schott Stadium, Cal groundskeeper Anthony Pulizzano made an impromptu trip to Santa Clara to assess the work that would need to be done to the field. And the prognosis was not good. “The mound was absolutely terri- ble,” Pulizzano said. “It was low by a couple of inches … and in places the whole playing surface had to be redone.” Pulizzano said his crew “scattered like flies” from Berkeley to Santa Clara and put in two 12-hour days on Wednesday and Thursday to get the field up to NCAA specifications for postseason games. The crew — which includes two Menlo College coaches Matt Daily and Matt Allison and rounds out with the Cal staff of Pulizzano, Matt Artozqui, Jason Craft, Tavi Rodriguez, Tory Merritt, Tim Vigil, Miguel Vazquez and Danny Alvarado — removed a crooked pitcher’s mound, then added two inches of clay and aligned a new mound. They also repaved the batter’s box and had to re-sod parts of the infield grass. “That doesn’t really surprise me that they had to make improve- ments, especially to the mound,” said Santa Clara pitcher J.R. Graham. “It was definitely small compared to other mounds where we played this year.” Graham was Santa Clara’s ace pitcher this year and was the only Broncos player to be selected in last week’s Major League Baseball draft. Having previously been draft- ed out of Livermore High School, Graham opted for college, choosing SCU because of the baseball pro- gram, which posted winning records at home through each of its first

three full seasons at Schott Stadium. Graham said the program looked poised to take it to the next level. However, a glut of injuries hindered the Broncos as they finished under .500 in each of Graham’s three sea- sons. “You always feel like you’re taller than the hitter when you’re a pitch- er,” Graham said. “But at home, I was always at eye-level with the batter and it was really weird. It wasn’t a good feeling. [The mound] was just really small.”

Road to Omaha

So, who knew that Schott Stadium would end up being a prel- ude stop on the road to Omaha and the College World Series? Cal is certainly embracing the moment, having played perhaps its most spirited game of the year in a 7-0 win over upstart Dallas Baptist in Saturday’s Super Regional open- er. Results for last night’s Game 2 were not available at press time. If necessary, Game 3 will be held today at a time yet to be determined. However, Saturday’s game left Cal one game from Omaha. Yes, the blue-and-gold has never been seen with quite as much sup- port and fervor on this side of the bay. It is certainly a stark contrast to the Broncos’ red-and-black. But for this weekend at least — with many Cal players sporting Mohawks dyed Golden Bears-blonde — Schott Stadium unmistakably belongs to Cal. And as Cal attempts to over- come an unprecedented Cinderella story in qualifying for its first College World Series trip since 1992, perhaps the potential of the modern venue that is Schott Stadium will at last be realized.

GIANTS

Continued from page 11

banged up with injuries to sluggers Freddy Sanchez and Buster Posey among others, just don’t lose many close games at home. Chris Stewart started the seventh with a walk. Then Andres Torres hit

a double off Arredondo (0-2), who

intentionally walked Miguel Tejada

to load the bases with one out.

Arredondo was lifted for left-han- der Bill Bray, who didn’t fare much better. Schierholtz hit the go-ahead sacrifice fly to center, and Huff fol- lowed with a run-scoring single to give the Giants a 4-2 lead. That was more than enough to back the bullpen.

Ramirez, Javier Lopez and Sergio Romo held the Reds scoreless for two innings before Wilson entered in the ninth. That’s the formula San Francisco used to win the World Series last season, even if it looked like Sanchez might throw the game away early. Of course, that both starters strug- gled with their control was no sur- prise. Sanchez and Volquez entered the game as the top two in the National League in walks and the trend continued to hurt both. Sanchez hit Joey Votto and walked Jay Bruce to lead off the fourth. Then Scott Rolen hit an RBI double before Edgar Renteria lofted

a sacrifice fly to left field to give the Reds a 2-0 lead. The Giants started their rally in the fourth when Huff doubled down the left-field line to score Schierholtz from first and trim Cincinnati’s lead to 2-1. Volquez walked Cody Ross to put runners on first and second with one out, then struck out Brandon Crawford and got Manny Burriss to line out to third.

runners on first and second with one out, then struck out Brandon Crawford and got Manny
runners on first and second with one out, then struck out Brandon Crawford and got Manny
runners on first and second with one out, then struck out Brandon Crawford and got Manny
runners on first and second with one out, then struck out Brandon Crawford and got Manny

THE DAILY JOURNAL

SPORTS

Monday June 13, 2011

13

Dallas wins NBA title,Nowitzki named MVP

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

MIAMI — For Dirk Nowitzki, the resume is complete. He’s an NBA champion. For LeBron James, the agonizing wait continues for at least one more year. Avenging what happened five years ago in perfect turnabout style, the Dallas Mavericks won their first NBA title by winning Game 6 of these finals in Miami 105-95 on Sunday night — celebrating on the Heat’s home floor, just as Dwyane Wade and his team did to them in the 2006 title series. The Mavericks won four of the series’ last five games, a turnabout that could not have been sweeter. “I really still can’t believe it,” said Nowitzki, who had 21 points and took home finals MVP honors. “Tonight,” Jason Terry said after leading Dallas with 27 points, “we got vindication.” James did not. Not even close, and a year unlike any other ended they way they all have so far — with him still waiting for an NBA title. He scored 21 points for Miami, shook a few hands afterward, and departed before most of the Mavs tugged on their championship hats and T-shirts. Chris Bosh had 19, Mario Chalmers 18 and Dwyane Wade 17 for the Heat. “We worked so hard and so long for it,” Nowitzki said. “The team has had an unbelievable ride.” So did the Heat. Unlike Dallas, theirs wasn’t a joyride. “It goes without saying,” Heat coach Erik Spoelstra said. “You’re never really prepared for a moment

like

Neither team deserved

this championship more than the other, but Dallas earned it.” Make no mistake: Miami lost the finals, but the blame will be directed at James. Even he knew that after the way he left Cleveland with “The Decision” and all the animus that generated not just in Ohio but around the entire league, the only way he could silence some critics was with a title. Instead, he got more criticism — and a thinly veiled jab from his for- mer owner with the Cavaliers, Dan Gilbert, who reveled in the moment on Twitter. “Mavs NEVER stopped & now entire franchise gets rings,” Gilbert wrote. “Old Lesson for all: There are NO SHORTCUTS. NONE.” Mavs coach Rick Carlisle joined a highly elite group, those with NBA titles as both a player and a head coach. Only 10 other men are on that list, including the presumably retired-for-good Phil Jackson, one of Carlisle’s mentors in K.C. Jones, and Heat President Pat Riley — who led Miami past Dallas in 2006, and was the mastermind of what the Heat did last summer by getting James, Wade and Bosh on the same team with an eye on becoming a dynasty. It might still happen, of course. But even after 72 wins this sea- son, including playoffs, the Heat lost the last game. And that means this year was a disappointment — except to just about everyone else in the NBA, or so it would seem. “This is a true team,” Carlisle said. “This is an old bunch. We don’t run fast or jump high. These guys had each other’s backs. We played the right way. We trusted the

pass. This is a phenomenal thing for the city of Dallas.” Hating the Heat became the NBA’s craze this season, and the team knew it had no shortage of crit- ics, everyone from Cleveland (where “Cavs for Mavs” shirts were popular during these finals) to Chicago (the city James and Wade both flirted with last summer) and just about every place in between lining up to take shots at Miami. Given their newfound popularity, meet the new America’s Team. Sorry, Cowboys — your long- held moniker might have to be ceded to your city’s NBA club. When it was over, Mavs owner Mark Cuban ran onto the court to hug Carlisle, then punched the air and whooped. “I’m so happy for him. I’m so happy for Dirk,” Carlisle said. Carlisle said Riley came down to congratulate the Mavericks after the game, showing “unbelievable class.” “Their time will come,” Carlisle said. “But now, it’s our time.” When the Mavericks took a 2-0 lead in Dallas during the ’06 finals, plans for their victory parade were announced. The Mavs didn’t win another game in that series. Now, that parade will finally hap- pen. And when it’s over, then the league’s uncertainty will truly begin. Labor strife likely awaits, and although more talks geared toward movement on a new deal are sched- uled for this week, both owners and players are bracing for a lockout to begin once the current collective bargaining agreement expires June

30.

current collective bargaining agreement expires June 30. REUTERS Dallas superstar Dirk Nowitzki hoists the NBA Finals

REUTERS

Dallas superstar Dirk Nowitzki hoists the NBA Finals Bill Russell MVP trophy. The Mavericks defeated the Miami Heat 105-95 Sunday night to capture

the first NBA title in franchise history.

trophy. The Mavericks defeated the Miami Heat 105-95 Sunday night to capture the first NBA title
trophy. The Mavericks defeated the Miami Heat 105-95 Sunday night to capture the first NBA title
trophy. The Mavericks defeated the Miami Heat 105-95 Sunday night to capture the first NBA title
trophy. The Mavericks defeated the Miami Heat 105-95 Sunday night to capture the first NBA title

14 Monday June 13, 2011

SPORTS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Athletics sinking fast, lose for 12th time in 13 games

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

CHICAGO — Coco Crisp and the Oakland A’s just can’t catch a break. A day after being robbed of a go- ahead two-run homer, Crisp was called out on a play he appeared to be safe on to seal a 5-4 victory for the Chicago White Sox over the A’s on Sunday. Down to their last out with run- ners on first and second, Crisp hit a grounder to third. Brent Morel field- ed it and chose to throw to first instead of stepping on the third base bag. First baseman Mark Teahen stretched to his left to catch Morel’s throw as Crisp crossed the bag. First base umpire Brian O’Nora signaled that Crisp was out, leaving him in disbelief. A’s interim manager Bob Melvin came out to argue. “It looked to us like he was safe” Melvin said. Did he see the replay?

“Yeah.” And? “I can’t go there.” Replays seemed to show that Crisp beat the throw from Morel, which nearly brought Teahen off of first base. There were runners on first and second at the time, which meant Morel might have opted for the force play at third. “I didn’t see the replay, but I thought he had a better chance at third base to tag the base rather than throw across,” White Sox manager Ozzie Guillen said. “As soon as he threw the ball to first, I said, ’That’s a problem.”’ Crisp, whose 1,000th hit bid was stolen by a leaping Brent Lillibridge Saturday night, reached the mile- stone leading off the first inning. Crisp was unavailable to talk after the game. Oakland dropped three of the four games in Chicago and has lost 12 of its last 13 games. For the second straight day, an A’s throwing error led to an unearned

run that proved to be the difference. The White Sox broke a 3-3 tie with two runs in the seventh, the first scoring on Carlos Quentin’s grounder that could have been a double play. Playing third base, Scott Sizemore fielded and threw wide to second baseman Jemile Weeks. Teahen scored on the play and Alexei Ramirez later came around on Paul Konerko’s RBI sin- gle. “It was a combination of me over- running it and a slight kick to the right,” Sizemore said. “I didn’t have a good grip on it and threw it. By that time, I had my mind made up. I just threw it away.” Oakland committed six errors in the four game series and the A’s have 51 errors in 67 games. The Texas Rangers are the only American League team that has committed more. “We don’t have a true third base- man right now, but we’re not going to use that as an excuse,” Melvin said. “We’re going to continue to

work on our defense and it’s going to get better.” Adam Dunn hit a three-run homer off of A’s starter Guillermo Moscoso in the fourth to back seven strong innings by Phil Humber. “You can’t lose concentration after that,” Moscoso said. “I kept my focus and pitched two more innings and we tied the game.” Moscoso (2-3) allowed baserun- ners in every inning except the first, but lasted one out into the seventh. He gave up six hits, five runs — four earned — four walks and struck out two. “He keeps the ball down, locates, throws breaking balls behind in the count, throws changeups to right- handers as well,” Melvin said. “I was extremely pleased.” Humber (6-3) pitched at least seven innings for the fifth straight start, allowing three runs, four hits, two walks and a homer. He struck out a career-high seven. Humber is 5-1 with a 2.53 ERA over his last nine starts.

The Athletics scored a run off Chicago closer Sergio Santos in the ninth, but Santos was able to nail down his 12th save on the Crisp groundout. Sizemore’s solo homer off Humber in the seventh tied it at 3. Three of Sizemore’s four career homers have come as a visiting player at U.S. Cellular Field. Crisp had two hits, two runs and a stolen base for Oakland. The White Sox finished 6-4 on their 10-game homestand and wrapped up just their second season

series victory against Oakland since 2001. The Athletics have lost 12 of

13 and their starting pitchers are 0-

10 over their past 13 games. NOTES: A’s LHP Brett Anderson

is scheduled to meet with orthope- dist Dr. James Andrews on Monday

to get a second opinion on his ailing

left

Humber was a mem-

ber of the Oakland organization for about a month during the offseason, before being waived to make room for free-agent signee Grant Balfour.

AOTS

Continued from page 11

the idea of returning to CCS. In 2011, Tha carried the Westmoor Rams to a share of the PAL Ocean Division title and a 13-1 record, going unblemished along the way. In the PAL postseason, a focused Tha could not be stopped, as she repeated her championship feat. Her performance as the No. 1 singles player stood out enough that she was award- ed the first seed in the CCS tournament. Tha beat Sophie Xia in her first match, 15- 13, 12-15, 15-2, then took care of South City’s Queenie Daniela, dropping only eight

points in that contest. Unfortunately for Tha, the CCS No. 2 seed, Stephanie Lam of Monte Vista, apparently has her number. Lam beat Tha in two sets, forcing Tha into the losers’ bracket. Tha persevered though, beating Xia once more to force a rematch with Lam in the championship match. Tha would have to set- tled for a second place finish again though, falling to Lam in two sets. The Daily Journal Boys Badminton Player of the Year is a former All-League doubles player that advanced to a pair of wins from a CCS title as a singles player. Jan Banquiles of Burlingame played his badminton last season with Nick Cui. Together, their performance was good enough for a All-League selection.

performance was good enough for a All-League selection. This year, as a sophomore, Banquiles went solo

This year, as a sophomore, Banquiles went solo and the move proved to be the right one. While Burlingame struggled to a 5-9 record in the PAL Ocean Division, Banquiles was strong and in the PAL championships he demonstrated his potential by winning the entire thing. His play garnered him the sev- enth seed in the CCS playoffs. Banquiles won his first two matches, the first against Mitty’s Brian Lin and the second against Tedman Zhuang. But his loss to Jeffrey Kuo forced Banquiles into the losers’ bracket. Banquiles won another match before bowing out to Eric Yee of Santa Clara. Still, his debut as a sin- gles player in CCS was good for a fourth place finish — the best by any San Mateo county badminton player.

COACH

Continued from page 11

Martinez has had long struggles with his health. In 2008, the legendary coach went into a 10-day coma and after his kidneys failed, he was forced into dialysis three times a week. All this came after getting bypass surgery on hisleg, which resulted in a staph infection. Most famously known as former Serra high Tom Brady’s longtime mentor, Martinez, who coached football, women’s basketball and softball, accumulated over 1,100 wins, mak- ing him the winningest coach in California Community College history. During a five- year run in the mid-1980s, Martinez coached all three sports at the same time.

College history. During a five- year run in the mid-1980s, Martinez coached all three sports at
College history. During a five- year run in the mid-1980s, Martinez coached all three sports at
Jun/11#01
Jun/11#01
College history. During a five- year run in the mid-1980s, Martinez coached all three sports at

THE DAILY JOURNAL

SPORTS

Monday June 13, 2011

15

Frazar wins first PGA Tour title in 355th try

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

MEMPHIS, Tenn. — Harrison Frazar knows he’s supposed to act as if he’s won before. Turns out it’s really tough the first time around, especially for someone who thought he’d missed his chance. Frazar won his first PGA Tour title in his 355th tournament, beat- ing Robert Karlsson with a par on the third hole of a sudden-death playoff Sunday at the St. Jude

Classic. He won a month before turning 40 when Karlsson pushed a par-saving putt 3 feet past the hole. “It was a whirlwind there. This was the first time,” Frazar said. “I don’t know if I’m supposed to keep the seersucker jacket. I don’t know if I’m supposed to carry the trophy. You don’t know who you’re sup- posed to talk to. I felt bad. I didn’t thank the sponsors. I didn’t thank FedEx. I didn’t thank the volun- teers. I was not quite sure really

what was happening right then. “The only tournament that I won in Q-school, you walked in, signed your card in the scoring trailer, and they gave you a pat on the back, ’Good job.’ You walked out the door. There was nobody there.” And Frazar had been so ready to quit golf he had plans lined up for a new job at the end of the year. He turns 40 on July 29, misses his family back in Texas, and is playing this year on a major med-

ical exemption after separate sur- geries on his hip and shoulder last summer. Memphis is just the fourth cut he’s made in 10 events, though he just qualified for the upcoming U.S. Open at Congressional. Now Frazar has the biggest pay- check of his career, taking home $1,008,000. He knows he’ll be playing at least a couple more years now he has a slot in the Tournament of Champions in Maui in January and in Augusta next

April for his first Masters. “It just shows you how some- times when you let your guard down or let your expectations soft- en, you can free yourself up,” Frazar said. Frazar hadn’t had a chance to share the news with his wife and three children when he talked with reporters. He said his wife likely was stuck in the Dallas airport, flying to meet him at Congressional.

MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT SUN 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 @Dbacks
MON
TUE
WED
THU
FRI
SAT
SUN
13
14
15 16
17 18
19
@Dbacks
@Dbacks
@Dbacks
@A’s
@A’s
@A’s
OFF
6:40 p.m.
6:40 p.m.
6:40 p.m.
7:05 p.m.
7:05 p.m.
1:05 p.m.
CSN-BA
CSN-BA
NBC
CSN-BA
NBC
CSN-BA
vs.Royals
vs.Royals
vs.Royals
vs.Giants
vs.Giants
vs.Giants
OFF
7:05p.m.
12:35p.m.
7:05p.m.
7:05 p.m.
7:05 p.m.
7:05 p.m.
CSN-CAL
CSN-CAL
CSN-CAL
CSN-BA
CSN-BA
CSN-BA
6/17
6/25
7/2
7/6
7/9
7/12
7/16
vs.NY at
vs.West
@ KC
vs.Galaxy
vs.Union
@ Crew
Stanford
@Chivas
Bromwich
5:30 p.m.
7p.m.
7:30 p.m.
4:30 p.m.
7:30p.m.
7:30p.m.
Albion
CSN-BA
CSN-BA
CSN-BA
CSN-BA
CSN-BA
7:30 p.m.

TRANSACTIONS

SATURDAY BASEBALL National League SAN DIEGO PADRES—Agreed to terms with INF Jace Peterson, OF Kyle Gaedele, RHP Justin Hancock,INF Zack Kometani,RHP Colin Rea,OF Lee Orr,RHP Greg Gonzalez,C Jeremy Rodriguez, RHP Matt Stites,OF Mike Gallic,C Matthew Colan- tonio, LHP Robert Eisenbach, INF Paul Karmas, OF Justin Miller,INF Clint Moore,RHP Kyle Brule, RHP James Jones and INF Travis Whitmore. SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS—Agreed to terms with INF Bill Hall. Placed 2B Freddy Sanchez on the 15-day DL. FOOTBALL Canadian Football League EDMONTON ESKIMOS—Signed DB Lenny Walls.

SUNDAY BASEBALL American League BOSTON RED SOX—Traded C Mike McKenry to Pittsburgh for a player to be named and cash considerations. LOS ANGELES ANGELS—Recalled INF Andrew Romine from Salt Lake (PCL). Optioned RHP Kevon Jensen to Salt Lake. NEW YORK YANKEES—Placed RHP Amauri Sanit on the 15-day DL, retroactive to June 11, and RHP Bartolo Colon on the 15-day DL. Re- called OF Chris Dickerson and RHP Hector Noesi from Scranton/Wilkes Barre (IL). TEXAS RANGERS—Placed C-1B Mike Napoli on the 15-day DL.Recalled CTaylorTeagarden from Round Rock (PCL).

MLS STANDINGS

EASTERN CONFERENCE

 

W

L

T

Pts GF

GA

Philadelphia

6

3

4

22

16

11

New York

5

2

7

22

21

13

Houston

4

5

6

18

19

18

Columbus

4

4

6

18

14

16

D.C.

4

5

4

16

18

24

Chicago

2

4

8

14

16

19

Toronto FC

2

5

8

14

15

25

New England

3

7

4

13

11

18

Kansas City

2

6

4

10

16

20

WESTERN CONFERENCE

 

W

L

T

Pts GF

GA

Los Angeles

8

2

7

31

22

14

FC Dallas

7

4

4

25

18

16

Seattle

5

4

7

22

18

15

Colorado

5

3

7

22

17

14

Real Salt Lake

6

3

3

21

14

7

San Jose

5

4

4

19

20

16

Chivas USA

4

5

5

17

17

16

Portland

5

6

2

17

15

19

Vancouver

1

6

8

11

16

22

NOTE:Three points for victory, one point for tie.

Saturday’s Games Philadelphia 1, Real Salt Lake 1, tie San Jose 4, D.C. United 2

AL STANDINGS

AMERICAN LEAGUE

East Division

 

W

L

Pct

GB

Boston

39

26

.600

New York

36

27

.571

2

Tampa Bay

35

30

.538

4

Toronto

32

34

.485

7 1/2

Baltimore

30

33

.476

Central Division

 

W

L

Pct

GB

Cleveland

34

29

.540

Detroit

35

30

.538

Chicago

33

35

.485

3 1/2

Kansas City

29

37

.439

6 1/2

Minnesota

26

39

.400

9

West Division

 

W

L

Pct

GB

Texas

36

31

.537

Seattle

34

32

.515

1 1/2

Los Angeles

31

36

.463

5

Oakland

28

39

.418

8

———

Sunday’s Games N.Y.Yankees 9,Cleveland 1 Seattle 7,Detroit 3 Boston 14,Toronto 1 Tampa Bay 9,Baltimore 6

Chicago White Sox 5,Oakland 4 Minnesota 6,Texas 1 Kansas City 9,L.A.Angels 0 Monday’s Games

Cleveland

(C.Carrasco

5-3)

at

(A.J.Burnett 6-4),4:05 p.m.

N.Y. Yankees

NL STANDINGS

NATIONAL LEAGUE

East Division

 

W

L

Pct

GB

Philadelphia

40

26

.606

Atlanta

38

28

.576

2

Florida

32

32

.500

7

New York

32

33

.492

7 1/2

Washington

30

36

.455

10

Central Division

 

W

L

Pct

GB

Milwaukee

38

28

.576

St.Louis

38

29

.567

1/2

Cincinnati

34

33

.507

4 1/2

Pittsburgh

31

33

.484

6

Chicago

25

39

.391

12

Houston

24

42

.364

14

West Division

 

W

L

Pct

GB

San Francisco

37

29

.561

Arizona

36

30

.545

1

Colorado

31

34

.477

5 1/2

Los Angeles

31

36

.463

6 1/2

San Diego

29

38

.433

8 1/2

———

Tuesday’s Games Atlanta 4,Houston 1 Milwaukee 4,St.Louis 3 L.A.Dodgers 10,Colorado 8 Washington 2,San Diego 0 San Francisco 4,Cincinnati 2

4,Houston 1 Milwaukee 4,St.Louis 3 L.A.Dodgers 10,Colorado 8 Washington 2,San Diego 0 San Francisco 4,Cincinnati 2

16 Monday June 13, 2011